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ox  AND 

-L^.::  :-OuWDATIONS. 


PHOTOGRAPH     BY     W.     S.     SHERWOOD 


THE  AUTHOR'S  PICTURE 


HISTORY 

^  OF 

RITCHIE    COUNTY 


\X/1TH      BIOGRAPHICAL     SKETCHES     OF     ITS 

PIONEERS  AND  THEIR   ANCESTORS,  AND 

WITH    INTERESTING    REMINISCENCES 

OF    REVOLUTIONARY    AND 

INDIAN    TIMES 


By 


MINNIE    KENDALL    LOWTHER 


WITH    PORTRAITS     AND     OTHER 
ILLUSTRATIONS 


WHEELING     NEWS     LITHO.     CO.,     WHEELING,    W.     VA. 


■ox   AND 
QATIONS. 
1911 Lj 


COPYRIGHT,   1911 

BY 

MINNIE    KENDALL    LOWTHER 


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O- 


♦O^nm?  nf  our  d|tliiltoiiri !  l|nui  afifrrttnti  rltnga 
11    1  Anb  lian^rs  'rouub  tl|^^  witli  lipr  s^ra^l) 
uitnga ! 
itar^r  tl)i|  l|tUa,  tI|ouglT  rlab  tn  autumn  bruitin, 
(Uliau  fairest  Bummits  uilitd|  tl)?  r^iiarfi  rrowu ! 
^uiretrr  tltp  fragraur?  of  tlii|  summpr  bvnzt 
(5hau  all  Arabia  brfatl|ps  along  tl)^  spaa ! 
Sllir  atraugpr'a  galp  uiafta  liom^  tltp  rxilp*a  atgl), 
iFor  tljp  l|rart'a  t^mpk  ta  tta  omn  blup  akg. 

— Oliver  Wendell  Holmes. 


nf 

SI)?  ftotippra  of  Ettrl|tf  Oloutttg 


PREFACE 


The  idea  of  writing  a  history  of  Ritchie  county  had  its 
origin  in  a  suggestion  made  by  Lewis  Harvey  Adams  while 
editor  of  the  "Ritchie  Standard,"  about  the  year  1904  when 
he  requested  us  to  v/rite  some  historical  articles  (of  towns  and 
other  points  of  interest  in  the  county)  for  his  paper.  We  had 
long  been  an  invalid  (from  an  injury  to  the  spine  sustained 
by  a  fall  from  a  horse)  and  was  at  that  time  local  correspond- 
ent for  his  paper.  However,  we  agreed  to  comply  with  this 
request  in  cas£  that  the  desired  data  could  be  obtained,  and 
shortly  after  set  about  the  task,  and  when  once  at  work,  we 
became  so  much  interested,  that  the  research  resulted  in  a 
brief  history  of  the  county  which  ran  as  a  serial  in  the  "Ritchie 
Standard"  from  June  7,  lOOG,  to  January  3,  1907  ;  .and  by  the 
time  this  serial  was  at  an  end,  quite  a  number  of  the  readers 
of  the  paper  were  requesting  its  issue  in  "book  form."  P.ut 
Ijeing  conscious  of  its  many  inaccuracies  and  imperfections 
we  resolved  to  set  out  anew,  and  to  make  a  more  complete 
an.d  authentic  history  before  submitting  it  to  the  public  in  book 
form.  So  the  wdiole  ground  has  been  gone  over  again,  and 
much  new  territory  has  been  explored.  Letters  of  inquiry 
with  out-lines  of  su.ggestive  questions  have  been  sent  to  every 
known  pioneer  family  ;  the  telephones  and  the  newspapers  have 
been  pressed  into  service,  and  various  other  devices  have  been 
resorted  to  in  the  gathering  and  the  verifying  of  this  data;  and 
we  now  submit  to  the  people  of  this  county  as  authentic,  and 
as  complete  a  history  as  can  be  hoped  for  at  this  late  day  when 
the  lips  of  so  many  of  the  makers  of  this  history  are  now  sealed 
in  death.  And  while  we  realize  that  many  imperfections  are 
still  in  evidence  in  this  work,  we  trust  that  the  reader  will  noi: 
lose  sight  of  the  disadvantages  that  have  confronted  us,  and  the 
fact  that  we  are  a  novice  in  the  "book  business"— this  being 
our  first  venture. 

The  orio-inal  idea  was  to  go  back  with  these  sketches  to 
the  time  the  ancestors  of  the  pioneers  of  the  county  crossed 


VIII  PREFACE' 

the  water  and  down  to  their  sons  and  daughters ;  and  it  will 
be  observed  that  this  is  still  the  general  plan  of  the  book, 
though  circumstances  have  demanded  not  a  few  departures 
from  this  plan.  But  in  each  and  every  instance  we  have  used 
such  material  as  has  been  available.  Some  of  the  older  fami- 
lies are  written  up  for  several  generations  in  order  to  bring 
them  down  to  the  memory  of  the  present  people.  Some  have 
had  well-preserved  records  and  other  data  to  draw  upon,  while 
others  whose  ancestry  ma}^  ha\e  been  just  as  interesting,  had 
i.one.  Others  again  manifested  no  interest,  hence  the  absence 
of  some  who  should  have  been  included. 

Quite  a  number  of  complete  family  genealogies  have  been 
furnished  us,  but  owing  to  the  size  of  this  volume,  and  the 
arduous  task  involved,  it  has  been  necessary  to  leave  the 
younger  generations  and  their  achievements  principally  to  the 
future  historian,  or  to  the  individual  family  record-maker. 

The  prime  object  of  this  volume  has  been  to  embalm  the 
memory  of  the  pioneers  of  this  county,  and  to  show  briefly 
the  grow^th  and  progress  that  one  hundred  ten  years  have 
wrought  in  this  little  corner  of  our  great  Commonwealth. 
Some  have  felt  that  because  their  ancestors  did  not  figure  in 
public  affairs  that  their  brief  history  was  hardly  worthy  of 
a  place;  but  would  it  not  be  w^ell  for  us  to  remember  in  this 
connection  that  all  of  the  heroes  are  not  found  in  the  front  oi' 
the  battle  or  in  e.xalted  positions;  but  that  some  of  the  noblest 
of  earth  have  been  content  to  live  and  die  in  the  humbler 
walks  of  life — "unheralded  and  unsung."  And,  truly,  such 
examples  should  be  an.  inspiration  for  us  to  "do  with  our 
mi<2ht  what  our  hands  find  to  do,"  though  it  mav  be  a  verv 
lowly  task :  for — 

"Tl  may  not  be  on  the  mountain's  iieight. 
Or  over  the  stormy  sea; 
It  may  not  be  at  the  battle's  front 
'  My  Lord  may  have  need  of  me." 

We  gratefully  acknowledge  the  valuable  assistance  ihat 
has  been  rendered  us  by  the  many  in  the  accomplishment  of 
this  arduous  task;  for  had  this  assistance  been  withheld  this 


PREFACE  ■  IX 

little  volume  could  never  have  been  given  to  the  public.  Our 
investigations  have  been  persistent  and  thorough,  and  if  some 
cherished  tradition  is  found  to  be  set  aside,  please  bear  in 
mind  that  this  has  been  done  only  upon  good  authority.  Many 
conflicting  statements  have  confronted  us,  but  we  have  made 
our  decisions  always  in  favor  of  the  most  authentic  informa- 
tion, although  some  disputed  points  are  still  left  in  doubt. 

While  it  is  impossible  to  mention  all  who  have  contributed 
to  this  work,  the  following  named  persons  are  among  those 
who  have  been  especially  helpful -outside  of  their  own  family 
data : 

Israel  Davidson,  the  late  Joel  Westfall,  the  late  General 
Harris,  the  late  j\Irs.  Salina  Woods,  the  late  Mrs.  A^nes 
Layfield,  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth  McGregor,  Mrs.  Sarah 
Osbourn,  George  15.  Douglass,  Van  Martin,  Van  A.  Zeveiey, 
Martin  Smith,  the  Rev.  James  T.  Sinnett,  Harry  Dawson,  B. 
M.  Cowell,  Mrs.  Lma  Haymond  Lantz,  John  B.  Lemon,  E.  R. 
Tibbs,  Creed  Wilson,  Hu  Maxwell  (the  historian),  Mrs. 
Eveline  Evans,  Mrs.  Belinda  Hill^  Mr.  and  Mrs.  B.  H.  Wilson, 
George  B.  Johnson,  Christopher  Douglass,  the  late  William 
Douglass,  L.  V.  McWhorter  (the  historian  of  North  Yakima. 
W^ashington),  Miss  Fannie  McKinney  (Williamstown).  Mrs. 
Iva  Lowther  Peters  (New  York),  Miss  Julia  Maxwell  (West 
Tvlilford),  Granville  Lowther  (Braxton  county),  Josiah  Hughes 
(Roane  county),  Forrest  Goff  (Glenville),  A.  H.  Hall,  C.  L. 
Zinn,  Mrs.  Lullu  Halbm  Parker  (Kansas  city,  Missouri),  Miss 
Genevieve  Collins,  Newton  P»rake  (Buckhannon),  and  perhaps 
others. 

We  are  also  indebted  to  Withers  "Chronicles  of  Border- 
warfare,"  the  "History  of  Ohio,"  and  the  "Historical  and 
Geographical  Encyclopedia  of  the  Virginias'  for  interesting 
helps :  and  to  many  courtesies  from  the  telephone  operators 
along  the  different  lines,  and  for  special  favors  from  the 
Pritchard  Telephone  Company,  the  local  newspaper  editors 
and  the  kind  publishers.  Last  but  far  greater  than  all  has  been 
the  help  of  the  great  Author  of  all  good. 

MINNIE  KENDALL  LOWTHER. 

Fonzo,  West  Va.,  January  24,  1911. 


L 


CONTENTS 


Chapter  Page 

1. — Discover}'-  of  Ritchie  County 1 

II. — First  Settlers  in  Ritchie  County 2',) 

III.— South  Fork  Settled 4() 

IV. — Thomas  and  Phebe  Cunningham (■);/ 

v.— The  Westfalls  and  Whites 7  J 

VI. — South  Fork  Settlers — Continued S'A 

Vll.^South  Fork  Settlers — Continued 10-; 

VIII.— North  Fork  Settled 1-iO 

TX. — North  Fork  Settlers — Continued 14J 

X.  —First  Settlers  in  the  Cairo  Vicinity IGO 

XL— Scotch  Settlers '_ IT"? 

XII.— Bond's  Creek  Settled 188 

XIII.— Husher's  Run 30:) 

XIV.— Goose  Creek  Settled 220 

XV.— Middle  Fork  Settled 225 

XVI.— Bone  Creek  Settled 240 

XVII.— Otterslide  Settled 25(5 

XVIIL— Spruce  Creek  Settled 201 

XIX.— Grass  Run  Settled. 27tJ 

XX.— Leatherbarke  Settled 295 

XXL— Indian  Creek  Settled 303 

XXII. — Chevauxdefrise  Settled 31() 

XXIIL— Slab  Creek  Settled 330 

XXIV.— White  Oak  Settled 347 

XXV.— Beeson    Settled 357 

XXVL— Macfarlan  and   Dutchman 3()7 

XXVIL— Devil  Hole  Creek  Settled 377 

XXVIIL— Ritchie  Mines ' 382 

XXIX. — Pioneer  Life  and  Character 300 

XXX.— Schools  and  Teachers 394 

XXXL— Churches 400 

XXXIL— Mills 418 


XII  CONTENTS 

Chapter  Page 

XXXIII.— Postoffices 4;>S 

XXXIV.— Ritchie  County  Formed 430 

XXXV.— Developments   435 

■  XXXVI.— Physicians 443 

XXXVII.— Newspapers 453 

XXXVIIL— Ilarrisville   4(53 

XXXIX. — Prominent  Harris\ille  Families 474 

XL.— Cairo   499 

XLI. — Pennsboro 512 

XLII.— Ellenboro 53-3 

XLIIL— Smithville 541 

XLIV. — Burnt  House  (  Goff's,  Fonsoviile) 553 

XLV.— Auburn 5G0 

XLVL— Berea 573 

XLVIL— Pullman  (Oxford,  Holbrook) 579 

XLVIir. — Petroleum   (Hig'hland,  Cornwallis,  Glendale, 

Mole  Plill.  Rusk) 58r. 

XLIX.— Tollgate 594 

L. — Other  Prominent  Families 599 

LI. — The  Younger  ]Men's  Calendar 620 

LII. — The  Poet's  Corner (536 

LIIL— The  Blue  and  the  Gray (544 

LIV. — Some  xA.dditional  Ancestries (553 

LV. — Natural  Resources 6(jG 


LIST  OF  ILLUSTRATIONS 

Page 

1.  Author's  Picture Frontispiece 

2.  Old  Rock  at  the  Mouth  of  IncHan  run ;3 

3.  Lowther  Coat-of-arnis 5 

i.  Col.  William  Lovvther's  Cabin 7 

5.  Cemetery  where  Col.  Lowther  Sleeps <i 

G.  The  Old  Stone  Ilotise  at  Pennsboro • 2i 

7.  James  Hardman  and  Ilardman  Chapel 51 

8.  George  W.  Hardman 53 

9.  The  Old   Malone   Homestead    (Wyldewood   Cottage 

whrre  the  History  of  Ritchie  County  was  written)     56 

10.  Archibald    Wilson 106 

11.  John   CoHins 132 

12.  Daniel    Haymond -' 134 

13.  Marsh   Cabin 135 

14.  Emmanuel    Dotson 113 

15.  The  Old  Marshall  Home 167 

10.  Richard  and  Eleanor  Rutherford 111 

17.  The  Old  Rutherford  Home J 171 

18.  Andrew  and  Catharine  Hall  Douglass 178 

19.  William  and  Elizabeth  Plall  McGregor lOO 

30.  Robert   Sommerville 339 

31.  Mrs.  Jennie  Kendall  Lowther 315 

23.  Harman  and  Frances  Moats  Sinnett 316 

33.  Scene  of  the  First  Tragedy  in  Ritchie  County 368 

34.  Ruins  of  the   Ritchie   Mines  and    Frederick   Lcukmi, 

the  discoverer ■ 383 

35  H.  S.  Wilson -.--  388 

SG.  James  Woods 393 

27.  Flarrisville  School   Building 402' 

38.  A  Modern  School  P.uilding 403 

39.  Harrisville  M.  E.  Church 409 

30.  Harrisville  P.aptist  Church 412 

31.  Isaiah  and  Jane  Taylor  Wells 417 


XIV  LIST  OP  ILLUSTRATIONS 

Page 

?:2.     The  Isaiah  Wells  Mill  and  Homestead 419 

')3.     The  Old  Xorth  Fork  Bridge 437 

o4.     Gen.  Thomas  Alaley  Harris 4U 

35.  The  late  Residence  of  Gen.  T.  M.  Harris 44.'3 

36.  Dr.  and  Airs.  M.  S.  Hall 44^ 

37.  Enoch   G.   Day 4r,l 

38.  E.  S.  Zcveley 454 

30.     White  Hall  Hotel 405 

40.     The  Court  House  with,  the  Annex 468 

^1.     The  Jail 46!) 

4?.  Harrisville  looking  from  the  Cemetery  south  of  town  47') 

43.     P.  &  H.  Train  on  Trestle 47-3 

4i.     Panorama  of   Pennsboro 5T8 

45.  J.  P.  Strickler 53«) 

46.  Mrs.  j.  P.  Strickler 536 

47.  L.  V.  McWhorter  (Old  Wolfe) 569 

48.  Portraits  Younger  Alen's  Calendar — 15et\veen 620-621 

49.  John  S.  Hall 636 

50.  Herbert  P.  AIcGinnis 640 

51.  Soldiers'  Group — Between  pages 643-644 

52.  Oil  Derrick 667 


CHAPTER  I 


The  Discovery  of  Ritchie  County 

S  we  look  with  so  much  pleasure  and  admir- 
ation upon'  the  smiling  valleys  and  sunny 
hill-tops  that  surround  our  rural  homes,  it 
sounds  like  a  fairy-tale  to  be  told  that  a  little 
more  than  a  century  and  a  quarter  ago,  this 
beautiful  landscape  was  one  vast  unbroken 
wilderness — the  lair  of  wild  beasts,  and  the 
home  of  the  savage  Red  man.     But — 

"The  Red  man  is  no  more, 
The  pale-faced  stranger  stands  alone, 
Upon  the  river's  shore." 


Tradition,  as  well  as  history,  tells  us  that  the  first  "pale- 
faced  strangers"  that  ever  trod  the  "Little  Kanawha"  and 
Hughes  river  valleys  and  stood^  within  the  present  bounds  of 
Ritchie  county,  were  Colonel  William  Lowther  and  Jesse  and 
Elias  Hughes. 

It  was  in  the  year  1772,  when  the  glorious  touch  of 
autumn  was  on  every  bush  and  tree,  that  this  brave  trio  set 
out  on  their  long  and  perilous  expedition  which  was  destined 
to  result  in  the  discovery  of  what  is  now  the  prosperous  little 
County  of  Ritchie. 

Leaving  the  place  where  Clarksburg  now  stands,  they 
steered  their  course  up  the  West  Fork  of  the  Monongahela 
river  to  its  head  waters,  and,  crossing  over  the  dividing  ridge 
near  the  present  site  of  Weston,  pursued  their  journey  down 
Sand  creek  to  its  confluence  with  the  Little  Kanawha.  Here 
they  found  a  beautiful  mountain  river  upon  which  the  eye  of 
civilized  man  had,  perhaps,  never  before  rested,  and  being- 
filled   with   delight   at   this   discovery,   and   lured   on   by   their 


'The  incident  wliich  gave  rise  to  the  naii\es  of  Macfarlan  and  Dutch- 
man is  found  to  antedate  this.  But  it  lia.s  never  before  been  a  matter  of 
hii-tory.      See    later    chapter. 


2  HISTORY    Of   RITCHIE    COU.\T\ 

desire  to  explore,  to  penetrate  this  dense  wilderness,  and  to 
find  the  destination  of  this  river,  they  followed  its  tortuous 
course,  its  meanderings  like  a  "silver  thread" — naming  the 
tributaries  as  the}^  passed  along. 

The  general  course  of  the  first  one  that  appeared  sug- 
gested a  more  direct  route  from  the  point  near  ^^'eston  to  the 
river  they  were  exploring,  than  the  one  down  Sand  creek,  and 
they  named  it  "Leading  creek."  Cedars  adorned  the  banks 
of  the  next  stream  and  they  called  it  "Cedar  creek."  Then  one 
came  out  from  beneath  stately  pines,  and  "Pine  creek"  was 
the  name  given  to  it.  High  banks  of  yellow  clay  marked  the 
mouth  of  another,  giving  rise  to  the  name  of  "Yellow  creek'" 
— which  is  to-day  so  far-famed  for  its  richness  in  oil.  After 
this  came  a  tributarv  "stretching  far  awav  among  the  hills" — 
a  long  line  of  its  course  being  visible,  and  the  name  "Straight 
creek"  w^as  bestowed  upon  it.  From  toward  the  evening  sun 
flowed  another,  which  suggested  the  name  of  "West  Fork." 
And  from  the  cool,  limpid  waters  of  another,  thev  quenched 
their  thirst  and  it  has  ever  since  borne  the  name  of  "Spring 
creek." 

Little  did  these  pioneers  of  civilization  dream  that  before 
a  centur}-  had  passed  away,  this  legion  was  destined  to 
give  birth  to  what  is  to-day  one  of  the  richest  resources  of  our 
Commonwealth.  Scarcely  less  credible  is  the  romancer's  story 
of  the  powerful  magic  wand  of  "Aladin's  Lamp"  than  the  one 
that  the  historian  has  woven  about  "Burning  Springs."' 

Li  August,  1860,  when  the  news  went  out  from  this  place 
that  the  greatest  petroleum-producing  field  then  known  to  the 
world  had  here  been  discovered,  the  population  of  this  entire 
vicinity  was  less  tlian  a  score,  and  six  months  later,  on  that 
memorable  April  morn  when  the  whole  country  was  startled 
by  the  firing  on  Fort  Sumpter,  it  numbered  not  fewer  than  six 
thousand  persons.  Capitalists  and  adventurers  from  every 
quarter  of  the  globe  flocked  to  this  "Eldorado,"  and  immense 
fortunes  came  and  went  in  a  single  day.  This  was  the  begin- 
ning of  the  oil  industry  in  our  state.  And  though  the  popula- 
tion of  this  region  once  numbered  eighteen  thousand,  it  has 
now  almost  returned  to'"its  primitive  wilderness." 


'Burning   Springs   was  discovered     later     by     I'lwriek      Hostetter      and 
others.       (See    Hostetters    in    South    Forl<   settlers.) 


THE   DISCOJ'ERV    OF   RITCHIE    COUXTY  3 

y\fter  "Spring  creek"  came  another  tributary  to  wiiich  the 
name  "Reedy"  was  appHed.  And  at  some  distance  below  upon 
tlie  bank  of  a  small  stream,  a  huge  stone  was  found  standhig 
erect,  and  "Standing  Stone  creek"  has  ever  since  been  familiar 
to  the  inhabitants  of  the  Little  Kanawha  valley. 

Farther  down  a  beautiful  river  united  its  "gently  mur- 
muring tide"  with  the  Kanawha,  and  Jesse  Hughes  claimed 
the  privilege  of  conferring  his  own  name  upon  it.  His  com- 
panions n-iade  no  protest  and  the  name  of  "Hughes  river"  has 
ever  since  occupied  a  place  on  the  maps  of  the  "Little  Mount- 
ain State."  In  1789,  an  effort  w^as  made  to  have  the  name 
changed  to  that  of  "Junius,"  but  the  aged  citizens  still  mind- 
ful of  the  debt  of  gratitude  that  was  due  the  brave  discoverers, 
refused  to  listen  to  such  a  change. 

Up  this  river,  whose  name  is  so  familiar  to  us  all.  and 
upon  whose  beloved  banks  so  many  of  our  childish  feet  have 
loitered,  "looking  for  the  spring  flowers  wild,"  these  weary 
travelers  continued  their  explorations,  and  soon  a  stream  of 
some  magnitude  came  to  view  in  which  flocks  of  wild  geese 
were  bathing,  and  the  name  "Goose  creek"  at  once  suggested 
itself.  Farther  up,  the  river  divided  into  two  branches,  and 
these  were  designated  as  the  North  and  the  South  ?orks  of 
Hughes  river ;  and  as  they  proceeded  up  the  South  fork,  they 
discovered  a  small  stream  overhung  by  walnut  trees,  and  it 
was  called  "Walnut  creek"  until  1784,  when  Col.  Lowther, 
with  a  company  of  men,  surprised  the  Indians  on  this  creek, 
and  a  battle  ensued  in  which  five  red  men  and  a  white  l3oy 


The    old    rock    at    the   mouth    of    Indian   run  as  it  looks   today. 


4  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

were  killed,  and  ever  since  that  time  it  has  been  known  a:^ 
"Indian  creek."^  The  only  stream  mentioned  that  does  not 
retain  its  original  name.  ( 

After  the  discovery  of  Indian  creek,  these  explorers  rd- 
traced  their  footsteps  to  the  Kanawha  river  and  continued  its 
descent,  and  'ere  long  the  mouth  of  a  stream  filled  with  slate 
rose  before  their  vision,  and  the  name  "Slate  creek"  was  ap- 
propriated to  it.  And  shortly  after  this,  the  goal  for  which 
they  had  covered  so  many  weary  miles  was  in  sight ;  the 
mouth  of  the  river  had  been  reached,  and  this  little  band 
stood  upon  the  bank  of  the  bold  Ohio,  perhaps,  among  the 
first  Englishmen  that  ever  set  foot  upon  the  site  that  is  now 
marked  by  the  interesting  city  of  Parkersburg;  and  from  here 
the  homeward  march  began,  and  in  due  time  they  reached  the 
point  from  which  they  had  started,  having  made  the  way  pos- 
sible for  the  "settlements  of  the  now  beautiful  and  populous 
valleys  of  these  two  rivers." 

This  little  historical  drama  would  hardly  be  complete 
without  a  word  in  regard  to  the  ideritity  of  the  heroic  actors 
who  were  instrumental  in  bringing  it  about,  and  of  them  we 
shall  now  speak : 


^The  scene  of  this  conflict  was  near  the  present  site  of  the  Indian  r'.;n 
school-liouse,  on  land  now  owned  by  Dr.  C.  W.  Rexroad.  Here,  near  the 
mouth  of  tills  little  stream,  stand  the  several  cliffs  of  rocks  which  shel- 
tered the  Indians  on  tliat  memorable  night,  and  from  which  they  fled  in 
dismay  on  the  following  morning,  "at  tlie  dawn's  early  light,"  leaving 
their  dead,  their  prisoners,  and  their  guns.  And  tliough  these  old  rocks 
serve  as  a  most  fitting  memorial  to  one  of  the  first  tragedies  ever  enacted 
on  Ritchie  county  soil,  so  mute,  and  so  silent  do  they  stand  that  very 
few  who  gaze  upon  them  would  ever  suspect  their  interesting,  tragical 
history. 

An  Incident  of  this  battle  which  we  glean  from  "Border  Warfare" 
will  doubtless  add  interest  here: 

"As  soon  as  the  firing  was  opened  upon  the  Indians,  Mrs.  Alex  Roney, 
one  of  the  prisoners,  ran  toward  the  Whites,  rejoicing  at  the  prospect  of 
deliverance,  and  e.Kclaiming,  "I  am  Ellick  Roney's  wife  of  tlie  Valley,  I 
am  Ellick  Roney's  wife  of  the  Valley,  and  a  pretty  little  woman,  too,  if 
I  am  well-dressed!"  The  poor  woman,  ignorant  of  the  fact  that  her  son 
was  weltering  in  his  own  gore,  and,  forgetting  for  an  instant,  that  her 
husband  had  been  so  recently  killed,  seemed  intent  onlj^  on  her  own  de- 
liverance from  the  savage  captors. 

"Another  of  the  captives,  Daniel  Dougherty,  being  tied  down  and  im- 
able  to  move,  was  discovered  by  the  Whites  as  they  rushed  toward  the 
camp;  but  fearing  that  he  might  be  one  of  the  enemy,  and  that  he  might 
do  them  .'jome  injury  if  they  advanced,  ore  of  the  men  stopped  and  de- 
manded to  know  who  he  was.  But  being  benumbed  with  the  cold  and  so 
disconcerted  by  the  sudden  firing  of  the  Whites,  he  could  not  render  his 
Irish  dialect  intelligible  to  them:  and  the  white  man  raised  his  gun  and 
pointed  it  toward  him,  and  in  loud,  emphatic  tones  told  him  that  if  he 
did  not  make  it  known  who  he  was  that  he'd  blow  a  ball  through  him,  be 
he  White  man  or  Indian.  Fear  supplying  him  with  new  vigor,  Dougherty 
exclaimed.  'Loord  Jasus,  and  am  I  to  be  killed  by  the  "^Tiite  people  at 
last?'     Col.  Lowther  heard  him  and  his  life  was  saved." 


THE   DISCOVERY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 


The  Lowthers. — "Lowther"^  is  a  very  old  name  in  the 
land  beyond  the  deep.  It  is  supposed  to  be  of  Norman  or 
French   origin,   and   its   primitive   spelling   was   "Loutre,"   or 

"Louthre" — meaning  otter  or  na- 
tive ;  and  in  the  ancient  chronicles 
of  the  family  (in  the  "Old 
World")  it  is  said  to  be  frequent- 
ly met  with  in  this  form  to-day. 
But,  however  this  may  have  been, 
they  came  over  to  England  with 
William  the  Conqueror,  from 
Normandy  in  France,  during  the 
autumn  of  1066,  and  have  ever 
since  laid  claim  to  British  soil, 
though  (from  here)  they  have 
scattered  to  Ireland  and  to  vari- 
ous other  climes.  They  are  distinctively  connected  with  the 
North  of  England,  where  they  own  large  possessions  to-day. 

Sir  William  Lowther  was  the  prime  minister  of  William 
the  III,  about  the  year  1695,  and  was  subsequently  created  first 
Viscount  of  Lonsdale;  and  Sir  James  Lowther,  a  very  well- 
known  member  of  the  family,  who  married  the  daughter  of 
Lord  Bute  (the  first  prime  minister  of  George  the  III),  was 
made  the  first  Earl  of  Lonsdale,  near  1760,  and  the  present 
Earl  (of  Lonsdale)  is  his  direct  descendant. 

Another  head  of  the  family,  William,  Earl  of  Lonsdale, 
was  Postmaster-General  and  President  of  the  Council  in  the 
second  Beaconsfi eld's  f^rst  government  in  1866  ;  and  the  Hon- 
orable William  Lowther,  who  still  survives  at  the  age  of 
eighty-eight  years,  occupied  a  seat  in  the  House  of  Commons, 
from  Westmoreland  county,  for  a  quarter  of  a  century,  and 
his   son,   the   Right   Honorable   James   William    Lowther    (to 


"An  old  tradition  concerning  the  origin  of  tlie  name  "Lowther"  in 
the  "Old  World,"  which  has  been  handed  down  for  generations  in  the 
family,  is:  "That  Henry  Low,  whose  ancestral  line  came  from  Ireland, 
had  three  sons,  Henry,  George  and  "William,  who  were  English  miners 
and  for  some  superior  skill  and  valor  't-h-e-r'  was  added  to  their  name 
by  royal  decree,  and  William  was  said  to  be  the  grandfather  of  Col. 
William  Lowther.  But,  however  cherished  this  old  story  may  be,  its 
authenticity  is  now  scattered  to  tlie  winds  before  historical  facts  which 
are  indisputable;  as  the  history  of  the  family  is  to  be  found  in  'Dod's 
Pr.rliamentarian  Companion,'  'Who's  Who,'  and  various  other  English 
books  of  reference." 


6  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

whom  we  are  indebted  for  this  information),  has  been  in  Par- 
liament for  twenty-seven  years,  and  is  now  the  speaker  of  the 
House  of  Commons. 

All  down  the  centuries  the  name  has  been  associated  with 
the  pul)lic  affairs  of  Great  Britain,  and  John  Langton  Sanford 
and  Meredith  Townsend  in  their  "Great  Governing  Families 
of  England,"  say  : 

"The  history  of  the  Lowthers  is  that  of  immense  and 
almost  unbroken  civil  success.  Though  they  date  from  the 
earliest  feudal  period  and  possess  to  this  time  a  power  more 
nearly  feudal  than  that  of  any  other  family  in  England,  ex- 
cept the  Perceys  and  the  Wynnes,  they  would  be  defined  on 
the  continent  as  belonging  rather  to  the  peerage  of  'the  robe' 
than  the  nobility  of  the  sword.  A  race  of  proud,  sensitive, 
and  singularly  efficient  men,  they  have  filled  high  offices  as 
lawyers,  battled  bravely  as  politicians,  and  performed,  once 
or  twice,  good  service  as  ministers  of  the  State.  From  1300, 
for  five  hundred  years,  there  never  sat  a  parliament  which  was 
not  attended  by  a  Lowther  or  a  Lowther's  direct  nominee.'' 

The  first  record  that  we  have  of  the  family  in  the  Western 
world  is  in  the  Pennsylvania  colony,  on  October  22  and  23, 
1681,  when  William  Penn  granted  five  thousand  acres  of  land 
to  William  Lowther  and  his  sister.  Margaret,  near  "Simpson 
Tract."  They  were  the  son  and  the  daughter  of  Armstrong 
Lowther,  of  York  count3^  England,  and  their  mother  was  a 
sister  of  William  Penn.  W^illiam  married  Kathrine  Preston, 
and  had  a  son,  Thomas  Lowther.  Margaret  became  Mrs. 
Benjamin  Poole,  and  their  daughter  was  Mrs.  Richard  Nichol- 
son.^ 

But  Col.  William  Lowther  was  not  a  lineal  descendant 
of  this  Pennsylvania  family,  as  some  mistakenly  think.  His 
parents.  Robert  and  Aquilla  Reese  Lowther.  crossed  to 
America  (from  Ireland)  near  the  year  1738,  and  settled  in 
Albermarle  county.  Virginia.  They  later  removed  to  the 
South  Branch  of  the  Potomac  river,  in  what  is  now  the  East- 
ern Panhandle  of  this  State,  and  finally  to  Hacker's  creek, 
where  their  lives  came  to  a  close. (?) 


^To  Hon.  Hu  Maxwell  we  are  Indebted  for  this  bit  of  information, 
whicli  is  taken  from  tlie  "Crown  Inn"  (which  stood  near  Bethleliem,  in 
Pennsylvania),  written  by  W.  C.  Reichel. 


t 


THE   DISCOJ'ERV   OP   RITCHIE    COUNTY  7 

They  had  quite  a  family  of  children,  but  only  part  of 
their  names  are  at  our  command;  viz.,  Thomas,  Henry,  Jona- 
than, Joel  and  William. 

Thomas  and  Jonathan  were  killed  by  the  Indians.  Henry 
returned  to  his  home  in  Albermarle  county,  after  lending  a 
hand  in  the  erection  of  the  early  forts  in  Harrison  county. 
Joel  probably  died  in  Harrison  county,  where  he  settled,  and 
William  is  the  hero  of  this  drama. 

Col.  William  Lowther  was  born  in  Albermarle  county, 
Virginia,  in  1743,  not  long  after  the  arrival  of  the  family  in 
the  colonies ;  and  in  his  early  twenties,  he  was  married  to 
Miss  Sudna  Hughes,  sister  of  Jesse  and  Elias.  the  marriage 
taking  place  at  the  home  of  the  Hughes,  on  the  South  branch 
of  the  Potomac,  in^  v;hat  is  now  Hardy  county,  near  the  year 
1763  ;  and  here,  not  far  from  the  beautiful  old  town  of  Moore- 
field,  they  established  their  home  and  remained  until  they 
removed  to  Harrison  count}%  in  June,  1773.  The  date  of  their 
removal  being  marked  by  the  birth  of  their  fourth  son,  Jesse, 
who  is  said  to  have  come  upon  the  stage  just  six  weeks  after 
the  family  reached  their  new  home  (in  Harrison  county),  and 
his  natal  day  was  Julv  31.  1773. 


Col.    Wm.    Lowtlier'.s    cabin    as    it    looks   to-day. 


This  cabin  is  located  one  one-half  miles  below  West  Milford,  on 
the  Clarksburg  road.  It  was  built  by  Col.  Lowther,  perhaps  early  in  the 
year  1773  i  some  object  to  tliis  date,  but  we  are  confident  that  it  is  au- 
thentic), and  though  one  hundred  thirty-seven  years  have  winged  their 
flight,  it  still  stands  as  a  sacred  remnant  of  by-gone  days.  This  piature 
was  taken  in  June,  190S,  and  was  at  tliat  time  si  ill  occupied  by  the 
descendants  of  Col.  Lowther. 


HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 


Col.  Lowther  had,  however,  figured  in  the  erection  of 
Simpson's  fort,  near  eight  miles  below  Clarksburg,  and  West's 
fort,  near  Jane  Lew,  before  this  time.  He  played  an  important 
■part,  too,  in  the  construction  of  the  "Old  Nutter"  fort,  near 
Clarksburg,  ruins  of  which  still  mark  the  site. 

He  soon  became  distinguished  for  his  fearlessness  as  a 
frontiersman,  and  for  his  unselfish  devotion  to  the  welfare  of 
the  colonists ;  was  one  of  the  most  capable  defenders  of  the 
settlement  in  the  Avar  of  1774  (and  subsequently)  and  many  a 
successful  expedition  did  he  lead  against  the  enemy.  He  was 
the  first  Justice  of  the  Peace  in  the  district  of  West  Augusta ; 
the  first  Sheriff  of  Harrison  and  Wood  counties,  and  was  at 
one  time  a  member  of  the  General  Assembly  at  Richmond, 
Virginia^.  Having  served  in  all  the  subordinate  ranks  of  mili- 
tary life,  he  rose  to  that  of  Colonel.  (Was  com.missioned 
Major  by  General  George  Rogers  Clarke  in  1781.)  "Despis- 
ing the  pomp  and  pageantry  of  office,"  he  accepted  it  only  for 
the  good  of  his  country.^ 

On  a  balmy  day  in  the  latter  part  of  October  (28)  1814, 
he  passed  from  earth  at  his  old  home  near  West  Milford. 
The  old  cabin  that  had  sheltered  him  through  so  many  event- 
ful years  was  the  scene  of  his  closing  hours,  and  not  far  away 
on  his  own  homestead  he  lies  in  his  eternal  sleep.  He  died 
rich  in  the  love  and  esteem  of  the  countrymen  that  he  had  so 
faithfully  served,  and  it  is  said  that  his- name  has  been  handed 
down  to  their  descendants  "hallowed  by  their  blessings." 

A  pathetic  little  incident  that  has  been  preserved  in  the 
family  says  that  when  he  died  his  devoted  old  darkey,  "Tobe," 


Cemetery  ■where  Colonel  Lowther  slc:ep  = 


'Part  of  this  is  taken  from  the  re\ised  Border  Warfare. 


\ 


THE   DISCOVERY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY  9 

was  ?'€.Qn  stancling  by  the  fence  near  the  cabin  weeping  over 
his  loss ;  and  that  when  this  old  servant  was  done  with  earth, 
he  was  laid  at  his  master's  feet  and  a  dog-iron  was  placed  at 
his  grave  ;  and  to  this  day  this  iron  is  in-tact  and  serves  as  a 
positive  mark  for  Col.  Lowther's  grave,  whose  inscription  is 
no  longer  legible. 

After  his  death,  his  wife,  Sudna,  came  to  this  county  and 
made  her  home  with  her  son,  Elias  Lowther,  on  the  Flanna- 
gan  farm,  above  Berea.  Here,  near  the  year  1829,  she  died, 
and  in  one  corner  of  the  Flannagan  burying-ground  she  lies 
at  rest.  Jonathan  C.  Lowther,  her  only  surviving  grandson, 
remembers  seeing  her  lov/ered  here.  He  was  born  in  1819, 
and  thinks  that  he  must  have  been  a  lad  of  near  ten  years  at 
the  time.  He  cannot  recall  her  features,  biit  says  that  she  was 
quite  small  in  stature. 

Their  family  consisted  of  five  sons  only;  viz.,  Robert, 
Thomas,  William,  Jesse  and  Elias  Lowther,  all  of  whom  have 
a  long  line  of  descendants,  which  are  scattered  throughout  the 
Union. 

It  may  be  of  interest  in  this  connection  to  note  that  an 
old  cross-cut  saw  that  was  once  the  property  of  Col.  Lowther 
is  now  in  the  hands  of  his  great-grandson,  J.  M.  Lowther,  of 
Auburn.  He  purchased  this  saw  at  Winchester,  Virginia, 
and  carried  it  on  horseback  to  Clarksburg  (West)  Virginia, 
where  it  was  used  in  sawing  timber  for  the  old  "Nutter  fort," 
which  served  as  a  place  of  refuge  for  the  inhabitants  of  the 
West  fork  river  during  Lord  Dunmore's  war,  which  antedates 
the  Revolution. 

An  heirloom  in  the  form  of  an  old  land  grant  which  was 
made  to  Col.  Lowther,  on  June  8,  1785,  and  signed  by  Patrick 
Henry,  on  November  14,  1786,  while  he  was  Governor  of  Vir- 
ginia, is  now  a  cherished  possession  of  the  writer.  This  grant 
is  written  upon  parchment  and  conveys  two  hundred  twenty 
acres  to  the  Colonel  on  the  West  fork  river,  in  Harrison  coun- 
ty, "which  includes  his  settlement."  (Hence  our  proof  of  his 
early  settlement  at  West  Milford.) 

What  a  mantle  of  historic  interest  clusters  about  these 
silent  remnants  of  the  past  How  sacred  they  seem  to  us !  As 
one  gazes  upon  the  signature  of  this  renowned  orator  with 


10  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

a  feeling  of  awe  and  reverence,  through  the  phonograph  of 
years  comes  a  voice  of  eloquence  proclaiming  the  immortal 
words  that  must  ever  be  the  sentiment  of  the  true  American 
heart,  "Give  me  liberty  or  give  me  death!" 

Col.  Lowther's  military  record  is  sucli  as  to  admit  his 
descendants  to  membership  in  the  Sons  and  Daughters  of 
the  American  Revolution.  Mrs.  Iva  Lowther  Peters,  of  Fish- 
kill,  New  York,  his  grand-daughter,  several  generations  re- 
moved, and  her  brother,  Earle,  having  been  recently  admitted 
to  these  societies  on  his  record. 

Descendants  of  Col.  Lowther. — Robert  Lowther,  the 
eldest  son,  whose  natal  day  was  October  1,  17G5,  married 
Miss  Kathrine  Cain,  sister  of  John  Cain,  the  Slab  creek 
pioneer,  and  settled  on  the  portion  of  the  old  homestead. 
given  him  by  his  father.  But  at  the  death  of  Col.  Lowther, 
he  inherited  that  part  of  the  estate  which  included  the  ''old 
cabin,"  and  here,  on  November  16,  1833,  he  came  to  his  death 
by  a  fall  from  this  cabin  while  engaged  in  re-roofing  it.  His 
wife,  who  was  born  on  October  2",  1766,  died  here  on  March 
^5,  1851,  and  side  by  side  they  lie  at  rest  in  the  old  family 
burying-ground  shown  in  the  picture. 

They  were  the  parents  of  five  sons  and  three  daughters : 
William  B.,  Jesse  .0.  Robert,  junior.  John,  James  K..  I-Cath- 
rine  Susan  and  Mary  Lowther. 

William  B.  married  Miss  Margaret  Coburn,  and  was 
identified  wath  the  South  fork  settlers  in  this  county. 

Jesse  G.,  who  settled  near  West  Milford,  was  first  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Nancy  Swisher,  and  ten  children  were  the  result 
of  this  union.  His  second  wife  was  Miss  W^ady  Knight,  and 
the  two  children  of  this  marriage  were  :  the  late  Dr.  Jesse  G. 
Lowther.  a  well  known  practitioner  of  Wirt.  Wood  and  this 
county ;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Nancy  Lowther,  of  W'wi  county. 
He  died  at  West  Milford,  on  August  25,  1870,  at  the  age  of 
eighty  years,  and  sleeps  in  the  family  burying-ground  there. 

Robert,  junior,  married  Miss  Eliza  Highland  and  settled 
on  the  old  homestead,  near  West  Milford,  where  he  reared 
three  sons  and  two  daughters. 

John,  who  was  a  prominent  medical  practitioner,  married 
Miss  Elizabeth  Pritchard,  and  lived  and  died  at  Clarksburg; 


THE   DISCOVERY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY  11 

and  the  only  child  of  this  marriage  was  the  late  Evan  Low- 
ther,  of  that  city,  who  died  without  issue. 

James  K.  married  Miss  Lydia  Knight,  and  principally 
spent  his  life  within  the  walls  of  the  old  ancestral  cabin,  where 
he  died  at  the  age  of  ninety-five  years.  He  had  two  sons  and 
three  daughters,  and  one  of  these  daughters,  Talitha,  the  last 
survivor  of  the  family  died  (unmarried)  at  the  old  home,  on 
February  25,  1910. 

Kathrine  married  Thomas  Ireland,  and  they  were  the  first 
settlers  at  the  mouth  of  the  Middle  fork  of  Highes  river,  in 
this  county. 

Susan  became  Mrs.  Abraham  Morrison,  and  principally 
spent  her  life  on  Brown's  creek,  in  Harrison  county.  Her 
family  consisted  of  three  daughters,  who  have  all  crossed  the 
tide. 

Mary  Lowther  was  married  to  her  cousin,  William  J. 
Lowther  (son  of  Jesse),  and  came  to  this  county  and  settled 
near  Oxford.^ 

Thomas  Lowther  (the  second  son  of  Col.  William)  was 
born  on  March  7,  1767,  but  his  history  is  rather  obscure. 
However,  he  married  Miss  Mary  Coburn,  and  settled  on  the' 
land  given  him  by  his  father,  near  West  Milford,  and  reared 
a  small  family.  He  is  said  to  have  died  before  he  had  scarcely 
reached  the  meridian  of  life  of  a  malady  that  the  physicians 
of  to-day  would  term  appendicitis;  he  having  undergone  a 
surgical  operation  without  an  anesthetic.  Tradition  says  that 
he  was  a  snake-charmer,  that  he  could  wield  such  power  over 
a  poisonous  reptile  as  to  be  able  to  handle  it  without  harm 
to  himself.  He,  too,  rests  in  the  family  burying-ground  on 
the  old  homestead. 

He  was  the  father  of  Jesse  Lowther,  the  Cornwallis 
pioneer ;  of  Elias,  an  early  settler  at  Webb's  mill ;  of  Robert, 
of  Doddridge  county;  and  of  one  daughter,  Mary  or  Polly, 
who  is  said  to  have  married  a  man  by  the  name  of  West,  of 
near  Jane  Lew.  (Another  source  of  information  says  her  mar- 
ried name  was  White.) 


'The  descendants  of  this  branch  of  the  family  in  tliis  coujity  are  a 
veritable  host,  but  for  an  account  of  those  who  settled  here  in  pioneer 
days  see  later  chapters. 


12  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Thomas'  descendants  in  this  county  are  not  nearly  so 
numerous  as  those  of  the  other  sons,  but  they  are  not  a  few, 
however.  Among  them  ars  Mrs.  Matilda  McGregor,  of  Cairo, 
a  granddaughter ;  Mrs.  James  Rexroad,  Mrs.  Emma  Lee,  the 
late  Mrs.  F.  S.  Moyer  and  the  late  Mrs.  W.  E.  Hill,  great- 
granddaughters. 

William  Lowther,  the  third  son  of  Col.  William,  was  born 
on  the  South  branch  of  the  Potomac  river,  not  far  from 
Moorefield,  on  January  27,  1769 ;  and  when  he  was  yet  in  the 
"frocks  of  babyhood,"  his  parents  removed  to  Harrison  county, 
and  here  in  the  "hot  bed"  of  savage  warfare,  he  grew  to  man- 
hood. 

Though  uneducated,  he  was  a  man  of  marked  intelligence, 
and  his  memory  was  a  veritable  store-house  of  pioneer  lore, 
and  of  interestiiis'  reminiscences  of  Indian  times ;  for  often, 
when  a  lad,  he  accompanied  his  father  on  his  expeditions 
-against  the  dusky  foe,  and  was  an  eye  witness  to  the  conflict 
(between  the  whites  and  the  Indians),  at  the  famous  rock 
at  the  mouth  of  Indian  run,  in  1784,  he  being  then  but  fifteen 
years  of  age.  And  in  after  life  when  listening  to  a  recital  of 
these  stirring  days  from  the  "Chronicles  of  Border  Warfare," 
he  would  often  stop  the  reader  in  order  to  correct  some  mis- 
statement of  the  historian,  so  clear,  and  so  retentive  was  his 
memory.^ 

Near  the  year  1789,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Margaret 
Morrison,  who  was  born  on  the  banks  of  the  Yadkin  river, 
in  North  Carolina,  on  May  1,  3  768,  and  with  her  parents 
emigrated  to  Harrison  county  in  her  early  womanhood. 
After  their  marriage,  they  settled  near  one  mile  below  West 
Milford,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  by  the  Highlands. 
Here  they  reared  their  family,  and  here  they  remained  until 
near  the  year  1837,  when  they  came  to  this  county,  where 
they  spent  the  evening  hours  of  their  lives  with  their  son, 
Archibald  Lowther,  at  Holbrook. 

At  one  time,  near  the  year  1797,  Mr.  Lowther  went  to 
Ohio  for  the  purpose  of  seeking  a  home,  and,  while  on  the 


'As  Uie  writer's  father  was  one  of  the  grandsons  who  frequently  read 
for  him,  she  has  been  able  to  correct  some  of  these  errors. 


THE   DISCOVERY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY  13 

Muskingum  river,  he  helped  to  rear  the  first  cabin  where  the 
City  of  Zanesville  now  stands,  but  owing  to  the  prevalence 
of  "fever  and  ague"  in  this  section,  he  returned  to  his  home 
satisfied  to  remain  at  West  Milford. 

Mrs.  Lowther  was  a  woman  of  a  devout  religious  char- 
acter, a  Presbyterian  in  faith,  and  her  old  Bible,  which  was 
her  daily  companion,  is  now  in  the  hands  of  the  writer.  It 
bears  the  date  of  "1790,"  and  is  still  held  together  by  the  old 
leather  string  that  she  ever  kept  about  it.  Mr.  Lowther  never 
made  a  profession  of  religion,  but  his  last  audible  words  were 
a  prayer,  a  most  earnest  appeal  to  the  Infinite  Father  of  love 
and  mercy.  She  passed  away  on  MayiJJi^^  1850,  and  he,  on 
November  36,  1857.  Both  lie  at  rest  in  the  Lowther  burying- 
ground,  near  Holbrook,  surrounded  by  the  dust  of  five  gen- 
erations of  their  descendants. 

They  v/ere  the  parents  of  twelve  children,  six  of  whom 
reached  the  years  of  maturity.  Five  of  them  married  and 
four  of  that  five  were  the  heads  of  pioneer  families  of  this 
county, 

Alexander,  the  eldest  son  (born  on  January  14,  1791), 
married  Miss  Sarah  Ireland,  and  was  the  pioneer  of  Oxford. 

Sudna  (born  on  April  10,  1793),  became  Mrs.  George  Wil- 
lard,  and  came  to  this  county  in  pioneer  days.  (See  Middle 
fork  chapter.) 

William  (born  on  October  31,  1793)  married  Miss  Meli- 
cent  Maxwell  and  settled  at  Cairo. 

Robert  (born  on  May  34,  1795)  settled  in  Jackson  county. 

Rebecca  (born  on  December  30,  1803)  died  in  1885,  unmar- 
ried. 

Archibald  (born  May  17,  1811,  the  youngest  of  the  family) 
married  Miss  Charlotte  Willard  and  lived  and  died  at  Hol- 
brook. 

Mary  (born  December  13,  1797),  Margaret  (born  Septem- 
ber 37,  1806),  Sarah  (born  September  3,  1800),  Elias  (born 
December  37,  1806),  Kathrine  (born  September  31,  1809),  all 
died  in  childhood;  and  Jesse  (born  September  31,  1805),  in 
youth. 

Robert,  the  one  member  of  the  family  (of  William  and 
Margaret  Morrison  Lowther)  that  did  not  come  to  this  coun- 


]4  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUXTY 

ty,  married  Miss  !\Iary  Hattabough,  a  nativ^e  of  Kent  county, 
Delaware"  who  was  born  on  November  'i,  1792.  The  marriage 
took  place  near  the  year  1809,  and  they  remained  in  Harrison 
count}'  until  some  time  in  the  thirties,  when  they  removed  to 
Jackson  county,  where  they  died,  and  where  many  of  their 
descendants  still  live.  He  was  a  lawyer  by  profession  and 
was  the  first  resident  barrister  of  Jackson  county.  He  helped 
to  survey  the  pretty  town  of  Riplev,  and  almost  beneath  its 
shadow  his  ashes  lie.  ]^Irs.  Lowther  died  on  July  1,  1851,  and 
he  followed  her  to  the  grave  on  April  22,  1856. 

Their  children  were  as  follows :  the  late  Andrew  H. 
Lowther  (1810-1863),  of  Wirt  county;  Harriet  (1817-1845), 
the  late  Mrs.  John  H.  Wetzel,  of  Ripley;  William  A\'irt 
(1820),  who  died  at  the  age  of  eighteen  years  while  attending 
college  in  Indiana;  Agnes  (B.  1822),  who  died  in  infancy; 
Minerva  (1823-1901),  the  late  ^Irs.  Joseph  Smith,  of  Ripley; 
Margaret  (1826-1899)  was  the  late  Mrs.  Henry  Harpold,  of 
Baltimore;  Mary  (1828-1899)  died  at  Baltimore,  unmarried, 
and  Edward  Duncan  (1828-1899),  who  died  at  Ripley,  unmar- 
ried. 

The  Morrisons. — ^largaret  ^Morrison  Lowther,  as  above 
stated,  was  a  native  of  Xorth  Carolina.  Her  father,  Archibald 
IMorrison,  and  his  brother,  who  were  of  Scotch-Irish  birth, 
emigrated  from  England  to  America  some  time  before  the 
Revolution,  and  settled  on  the  Yadkin  river,  in  Xorth  Caro- 
lina. Here  he  married  a  ]\Iiss  Fooks,  and  at  the  breaking 
out  of  the  Avar  in  1775,  when  he  enlisted  as  a  soldier  in  the 
Continental  army,  he  became  separated  from  his  brother,  and 
never  heard  of  him  again.  But  near  the  year  1788,  Archibald 
Morrison  removed  from  Xorth  Carolina  to  A\  est  Milford,  in 
Harrison  county,  and  here  he  and  his  wife  sleep. 

His  sons  were  Alexander,  John  and  AMlliam,  who  rest 
in 'Harrison  county,  where  some  of  their  descendants  live; 
Archibald,  junior,  lies  in  Ohio;  ]Marshall  Reese,  in  California. 
Margaret  Lowther,  and  Susan,  whose  married  name  is  un- 
known to  us,  were  two  of  the  daughtet-s. 

Alexander  married  Miss  Margaret  Brake  and  settled  on 
Hacker's  creek  in  1824.  He  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812  ; 
and   a   curiosit}'   in   the   form   of  a   briar-root  cane,  which   he 


THE   DISCOVERY   OF   RITCHIE-  COUNTY  15 

brought  from  Xorth  Carolina,  and  upon  which  he  carved  the 
head  and  face  of  a  man,  is  still  in  the  family. 

Alexander  Morrison's  son,  James  Monroe  Morrison,  was 
commissioned  Lieutenant-General  of  the  U.  S.  Militia  by 
President  Lincoln.  He  married  Miss  Sarah  Jane  Bennett, 
and  the}'  were  the  parents  of  the  Rev.  U.  W.  Morrison,  of 
the  A\'est  A'irgima  Methodist  Protestant  conference. 

Jesse  Lowther  (the  fourth  son  of  Col.  William)  was  born 
on  July  51,  1773,  six  weeks  after  the  arrival  of  the  family  in 
Harrison  county.  He  is  said  to  have  been  the  first  white  male 
child  born  on  Harrison  county  soil. 

Near  the  year  1790,  when  he  was  but  a  boy,  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Mary  Ragan,  a  rosy-cheeked  Dutch  girl,  who 
was  born  on  December  25,  1770,  and  settled  where  West  Mil- 
ford  now  stands.  Mrs.  Lowther  was  the  daughter  of  a  Revo- 
lutionary soldier,  and  the  sister  of  Mrs.  Alexander  Ireland, 
senior.  In  1797,  they  removed  from  West  Milford  to  the 
Ohio  river,  and  established  a  home  on  Neal's  Island,  four 
miles  below  Parkersburg,  but  they  returned  to  their  old  home 
at  West  Milford,  after  a  few  years,  where  he  died  in  October, 
1854.  After  his  death,  his  wife,  Mary,  came  to  this  county, 
and  spent  the  closing  years  of  her  life  with  her  daughter,  Mrs. 
William  Hall,  at  Pullman.  Here  she  fell  asleep,  in  April, 
1857,  and  in  the  Pullman  churchyard  she  lies  at  rest.  Her 
husband  sleeps  in  the  family  burying-ground  near  A\'est  ]\Iil- 
ford. 

The  writer  now  has  a  cane  which  was  once  the  property 
of  Jesse  Lowther,  and  one  which- he  presented  to  his  brother, 
William.  L^pon  this  piece  of  anticpiity  is  a  silver  plate  which 
bears  the  initials  of  his  nanie  "J.  L." 

The  children  of  this  family  were  eleven  in  number: 
William,  the  eldest  (born  in  1791),  married  his  cousin,  Mary 
or  Polly  Lowther,  and  settled  at  Oxford. 

Mary  Ann  was  the  wife  of  William  Hall,  an  early  settler 
of  the  Oxford  vicinity. 

Sallie  married  William  Norris,  and  resided  on  the  South 
fork  for  a  brief  time  in  pioneer  days,  then  removed  to  Gihiicr 
county. 


IC  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Margaret  married  William  L.  ]\Iitchell,  and  died  at  West 
Milford.  She  was  the  mother  of  Virginia,  the  late  wife  of 
William  I.  Lowther,  of  Pullman;  of  Margaret,  wife  of  Lewis 
Maxwell,  junior,  formerly  of  this  county,  but  now  of  Gilmer; 
of  Mrs.  Mary  Hickman  of  the  West;  of  AVilliam,  Cyrus,  Madi- 
son B.,  Robert,  and  Lafayette  Mitchell,  all  of  whom  have 
passed  on,  except  Robert  and  William. 

Jesse,  junior,  wdio  was  a  physician,  w^ent  West,  finally  to 
Little  Rock,  Arkansas,  where  he  died.    L'riah  died  in  youth. 

Dr.  Robert  married  Mrs.  Ellen  Stringer  Huffman,  and 
located  at  Weston,  and  from  there  migrated  to  Mississippi, 
wdiere  he  died  after  a  nine  days'  illness  of  fever.  His  wife 
soon  followed  him  to  the  grave  from  a  broken  heart,  and  the 
half-brother  brought  the  two  little  sons,  aged  four  and  six 
years,  back  to  their  grandfather,  Jesse,  near  the  year  1839. 
Daniel  was  educated  at  Lexington  and  West  Point,  and  after 
finishing  his  college  work,  came  to  Harrisville,  where  he 
opened  a  law  office,  and  where  he  died  a  few  months  later, 
in  1866.  William,  who  was  also  a  lawyer,  went  to  Texas, 
v.diere  he  met  his  death  at  the  hands  of  a  man  that  he  had 
decided  a  case  against.  Huffman,  who  was  a  colonel  in  the 
Confederate  army,  and  who  lost  a  leg  in  the  cause,  died  at 
Clarksburg,  unmarried. 

Sudna  married  Armstrong  Maxwell  and  lived  and  died 
at  AVest  Milford.  The  members  of  this  family  were :  Mari- 
anne, who  married  Jesse  Lowther  (but  we  can't  say  what 
number),  Mrs.  Millie  M.  (John)  Racey,  Mrs.  Anna  L.  (Wm.) 
Stephens,  Mrs.  Sudna  A.  Mitchell,  of  Gilmer  county ;  Mar- 
cellus  Maxwell,  of  Nelsonville,  Ohio:  and  Irwin  and  William, 
who  have  passed  on  ;  and  Miss  Julia  Maxwell,  of  West  Mil- 
ford. 

Elizabeth  Lowther  married  Conrad  Kester  and  died  in 
Lewis  county,  where  many  of  her  descendants  live. 

Drusilla  became  Mrs.  Bradbury  Morgan,  of  Zanesville, 
Ohio;  and  Millie  was  Mrs.  Daniel  Wyer,  of  W'oodsfield,  Ohio. 

Elias  Lowther,  who  was  born  on  Xeal's  Island,  in  1801, 
during  the  residence  of  the  family  there,  was  married  to  Miss 
Selina    McWhorter,    daughter    of    Thomas    McWhorter,    and 


THE   DISCOJ'F.RY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY  17 

Spent  his  last  hours  at  Palestine,  in   Wirt  county,  though  he 
resided  at  various  other  points  in  the  State. 

He  was  the  father  of  the  following-  named  children:  AIc- 
Duffy  and  Calhoun  (twins),  Thomas  A\'.,  Cammillius,  Elias 
H.,  John  M.,  who  was  killed  at  Elizabeth  during  the  Civil 
war;  Columbia  V.  (Mrs.  John  Edwards),  Mary  M.  (Mrs.  P. 
W.  Morgan,  of  Jackson  county),  all  of  whom  have  crossed 
the  tide ;  and  Jesse  and  Granville  S.,  of  Braxton  county ; 
Henry  M.,  of  Kentucky;  W.  H.  H.,  of  Parkersburg;  Mrs. 
Celina  J.  (Amos)  Lowther,  Wirt  county,  are  the  surviving 
members,  and  they  are  all  well  advanced  in  years.  .  Mrs.  J.  E. 
Burns,  of  Auburn,  belongs  to  this  family,  she  being  the 
daughter  of  Jesse,  and  granddaughter  of  Elias. 

Elias  Lowther  (the  fifth  and  youngest  son  of  Col. 
William)  came  upon  the  stage  during  the  din  of  the  American 
Revolution.  Pie  w^as  born  in  the  old  cabin,  shown  in  the 
picture,  on  September  16,  1776,  and  married  Miss  Rebecca 
Coburn,  sister  of  his  brother  Thomas'  wife,  and  remained  in 
his  native  county  until  1820,  when  he  came  to  this  county 
and  erected  the  first  cabin  on  the  Zimri  Flannagan  farm,  above 
Berea.  He  was  at  one  time  a  member  of  the  Richmond  Leg- 
islature from  Harrison  county,  and  was  major  in  the  militia. 
During  the  latter  part  of  his  life  he  lost  his  mind,  and  his  last 
years  were  spent  in  the  insane  hospital  at  Staunton,  V^irginia, 
where  he  was  laid  to  rest  near  the  year  1845. 

His  wife,  who  was  born  in  Harrison  county,  on  December 
11,  1779,  died  a  few  years  later  at  the  home  of  hei  son.  J.  C. 
Lowther,  at  the  mouth  of  Otterslide,  and  on  the  Flannagan 
homestead  she  lies  in  her  last  sleep. 

Their  children  were  as  follows : 

Peggy  died  in  youth  ;  Decatur  was  drowned  in  the  miil- 
pond  at  Berea. 

Jesse  M.  married  Miss  Lucinda  Hall,  daughter  of  William 
Hall,  and  spent  his  last  hours  near  Berea.     (See  HAll  family.) 

William  went  to  Ohio.  Sarah  was  Mrs.  George  Starkey, 
of  Harrison  county.  Elizabeth  married  Robert  Hammond 
and  went  to  Ohio.  Mary  was  the  wife  of  Thomas  Pritchard, 
of  Slab  creek.     (See  later  chapter.)     Dorinda  was  Mrs.  Zibba 


18  HISTORY   OF  RiTClUE   COUNTY 

Davis,  of  Otterslide  ;  and  Jonathan  C.  Lowther,  of  Berea,  the 
only  survivor  of  the  family,  is  the  young;est  son. 

He  is  now  (1910)  ninety-one  years  of  age,  and  is  as  active 
as  a  boy,  being  able  to  jump  up  and  crack  his  heels  together. 
He  enjoj^s  the  distinction  of  being  the  only  surviving  grand- 
son of  Col.  Lowther.     (See  Otterslide  for  his  family.) 

The  Hugheses. — The  Hugheses  are  of  Welsh  origin.  Fam- 
ily tradition  tells  us  that  they  crossed  the  deep  with  the  Low- 
thers  and  settled  in  Albemarle  county,  Virginia;  and  that 
Thomas  Hughes  removed  from  there  to  the  South  branch  of 
the  Potomac  river,  in  what  is  now  Hardy  count}',  and  from 
thence  to  Harrison  county,  near  the  year  ITT'3  or  1773,  where 
he  found  a  home  on  Hacker.'s  creek.  One  day  during  the  latter 
part  of  April,  1778,  while  at  work  in  the  field,  he  and  Jonathan 
Lowther  were  shot  down  by  the  stealthy  foe.  The  others  who 
were  with  them  managed  in  some  way  to  escape  injury. 

Thomas  flughes  was  the  father  of  quite  a  family  of 
children,  among  whom  were  Jesse,  Thomas,  junior.  Elias, 
Job,  James,  Charles,  Sudna,  Martha,  and  another  daughter, 
who  married  Joseph  Bibbee,  of  Jackson  county. 

Job  LIughes  married  Miss  Mary  Harn,  of  Harrison  coun- 
ty, in  1791,  and  later  removed  to  Jackson  county,  where  he 
rests. 

Thomas,  junior,  who  was  born  in  1754,  was  lieutenant 
of  a  company  of  Indian  spies,  at  one  time.  He  settled  on  the 
West  Fork  river,  in  Harrison  county,  in  1775,  but  afterwards 
removed  to  Jackson  county,  where  he  died  in  October,  18:37. 
He  had  one  son,  Thomas,  and  here  our  knowledge  ends, 
though  there  are  doubtless  many  of  his  descendants  in  that 
part  of  the  State  to-day. 

Of  the  history  of  James  and  Charles  we  know  nothing, 
other  than  that  they  figured  in  Indian  warfare,  and  James 
was  among  the  pai-ty  that  encountered  the  savages  at  the 
time  that  Macfarlan  and  Dutchman  got  their  names. 

Sudna  was  the  wife  of  Col.  William  Lowther. 

Martha  married  Samuel  Bonnett,  and  \hox\  and  died  on 
Hacker's  creek,  in  what  is  now  Lewis  county.  Her  sons  were 
Lewis,  the  Rev.  Henry  Bonnett,  of  the  Methodist  Protestant 
church,  and  Elias  Bonnett ;  and  one  daughter,  Susan,  married 


THE  DISCOVERY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY  19 

a  Wagner;  another,  a  Hinzman. 

Lewis  Bonnett  was  married  to  Miss  Margaret  Means, 
daughter  of  Robert  Means  (and  aunt  of  Robert  Means,  of  Cal- 
houn county),  and  they  were  the  parents  of  Henry  Bonnett, 
of  Troy,  and  the  grandparents  of  U.  G.  Bonnett,  of  Burnt 
House. 

Jesse  Hughes,  the  eldest  son,  whose  history  is  of  more 
moment  to  us,  was  born  in  the  "Old  Dominion,"  in  1T50,  and 
in  early  life,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Grace  Tanner,  sister  of 
one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Roane  county,  and  near  the 
year  1773,  he  came  to  Hacker's  creek  in  Harrison  county. 

Two  years  after  the  discovery  of  the  river  that  bears  his 
name,  we  find  him  engaged  in  the  awful  struggle  at  Point 
Pleasant,  but  little  else  of  value  concerning  his  life  is  in  our 
possession  other  than  that  he  was  a  confirmed  Indian  hater, 
an  intrepid  leader,  and  a  prominent  border  scout. 

He  resided  near  Jane  Lew%  in  Lewis  county,  at  one  time 
on  the  small  stream  that  still  bears  liis  name,  "Jesse's  run," 
and  in  a  rural  burying-ground  in  this  section,  strangers  have 
been  pointed  to  a  low  mound  which  is  said  to  cover  his  silent 
dust,  but  this  is  in  error.  He  died  at  the  home  of  his  son-in- 
law,  George  Hanshaw,  at  Ravenswood,  in  Jackson  county, 
during  the  autumn  of  1839,  and  near  this  town  he  lies  in  his 
last  sleep.  After  his  death,  Mrs.  Hughes  made  her  home  with 
her  daughter,  Mrs.  Uriah  Gandee,  in  Roane  county,  until  her 
death,  and  in  the  Gandeeville  cemetery,  she  reposes. 

They  were  the  parents  of  two  sons  and  seven  daughters; 
viz.,  Jesse,  junior,  William,  Rachel  (Mrs.  William  Cottrell), 
Martha  (Mrs.  Jacob  Bonnett),  Sudna  (Mrs.  Elijah  Runner), 
Elizabeth  (Mrs.  James  Stanley),  Lucinda  (Mrs.  Uriah  Sayre), 
Nancy  (Mrs.  George  Hanshaw),  and  Massie,  who  married 
Uriah  Gandee,  the  founder  of  Gandeeville,  in  Roane  county, 
Mrs.  Gandee  was  the  last  survivor  of  Jesse  Hughes'  family. 
She  died  in  1883  at  the  age  of  one  hundred  four  years,  and 
was  laid  in  the  Gandeeville  cemetery  by  the  side  of  her  mother. 
James  S.  Gandee,  of  Higby,  Roane  county,  her  son,  still  sur- 
vives ;  and  the  Hon.  Frederick  Gandee,  of  that  county,  is  her 
grandson. 

One  of  these  daughters  was  captured  by  the  Lidians,  but 


90  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

was  rescued  the  following  year  and  lived  to  a  good  old  age, 
but  we  cannot  say  which  one. 

Jesse  Hughes'  name  was  ever  associated  with  that  of 
courage  and  daring,  and  he  "lived  many  years  to  enjoy  the 
peace  and  quietude  that  the  hardships  of  his  early  life  had  so 
dearly  bought."  And  the  beautiful  nver  that  bears  his  name 
is  a  more  fitting  memorial  than  bronze  or  marble. 

Ellas  Hughes  was  born  on  the  South  Branch  of  the  Poto- 
mac river,  in  what  is  now  Hardy  count}^  West  Virginia,  in 
1757,  and  with  his  parents  and  the  rest  of  the  family,  removed 
to  Harrison  county  in  the  early  seventies. 

He,  too,  served  under  the  command  of  General  Lewis  at 
the  battle  of  Point  Pleasant  and  was  one  of  the  last  survivors' 
of  this  desperate  conflict. 

PTe  had  been  born  and  reared  in  the  midst  of  savage  war- 
fare, and  his  father  and  a  young  lady  whom  he  ardently  ad- 
mired having  been  killed  by  the  ruthless  hand  of  the  dusky 
foe,  he  vowed  vengeance  on  the  race,  and  the  return  to  peace 
did  not  serve  to  mitigate  his  intense  hatred. 

In  1797,  tw^o  years  after  General  Wayne's  treaty  with  the 
Indians,  leaving  his  native  hills  (with  one  John  Radcliffe), 
he  went  to  Ohio  and  settled  on  the  Muskingum  river,  and 
during  the  following  year,  removed  to  the  Licking  river  and 
became  the  first  settler  in  what  is  now  Licking  county ;  the 
scene  of  this  settlement  being  in  some  old  Indian  cornfields, 
near  five  miles  below^  the  present  site  of  Newark,  Ohio. 

"One  night  in  April,  1800,  not  long  after  his  arrival  here, 
two  Indians  stole  his  and  Radclifife's  horses  from  a  small  in- 
closure  near  their  cabins  and  succeeded  in  getting  aw^ay  with 
them  unobserved."  But  finding  them  missing  in  the  morning, 
they,  well-armed,  and  accompanied  by  a  man  by  the  name  of 
Bland,  set  out  in  pursuit,  following  their  trail  in  a  northerly 
direction  all  day  and  camping  in  the  forest  at  night :  but  at 
the  dawn  of  the  next  day,  they  came  upon  them  fast  asleep 
and  all  unconscious  of  danger.     Concealing  themselves  behind 


'Though  Elias  Hughes  has  been  repeatedly  recognized  as  the  last  sur- 
vivor of  this  battle  (at  Point  Pleasant),  Samuel"  Bonnifield.  of  Tucker 
county,  is  entitled  to  this  distinction,  as  he  died  in  1847,  at  the  .ige  of 
ninety-six  years.  The  house  which  he  occupied  from  1824-1847  still  stands. 
He  was  four  times  sheriff  of  Randolph  county.  To  Hon.  Hu  Maxwell,  who 
recently  visited  his  grave,  we  are  indebted  for  this  information. 


THE  DISCOVERY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY  21 

some  trees,  they  waited  until  the  Indians  had  awakened  and 
were  making  preparations  for  their  departure,  when  they 
drew  their  rifles  to  fire  upon  them;  and  just  at  that  moment 
one  of  them,  instinctively  clapping  his  hands  upon  his  breast, 
as  if  to  ward  ofT  the  fatal  ball,  exclaimed  in  tones  of  dismay, 
"Me  bad  Indian!  me  no  do  so  more!"  But  the  appeal  was 
all  in  vain.  "The  smoke  curled  from  the  glistening  barrels, 
the  report  rang  out  upon  the  morniiig  air,  and  the  poor  In- 
dians fell  dead !"  Recovering  their  horses  and  securing  what 
plunder  the  savages  had,  they  returned  to  their  homes,  swear- 
ing: mutual  secrecv  for  this  violation  of  the  treatv  laws. 

But  one  evening  some  time  afterwards,  when  Hughes  vv^as 
sitting  quietly  in  his  cabin,  he  was  startled  by  the  entrance 
of  two  powerful  and  well-armed  savages.  Concealing  his 
emotion,  he  bade  them  welcome  and  profifered  them  seats. 
His  wife,  a  large  muscular  woman,  stepping  aside,  privately 
sent  for  Radclitfe,  whose  cabin  was  near  by ;  and  presently 
Radclifife,  who  had  made  a  detour,  entered  with  his  rifle  from 
an  opposite  direction,  as  if  he  had  been  out  hunting,  and 
found  Hughes  talking  with  his  visitors  about  the  murder 
with  his  scalping-knife  and  tomahawk  in  his  belt,  and  his 
rifle,  which  he  deemed  imprudent  to  try  to  obtain,  hanging 
fron:  the  cabin  wall.  There  all  night  long  sat  the  little  party, 
mutually  fearing  each  other,  but  neither  being  able  to  sum- 
mon sufficient  courage  to  stir ;  but  when  the  morning  dawned 
the  savages  withdrew,  shaking  hands  and  bidding  adieu  to 
their  rehictant  hosts,  using  every  precaution  in  their  retreat 
lest  they  should  be  shot  by  the  daring  borderer- 

Elias  Hughes  was  captain  of  a  band  of  scouts  in  Indian 
times,  and  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812.  He  married  Miss 
Jane  Sleeth,  who,  doubtless,  belonged  to  the  same  family  of 
Sleeths  who  have  a  place  in  the  Smithville  chapter,  and  they 
were  the  parents  of  sixteen  children.  Mrs.  Hughes  died  in 
1827,  and  he  passed  away  near  Utica,  Ohio,  on  December  22, 
1844,  in  the  hope  of  a  "glorious  immortality."  Military 
honors  and  other  demonstrations  of  respect  were  in  evidence 
at  his  funeral,  and  near  Utica  he  lies  at  rest. 


'This  story  is  gleaned  from  Howe's  History  of  Ohio. 


23  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Two  of  iiis  children  died  in  youth  and  the  rest  are  as  fol- 
lows :  Mrs.  Margaret  Jones,  Mrs.  Mary  Foster,  Mrs.  Susana 
Leach,  Mrs.  Sndna  Martin,  Mrs.  Jane  Hight,  Mrs.  Sarah 
Davis  and  Kathrine,  who  never  married,  were  the  daughters ; 
and  Job,  Thomas,  Henry,  Elias,  David,  John  and  Jonathan 
Hughes  were  the  sons. 

Note. — While  our  resources  for  this  chapter  have  been 
principally  traditional,  parts  of  it  are  already  a  matter  of  his- 
tory, as  the  account  of  the  "Explorations  of  the  Streams"  is 
to  be  found  in  "Hardesty's  Historical  and  Geographical  En- 
clycopedia  of  the  Virginias,"  and  other  parts  in  the  "Border 
Warfare"  and  the  "History  of  Ohio,"  as  mentioned  in  the 
foot  notes. 

To  Josiah  Hughes,  of  Roane  county ;  Henry  Bonnett,  of 
Troy,  and  L.  V.  McWhorter,  the  historian  of  North  Yakima, 
Washington,  we  owe  our  thanks  for  valuable  Hughes  data. 


CHAPTER  II 


First  Settlers  in  Ritchie  County 

ORE  than  a  quarter  of  a  century  had  passed 
away  after  the  discovery  of  Ritchie  county 
before  the  coming  of  the  first  settlers. 

Til  is  period  had  been  marked  by  one  of 
the  most  important  epochs  in  the  history 
of  our  country.  The  "Old  Independence 
Bell  had  proclaimed  liberty  throughout  the 
land  to  the  inhabitants  thereof ;"  the  tyrannous  scepter  of 
George  the  III  had  been  withdrawn;  and  the  "White  Dove  of 
Peace"  had  spread  her  downiy  wings  "o'er  a  land  of  the  free 
and  a  home  of  the  brave." 

A  new  era  had  dawned.  Civilization  had  taken  up  a 
westward  line  of  march,  and  near  the  close  of  the  18th  cen- 
tury, Ritchie  county  was  brought  into  notice  b_y  the  con- 
struction of  a  State  road  from  Clarksburg  to  Marietta,  which, 
for  near  forty  years,  was  a  leading  thoroughfare  between  the 
East  and  the  West ;  and  along  this  road  the  pioneers  erected 
their  cabins,  which  served  as  "inns  or  taverns"  for  the  con- 
venience of  travelers. 

The  first  one  of  these  cabins  that  came  within  rhe  present 
boundary  of  Ritchie  county  was  built  by  John  Bunnell,  near 
the  beginning  of  the  year  1800,  on  the  site  that  is  now  marked 
by  the  thriving  town  of  Pennsboro.  Hence  the  origin  of  the 
name  of  the  stream  near  by,  "Bunnell's  run,"  which  serves 
as  an  enduring  memorial,  although  we  have  been  unable  to 
learn  "from  whence  he  came  or  Avhither  he  went." 

Mr.  Bunnell  sold  his  possessions  here  to  John  W^ebster. 
of  New  England,  who,  early  in  the  nineteenth  century,  built 
the  "Stone  house"  at  the  western  end  of  Pennsboro,  which 
became  the  property  of  James  Martin,  in  1815,  and  remained 
in  the  hands  of  his  heirs  until  the  autumn  of  1908,  when  it 
was  purchased  by  A.  J.  Ireland. 


24 


HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 


j\Ir.  Webster  went  to  Texas  and  there  met  his  deatli  at 
the  hands  of  the  Indians. 

Though  the  "tenement  house"  of  the  buikler  has  long 
since  been  silent  dust,  this  historic  old  mansion  has  withstood 
the  storms  of  a  century,  and  still  stands,  in  good  preservation, 
as  a  monument  to  his  memory. 


The    Stone    House    as    it    appears    today. 

George  Husher,  whose  settlement  closely  followed  that 
of  Bunnell,  was  the  next  settler  in  Ritchie  county,  but  his  his- 
tory will  be  found  in  the  Bond's  creek  chapter: 

Lawrence  Maley. — During  the  early  springtime  of  the 
year  1803,  Lawrence  Alaley,  a  Scotch-Irish  Presbyterian,  built 
the  first  cabin  in  what  is  now  Union  district,  one  mile  east 
of  Harrisville,  on  the  farm  that  is  designated  as  the  "Cannon," 
but  better  known  to  the  older  citizens,  as  the  Airs.  Ann  Har- 
ris homestead. 

Having  a  wife  and  eight  children,  the  eldest,  a  son. 
twenty-one  years  of  age,  and  finding  it  necessary  to  clear  a 
cornfield  at  once,  he  built  a  rude  shelter,  by  driving  stakes 
in  the  ground,  and  peeling  popular  bark  for  a  roof,  upon  the 
bank  of  the  river  nearly  opposite  the  residence  of  Grandison 
Wolfe,  which  served  for  a  dwelling  until  the  corn  had  been 
planted,  when  he  erected  a  better  one.  near  the  present  site 
of  the  Cannon  residence. 

PTis  nearest  neighbor  was  then  at  Pennsboro.  but  others 


FIRST  SETTLERS  IN  RITCHIE  COUNTY  25 

soon  found  -their  way  into  this  wilderness,  and  a  settlement 
was  formed,  which,  for  forty  years,  was  known  as  the  "Maley 
settlement." 

Mr.  Maley  was  the  paternal  grandfather  of  Ritchie  coun- 
ty's most  distinguished  son,  the  late  General  T.  M.  Harris, 
and  he  was  a  native  of  Southern  Ireland,  the  son  of  an  Irish 
nobleman. 

He,  being  one  of  the  younger  sons  of  the  family,  was 
committed  to  the  care  of  his  mother's  brother,  a  Catholic 
priest,  to  be  trained,  perhaps,  for  the  priesthood ;  and  finding 
life  very  tmpleasant  under  such  circumstances,  he  ran  away 
and  came  to  America,  near  the  close  of  the  Revolutionary  war. 

Landing  in  Philadelphia,  he  drifted  into  the  country  near 
by,  where  he  became  associated  with  a  family  of  Seceders  by 
the  name  of  Harper  (The  Seceders  were  one  of  a  numerous 
body  of  Presbyterians  who  seceded  from  the  communion  of 
the  established  church  in  Scotland  in  1733),  an  association 
which  resulted  in  his  marriage  to  Miss  Agnes  Harper,  a  little 
later. 

Mrs.  Maley  inherited  a  small  dowry  from  her  father's 
estate,  which  she  exchanged  with  a  man  in  Philadelphia,  for 
a  thousand  acres  in  v^^hat  is  now  the  Harrisville  vicinity,  in 
1795 ;  and  she  and  her  husband,  with  their  family  and  posses- 
sions, started  at  once  to  take  charge  of  this  new  acquisition : 
but  when  they  reached  Harper's  Ferry,  after  a  long  and 
perilous  journey  over  the  mountains,  learning  of  the  hostility 
of  the  Indians  in  this  section,  they  changed  their  course,  and 
went  to  the  Shenandoah  valley,  where  they  remained,  in  Rock- 
bridge county,  until  they  came  to  Ritchie,  in  1803. 

Mr.  Maley  did  not  long  survive  the  hardships  of  this 
wilderness  life,  and  in  1808,  he  filled  the  first  grave  that  was 
"hollowed  out"  in  the  old  "Pioneer  cemetery,"  on  the  Cannon 
farm,  one  mile  northeast  of  Harrisville.  His  wife  rests  by  his 
side. 

Their  children  were  as  follows : 

William,  Thomas  and  Mrs.  Mary  McCoy,  all  of  Illinois; 
Dr.  Samuel,  James  and  John,  of  Iowa;  Mrs.  Agnes  (John) 
Harris  and  Miss  Margaret  Maley,  who  lie  sleeping  in  the  Irlar- 
risville  cemetery. 


26  HISTORY   or   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

Mrs.  Harris,  widow  of  the  late  General  Harris,  is  a  grand- 
daughter of  this  distinguished  settler. 

The  Stuarts  and  Wilkinsons. — The  next  pioneers  in  this 
vicinity  were  George  and  Joseph  Stuart,  two  brothers,  and 
Joseph  Wilkinson,  son-in-law  of  the  latter,  who,  with  their 
families,  came  from  Harrison  county,  in  1805. 

Mr.  Wilkinson  settled  on  the  late  Isaiah  Wells  homestead, 
Joseph  Stuart,  at  the  mouth  of  Stuart's  run,  and  George 
Stuart,  on  the  farm  that  soon  after  passed  into  the  hands  of 
Thomas  Harris,  and  on  which  the  beautiful  town  of  Harris- 
ville  now  stands. 

Mr.  Wilkinson  only  survived  a  few  years  after  his  settle- 
ment, and  his  remains  filled  the  second  grave  that  was  made 
in  the  "Pioneer  cemetery."  He  married  Miss  Xancy  Stuart, 
daughter  of  Joseph,  and  was  the  father  of  three  children : 
Elizabeth,  the  only  daughter,  died  in  youth,  and  the  two  sons, 
Calvin  and  Ezekiel,  went  to  California. 

After  his  death.  ]\Irs.  Wilkinson  married  Nicholas 
Shrader,  and  in  the  Indian  creek  Baptist  churchyard,  she 
sleeps. 

Joseph  Stuart  married  Miss  Margaret  Sparks,  of  Harrison 
county,  and  was  the  father  of  ten  children.  He  lost  his  life 
by  the  falling  of  a  lumber  kiln,  while  erecting  the  first  store 
house  at  Harrisville,  and  he,  too,  rests  in  the  "Pioneer  ceme- 
tery" there.  After  his  death,  the  family,  losing  their  land  in 
this  section,  removed  to  Goose  creek. 

His  children  were  as  follows : 

Mrs.  Nancy  Wilkinson  Shrader,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Abel) 
Sinnett,  Mrs.  Margaret  (Thomas)  Stout,  and  Belinda  and 
Rachel,  who  died  unmarried;  and  Stephen,  John,  George, 
Joseph  and  William  Stuart,  all  of  Ritchie  county,  except 
Stephen  and  John,  who  went  West. 

Among  the  grandchilldren  of  this  pioneer  who  are  resi- 
dents of  the  coimty  at  this  time,  are  Mrs.  Lawson  Hall,  Au- 
burn ;  Mrs.  Lewis  Hammer  and  Mrs.  Belinda  Hill,  Washburn, 
and  perhaps  numerous  others. 

George  Stuart  married  Miss  Hannah  Plarris,  daughter  of 
Thomas  Harris,  and  in  the  Harrisville  vicinity  they  both  died. 

We  have  been  unable  to  get  a  list  of  the  names  of  their 


FIRST  SETTLERS  JN  RITCHIE  COUNTY  27 

children,  but  Mrs.  Hannah  Jones  and  Mrs.  Sarah  Calhoun,  of 
Oxford,  are  some  of  their  descendants. 

Levi  Wells. — Shortly  after  the  coming  of  the  Stuarts, 
Ashabel  Wilkinson  made  the  first  settlement  on  the  Dr. 
William  M.  Rymer  estate ;  and  this  same  year,  1805,  brought 
Levi  Wells  with  his  wife,  three  sons  and  two  daughters,  from 
Fayette  county,  Pennsylvania,  to  the  late  George  Sinnett 
homestead.  Soon  after  his  arrival,  the  first  marriage  took 
place  in  the  settlement,  when  his  daughter,  Nancy,  became 
the  wife  of  William  Maley. 

In  1815,  Mr.  Wells  changed  his  place  of  residence  to  the 
Pennsboro  vicinity,  and  Patrick  Sinnett  became  the  second 
owner  of  this  farm,  which  is  still  in  the  hands  of  his  heirs, 
it  being  the  home  of  his  granddaughter.  Miss  Virginia  Sinnett. 

Mr.  Wells  later  removed  to  the  Kanawha  river,  and  from 
him  the  Elizabeth  W^ellses  are  descended. 

The  Sinnetts. — Patrick  Sinnett,  with  his  large  family, 
came  from  Pendleton  county,  (West)  Virginia.  He  was  a 
'typical  son  of  "Old  Erin,"  having  been  born  there  near  the 
middle  of  the  eighteenth  century.  He  had  been  one  of  the 
King's  waiters  for  seven  years  before  coming  to  America  in 
his  young  manhood ;  and  finding  such  service  very  distaste- 
ful, he  one  day  wandered  down  to  the  habor  just  as  a  vessel 
was  ready  to  set  sail  for  the  Colonies,  and  without  further 
deliberation,  stepped  on  board  and  turned  his  face  toward  the 
Occident.  When  he  landed  on  these  shores,  he  found  himself 
penniless  in  a  land  of  strangers,  and  was  sold  for  his  fare,  and 
was  compelled  to  work  for  three  years  to  cancel  the  debt,  so 
unjust  were  the  laws,  and  so  unmerciful  were  the  executors, 
at  that  age  of  the  world. 

He  served  as  a  soldier  in  Lord  Dunmore's  war,  being 
under  the  direct  command  of  General  Lewis  at  the  battle  of 
Point  Pleasant ;  and  he  also  served  as  an  American  soldier 
in  the  Revolutionary  war,  which  closely  followed. 

He  married  Miss  Kathrine  Hefner,  a  German  lady,  and 
was  the  father  of  eleven  children.  He  died  at  the  great  age 
of  one  hundred  five  years,  some  time  in  the  fifties,  at  the 
home  of  his   daughter,   Mrs.   Adam    Cunningham,   junior,  on 


28  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

the  farm  that  is  now   the  estate  of  the  late   Charles   Aloyer, 
and  here,  beside  his  wife,  he  sleeps. 

His  descendants  in  this  county  are  a  host,  and,  like  he, 
many  of  them  are  remarkable  for  their  longevity. 

His  children  were  all  born  in  Pendleton  county,  and  were 
as  follows:  John,  William,  Seth,  Abel,  Henry,  Jacob,  George, 
Elizabeth,  Sarah,  Kathrine  and  Phebe. 

William  and  Seth  went  to  Ohio;  Henry  remained  in  Pen- 
dleton county ;  and  the  rest  all  came  to  this  county ;  but  Kath- 
rine and  Phebe  both  married  Chancellors  and  afterwards 
went  West;  Elizabeth  became  Mrs.  James  Drake,  and  Sarah, 
Mrs.  Adam  Cunningham,  junior,  and  they  with  their  brothers, 
John,  Abel,  Jacob  and  George,  were  all  the  heads  of  well 
known  pioneer  families  of  this  county;  but  their  histories  will 
be  found  in  other  parts  of  this  work,  all  wdth  the  exception  of 
George,  who  succeeded  his  father  on  the  old  homestead. 

George  Sinnett  was  born  in  Pendleton  county,  on  March 
Vi,  1799,  and  with  his  parents  came  to  this  county  in  1815  ; 
and,  near  five  years  later,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  Rex- 
road,  daughter  of  Plenry  Rexroad,  and  on  the  old  homestead, 
where  he  died  in  1896,  at  the  great  age  of  ninety-seven  years, 
he  spent  his  entire  life. 

■  Having  given  birth  to  six  children,  his  w^ife,  ]\Iary,  passed 
away,  and  in  1813,  he  was  again  married  to  Miss  Salome 
Heaton,  daughter  of  John  Heaton,  senior,  who  was  born  in 
1814;  and  three  daughters  were  the  result  of  this  union;  viz., 
Harriet  C,  Virginia  and  Josephine.  Harriet  is  the  wife  of 
Sheriff  John  Hulderman,  and  Josephine  is  Mrs.  '"Nel"  ^Ic- 
Dougal,  and  Virginia  is  single. 

The  children  of  the  first  marriage  were: 

Catherine  (born  in  1832),  who  married  Addison  Rexroad; 
Samuel  (born  in  1824),  of  King  Knob,  Hulda  (born  in  1826), 
who  became  the  wife  of  John  S.  Porter  and  went  to  some 
other  State;  Abel  (born  in  1828),  who  went  to  Ohio;  Eliza- 
beth (born  in  1830)  married  John  A  Lowther,  of  Oxford,  and 
after  his  death,  she  became  ]Mrs.  Jacob  Allender.  She  still 
survives.  Mary  T.  (born  in  1832)  became  ]Mrs.  Turner  and 
went  to  Taylor  county. 

William    Cunningham. — The   year    1806   was   marked   by 


FIRST  SETTLERS  IN  RITCHIE  COUNTY  29 

the  coming  of  William  Cunningham,  with  his  wife,  Susana 
Barbara  Handyshel  Cunningham,  and  their  ten  children,  from 
Culpepper  county,  Virginia,  to  the  homestead  of  the  late  Noah 
Rexroad,  now  the  property  of  E.  C.  Fox  and  S.  M.  HofT. 

Mr.  Cunningham  was  one  of  the  most  noted  pioneers  of 
early  days.  He  was  born  in  Ireland  on  July  23,  1764,  and 
when  he  was  but  a  small  boy,  his  parents  emigrated  to  Amer- 
ica and  settled  in  Culpepper  county,  Virginia.  He  was  a  first 
cousin  of  Thomas  Cunningham  of  Indian  fame,  and  their 
fathers  are  said  to  have  crossed  the  ocean  at  the  same  time. 
He  served  as  a  soldier  during  the  latter  part  of  the  American 
Revolution,  being  then  but  a  mere  youth,  and  was  a  member 
of  the  victorious  army  at  Yorktown,  and  a  witness  of  the  sur- 
render of  Lord  Cornwallis.  And  in  honor  of  this  defeated 
chieftain  he  named  the  town  of  Cornwallis,  where  he  resided 
when  the  stations  along  the  Baltimore  &  Ohio  railroad  were 
located.. 

When  Harrisville  was  laid  out  for  a  town  in  1823,  he  was 
suddenly  sei/ced  with  the  idea  of  founding  a  town  of  his  own, 
and  forthwith  proceeded  to  have  one  laid  out  on  the  ridge 
where  A.  O.  Wilson  and  D.  B.  Patton  now  reside,  which  he 
named  "Williamsburg;"  but  Harrisville  has  long  since  swal- 
lowed up  this  proposed  village. 

He  changed  his  place  of  residence  to  Cornwallis  near  the 
year  1840,  and  here  he  bade  adieu  to  earth  in  1863,  at  the  ripe 
old  age  of  ninety-nine  3^ears. 

He  gave  the  grounds  for  the  Pioneer  cemetery  at  Harris- 
ville, and  within  its  peaceful  bosom  his  ashes  lie.  Plis  wife 
also  sleeps  here,  she  having  passed  on  in  1843.  (She  was  of 
German  descent.) 

This  burying-ground  is  no  longer  "a  neglected  spot,"  as 
the  historian  of  a  quarter  of  a  century  ago  termed  it,  but  it  is 
now  enclosed  by  an  iron  fence,  the  result  of  the  late  General 
Harris'  labor  of  love. 

Many  of  the  pioneers  slumber  here?  and  despite  the  hard- 
ships they  endured,  the  inscriptions  bear  silent  testimony  to 
the  longevity  of  their  lives. 

AVilliam  Cunningham's  sons  were:  Elijah.  James, 
William,  junior,  John,   Isaac  and  Henry;  and  his  daughters 


30  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Mrs.  Phebe  (Jesse )  Lowther.  Cornwallis  ;  Mrs.  Leah  (Jacob) 
Wigner,  Ellenboro ;  Mrs.  Lydia  (Henry)  Wigner,  Cairo;  Mrs. 
Susan  (Robert)  Parks,  Ohio;  and  Mrs.  Barbara  (Nathaniel) 
Parks,  Ellenboro.  Mrs.  George  B.  Johnson,  of  Ellenboro,  is 
a  daughter  of  the  last  named  Mrs.  Parks. 

A\'.  H.  Cunningham,  of  Husher's  run ;  the  late  D.  R. 
Wigner,  of  Pike,  and  Mrs.  Matilda  McGregor,  of  Cairo,  are 
other  grandchildren  of  this  pioneer;  and  the  late  Mrs.  W.  E. 
Hill,  of  Harrisville ;  J.  W.  and  Erank  Elliott,  of  Indian  creek ; 
Thomas  Elliott,  of  Pullman ;  Mrs.  James  Rexroad,  of  Den 
run,  and  many  others  we  might  mention,  are  great-grand- 
children. 

William  Wells  was  the  first  settler  at  the  mouth  of  Bun- 
nell's run.  He  was  a  brother  of  Levi  Wells,  and  he  came 
from'  Fayette  county,  Pennsylvania,  in  1808,  and  took  up  his 
residence  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  Mrs.  Bertha 
McDougal,  and  to  the  day  of  his  death,  his  interests  were 
identified  with  this  community. 

The  Wellses  came  from  Wales  to  the  Keystone  State, 
near  the  middle  of  the  eighteenth  century,  and  took  up  arms 
in  defense  of  their  adopted  country  in  her  struggle  for  inde- 
pendence. 

William  Wells  was  born  in  1766,  and  married  ]\liss  Eliza- 
beth Trump,  who  was  of  Dutch  descent,  and  they  were  the 
parents  of  one  son  and  four  daughters ;  Isaiah  Wells, ^  Rachel, 
Hester,  Mar}-  and  Eleanor. 

Rachel  married  Daniel  Smith ;  Hester,  John  lieaton ; 
Mary,  James  McCown,  and  Eleanor  died  single. 

Mrs.  Wells  died  in  1850,  at  the  age  of  eighty-seven  years ; 
and  Mr.  AVells,  in  1851,  at  the  age  of  eighty-five  years.  Both 
rest  in  the  Harrisville  cemetery. 

Mr.  Wells  was  the  owner  of  the  first  mill  on  Bunnell's 
run,  and  one  of  the  first  in  the  county,  but  he  sold  this  mill  at 
an  earl}^  day  to  John  AA'hitney.  who  turned  it  into  a  horse-mih, 
and,  in  1840,  tore  it  down. 

The  Heatons. — This  same  year  (1808)  brought  John 
Heaton,   senior,   from    the    ]\Iotherland   to   this    vicinitv.      He 


U"or  the  family  of  Isaiah  Wells  see  chapter  on  Mills. 


FIRST  SETTLERS  LY  RITCHIE  COUNTY  31 

was  born  in  sunny  England,  on  April  28,  1774,  and  not  long 
after  his  arrival  here,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Hester  Wells, 
daughter  of  William  Wells,  and  took  up  his  residence  on  the 
late  Dr.  W.  M.  Rymer  farm,  he  being  the  second  owner. 

He  died  on  September  33,  1854,  and  Mrs.  Heaton,  on 
February  13,  1859,  at  the  age  of  sixty-nine  one-half  years. 

Their  family  consisted  of  three  sons  and  seven  daughters ; 
viz.,  John,  Eli,  A\'illiam,  Selvina.  Elizabeth,  Jane,  Sarah, 
Salina,  Mary  and  Anne.  The  last  two  named  died  in  child- 
hood, and  nearly  or  quite  all  of  the  rest  have  now  passed  to 
the  other  side. 

W^illiam  died  in  the  West;  Selvina  married  Amos  Gulp; 
Elizabeth,  William  Wells  ;  and  Jane  became  Mrs.  Mussetter. 
and  they,  too,  all  went  West;  Sarah  married  George  Martin 
and  died  in  Gilmer  county,  and  years  after,  when  her  remains 
were  disinterred  for  removal  to  Harrisville,  they  were  found 
to  be  petrified,  coffin  and  all.  Salina  married  George  Sinnett, 
and  lived  and  died  at  Harrisville. 

John  and  Eli  Heaton,  who  were  prominent  figures  in 
public  afifairs,  spent  their  entire  lives  aL  Harrisville. 

John  Heaton,  junior,  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife 
being  Aliss  Susana  Wigner,  and  his  second.  Miss  Sarah 
Stevens.  All  died  at  Harrisville,  and  here  they  repose  in  the 
cemetery  south  of  town. 

Mr.  Heaton  was  the  father  of  seven  children  :  Alcinda, 
the  one  child  of  the  first  union,  became  Mrs.  Henry  Gulp,  and 
went  West. 

Mrs.  Dora  (J.  H.)  Lininger,  Mrs.  Lillie  (J.  M.)  Barbe, 
Mrs.  Nerdie  (Ghas.)  Musgrave,  the  late  John  Heaton  (the 
third),  W^ill  R.,  and  one  who  died  in  infancy,  were  the  children 
of  the  second  union. 

Will  R.  is  a  well  known  newspaper  man,  he  having  long 
been  identified  with  the  Harrisville  papers. 

Eli  Heaton's  stay  on  earth  was  very  brief ;  he  died  sud- 
denly on  January  25,  1868,  at  the  age  of  forty-two  years,  while 
serving  as  sheriff  of  the  county.  Elis  brother,  John,  succeeded 
him  in  this  office  and  finished  his  unexpired  term. 

He  married  Mrs.  Sophia  A.  D.  Zinn  Davis,  mother  of  the 
late  T.   E.   Davis,  of  Harrisville,  and  was  the  father  of  five 

r 

1 


'61  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

children,  three  of  whom  died  in  childhood ;  vi;:.,  Adelaide, 
Grace  and  Pussy,  and  Hallie,  of  the  West ;  and  the  late  Mrs. 
Hettie,  wife  of  J.  N.  Pierpoint,  were  the  two  that  grew  to 
the  years  of  maturity. 

Miss  Linnie  Peirpoint,  of  Harrisville,  his  granddaughter,  is 
the  only  surviving-  descendant  in  this  county. 

Mrs.  Heaton  died  in  1867.    Both  sleep  at  Harrisville. 

Heaton  has  been  one  of  the  prominent  names  in  this  coun- 
ty almost  throughout  its  history. 

The  Skeltons. — This  same  year  (1808)  brought  Edward 
Skelton,  with  his  family,  to  the  W.  H.  Peirpoint  farm.  He 
was  born  and  reared  in  England,  and  there  he  was  married  to 
Mrs.  Sarah  Walker  Gibson,  a  young  widow,  of  London,  who 
was,  also,  of  English  birth.  And  from  England  they  emi- 
grated to  New  York  city,  where  the}^  established  a  home,  but 
being  driven  from  there  by  a  scourge  of  yellow  fever,  they 
came  to  Harrisville.  Here  Mrs.  Skelton  died,  and  after  the 
home  was  broken  up  Mr.  Skelton  went  to  Cairo,  and  spent  the 
remnant  of  his  days  with  his  daughter,  Mrs.  Jacob  McKinney. 
Here  he  died,  and  in  the  old  Pioneer  burying-ground  at  Har- 
risville, beside  his  wife,  he  sleeps. 

He  was  the  father  of  one  son.  Edward,  and  three 
daughters,  Mary,  Eliza  and  Anne. 

Edward  Skelton,  junior,  married  Miss  Jane  ^McKinney. 
Mary  became  Mrs.  Jacob  McKinney.  (See  McKinney  fam- 
ily.)    Eliza  married  James  Maley ;  and  Anne.  Henry  Wigner. 

Mrs.  Skelton  had  one  son,  John  Gibson,  by  her  first  lius- 
band. 

James  Mitchell  was  the  next  arrival  in  this  vicinity.  He 
came  from  the  "Old  Dominion"  (1808),  bringing  with  him 
four  or  five  slaves,  the  first  that  had  ever  been  seen  in  this 
section,  and  took  up  his  residence  on  the  Edward  Cokelev 
farm ;  and  in  1809,  William  Rogers  became  the  second  owner 
of  the  Wolfe  farm.  He,  too,  came  from  the  "Old  Dominion," 
bringing  his  family  of  slaves.  His  sons.  Robert  and  Lewis, 
also  found  homes  here  at  this  same  time. 

Robert  Rogers  is  said  to  have  settled  on  the  Xorth  fork 
of  Hughes  river,  and  Lewis,  on  Indian  creek;  but  we  have 
been   unable   to   learn   an3'thing  of  their   subsequent   history. 


FIRST  SETTLERS  IN  RITCHIE  COUNTY  3-3 

other  than  that  Lewis  was  the  father  of  the  late  Tohn  B. 
Rogers,  of  Smithville,  and  that  all  the  Rogerses  in  this  and 
adjoining  counties  sprung  from  this  family.  (See  South  fork 
chapter  for  family  of  John  B.  Rogers.) 

And  of  the  Mitchell  family  we  know  nothing  farther,  as 
it  is  evident  that  the  Mitchells  of  this  county  did  not  spring 
from  this  source,  as  they  came  from  Barbour  county  at  a 
much  later  day. 

The  Harrises. — During  this  same  year,  1809,  John  Harris 
came  from  Harrison  county,  and  made  the  first  settlement  on 
the  farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of  his  late  son,  John  P.  Harris. 
He  was  at  this  time  a  single  man,  but  the  following  year  (1810) 
he  w^as  married  to  Miss  Agnes  Maley,  daughter  of  Lawrence 
Maley,  and  remained  a  prominent,  useful  citizen  of  this  com- 
munity until  he  was  laid  in  the  Harrisville  cemetery. 

Mr.  Harris'  services  to  this  county  were  of  a  high  order, 
for  more  than  thirty  years  he  served  as  justice  of  the  peace 
of  Ritchie  and  Wood  counties.  He  was  the  father  of  eight 
children,  all  of  whom  have  crossed  the  tide.  The  late  General 
Thomas  M.  Harris,  whose  interesting  history  occupies  another 
chapter,  James  and  John  P.  Harris  were  the  sons  ;  and  Hannah, 
Margaret,  Anne,  Mary  and  Jane,  the  daughters. 

James  married  Miss  Anne  Rutherford,  daughter  of  Rich- 
ard Rutherford,  senior,  and  they  Vv^ere  the  parents  of  two 
children.  Miss  Ella,  of  Concord,  Ohio ,  and  a  son  who  died  in 
infancy.  He  was  laid  away  on  the  old  homestead,  near  Har- 
risville, many  years  ago,  but  his  aged  companion  survived 
until  1908,  when  she  was  laid  by  his  side. 

John  P.  Harris  married  Miss  Margaret  Rutherford,  sister 
of  his  brother's  wife,  and  lived  and  died  on  the  homestead 
that  is  now  owned  and  occupied  by  his  son,  R.  R.  Harris. 

Mrs.  Harris  survived  him  by  several  years,  and  she  fell 
dead  while  walking  on  the  street  in  New  York  city,  near  ten 
years  ago,  and  at  Harrisville,  by  the  side  of  her  husband  and 
eldest  son,  James,  she  reposes.  Their  surviving  children  are 
Richard  R.,  who  is  a  prominent  nurseryman,  of  Plarrisville ; 
Thomas  G.,  a  physician,  of  Weston  ;  John,  a  railroad  engineer, 
of  Weston ;  Agnes,  who  is  the  wife  of  the  Rev.  William  B. 
Barr,  of  the  Presbyterian  church  of  New  Jersey ;  Mary,  the 


34  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

wife  of  the  Rev.  Edward  S.  Littell,  of  the  Presbyterian  church 
of  Pennsylvania ;  and  Annabel,  who  held  a  position  as  teacher 
in  a  college  at  Knoxville,  Tennessee,  became  the  wife  of  the 
Rev.  John  T.  Aikin,  of  the  Presbyterian  church  of  Rochester, 
Pa.,  June  24,  1910. 

Hannah,  the  eldest  daughter  of  John  and  Agnes  Maley 
Harris,  married  Samuel  P)lue  and  went  to  Pennsylvania,  and 
her  two  children,  Agnes,  a  daughter,  and  a  son,  died  in  child- 
hood. 

Margaret  Harris  married  T.  F.  Leech  and  lived  and  died 
at  Harrisville.  Mrs.  R.  R.  Hall,  of  Harrisville,  is  her  only 
sunaving  child  ;  another  daughter,  }>Iartha  E.,  having  passed 
on  in  her  youth. 

Anne  Harris  died  in  youth,  and  Alary  and  Jane,  in  child- 
hood. 

Thomas  Harris'  settlement  here  antedated  that  of  his 
brother.  John,  by  two  years,  he  ha\'ing  succeeded  his  son-in- 
law,  George  Stuart,  on  the  land  where  Harrisville  now  stands, 
in  1807. 

He  married  Miss  Xancy  Cunningham,  sister  of  Elijah  M. 
Cunningham,  and  with  his  family  came  from  Harrison  county, 
and  remained  here  until  his  death ;  and  in  ,the  old  Pioneer 
cemetery,  beside  his  wife,  he  rests.  Pie  was  the  father  of  ten 
children;  viz.,  John  went  to  Illinois;  James,  to  Zanesville, 
Ohio ;  and  Adam  rests  at  Smithville ;  Efihe  became  Airs.  John 
Chancellor  and  v/ent  to  Iowa ;  Margaret,  who  married  William 
Stanley,  lies  at  Harrisville ;  Hannah  married  George  Stuart 
and  lived  and  died  in  this  county;  Elizabeth,  Rachel,  Sarah 
and  Mary,  who  remained  single,  also  died  here. 

From  this  pioneer  Harrisville  took  its  name,  and  is  a  most 
beautiful  monument  to  his  memory. 


The  Harrises  are  of  Scotch-Irish  origin.  Two  brothers 
came  from  Ireland  before  the  Revolution,  landing  in  the  City 
of  "Brotherly  Love."  These  brothers  were  separated,  soon 
after  their  arrival,  Thomas  going  Southward,  was  never  heard 
of  again,  and  the  other  one  (whose  Christian  name  is 
wanting)  was  the  father  of  Thomas  and  John,  the  Ritchie 
county  pioneers.     He  married  a  widow,  a  Airs.  Aliller,  whose 


FIRST  SETTLERS  IN  RITCHIE  COUNTY  35 

maiden  name  was  Plummer,  and  near  the  year  1800,  they 
came  to  Harrison  coimty.  Besides  the  two  sons  mentioned 
they  were  the  parents  of  four  daughters,  all  of  whom  were  the 
wives  of  Ritchie  county  pioneers  : 

Margaret  married  Elijah  M.  Cunningham ;  Jane,  Benja- 
min Starr;  Anna,  John  Harris,  and  another  daughter  was  the 
wife  of  Nutter  Webb,  a  pioneer  of  Goose  creek. 

The  Chancellors. — The  year  1809  was,  also,  marked  by  the 
coming  of  Thomas  Chancellor,  with  his  family,  from  Culpep- 
per county,  Virginia,  to  the  farm  that  for  long  years  was  the 
home  of  the  late  Mrs.  John  Hawkins,  but  now  the  homes  of 
Edward  Wells  and  James  Maxwell.  He  married  Miss  Judith 
Gaines,  a  Virginia  maiden  of  Welsh  descent,  she  being  his 
third  wife,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  seven  sons  and  one 
daughter. 

Mrs.  Chancellor  was  the  niece  of  Edmond  Pendleton,  of 
Virginia,  and  a  cousin  of  General  Edmond  Pendleton  Gains, 
of  the  United  States  army.  Mr.  Chancellor  was  a  soldier  of 
the  Revolutionary  war,  he  having  served  in  the  Virginia  in- 
fantry. He  died  not  long  after  his  settlement  here,  and  the 
family  went  to  Wood  county,  where  a  number  of  their 
descendants  still  live. 

The  two  eldest  sons  of  these  pioneers,  Richard  and  James 
Chancellor,  died  at  Norfolk,  Virginia,  while  serving  as  soldiers 
in  the  war  of  1812,  leaving  no  issue ;  Cooper  and  William 
sleep  in  Wood  county.  Benjamin  went  to  Missouri,  and 
finally  to  Mississippi,  where  he  sleeps.  John  emigrated  to 
Missouri,  and  later  to  Arkansas,  where  he  reposes.  (Pie  was 
the  grandfather  of  C.  B.  Chancellor,  of  the  Chancellor  Plard- 
ware  Company,  of  Parkersburg.)  Rebecca,  the  only  daughter, 
who  never  married,  also  sleeps  in  Wood  county;  and  Thomas, 
the  sixth  son,  who  was  born  in  the  Old  Dominion,  in  1805. 
married  Miss  Prudence  Rector,  of  Taylor  county,  and  re- 
moved to  Wood  county  in  1838,  where  he  died  on  July  4, 
3  872,  at  his  home  in  Parkersburg.  Here  his  family,  who  are 
prominently  known,  still  reside.  To  the  late  Hon.  W.  N. 
Chancellor,  his  son,  we  are  indebted  for  this  sketch;  his  other 
sons,  Edmond  P.  and  Alfred  B.,  are  also  citizens  of  Parkers- 
burg. 


3G  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

The  Chancellors  are  of  French  origin,  although  they 
went  from  France  to  England  in  the  eleventh  century  (lOGo) 
with  William  the  Conquorer,  and  subsequently  removed  to 
Scotland  in  the  fourteenth  century.  However,  Richard  Chan- 
cellor, the  founder  of  the  family  in  the  United  States,  came 
from  England  in  1()82,  and  settled  in  Westmoreland  county, 
Virginia.  Fie  had  two  sons,  W^illiam  Cooper,  and  Richard 
Chancellor,  junior  (the  hatter).  William  Cooper  Chancellor 
married  a  ]\Iiss  Thomas,  and  removed  to  Culpepper  county 
(Virginia),  and  here  his  son,  Thomas,  the  Ritchie  county 
pioneer,  was  born. 

Doubtless  the  town  of  Chancellorsville,  in  the  Old 
Dominion,  which  was  so  far-famed  during  the  late  Civil  war, 
took  its  name  from  this  family. 

The  Starrs. — Near  the  year  ISIO,  John  and  Benjamin 
Starr,  and  Elijah  Cunningham,  with  their  families,  found 
homes  in  this  wilderness.  They  all  came  from  Harrison  coun- 
ty, and  were  all  the  uncles  of  General  Harris. 

Mr.  Cunningham  settled  on  land  adjoining  the  U^olfe 
farm;  Benjamin  Starr,  on  the  George  ^Martin  farm,  now  the 
home  of  Mrs.  Susan  Rymer;  and  John  Starr,  on  Indian  creek, 
on  the  homestead  that  is  now  the  estate  of  his  late  son,  James. 

John  Starr's  wife  was  Miss  Anne  Harris,  sister  of  John 
and  Thomas  Harris,  and  they  were  the  first  settlers  on  Indian 
creek.  Here  they  lived  and  died,  and  in  the  Harrisville  ceme- 
tery they  lie  at  rest.     He  has  been  sleeping  since  1846. 

The  children  of  the  family  were  Mary,  Elizabeth,  Effie, 
Hannah,  Moses,  Benjamin,  John  and  James  Starr. 

Mary  became  the  wife  of  Jacob  Moats,  senior,  and  spent 
her  life  in  the  Harrisville  vicinity.     (See  Moats  family.) 

Elizabeth  Starr  was  married  to  Jacob  Wigner,  junior, 
and  in  this  county  she  remained  until  death.  Her  children 
were :  Cathrine,  Eliza,  Elizabeth,  Matilda,  James,  Harper, 
Nelson,  W^ilbur,  Clarke  and  George  AVigner. 

Effie  Starr  was  the  late  Mrs.  Henr}'  ]\Ioats,  of  Addis'  run. 
(See  Moats  family.) 

Hannah  Starr,  with  her  husband,  William  Cokeley,  set- 
tled at  Mt.  Zion,  where  she  is  now  resting  in  the  churchyard. 
(See  Chevauxdefrise  chapter.) 


FIRST  SETTLERS  IN  RITCHIE  COUNTY  37 

Moses  Starr  was  married  to  Miss  Margaret  Prince,  and 
in  Wood  county  he  resided.  His  family  consisted  of  two 
daughters  :  Anne  is  the  widow  of  Jacob  Moats,  junior,  of  Har- 
risville,  and  Jane  is  Mrs.  Sarber,  of  Parkersburg. 

Benjamin  Starr  died  in  youth. 

John  Starr  was  married  to  Miss  Ellen  Ayres,  sister  of 
John  B.  Ayres,  formerly  of  this  county,  but  now  of  Spencer, 
and  resided  at  different  points  in  this  county,  before  going  to 
Addis'  run,  where  he  died  in  1875.  His  wife  survived  him 
until  1898. 

Their  children  were:  Miss  Mary  and  Benjamin,  Missouri: 
John,  of  Addis'  run;  Anne  (Mrs.  G.  W.  Hammer),  Mrs. 
Frances  Watson  P'oster,  and  Miss  Hannah  Starr,  Harrisville. 

James  Starr  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Eliza  Ayres  Starr,  (sister 
of  his  brother's  wife)  spent  their  lives  at  the  old  homestead, 
on  Indian  creek.  Here  she  passed  from  earth  in  1891,  and  he, 
on  February  25,  1901. 

Their  only  son,  Alpheus,  died  in  youth;  Margaret  mar- 
ried H.  M.  Murdock,  and  lives  in  Ohio:  and  Misses  Sarah  and 
Fannie  are  of  Harrisville. 

Benjamin  Starr,  senior,  the  pioneer,  was  married  to  Miss 
Jane  Harris  (sister  of  his  brother's  wife)  and,  perhaps,  re- 
mained here  until  his  death,  yet  we  have  been  unable  to  learn 
anything  definite  concerning  his  subsequent  history  or  that 
of  his  family,  other  than  that  he  had  two  children,  Moses  and 
Elizabeth  Starr. 

Elijah  Morgan  Cunningham  was  married  to  Miss  Mar- 
garet Harris,  he  and  Thomas  Harris  having  traded  sisters, 
and  in  this  vicinity  they  remained  until  they  were  borne  to 
the  old  "Pioneer  cemetery,"  near  Harrisville.  He  was  a 
native  of  Harrison  county,  and  a  brother  of  Edward,  a  very 
early  settler,  on  Husher's  run. 

His  only  son  died  in  childhood,  and  his  daughters  were : 
Elizabeth  (Mrs.  Elijah  Husher,  of  Husher's  run)  ;  Sarah 
(Mrs.  Riddel,  mother  of  David  J.  Riddel,  of  Riddel's  chapel)  : 
Effie  (the  late  Mrs.  James  Riddel,  of  Roane  county),  and 
Rachel  and  Jane,  who  remained  single.  (Effie  and  Jane  were 
twins.)     All  of  whom  have  crossed  to  the  other  side. 


38  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

This  family  were  related  to  W  illiam  Cunningham,  of 
Revolutionary  fame,  and  to  Thomas,  of  Indian  times,  they 
having-  been  descended  from  the  same  Irish  family,  as  the 
similarity  of  names  would  suggest;  but  we  have  been. unable 
to  determine  the  exact  connection,  though  circumstances  point 
to  the  fact  that  they  were  first  cousins. 

The  Drakes. — During  the  year  1811,  the  Reverend  John 
Drake,  a  minister  of  the  Baptist  church,  made  the  first  im- 
provement on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of  the  late 
Edward  D.  Lough. 

He  was  the  first  minister  in  the  settlement,  and  being 
licensed  to  celebrate  the  rites  of  matrimony,  took  this  matter 
from  the  hands  of  the  Reverend  Reese  Wolfe,  a  lay  minister 
of  the  Baptist  church  faith,  of  Parkersburg,  wdio  had  been 
performing  this  important  service  for  the  little  colony. 

The  Rev.  Mr.  Drake  was  a  lineal  descendant  of  Sir 
Francis  Drake,  the  English  admiral  and  explorer.  His  father, 
George  Drake,  came  from  England,  some  time  during  the  last 
half  of  the  eighteenth  century,  and  probably  settled  in  the  Vir- 
ginia colony. 

However,  John  Drake  was  born  in  1775,  and  was  one  of 
the  first  missionaries  to  cross  the  Allegheny  mountains,  to 
Western  Virginia. 

He  was  twice  married,  but  the  maiden  names  of  both  of 
his  waves  are  missing.  But  the  record  shows  that  he  and  his 
first  wife,  Isabel,  were  married  on  January  15,  1794;  and  that 
he  was  married  to  his  second  wife,  Elizabeth,  on  January  30, 
1803,  and  with  her  he  came  to  this  county. 

After  a  few  years'  residence  at  Harrisville,  he  removed 
to  Smithville,  and  found  a  home  at  the  mouth  of  Leatherbrake, 
on  land  that  is  now  owned  by  W.  A.  Flesher.  Here  he  con- 
^tinued  to  reside  until  August  3,  1836,  when  he  was  called  to 
his  heavenly  reward ;  and  in  the  Murphy  graveyard,  on  the 
John  P.  Kennedy  farm,  his  ashes  lie. 

No  imposing  monument  marks  his  resting  place !  Per- 
haps, not  even  a  stone  is  there  to  distinguish  it  from  the  many 
other  early  graves  in  the  burying-ground,  but  the  record  of 
his  hardships,  his  noble  deeds,  his  heroic  self-sacrifice,   is   a 


FIRST  SETTLERS  IX  RITCHIE  COUNTY  39 

memorial,  sufficient — the   Baptist  church  in  this  county  is  a 
fitting  and  enduring  monument  to  his  memory. 

His  wife,  Elizabeth,  survived  him  by  many  years,  dying 
on  May  26,  1854,  at  the  age  of  seventy-one  years. 

Bible  Record  of  the  Family  of  Rev.  John  Drake. — Chil- 
dren of  John  and  Isabel  Drake: 

James  Drake,  born  on  March  15,  1795,  married  Elizabeth 
Sinnett,  on  September  25,  1815. 

Jemima  Drake,,  born  on  September  19,  1796,  married  John 
Earle  on  July  22,  1814. 

Elizabeth  Drake,  born  on  March  21,  1799,  and — 
Children  of  John  and  Elizabeth  Drake : 
Susana  Drake,  born  on  February  26,  1804,  died  in  1810. 
George  Drake,  born  October  22,  1805,  died  in  1825. 

Rachel  Drake,  born  on  January  4,  1808,  married  George 
Camp  on  April  13,  1826. 

Mary  Drake,  born  on  October  20,  1809,  married  Seth 
Rogers,  on  March  9,  1854. 

Agnes  Drake,  born  on  February  19,  1812,  niarried  Solo- 
mon Rexroad,  on  November  17,  1833. 

John  Drake,  born  on  April  5,  1814,  died  in  1852. 
David  Drake,  born  on  December  19,  1816,  and — 
Lavina  Drake,  born  on  August  15.  1820,  died  in  1852. 
Noah  Drake,  born  on  March  16,  1S23,  died  in  1851. 
Aaron  Drake,  born  on  October  25,  1826,  and — 

vSome  of  these  sons  went  to  Charleston  and  here  their 
history  ends,  but  James  remained  here  and  his  descendants 
are  a  host  in  this  county.     (See  Indian  creek  chapter.) 

The  late  Mrs.  Agnes  Layfield,  of  Cokeley,  was  a  grand- 
daughter of  this  pioneer. 

James  Drake,  a  brother  of  the  Reverend  John  Drake, 
went  to  Ohio,  and  Hannah,  a  sister,  married  Aaron  Smith,  a 
pioneer  of  this  county,  and  has  a  large  number  of  descendants 
among  our  well  known  citizens.     (See  South  fork  settlers.) 

Adam  Cunningham  was  another  early  pioneer  in  this 
section. 

He   was   the   son   of   Adam,   senior,   and    the   nephew   of 


40  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Thomas  Cunningham,  and  was  a  native  of  this  county,  being 
born  on  the  Hoff  farm,  below  Smithville. 

He  married  Sarah,  the  daughter  of  Patrick  Sinnett.  and 
settled  on  the  old  ridge  road  between  Harrisville  and  Smith- 
ville, on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of  the  late  Charles 
Moyer;  here  he  passed  from  earth  at  a  ripe  old  age,  and  here, 
with  his  wife,  he  sleeps. 

His  children  were:  Jacob,  of  Indian  creek;  Absolem, 
father  of  John,  the  Washburn  artist;  Mrs.  Millie  (Wm.) 
Hoover,  of  Wood  county;  the  late  Mrs.  Dolly  (James)  Webb, 
of  Harrisville;  A'Trs.  Phebe  (Ephraim)  Cunningham,  of  Indian 
run;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Sarah  Ann  Mulienax,  of  the  same  vicin- 
ity. 

The  Moatses. — Near  the  year  1819,  George  Moats  and  his 
wife,  Eve,  with  their  family,  came  from  Pendleton  county, 
and  took  up  their  residence  on  the  land  that  is  now  marked 
by  the  west  end  of  Harrisville. 

They  were  the  grandparents  of  Andrew  Moats,  of  Har- 
risville, and  the  ancestors  of  all  the  families  of  this  name  in 
the  county,  they  being  the  parents  of  twelve  children.  Mrs. 
Moats  was  a  native  of  North  Carolina,  and  both  were  of  Ger- 
man descent. 

They  gave  the  grounds  for  the  first  Baptist  church  in  the 
Harrisville  vicinity,  and  near  the  site  of  this  old  church, 
which  stood  just  north  of  the  present  residence  of  Mrs.  Wm. 
M.  Rymer,  Mr.  Moats  met  a  tragic  death,  in  1811:,  by  the 
falling  of  a  tree,  under  which  he  had  sought  shelter  from  a 
storm.  He  was  buried  almost  on  the  site  where  he  was  killed, 
but  sixty  3^ears  after,  his  ashes  were  removed  to  the  cemetery 
on  the  hill  south  of  town.  Mrs.  Moats  rests  in  the  Indian 
creek  Baptist  churchyard. 

Their  sons  were:  Peter,  Jacob,  Henry  and  \\'illiam  ;  and 
their  daughters,  Christiana,  Barbara,  Magdalene,  Kathrine, 
Elizabeth,  Frances,  Susan  and  Julia  Moats,  whose  descend- 
ants are  now  a  host  among  the  good  citizens  of  the  county. 

These  children  in  their  turn  were  nearly  all  the  heads 
of  pioneer  families. 

Peter  Moats,  the  eldest  son,  was  born  in  Pendleton  coun- 
ty, in  1797,  and  there  he  was  married,  at  the  age  of  nineteen 


FIRST  SETTLERS  IN  RITCHIE  COUNTY  41 

or  twenty  years,  to  Miss  Rachel  Grogg,  and,  with  his  parents, 
came  to  this  county  and  settled  on  one  end  of  the  old  home- 
stead, on  the  part  that  is  now  owned  by  the  heirs  of  the  late 
Samuel  Moats.  Here  he  died,  and  in  the  Egypt  cemetery  he 
sleeps.    He  was  one  of  the  earliest  blacksmiths  in  this  vicinity. 

His  children  were:  Joseph,  Jesse  and  Cathrine  (Mrs. 
Wm.  Godfrey),  who  went  to  Ohio;  the  late  Wm.  P.  and  Mrs. 
Lucinda  (Jacob)  Cunningham,  of  Washburn;  Mrs.  Flora  Eve 
(Kuhnrod)  Mullenax,  of  Missouri ;  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
(James)  Layfield,  and  Mrs.  Susana  (Salathial)  Simmons,  both 
of  Cairo. 

Jacob  Moats,  the  second  son,  was  born  in  1799;  and  in 
1823,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Mary,  the  daughter  of  John 
Starr,  senior,  and  on  the  old  homestead,  near  Harrisville, 
where  their  son,  Jacob,  died  a  few  years  since,  they  established 
their  home.  Here  she  saw  the  last  of  earth  in  1873,  and  he, 
in  1885,  and  both  rest  at  Harrisville. 

Their  eldest  daughter,  Anne,  was  the  late  Airs.  Andrew 
Cokeley,  and  Susana  was  the  late  Mrs.  Isaac  Cokeley,  both 
of  Harrisville ;  Mary  became  Mrs.  Joshua  Nest  and  went 
West ;  Elizabeth  was  Mrs.  Holland,  of  Tyler  county  ;  Mar- 
garet, Mrs.  Robinson,  of  Wood  county ;  Jane,  the  late  wife  of 
J.  R.  Sigler,  of  Cairo;  India  is  Mrs.  William  Gilbert,  of  Will- 
iamstown ;  Andrew  has  long  been  a  prominent  merchant  of 
Harrisville;  and  Benjamin  and  Jacob,  junior,  lie  sleeping  in 
the  Harrisville  cemetery. 

Henry  Moats,  with  his  wife,  Mrs.  Effie  Starr  Moats,  set- 
tled on  the  head  of  Addis'  run,  where  his  son,  Heniy,  now 
lives.  He  entered  a  large  tract  of  twelve  hundred  acres  of 
land  in  this  section,  but  his  claim  being  contested,  he  pur- 
chased the  entire  tract,  and  obtained  a  title  for  it,  and  it  is 
now  divided  into  several  homesteads  (viz. ;  J.  H.  Hattield's, 
John  Starr's,  George  Layfield's,  Edward  Cokeley 's  and  per- 
haps others)  besides  what  is  owned  by  his  heirs. 

He,  too,  was  a  blacksmith  by  trade,  and  was  the  first  one 
in  this  section.     Here  his  last  hours  were  spent. 


42  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

His  children : 

John  went  West,  where  he  died ;  George  and  James  lost 
their  lives  in  the  defense  of  the  Union  in  the  sixties ;  Henry 
resides  at  the  old  home ;  William  is  the  owner  and  operator 
of  the  Moats  mill  at  Rusk;  Kathrine  married  Thomas  Martin, 
and  she  now  lives  with  her  son  in  New  York ;  Hannah  was 
the  late  Mrs.  David  Shrader,  of  Cairo,  and  another  daughter 
was  Mrs.  Hiram  (?)  Norman,  of  Calhoun  county. 

William  Moats  married  Miss  Phebe  Drake,  daughter  ol 
James  Drake,  and  settled  on  the  old  parental  homestead,  he 
having  succeeded  his  father  there.  Here  he  lived  and  died, 
and  at  Harrisville  he  rests. 

After  the  death  of  his  wife,  Phebe,  he  married  Miss  Edna 
M.  Cunningham,  daughter  of  Enoch  M.  Cunningham,  of 
Smithville,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  Pompey  Moats,  and 
Misses  India  and  Virginia,  who  reside  at  the  old  homestead 
near  Harrisville. 

The  children  of  William  and  Phebe  Drake  Moats  V'/ere 
the  late  James  and  Sinnett  Moats,  of  Indian  creek,  who  were 
both  soldiers  of  the  Union  army,  and  Cornelius,  of  Harrisville. 
The  other  children  born  of  this  union  died  in  childhood. 

Christiana  Moats,  the  eldest  child  of  George  and  Eve 
Moats,  who  was  born  in  1793,  was  married  to  John  Shrader, 
and  settled  on  Husher's  run.  Her  sons  were  Nicholas,  George 
and  William  Shrader,  and  one  of  her  daughters,  Fannie,  was 
]\Irs.  James  Rollins,  of  Ellenboro. 

Barbara  Moats  became  Mrs.  Solomon  Dick,  and  resided 
here  and  in  the  "Buckeye  State."  George  Dick,  of  Ohio,  is 
one  of  her  sons,  but  the  names  of  tlie  other  members  of  the 
family  are  wanting. 

Magdalena  Moats  was  the  late  Mrs.  William  Kibby,  of 
Cornwallis,  and  Hezekiah  Kibby,  the  ex-assessor,  of  Grant 
district,  is  her  only  heir. 

Kathrine  Moats  was  married  to  Absolem  Harpold,  and 
from  the  Webb's  mill  vicinity,  they  went  to  Indiana.  Nicho- 
las and  George  Harpold  were  two  of  her  sons. 


FIRST  SETTLERS  LV  RITCHIE  COUNTY  '      43 

Susan  Moats  was  the  late  Mrs.  Solomon  Mullenax,  oi 
Missouri;  Elizabeth  was  the  wife  of  John  Layfield,  senior; 
Frances  was  Mrs.  Harmon  Sinnett;  and  Julia  Anne,  Mrs. 
Ephriam  Gulp,  all  of  this  county.  (See  other  chapters  for 
their  families.) 

The  Cokeleys.^Another  family  whose  name  belongs  to 
this  community,  though  not  among  the  earliest  settlers,  is 
that  of  Cokeley. 

Jeremiah  Cokeley  came  from  Ireland  near  the  year  1750, 
and  settled  in  the  Virginia  colony.     He  was  the  father  of  five 
sons ;   viz.,   William,   Daniel,   Edmund,   Jeremiah   and   Elijah,, 
and  from  his  son,  Edmund,  the  Ritchie  county  Cokeleys  are 
descended.. 

Edmund  Cokeley  was  a  Revolutionary  soldier,  he  having 
taken  up  his  sword  in  behalf  of  the  colonies. 

In  1818,  his  son,  Elijah,  married  Christiana  Crofus,  a 
German  maiden,  who,  with  her  parents,  crossed  to  Virginia 
in  1790;  and,  in  1822,  he  passed  from  earth  at  his  home  in 
Virginia,  and  here,  near  Cumberland,  on  the  Virginia  side,  he 
sleeps. 

In  1840,  his  widow,  with  her  three  sons  and  one  daughter ; 
viz.,  Edmund,  Isaac,  Andrew  and  Anne,  came  to  the  Harris- 
ville  vicinity,  and  with  them  came  Daniel  Cokeley,  a  brother 
of  Elijah,  and  his  family,  and  from  these  two  brothers  all  the 
diiterent  families  of  this  name  in  this,  and  sister  counties,  are 
descended. 

Edmund  Cokeley,  the  eldest  son  of  Elijah,  married  Miss 
Eliza  Wagner,  of  Cumberland,  Maryland ;  and  near  the  break- 
ing out  of  the  Civil  war,  with  hie  family  and  his  widowed 
mother,  he  removed  to  Iowa,  where  he  died  but  a  few  years 
since.  His  mother  died  in  the  early  sixties,  and  lies  at  rest 
in  a  rural  cemetery  near  Vinton,  Iowa. 

His  children  were  Jonathan,  Edward,  Asby,  Christiana, 
Margaret  and  Martha. 

Isaac  Cokeley  married  a  Miss  Rexroad  and  lost  his  life 
in  defense  of  the  Union  in  1863. 


44  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Anne  Cokeley,  the  only  daughter  of  Elijah  Cokeley,  be- 
came the  wife  of  Jonathan  Barksdale,  of  Virginia,  and  after 
a  brief  married  life,  she  died  and  her  family  went  to  lo^va. 

Andrew  Cokeley,  the  younger  son  of  the  family  of  Elijah, 
was  married  to  Miss  Anne  Aloats,  daughter  of  Jacob  Aloats, 
senior,  on  April  15,  1841,  and  settled  on  the  old  homestead 
near  two  and  one-half  miles  West  of  Harrisville,  where  his 
heirs  still  reside. 

He  was  the  father  of  twelve  children : 

Jacob,  of  vVilliamstown ;  Edmund  E.,  George,  the  late 
Andrew  J.,  all  of  Harrisville ;  and  Alvah,  of  Cairo ;  Elizabeth, 
the  eldest  daughter,  was  the  late  Mrs.  Aaron  Eriedly,  of 
Spruce  Grove  ;  Mary  Jane  was  the  late  Mrs.  Wiljiam  Aloats. 
of  Addis'  nm ;  Alcinda  was  the  late  Mrs.  Henr\^  Moats,  of 
Spruce  Grove,  the  mother  of  the  late  F.  M.  Moats,  editor  of 
the  Ritchie  Standard ;  Susan  L.  was  the  late  Mrs.  John 
Echard,  of  Five  Forks ;  Melvina  became  Mrs.  Jonathan  Coke- 
ley, and  resides  at  Vinton,  Iowa ;  Alargaret  R.  married  Franl^ 
Griffin  and  died  in  1877,  leaving  one  son ;  Belle  married 
Everett  Brake  and  resides  at  the  old  home. 

Daniel  Cokeley. — Daniel  Cokeley,  the  pioneer,  married 
Miss  Elizabeth  Crofus,  sister  of  his  brother  Elijah's  wife,  and 
came  from  Virginia  in  1840,  as  above  stated,  and  settled  neai; 
two  miles  from  Harrisville,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  estate 
of  his  late  son,  Isaac.  Here  he  died  in  1861,  at  the  age  of 
ninety-four  years,  six  months,  fifteen  days. 

His  children  were:  Isaac,  William,  Mrs.  Nancy  Simmers, 
all  of  Harrisville;  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Shock,  and  Mrs.  Sarah  Rob- 
inson (mother  of  honored  Sherman  Robinson,  of  Harrisville), 
both  of  Calhoun  county.  His  daughter,  Mary,  married 
A\'illiam  Sharpneck,  of  Petroleum,  and  after  her  death  her  sis- 
ter, Margaret,  married  Mr.  Sharpneck. 

Isaac  Cokeley  married  Miss  Susana  Moats,  daughter  of 
Jacob  Moats,  senior,  and  spent  his  life  at  the  old  homestead, 
near  Harrisville. 

His  children:  Daniel,  of  Devil  Hole;  Jacob,  of  Elm  run, 
who  have  both  passed  on ;  Isaac,  of  Harrisville ;  Alargaret, 
late  wife  of  John  E.  Simmons,  of  Spruce  Grove;  Luvina,  late 


FIRST  SETTLERS  IN  RITCHIE  COUNTY  45 

wife   of   Andrew   Simmons,   and   Miss    Mary,   who,   with   her 
mother,  resides  at  the  old  homestead. 

Wiliiain  Cokeley,  son  of  Daniel,  married  Miss  Hannah 
Starr,  daughter  of  John  Starr,  senior,  and  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
Duckworth,  of  Mt.  Zion.  is  the  one  child  of  this  union.  (See 
Mt.  Zion  chapter  for  further  history.) 


CHAPTER  III 


South  Fork  Settled 


ILLIAM  LAYFIELD.— Though  the  Mur- 
phys  have  always,  heretofore,  been  accred- 
ited with  the  first  settlement  on  the  South 
fork  of  Hughes  river,  careful  investigation 
proves  this  to  be  in  error:  the  shade  of 
AVilliam  Layfield  rises  to  a  point  ol  justice, 
as  he  is  the  rightful  claimant  to  this  dis- 
tinction ;  his  settlement  on  the  S.  H.  West- 
fall  farm,  above  Smithville,  having  antedated  the  coming  of 
the  Murphys  by  one  year.  For  twelve  months  he  was  alone 
in  this  dense  wilderness,  being  the  only  settler  on  this  branch 
of  the  river,  within  the  present  bounds  of  the  county. 

After  a  four  years'  residence  here,  he  removed  to  what 
is  known  as  "Layfield's  run,"  a  tributary  of  Goose  creek, 
where  he  lived  for  many  years,  and  where  he  buried  his  first 
wife,  Mrs.  Margaret  Crawford  Layfield.  He  died  on  March 
20,  1852,  at  the  home  of  his  son,  Sanford,  near  Cornwallis. 
and  in  the  Egypt  cemetery,  by  the  side  of  his  second  wife, 
Mrs.  Susan  Douglas  Layfield  (widow  of  John  Douglass,  of 
Scotland),  he  sleeps. 

He  was  of  Irish  descent.  His  father,  James  La3^field, 
came  from  the  "Emerald  Isle,"  and  settled  on  the  Soutli 
branch  of  the  Potomac  river  at  Moorefield  (West),  Virginia, 
where  he  (William)  was  born. 

When  he  was  but  a  lad,  all  the  family,  except  him  and 
one  brother,  were  captured  by  the  Indians,  and  they  were 
being  hotly  pursued  by  the  dreaded  foe  when  they  were  over- 
taken by  a  violent  storm,  from  which  they  sought  refuge 
under  a  tree.  This  tree  was  torn  up  by  the  roots,  and  William 
escaped,  but  he  never  knew  the  fate  of  his  brother ;  never 
heard  of  any  of  the  family  again,  so  the  many  families  of  this 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLED  47 

name  in  the  different  parts  of  the  country  are  descended  from 
him. 

He  was  the  father  of  six  sons  and  one  daughter :  John, 
James,  ElHson,  Sanford,  David  and  William,  junior,  and  Mary 
Ann,  who  became  Mrs.  Augusta  Crane,  and  went  West. 

To  the  late  venerable  Henry  Layfield.  of  Cokeley's,  we 
are  indebted  for  this  interesting  reminiscence,  which  he  has 
repeatedly  heard  from  his  grandfather's  own  lips. 

The  Murphys. — The  Murphys  were  the  second  settlers 
on  this  river.  Four  brothers  came  from  Harrison  county,  in 
1801,  and  found  homes  in  the  Webb's  mill  vicinity.  Amiziah 
took  up  his  residence  on  Vv'hat  is  now  the  Frederick  Lemon 
estate,  at  Macfarlan  ;  William,  on  the  John  P.  Kennedy  farm; 
Samuel,  on  the  late  Alfred  Scott  estate ;  and  John,  on  the  Rev. 
M.  McNeill  homestead.  Here  these  brothers  passed  from 
earth,  and  in  the  Murphy  graveyard,  on  the  John  P.  Kennedy 
farm,  and  on  the  McNeill  homestead,  their  ashes  lie.  After 
the  older  generation  had  passed  away,  their  heirs,  having  lost 
their  lands  owing  to  bad  titles,  went  to  Illinois,  to  Washing- 
ton county,  Ohio,  and  to  Wood  county,  this  State,  and  conse- 
quently, little  is  known  of  their  early  history,  save  the  fact 
that  they  Avere  Indian  fighters. 

Other  settlers  found  homes  in  this  wilderness  in  rapid 
succession,  and  for  a  number  of  years  this  was  known  as  the 
"Murphy  Settlement"  along  the  river  from  the  mouth  of  In- 
dian creek  to  the  mouth  of  Slab  creek ;  and  the  memory  of 
these  pioneers  is  still  kept  green  by  the  name,  "Murphy  dis- 
trict." 

Nutter  Webb. — After  the  Murphys  came  Nutter  Webb. 
He  was  a  native  of  Harrison  county,  and  the  first  blacksmith 
in  this  vicinity.  His  old  cabin  stood  on  the  south  bank  of  the 
river  just  opposite  the  present  site  of  AVebb's  (Hardman's^ 
mill,  and  here  he  resided  until  he  was  laid  in  the  cemetery  that 
bears  his  name,  in  August,  1833.  A  long  line  of  his  descend- 
ants still  lay  claim  to  Ritchie  county  soil. 

He  married  Miss  Anna  Cunningham,  daughter  of  Adam 
Cunningham,  brother  of  Thomas,  and  was  the  father  of  two 
sons  and  several  daughters  :  Benjamin,  whose  history  appears 
in  a  later  chapter,  was  one  of  the  most  prominent  figures  in 


48  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUXTY 

the  early  history  of  this  part  of  the  county  ;  WiUiam  was  also 
a  pioneer,  he  having  made  the  first  settlement  on  the  Elias 
Valentine  farm ;  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Simms,  Parkersburg ;  Mrs. 
Rebecca  (John)  Malone,  Mrs.  Margaret  (Adam)  Harris,  Mrs. 
Rachel  (Wm.)  Stuart,  mother  of  Robert  Stuart,  of  Iris,  were 
four  of  the  daughters,  and  perhaps  all  of  them. 

The  Webbs  are  of  Indian  fighting  stock,  they  being  de- 
scended from  Jonas  Webb,  an  early  settler  of  Harrison  coun- 
ty, who  is  mentioned  in  "Border  Warfare." 

Adam  Cunningham  was  another  early  settler  in  the 
Webb's  mill  vicinity,  he  having  found  a  home  on  the  Hofif, 
now  the  John  S.  Deem,  farm.  He  was  a  brother  of  Thomas 
Cunningham,  and  here  the  remainder  of  his  life  was  spent,  and 
in  the  Murphy  gravej^ard  he  sleeps. 

He  was  the  father  of  twelve  children,  whose  names  in 
part  are  missing,  but  the  following  are  among  them  :  Adam., 
the  grandfather  of  John  Cunningham,  the  Washburn  artist; 
Edward  and  Elijah,  and  Mrs.  Rebecca  Beard,  Mrs.  Drusilla 
Beard,  ]\Irs.  Rachel  Nutter,  Mrs.  Hannah  Harris  and  Mrs. 
Nutter  Webb. 

William  Stuart. — Contemporary  with  the  settlements  of 
the  Murphy  Brothers  was  that  of  William  Stuart,  senior,  on 
the  late  John  Byrd  estate,  near  the  old  "State  Ford,"  above 
Gofif's.  He  was  a  typical  son  of  "Old  Erin,"  having  been 
born,  reared  and  educated  in  the  city  of  Belfast.  Ireland. 
Here  he  learned  the  trade  of  cabinet-maker  and  joiner;  and 
here  he  was  married  to  Miss  Martha  Boyd,  an  English 
maiden,  of  Southampton ;  and  from  here  they  emigrated  to 
America  in  1789,  landing  in  the  "City  of  Brotherly  Love." 
where  he  worked  at  his  trade,  for  a  time,  before  purchasing 
land  in  Huntingdon  county,  Pennsylvania,  on  the  banks  of 
the  "blue  Juniata  river,"  below  the  then  little  village  of  Hunt- 
ingdon. Here  they  remained  but  a  brief  time ;  and  from  here 
they  came  to  Ritchie  county,  in  1801,  and  settled  on  the  Byrd 
farm,  where  he  died  on  March  13,  1809.  His  wufe  died  in 
1834.  Both  sleep  on  their  old  homestead,  in  the  burying- 
ground  that  is  now  designated  as  the  "Reeves  graveyard." 
Their  son,  John,  and  daughter,  Sarah  B.,  who  was  the  victim 
of  the  first  surgical  operation  in  this  county,  also  sleep  here ; 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLED  '  49 

Polly,  and  IVIartha,  who  married  Benjamin  Webb,  rest  in  the 
Webb's  cemetery  ;  Jane  married  Enoch  Cunningham,  and  at 
Smithville  she  reposes  ;  James  died  in  Harrison  county,  and 
W'illiam,  who  was  the  father  of  Robert,  at  Iris. 

Among  the  grandchildren  of  this  pioneer,  who  are  citizens 
of  the  county,  are  Lewis  Rogers,  of  Lamb's  run  ,  P.  J.  Cun- 
ningham, of  Pennsboro.  James  T.  Smith,  of  Burnt  House; 
and  B.  F.  Prince,  of  Cantwell,  are  great-grandsons.  ■ 

Thomas  Summerfield  was  the  first  settler  on  what  is  now 
the  AV.  A.  Flesher  and  the  late  John  Miller  homesteads.  He 
afterwards  moved  across  the  river  and  made  a  settlement  on 
the  J.  R.  Westfall  farm,  and  finally  went  to  Ohio. 

Alexander  Davidson. — In  ISiO,  the  Aliller  and  Flesher 
farm  became  the  property  of  Alexander  Davidson,  who  con- 
tinued to  reside  here  until  he  was  borne  to  the  Smithville 
cemetery,  in  1837. 

Mr.  Davidson  was  of  Scotch-Irish  descent.  His  father, 
James  Davidson,  was  born  in  Ireland,  and  his  mother,  Mary 
Allen,  in  Scotland ;  and  shortly  after  the  Revolution  they 
came  to  America  and  settled  in  the  valley  of  Virginia,  near 
Winchester;  here  Alexander  was  born;  and  here  he  was 
married  to  Miss  Kathrine  Kline,  a  German  maiden,  who  was 
also  a  native  of  the  "Old  Dominion  ;"'  and  after  the  birth  of 
their  third  child,  they  removed  to  Parkersburg,  where  Mr. 
Davidson  engaged  in  the  shoe-maker's  trade  for  a  time,  be- 
fore coming  to  the  Harrisville  vicinity,  near  181(),  where  he 
remained  until  he  came  to  Smithville. 

He  was  the  father  of  ten  children  ;  and  after  his  death 
Mrs.  Davidson  and  the  family,  ha\^ing  lost  their  land  here, 
emigrated  to  Illinois  in  a  wagon.  Here  a  number  of  them 
sleep. 

He  was  the  father  of  the  venerable  Israel  Davidson,  of 
Spruce  creek,  who  is,  perhaps,  entitled  to  the  distinction  of 
being  the  oldest  (li\ing)  son  of  Ritchie  county,  he  having 
passed  his  ninetieth  milestone ;  and  of  the  late  Samuel,  of 
Gilmer  county;  of  the  late  Mrs.  Eleven  Riddle,  of  Lawford ; 
and  the  late  Mrs.  Edward  Rogers,  who  sleeps  in  the  Pioneer 
cemetery,  at  Harrisville. 


50  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COuNTY 

William  Cline,  early  in  the  century,  built  the  first  house 
at  Smithville,  on  the  site  that  is  now  marked  by  the  hotel  of 
M.  A.  Ayres.  He  was  the  father  of  Abraham  and  William 
Cline,  whose  names  will  appear  later;  but  in  1816,  this  im- 
provement passed  into  the  hands  of  James  and  Benjamin 
Hardman,  two  brothers,  who  came  from  what  is  now  Gilmer 
county.  These  brothers  had  married  the  daughters  of  Thomas 
and  Phoebe  Cunningham,  the  first  settlers  in  the  Frederick's 
mill  vicinity  (in  1S07),  whose  interesting  history  occupies 
another  chapter. 

The  Hardmans. — In  the  meantime,  while  these  settlements 
were  going  on  at  Smithville,  Peter  Wolfe,  of  Harrison  county, 
was  making  the  first  improvement  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the 
A.  P.  Hardman  estate,  in  the  Frederick's  mill  vicinity ;  and  he 
and  James  Hardman  traded  farms.  Air.  A\"olfe  moved  to  Sinith- 
ville,  where  he  died  before  the  year  1830.  and  Air.  Hardman 
took  up  his  residence  on  the  A.  P.  Hardman  homeslead,  which 
he  twice  lost  owing  to  a  defective  title ;  and  he  then  moved 
to  the  Staunton  pike,  and  became  the  first  settler  in  the  Hard- 
man  chapel  vicinity,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of  his 
late  son,  James  S.  Hardman.  Here  he  passed  from  earth  in 
August,  1874.  He  was  a  lay  minister  of  the  Methodist  Episco- 
pal church,  and  he  gave  the  grounds  for  the  cemetery  and  the 
church  which  bears  his  name,  "Hardman  chapel,"  and  beneath 
its  shadow  his  ashes  lie.  He  was  born  in  the  "Old  Domin- 
ion." on  November  14,  1795,  and,  with  his  parents,  came 
to  Gilmer  county,  to  the  Kanawha  river,  when  he  was  but  a 
small  child.  At  the  age  of  eighteen  years,  he  enlisted  as  a 
soldier  in  the  war  of  1812,  taking  the  place  of  his  father,  who 
had  been  drafted,  and  served  one  year,  until  the  close  of  the 
war.  He  was  never  engaged  in  battle,  but  frequently  wit- 
nessed the  maneuvers  of  the  enemy's  vessels  far  out  at  sea. 
Tn  1816,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Pliebe  Cunningham,  who 
was  born  in  Lewis  county,  on  August  10,  1795,  and  died  at 
her  home  at  Hardman  chapel,  on  July  3,  1871. 

From  this  venerable  couple,  the  many  different  families 
of  the  name  in  the  county  are  descended.  Their  two  surviv- 
ing daughters  are  Mrs.  Nancy  (Asa)  Dilworth,  of  Eatons  ;  and 
Mrs.     Julia     (Ira     S.)     GofiF.     of     \\'aiker.       And     their    late 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLED 


51 


sons  and  daughters  were  Joseph,  who  died  in  childhood ;  Mrs. 
Leah  (John)  Beall,  Leatherbrake ;  Mrs.  Harriett  Fisher,  Gil- 
mer county;  Mrs.  Dorcas  Beall,  Weston;  Mrs.  Barbara 
(George)  Wells,  Cornwallis ;  Mrs.  Phebe  (J.  M.)  McWhorter, 
of  Buckhannon,  who  first  married  Harrison  B.  Cunningham  ; 


James   Hardman. 


Hardman  Chapel. 


■George  W.,  James  S..  and  Asbury   Poole,   Hardman  chapel; 
and  Thomas  C.,  of  Auburn. 

Benjamin  Hardman  changed  his  place  of  residence  from 
Smithville  to  the  banK  of  the  river  at  Frederick's  mill,  he 
being  the  first  settler  here,  and  the  builder  of  this  mill ;  and 
from  this  community,  a  number  of  years  later,  he  went  to 
Iowa,  where  he  remained  but  a  short  time.  Returning  to  this 
State,  he  went  to  Roane  county,  and  settled  on  the  Middle 
fork  of  Reedy,  and  from  there,  passed  into  the  other  world, 
He,  too,  was  a  lay  minister  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church, 
one  of  the  earliest  in  this  wilderness.  His  wife  was  .Sira  Leah 
Cunningham,  and  by  his  side  she  is  sleeping,  on  the  old  home- 
stead in  Roane  county. 

Their  children  were:  the  late  Thomas,  of  Gilmer  county; 
William,  Joseph,  Benjamin,  Nathaniel,  Mrs.  Emily  Ingraham 
and  Mrs.  Argabrite,  all  of  Roane  county;  Mrs.  Phebe  (Phillip) 
Frederick,  Burnt  House;  Mrs.  Rebecca  (Henry)  Elliott,  Cal- 
houn county ;  Mrs.  Sarah  (Alexander)  Burdett,  Missouri ;  and 


C2  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Mrs.  Mary  (Henry  C.)  McWhorter,  Charleston ;  mother  of 
Judge  McWhorter,  who  stepped  down  from  a  long  term  as 
judge  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  the  State,  iu  1909. 


The  Hardmans  ha\e  a  very  interesting  ancestral  history. 
Joseph  Hardman  was  born  in  Germany  not  far  frora  the  middle 
of  the  eighteenth  century,  and  about  the  time  he  had  reached 
manhood's  estate,  he,  leaving  the  Fatherland  with  an  emi- 
grant party,  which  included  his  sister,  Margaret  Hardman 
(who  may  have  been  Mrs.  Jeremiah  Riddel  at  this  time), 
James  Riddel,  John  Goff  and  Salathiel  Goff,  went  to  England : 
and  from  there,  a  year  later,  they  all  embarked  to  America, 
landing  in  Baltimore  a  short  time  before  the  Revolution — per- 
haps in  1773  or  1774,  where  they  remained  for  twelve  months 
before  going  to  Georgetown,  in  what  is  now  the  District  of 
Columbia.  Air.  Riddel  and  the  Gofifs  being  more  advanced  in 
years  than  Mr.  Hardman,  were  the  heads  of  families,  that 
they  brought  with  them  across  the  sea ;  and  ere  long,  the  fair 
face  and  charming  manner  of  Miss  Dorcas  Riddel  completely 
captivated  the  afifections  of  young  Hardman,  and  they  were 
married ;  and  upon  the  banks  of  the  Potomac,  within  a  neigh- 
boring distance  of  the  Washington  estates,  the}^  founded  their' 
home.  And  thus  it  was  that  Joseph  Hardman  came  to  know- 
George  Washington,  not  only  as  a  general,  for  he  was  a  Revo- 
lutary  soldier,  but  as  an  intimate  friend.  It  is  said  that  the 
abilit}'  and  the  judgment  of  the  young  German  w^as  of  such  an 
order  that  he  was,  not  unfrequently,  called  into  council  with 
other  trustworthy  pioneers,  by  General  Washington,  to  con- 
struct plans  for  the  safety  and  protection  of  the  inhabitants 
of  certain  districts  of  Maryland  and  Virginia. 

"The  reminiscences  of  these  stirring  days,  and  his  in- 
timate acquaintance  with  the  great  General,  were  ever  dear  to 
his  heart,"  and  to  the  close  of  his  life  "his  deep  blue  eyes 
would  sparkle  and  radiate  with  a  peculiar  light,"  as  his  mind 
reverted  to  those  heroic  scenes.  After  a  seven  years'  resi- 
dence at  Georgetown,  he,  with  the  other  families  above  men- 
tioned,  removed  to  Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  where  he  engaged 
in  the  butcher  business,  and  by  strict  economy  soon  accumu- 
lated a  sufBcient  amount  of  monev  to  cause  him  to  cast  wist- 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLED 


ful  glances  to  the  land  beyond  the  mountains;  so  one  morning 
in  the  early  spring  time,  late  in  the  century,  he,  with  his  be- 
loved Dorcas  and  three  children,  Nancy,  James  and  Thomas, 
and  their  belongings,  set  out  in  wagons  for  the  great  North- 
west; and  after  long  weeks  of  peril  and  hardships,  such  as 
only  pioneers  of  civilization  can  know,  they  reached  Ran- 
dolph county,  where  they  "pitched  their  tent"  and  sojourned 
for  a  time,  before  coming  to  Cedar  creek,  in  Gilmer  county, 
where  they  reared  their  humble  dwelling  and  remained  for 
many  years. 

Shortly    after    they    settled    down    here,    another    child 
was    added    to    the    family,    which    they    called    "Benjamin," 

and  in  1813,  the  fifth  and  last  child  was 
born,  and  his  name  was  "George 
Washington,"  for  the  fond  parents  de- 
clared that  his  very  features  were  like 
none  other  than  the  great  General.  He 
grew  to  the  intelligent  manhood  that 
his  early  youth  promised,  and  married 
Miss  Rachel  Goff,  granddaughter  of 
Salathiel  Goff,  and  settled  five  miles 
below  Grantsville,  on  the  little  Kana- 
wha river,  at  what  is  known  as  "Plard- 
man's  Bend,"  and  here,  on  the  old 
homestead,  beside  his  wife,  he  quietly 
Georgre  w.  Hardman.  reposes.  He  was  promoted  to  the 
rank  of  major  in  the  Mexican  war,  and  was  a  large  land-owner 
and  stock-raiser,  and  from  him  the  Hardman s,  who  are  so 
prominently  known  in  political  circles  in  the  State,  are  de- 
scended. He  being  the  father  of  the  following  named  chil- 
dren :  Sylvester  and  Orlando,  who  have  joined  the  throng 
over  there,  once  occupied  seats  in  the  State  Senate;  George 
W.,  late  candidate  for  Congress  on  the  Democratic  ticket, 
has  twice  served  as  sheriff  of  Calhoun  county ;  Columbus, 
who  passed  on  in  1909;  Cassett,  Marcellus,  Jerome  and  Allen, 
who  are  all  prominent  farmers,  stockmen  and  timbermen  of 
Roane  county ;  Warren  and  Floyd,  who  died  in  infancy ;  the 
late    Mrs.    Dorcas    (Levi)    Ball,    and    Mrs.    S.    Jane    (Albert) 


54  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Pearcy.  C.  C.  Hardman,  of  Kyger,  Roane  county,  the  young 
instructor  of  Farmers'  Institutes,  who  recently  formed  the 
acquaintance  of  the  people  of  this  county,  is  the  son  of  the 
late  Sh^vester  Hardman. 

Nancy  Hardman,  the  only  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Dorcas 
Hardman,  married  a  man  by  the  name  of  Parsons,  of  Gilmer 
county,  and  he  went  to  the  war  (of  1813)  with  James  Hard- 
man  and  died  soon  after  his  return  home.  His  wife,  Nancy, 
then  married  a  Air.  Kearns,  of  Stuart's  creek.  Gilmer  county, 
and  there  some  of  her  descendants  still  live. 

Thomas  Hardman  was  married  to  Miss  Rebecca  Goff, 
daughter  of  John  and  granddaughter  of  Salathiel,  and  settled 
at  Reedyville,  in  Roane  county.  Here,  at  his  home,  Joseph 
and  Dorcas  Hardman  died  and  at  Reedyville  they  lie  at  rest. 
Joseph  was  ninety-six  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  his  death. 

Some  time  after  the  Civil  war,  Thomas  Hardman  and 
his  wife  went  to  Parsons,  Kansas,  where  they  spent  the  clos- 
ing hours  of  their  lives  with  their  children,  and  there  their 
ashes  lie. 

Their  family  consisted  of  the  following  named  children: 

William,  the  eldest  son,  still  survives  as  a  citizen  of 
Roane  county,  though  well  advanced  in  years  ;  Nancv  was  the 
late  wife  of  Sandy  Board;  Christen?,  married  Kellis  Arga- 
bright;  George,  John.  James,  Salathial  and  Drusilla.  who  ^vas 
the  wife  of  Captain  Albert  G.  Ingraham,  of  the  Confederate 
army.  The  late  John's  family  live  in  Roane  county,  as  do 
other  descendants,  and  some  of  them  reside  in  the  far  West. 


Note. — To  Mr.  Paul  Hardman,  of  Nebo,  Clay  courty  (only  son  of  Mar- 
cellus  and  the  late  Chantilla  Stump  Hardman,  and  grandson  of  George 
"^'ashinglon),  we  are  indebted  for  this  valuable  ancescial  .«ketch  of  the  Hard- 
man«,  and  for  the  verification  of  the  nationality  of  the  GofEs  and  the  Riddles. 
He  having  been  selected  a  few  years  ago  to  prepare  a  history  of  the  Hard- 
mans  to  be  read  at  a  re-union  of  hi«  branch  of  the  family,  set  himself 
about  the  task  sparing  no  pains  in  gathering  and  verifying  this  data,  so 
far  as  it  was  possible  to  do  so.  And  thougli  the  Riddle.s  claim  to  be 
French  and  the  GofEs,  English,  it  has  been  proved  beyond  a  doubt,  that 
they  came  from  Germany  to  England,  and  from  there  to  the  colonies. 
IVIr.  Hardinan's  sources  of  inforination  were  many  and  varied.  He  inter- 
viewed aged  persons  in  his  quest  who  had  known  the  older  generations 
of  these  families,  and  who  had  heard  them  tell  in  their  German  brogue 
(for  they  could  not  speak  Engli.'^h  distinctly)  of  the  oppression  that  drove 
them  froin  the  land  of  their  birth  beyond  the  deep.  He  also  met  with  a 
young  lady  from  Germany,  not  long  since,  who  is  acquainted  with  the 
Hardmans  of  the  present  generation  in  her  native  land,  and  she  remarked 
about  the  striking  resemblance  that  he  bore  to  them. 

Another  .'strong  proof  of  the  long  a'^sociation  of  the  Goffs.  the  Riddels 
and  the  Hardmans  is  the  numerous  marriages  and  inter-marriages  of  the 
families  for  the  past  five  or  six  generations. 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLED  55 

Several  of  these  sons  served  as  Union  soldiers  diirinp-  the  Civil 

o 

war. 

Peter  Wolfe,  as  before  stated,  made  the  first  settle- 
ment on  the  A.  P.  Hardnian  estate,  and  he,  trading  farms 
with  James  Hardman,  went  from  there  to  the  M.  A. 
Ayres  farm  at  Smithville,  where  he  was  laid  to  rest  before 
the  year  1830.  He  was  born  in  Harrison  county  of  German 
parentage,  and  was  of  Indian  fighting  stock.  He  married 
Miss  Maudlin  Hanley,  of  Harrison  county,  and  came  to  this 
county  early  in  the  century.  He  wa,s  the  father  of  Samuel 
Wolfe,  who  resided  here  in  pioneer  days,  but  finally  found  a 
resting  place  in  the  west ;  of  the  late  John  Wolfe,  of  Gilmer 
county;  Susan,  who  married  James  Malone,  junior,  and  sleeps 
at  Harrisville ;  of  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Righter)  Cunning- 
ham, of  Ohio ;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Mary  Drimon,  of  Harrison 
county. 

Mrs.  John  M.  Brown,  of  Hannahdale,  is  the  great-grand- 
daughter of  this  pioneer,  and  the  Wolfes,  of  \\''olfe  Pen,  are 
also  his  descendants,  besides  not  a  few  of  them  live  in  Gilmer 
comity. 

Valentine  Bozarth  was  the  successor  of  Mr.  Wolfe  on 
the  Smithville  farm.  He  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Rebecca  Hall 
Bozarth,  came  from  Plarrison  county  and  went  to  Iowa,  here 
their  brief  history  ends.  The  Bozarths  were  brave  Indian 
fighters,  and  their  thrilling  adventures  with  the  red  men  are 
recorded  on  the  pages  of  "Border  W^arfare." 

The  Malones. — Contemporary  with  the  settlement  of  Mr. 
Wolfe  on  the  Hardman  farm  was  that  of  James  Malone, 
senior,  on  the  W.  G.  Lowther  homestead,  which  joins  it  on 
the  east. 

Mr.  Malone  was  of  Irish  descent,  and  along  with  Mr. 
Wolfe,  he  came  from  Harrison  county,  and  erected  his  cabin 
near  the  present  site  of  the  Lowther  residence,  which,  though 
somcAvhat  modernized,  was  built  more  than  three-quarters  of 
a  century  ago  by  Samuel  Wolfe,  and  is  one  of  the  oldest  land- 
marks in  this  section. 

The  location  of  this  farm  is  one  of  the  most  beautiful 
along  the  river,  and  among  its  other  points  of  special  interest 
are :   an    old   Indian    mound,   which,   though   once   visible   for 


HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 


miles  around,  is  fast  disappearing  under  the  plowman's  cul- 
tivator ;  and  a  lasting  spring,  which  has  quenched  the  thirst 
of  the  children  of  men,  the  dusky  face  as  well  as  the  pale,  for 
"thousands  of  moons,"  and  over  its  lucid  waters  bends  the 
branches  of  a  willow  of  hugh  dimensions,  the  history  of  which 
began  less  than  forty-five  years  ago,  when  Miss  Abigail  Os- 
bourne,  eldest  daughter  of  the  late  AVilliam  Osbourne,  who 
was  then  a  small  girl,  planted  her  riding  switch  there.  The 
circumference  of  this  tree  at  the  base  now  measures  fifteen 
feet. 

Mr.  Malone  removed  (from  here)  to  the  Kennedy  farm, 
at  the  mouth  of  Lamb's  run,  and  here,  he  and  his  wife,  who 
was  Miss  Elizabeth  Findlay,  a  descendant  of  the  Drake  family, 
lie  sleeping. 


The  Old  Malone  liomestead  as  it  appears  to-day  ("Wyldewood  cot- 
tage") where  the  "History  of  Ritchie  County"  was  written.  One  of  the 
oldest   landmarks  on  the  river. 

He  was  the  father  of  James  Malone,  junior,  of  John,  Mrs. 
Jane  Cunningham  (mother  of  Mrs.  Israel  Davidson,  of  Spruce 
creek)  ;  and  of  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Cornelius)  Wyei',  of 
Gilmer  count}^  His  children  were  all  the  heads  of  pioneer 
families  of  this  county. 

John  Malone  married  Miss  Rebecca  Webb,  sister  of  Ben- 
jamin Webb,  and  was  the  first  settler  on  the  E.  R.  Tibbs 
farm,  at  Goff's.  He  went  from  here  to  Bull  creek,  v.'here  some 
of  his  descendants  still  live. 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLED  57 

James  Malone,  junior,  married  Miss  Susan  Wolfe,  daugh- 
ter of  Peter,  and  succeeded  his  father  on  the  Kennedy  farm. 
He  removed  from  there,  early  in  the  forties,  to  the  farm  that 
is  now  designated  as  the  Willianf  Flannagan  homestead,  near 
Hannahdale,  and  here  he  passed  from  earth,  in  the  early  six- 
ties, and  in  the  Harrisville  cemetery,  beside  his  wife,  he  sleeps. 

He  figured  prominently  in  the  early  history  of  the  county, 
as  Justice  of  the  peace  and  as  representative  in  the  legislature 
at  Richmond. 

He  was  the  father  of  Alfred  Malone,  a  lay  minister  of  the 
M.  E.  church,  who  sleeps  in  Kansas;  James  (the  HI),  who 
died  in  the  Union  cause;  Francis  M.,  who  rests  at  Lima, 
Ohio ;  the  late  Samuel,  of  Nebraska ;  and  Osbourne,  who  died 
at  Weston;  Fannie  became  Mrs.  Broadwater,  of  Hannahdale; 
Rebecca,  Mrs.  Jacob  Trainer,  of  Riddel's  chapel;  Mary  Jane. 
Mrs.  William  Maley,  of  the  same  vicinity ;  Elizabeth  was  the 
late  Mrs.  John  Clutter,  and  Eliza,  Mrs.  Harvey  Clutter,  of 
Iowa ;  Martha  married  and  died  in  St.  Louis,  Missouri ;  and 
Sarah,  the  only  survivor  of  the  family,  is  Mrs.  Clutter,  of  Pitts- 
burg, Kansas. 

Mrs.  J.  M.  Brown,  of  Hannahdale,  is  the  granddaughter 
of  this  pioneer. 

Among  the  great-grandchildren  of  James  Malone,  senior, 
who  are  citizens  of  this  part  of  the  county,  are  C.  J.  Valen- 
tine, of  Fonsoville;  S.  A.  Wyer,  of  Auburn;  J.  B.  Valentine, 
of  Macfarlan ;  and  not  a  few  of  the  Wyers  of  Gilmer  county. 

John  Wilson  was  the  pioneer  on  the  Kennedy  farm,  Mr. 
Malone  having  purchased  his  improvement. 

Mr.  Wilson  and  his  wife,  who  was  formerly  a  Miss  White, 
went  from  here  to  Iowa,  and  we  have  been  unable  to  learn 
anything  farther  of  their  history,  save  that  Francis  Wilson, 
of  Tanners,  belongs  to  this  family,  he  being  descended  from 
a  brother  of  John  Wilson. 

The  Elliotts. — Not  far  from  the  time  of  the  coming  of  the 
Malones,  Jabez  Elliott  found  a  home  on  the  Eugene  Barker 
farm,  near  the  mouth  of  Lamb's  run,  and  in  this  vicinity  he 


58  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

spent  the  rest  of  his  days,  and  in  the  Smithville  cemetery  he 
found  a  final  resting  place. 

The  early  history  of  this  family  is  very  meager,  and  what 
is  in  our  possession  cannot«be  verified. 

But  they  are  of  English  origin  and  they  probably  first 
settled  in  the  New  England  colonies,  where  they  were  en- 
gaged in  savage  warfare.  And  we,  also,  find  them  in  Ohio  bat- 
tling with  the  Indians,  during  General  Wayne's  campaign. 

Jabez  Elliott  is  said  to  have  been  a  native  of  the  New 
England  States  and  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812.  He  married 
Miss  Elizabeth  AVigner,  daughter  of  John  Wigner,  senior, 
and  sister  of  John,  junior,  of  Ellenboro,  and  came  here  from 
Harrison  county.  His  venerable  widow  spent  her  last  days 
in  an  old  cabin  that  stood  near  the  present  residence  of  W.  J. 
Burwell,  in  the  vicinity  of  Gofif's.  Here  she  passed  to  her 
reward  in  1875,  at  the  age  of  ninety-six  years.  She  had  been 
a  communicant  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  for  seventy- 
eight  years,  she  being  one  of  the  class  that  was  organized  in 
1810.  She  rests  in  the  Smithville  cemetery  by  the  side  of  her 
husband. 

Their  children  were  as  follows  : 

John,  Jacob,  Henry,  AVashington,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Low- 
ther,  Mrs.  Sarah  Howard  and  Ad^rs.  Manly  Collins,  all  of  this 
county;  and  Jabez,  junior,  of  Calhoun.  All  have  now  passed 
to  the  other  shore,  but  their  descendants  in  this  county  are 
not  a  itw. 

Among  the  grandsons  are  Frank  and  AA-^esley  Elliott,  of 
Indian  creek ;  and  Thomas  Elliott,  of  Pullman.  Hayes  Elliott, 
the  assistant  cashier  of  the  Pullman  bank,  is  a  great-grandson. 

Manly  Collins  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  ]\Iary  Elliott  Collins, 
were  the  first  settlers  on  Lamb's  run  after  the  Elliott  family, 
they  having  built  their  cabin  where  Emery  Tibbs  now  lives. 

Mrs.  Collins  survived  until  a  few  years  since,  when  she 
passed  away  at  a  ripe  old  age,  and  was  laid  at  rest  in  the  Cun- 
ningham burying-grovmd,  near  Mahone. 

Mr.  Collins  was  the  son  of  Mrs.  Alary  Collins,  who  spent 
her  last  hours  on  Slab  Creek,  and  a  brother  of  Chainey  Collins, 
of  Smithville;  of  Mrs.  Phebe  Smith,  late  wife  of  Aaron  Smith, 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLED  59 

of  Smith's  chapel ;  and  of  John  Collins,  of  Wirt  county,  all  of 
whom  have  passed  on. 

The  children  of  Manly  and  Mary  Collins  are  as  follows: 

Daniel,  Benjamin,  Mrs.  Sarah  Frederick,  and  Mary  and 
Louisa,  who  are  dead. 

After  the  death  of  Jabez  Elliott  his  family  had  a  dwell- 
ing erected,  where  Peyton  Tingler  now  lives,  and  for  a  num- 
ber of  years  this  cabin  was  occupied  by  the  Elliott  family. 

This  stream  is  said  to  have  taken  its  name  from  a  man 
by  the  name  of  Lamb,  but  we  have  been  unable  to  learn  any- 
thing farther  concerning  his  history. 

The  Wigners. — John  Wigner,  senior,  succeeded  William 
Layfield  on  the  S.  H.  Westfall  farm,  above  Smithville.  This 
old  pioneer  cabin  stood  on  a  rivulet,  which  still  bears  his  name, 
"Wigner's  run." 

Mr.  Wigner  was  of  German  lineage,  and  he  came  here 
from  near  Philadelphia  before  the  year  1810,  and  here  the 
remnant  of  his  days  was  spent,  and  in  some  of  the  old  bury- 
ing-grounds  in  this  vicinity  his  ashes  lie. 

He  was  the  father  of  John  Wigner,  junior,  the  first  settler 
at  Ellenboro ;  of  Jacob,  of  Stuart's  run  ;  of  Henry,  of  Husher's 
run;  Joseph  and  Daniel,  of  Ohio;  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Jabez) 
Elliott,  of  Gofif's ;  Mrs.  Elijah  Cunningham,  Husher's  run ; 
Mrs.  Piarbara  Newcome,  and  Mrs.  Susan  White,  of  Gallipolis, 
Ohio. 

John  Cornell. — John  Cornell  was  the  first  resident  of  the 
Martin  Smith  farm,  above  Smithville.  He  and  his  wife,  Mrs. 
Susan  Park  Cornell,  came  from  "Maryland,  My  Maryland," 
and  having  twice  purchased  this  farm  and  lost  it  at  law, 
removed  to  Pleasants  county,  in  1840,  where  he  "laid  down 
the  cross"  in  1860.  Seventeen  years  later  his  wife  joined  him 
on  the  other  side,  and  in  the  Rutnian  cemetery  they  both  lie 
at  rest. 

Mr.  Cornell  was  a  Revolutionary  soldier,  and  was  the 
son  of  William  Cornell,  an  Irishman.  He  and  his  wife  were 
the  parents  of  twelve  children — seven  sons  and  five  daughters, 
all  of  whom  reached  the  years  of  maturity:  Benjamin  resides 
at  Bufifalo,  in  Putnam  county ;  Susan  is  Mrs.  William  Ward, 
of  Shultz  ;  Mary  is  Mrs.  Stephen  Workman,  of  Huntington; 


60  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Sarah  is  Airs.  William  Douglass,  of  Highland;  William  sleeps 
in  Oregon;  Harrison,  in  the  Dry  Ridge  cemetery;  two  sons 
and  two  daughters,  with  the  parents  in  the  Rutman  cemetery; 
one  son,  at  Smithville,  and  one,  in  Calhoun  county. 

John  Cornell,  of  Calhoun  county,  is  a  grandson  of  this 
pioneer,  as  is  J.  A.  Cornell,  of  Burnt  House.  And  Mrs.  Free- 
man G.  Barr,  of  Smithville,  is  a  great-granddaughter. 

Mrs.  Douglass,  while  on  a  visit  with  her  daughter,  Mrs. 
A.  D.  Adams,  at  the  M.  E.  church  parsonage  at  Smithville, 
during  the  autumn  of  1904,  visited  the  place  of  her  nativity, 
after  an  absence  of  sixty-five  years,  and  noted  with  interest 
the  changes  that  had  been  wrought  by  the  mighty  hand  of 
"Father  Time." 

Elias  Lowther  was  another  early  settler  in  the  Webb's 
mill  vicinitv.  He  was  the  second  blacksmith  and  the  first 
gunsmith  and  powder-maker  in  this  section.  He  was  the  son 
of  Thomas  and  the  grandson  of  Col.  William  Lowther,  and 
like  the  other  pioneers  of  this  name,  was  a  native  of  West  Mil- 
ford.  He  removed  to  Wirt  county  near  the  year  1825,  and 
here,  fell  asleep,  and  here  some  of  his  descendants  live.  He 
had  two  sons,  Andrew  and  Daniel,  and  perhaps  other  children. 

The  Dyes. — Dennis  Dye  was  the  first  settler  on  the  farm 
which,  is  still  designated  as  the  "Dye  farm,"  in  the  Webb's 
mill  vicinity,  though  now  owned  by  Martin  Smith  and  son. 

Mr.  Dye  was  the  son  of  Reuben  and  Alary  Dye,  who 
came  from  Prince  William  county,  Virginia,  at  an  early  day 
and  settled  in  AVood  county,  and  he  was  a  brother  of  the  hte 
D.  Dye,  of  Elizabeth;  John,  of  Ohio,  and  William  and  Benja- 
min, who  started  to  Texas  and  were  never  heard  of  again. 

Dennis  Dye  was  born  in  1801,  and  came  to  this  county 
in  his  early  manhood  and  married  Miss  Anna  Webb,  daughter 
of  Benjamin  Webb,  and  took  up  his  residence  on  the  old 
homestead,  above  mentioned,  near  the  year  1835,  where  he 
remained  until  June  20,  1866,  when  he  crossed  to  the  other 
side. 

His  wife  was  born  on  July  14,  1809,  and  died  in  June,  1888. 
Both  sleep  in  the  Webb's  mill  cemetery. 

His  children  are  as  follows:  Benjamin,  David,  William, 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLED  61 

Mrs.  Julia  (Adam)  Laird,  Mrs.  Jane  (Daniel)  Nicholson,  of 
Calhoun  county;  and  Mrs.  Martha  (Robert)  Taylor,  of  Smith- 
ville;  and  Mrs.  Drusilla  Gear,  of  Wirt  county;  who  have  all 
passed  on;  and  Mrs.  Harriet  (Barnes)  Smith,  Burnt  House; 
Mrs.  Nancy  (Jacob)  Cunningham,  Smithville;  Mrs.  Mary 
(Barnes)  Smith,  Auburn;  Mrs.  Ag-nes  Haught,  Wirt  county; 
and  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Nutter,  Kansas,  are  the  surviving  ones. 

Benjamin  Dye,  whose  family  are  still  identified  with  the 
Smithville  vincinity;  was  born  at  the  old  home  at  Webb's 
mill,  on  August  16,  18?'7,  and  though  he  resided  across  the 
Calhoun  county  line,  after  his  marriage  to  Miss  Roena  Petty, 
daughter  of  Rowland  Petty,  of  Wirt  county,  on  January  JO, 
1860,  his  entire  life  was  spent  within  the  bounds  of  the  Sm.ith- 
ville  vicinity.  He  passed  from  earth  on  Alarch  3,  1905, 
and  Mrs.  Dye  followed  him  to  the  grave  on  May  30,  1909. 
Both  lie  at  rest  in  the  Nicholas  burying-ground,  near  the  old 
home  in  Calhoun  county. 

They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  named  children : 

The  one  daughter  died  in  childhood ;  and  their  sons  are : 
Dr.  W.  T.  W.  Dye,  of  Grantsville ;  Dr.  James  A.  Dye,  Minora; 
Rowland  F.  Dye,  Smithville ;  George  W.  and  Judson  B.  Dye, 
Freed. 

The  Smiths. — John  Every,  of  whose  history  we  know 
nothing,  erected  the  first  dwelling  on  the  B.  H.  Wilson  farm 
at  Goff's,  but  this  improvement  passed  into  the  hands  of 
Barnes  Smith  as  early  as  1810,  and  remained  in  his  possession 
until  near  the  year  1835,  •  when  he  removed  to  Smithville, 
where  he  passed  from  earth,  on  March  9,  1857. 

In  his  honor  the  town  was  named  and  within  the  peace- 
ful bosom  of  its  cemetery  his  ashes  lie. 

Mr.  Smith  was  of  English  lineage.  His  ancestors  came 
to  America  in  Colonial  days  and  settled  in  Virginia,  but  he 
was  born  in  Harrison  county,  on  May  18,  1782,  and  there  he 
was  married  to  Miss  Anne  Earle,  who  was  born  on  November 
26,  1788,  and  died  on  October  14,  1855,  and  rests  at  Smithville. 
Nine  children  were  the  result  of  this  union : 

Isaac  and  Barnes,  junior,  sleep  at  Smithville:  Joshua,  in 
Calhoun  county;  Levi  J.,  in  Boone  county,  Iowa;  Sarah,  who 
married  Samuel  Davidson,  in  Gilmer  county,  near  Tanners- 


62  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

ville ;  Kathrine  (Mrs.  Levi  Smith),  on  Spruce  creek;  Hila 
(Mrs.  Eli  Riddel),  near  Goff 's ;  Mary  (Mrs.  George  Goff),  in 
Missouri;  Elizabeth  (Mrs.  Thomas  Goff),  in  Iowa. 

Although  these  children  were  so  widely  scattered,  their 
descendants  in  this  county  are  a  multitude.  Among  the 
grandchildren  are  Martin  Smith,  Alvus  Smith,  Mrs.  M.  A. 
Ayres,  and  Mrs.  Alfred  Barr,  of  Smithville ;  T.  M.  Goff',  of 
Harrisville;  the  late  Mrs.  A.  P.  Hardman,  Fonsoville;  Mrs. 
John  White,  S.  B.  and  S.  A.  Smith,  of  Iowa. 

Dr.  J.  M.  Goff,  of  Harrisville,  is  a  great-grandson. 

(Several  of  these  sons  were  among  the  pioneers  of  this 
county  and  the  history  of  their  families  will  be  found  else- 
where.) 

Aaron  Smith,  brother  of  Barnes,  who  was  also  a  native 
of  Harrison  county,  was  the  first  settler  at  Goff's,  on  the  land 
that  is  now  the  homes  of  Abner  Hatfield  and  E.  C.  Goff"  and 
the  Reeves  estate. 

His  old  cabin,  which  was  built  early  in  the  century,  stood 
near  the  present  Hatfield  residence,  and  not  far  away,  on  this 
homestead,  he  lies  in  his  last  sleep. 

He  married  Miss  Hannah  Drake,  sister  of  the  Rev. 'John 
Drake,  who  was  born  on  April  17,  1778,  and,  like  his  brother, 
has  an  innumerable  line  of  descendants  in  this  and  adjoining 
counties. 

After  his  death  his  widow  married  John  Riddel,  the  Grass 
run  pioneer,  and  in  Roane  county  she  died  on  October  27,  1868. 

Their  children  are  as  follows:  Elijah,  Levi,  William, 
Elisha.  Rebecca,  Zilpah,  Susan,  Orpha,  Rhoda  and  Eda. 

Elijah  married  his  cousin,  Miss  Roana  Smith,  daughter 
of  Squire  Smith,  of  Harrison  county,  and  lived  and  died  near 
the  mouth  of  Smith's  run,  where  his  son,  Aaron,  still  survives. 
He  was  also  the  father  of  the  late  James,  of  Gilmer  county  ;  and 
of  Mrs.  Thomas  D.  Tibbs,  of  Lamb's  run. 

Levi  married  his  cousin,  Miss  Kathrine  Smith,  daughter 
of  Barnes,  senior,  and  was  one  of  the  Spruce  creek  pioneers. 

William  married  Miss  Susana  Cain,  daughter  of  David 
Cain,  and  went  to  Lee  creek,  where  he  died  in  1883,  at  the  age 
of  eighty-six  years. 

Elisha    married    Miss    Martha    Stuart,    sister    of    Robert 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLED  63 

Stuart,  aii^  settled  the  Connolly  farm,  on  Leatherbrake,  where 
he  and  his  wife  and  several  children,  all  died  near  the  same  time 
of  fever. 

Elisha,  his  eldest  son,  who  was  married,  died  at  this 
time;  and  Levi,  of  Hardman  chapel ;  and  Gilbert,  oi  Long  run ; 
and  Mrs.  Lydia  Ann  Goff,  wife  of  the  late  M.  A.  Goff,  of 
Hazelgreen ;  and  mother  of  L.  C.  GolT,  of  Juna,  have  since 
passed  on,  leaving  families;  and  James  T.  Smith,  of  Burnt 
House;  and  Mrs.  Sarah  Jane  (John)  Goff,  of  Gilmer  county: 
are  the  surviving  members  of  the  family. 

Rebecca  Smith  married  Cornelius  Cain,  and  lived  and 
died  in  this  county.  Her  children  were  the  late  Mrs.  Rosetta 
Moats,  of  Cairo ;  Mrs.  Phillip  Goft",  of  Juna ;  Mrs.  Ruhama 
(Ephraim)  Morehead,  Mrs.  Louisa  Chevrount,  David,  Cor- 
nelius H.,  Albert,  James  and  Lemuel  Cain. 

Zilpah  Smith  married  James  Riddel  and  went  to  Gilmer 
county. 

Susan  became  Mrs.  Jacob  Smith  and  went  to  Roane 
county. 

Orpha  was  Mrs.  Hill,  of  Clay  county ;  Rhoda,  Mrs.  Board, 
of  Roane  county.  Eda  married  Benjamin  Goff  and  became 
the  head  of  a  pioneer  family  of  this  county.  (See  later  chap- 
ter.)    She  was  the  last  survivor  of  the  family. 

David  Cain  was  the  first  settler  on  the  late  Wilson  Prunty 
homestead,  now  the  property  of  John  Gorrell. 

He  was  of  Holland  descent.  He  married  Miss  Mary  Cain, 
who  was  born  in  1T79,  and  came  here  from  Ohio.  He  finally 
went  to  Lee  creek,  where  he  sleeps.  His  wife  rests  in  the 
Egypt  cemetery  at  Cairo. 

The  Cain's  run,  on  the  south  side  of  the  river,  took  its 
name  from  a  sugar  camp  that  he  owned,  which  was  located 
just  below  the  John  Wass  residence. 

Mr.  Cain  has  been  accredited  with  the  first  settlement  at 
the  mouth  of  Slab  creek,  btU  this  claim  proves  to  be  in  error, 
as  John  Shores,  father  of  the  late  James  Shores,  of  Cairo,  was 
the  first  pioneer  at  the  mouth  of  this  creek. 

Mr.  Cain's  children  were  as  follows : 

Susana    (Mrs.  Wm.   Smith),  of  Lee  creek;  Mary   (Mrs. 


64  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Joseph  Wilson),  of  Slab  creek;  Cornelius  Cain,  of  Cairo,  and 
Jesse. 

Jesse  married  a  Miss  Firth,  of  Barbour  county,  and  set- 
tled on  the  north  side  of  Hughes  river,  at  the  mouth  of  the 
run,  which  still  bears  his  name,  "Jesse  Cain's  run,"  where 
Peter  and  Charles  Wass  now  live. 

Quite  a  number  of  David  Cain's  grandchildren  are  still 
identified  among  the  citizens  of  the  county. 

Lemuel  Wilson,  of  Smithville ;  Mrs.  Phillip  Gofif,  of  Juna ; 
the  late  Mrs.  Rosetta  Moats,  of  Cairo  ;  are  among  the  nundDcr. 


A  family  by  the  name  of  Belt  made  the  first  improvement 
at  the  forks  of  Hughes  river,  on  the  farm  that  became  the  per- 
manent home  of  the  Jacksons,  in  1830. 

Thomas  Cummins,  another  early  settler,  moved  farther 
west  in  1811,  and  the  name  of  George  Turvey  is  also  men- 
tioned among  the  very  early  settlers,  but  we  have  been  unable 
to  learn  anything  of  his  history  or  settlement. 

Although  many  authentic  dates  are  wanting,  the  greater 
number  of  these  settlers  are  said  to  have  come  before  the  year 
1810. 


CHAPTER  IV 


Thomas  and  Phebe  Cunningham 

HE  year  1807  was  marked  by  the  coming  of 
Thomas  and  Phebe  Cunningham,  from  Har- 
rison county.  Though  many  historic  remin- 
iscences cluster  about  the  names  of  the 
brave-hearted  pioneers  of  this  county,  per- 
haps no  other  one  is  of  such  absorbing  in- 
terest as  the  one  that  hangs  about  the  mem- 
ory of  Thomas  and  Phebe  Cunningham;  and,  perhaps,  too,  no 
other  pioneer  family  is  more  largely  represented  among  the 
present  citizenship  of  the  county  ;•  and  from  the  pages  of 
"Border  Warfare"  we  glean  the  story  of  their  adventure  with 
the  Indians,  before  they  became  identified  with  the  history  of 
Ritchie  county : 

In  1785,  when  our  tragical  story  opens,  Thomas  Cunning- 
ham and  his  brother,  Edward,  resided  in  Harrison  county  on 
Bingamon  creek,  a  branch  of  the  West  fork,  in  adjoining 
cabins.  Thomas  was  absent  on  a  irading  expedition,  when 
six  Indians  made  their  appearance  at  his  home. 

Mrs.  Cunningham  and  the  four  children  were  gathered 
al)out  the  dinner-table  when  one  entered,  and  closing  the  door 
behind  him,  stood  with  drawn  tomahawk  for  a  few  moments; 
then,  having  at  once  apprehended  danger  from  the  other 
cabin,  and  having  no  such  fear  of  the  helpless  mother  and 
children,  he  seemed  for  a  time  only  intent  upon  his  own 
escape. 

Edward,  seeing  the  Indian  enter  his  brother's  cabin, 
secured  his  own  door,  and,  stepping  to  a  small  opening  in  the 
wall,  stood  ready  to  fire  when  the  "ntruder  should  make  his 
appearance  ;  but  in  Thomas'  cabin  was  a  like  aperture,  and 
through  it  the  Indian  fired  at  Edward,  and  gave  the  signal 
for  victory,  which  was   answered  by   Edward,  who  saw   the 


06  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

aim  of  the  savage  in  time  to  save  his  life.  So  narrow  was 
his  escape  that  the  bark  from  the  log  struck  him  in  the  face. 

The  Indian,  seeing  that  he  had  missed  his  aim,  at  once 
seized  an  adz  and  began  cutting  an  outlet  through  the  back 
of  the  cabin,  so  that  he  could  escape  without  danger  from 
Edward's  house.  While  thus  engaged,  he  asked  ]ylrs.  Cun- 
ningham how  many  were  in  the  other  cabin,  and  she  tacill}- 
replied  by  holding  up  the  fingers  of  both  hands. 

Just  after  the  firing  had  ceased  another  Indian  entered  the 
yard,  and,  seeing  Edward's  gun  through  the  port  hole,  beat 
a  hasty  retreat;  but  Edward  fired,  the  bullet  taking  effect  in 
the  Indian's  hip;  he  managed,  however,  to  reach  some  place 
of  safety  before  Cunningham  could  again  load  his  gun. 

Mrs.  Cunningham  made  no  effort  to  escape,  for  she  felt 
that  death  only  awaited  her  at  the  hands  of  the  lurking  foe 
without.  To  escape  with  her  children  was  impossible ;  and 
to  leave  them  at  the  mercy  of  this  savage  monster  was  not  to 
be  thought  of.  So  she  cherished  the  liope  that  he  might  quiet- 
ly withdraw,  but  the  fallacy  of  such  a  hope  was  soon  evident, 
w'hen  he  sank  his  ruthless  tomahawk  into  the  brains  of  one 
of  her  children,  and  casting  its  scarcely  lifeless  form  into  the 
yard,  ordered  her  to  follow  him.  She,  knowing  that  resistance 
meant  certain  death,  quietly  obeyed,  stepping  over  the  dead 
body  of  her  child,  as  she  passed  out  w'ith  her  babe  in  her  arms, 
and  the  other  two  children  clinging  to  her  and  screaming 
frantically  at  the  horror  of  the  sight. 

W'hen  all  were  outside,  scalping  the  dead  boy.  he  set  iire 
to  the  house,  and  withdrew  to  a  high  point  in  the  field,  where 
he  joined  his  two  companion,  who  Avere  caring  for  the 
wounded  Indian.  The  other  two  were  left  to  guard  the  door 
of  Edward's  house,  so  that  they  could  strike  the  fatal  blow 
when  the  flames  should  drive  them  out;  but  fortunately  the 
family  were  able  to  extinguish  the  fire  from  within  by  tearing 
the  boards  from  the  roof,  though  the  Indians  kept  up  their 
firing  all  the  while. 

AVithout  hope  of  accomplishing  more,  and  fearing  detec- 
tion, they  gathered  together,  and,  having  tomahawked  the 
elder  Cunningham  boy  and  his  little  sister — whom  they  beat 
against  a  tree  until  life  w^as  extinct — they  took  their  departure. 


THOMAS  AND   PHEBE   CUNNINGHAM  67 

Mrs.  Cunningham  said  that  the  last  she  saw  of  her  little 
daughter  was  one  quivering  foot  sticking  up  from  behind  a 
log,  where  she  had  been  thrown.  The  poor  mother  stood 
aghast,  dazed  with  grief,  momentarily  expecting  the  death 
blow  to  fall  upon  her  and  the  little  one  at  her  breast.  But 
a  more  cruel  fate  awaited  her — that  of  the  life  of  a  captive. 

From  this  awful  scene,  she  was  taken  to  a  cave.  (This 
cave  is  said  to  be  about  two  miles  from  the  scene  of  the  cap- 
ture, on  Little  Indian  run — a  branch  of  Bingamon  creek — in 
Harrison  county.)  Here  the  Indians  remained  until  night, 
and,  under  cover  of  darkness,  returned  to  the  home  of  Ed- 
ward Cunningham,  and.  finding  it  deserted,  plundered,  and 
set  it  on  fire. 

Mr.  Cunningham  and  his  family  had  taken  refuge  in  the 
forest  during  the  night,  the  nearest  settlement  being  eight 
or  ten  miles  distant,  and  on  the  following  morning  gave  the 
alarm  ;  and  a  company  of  men  were  soon  in  pursuit.  When 
they  reached  the  scene  of  the  tragedy,  finding  the  cabins  in 
ashes,  and  being  unable  to  follow  the  trail,  so  carefully  had 
it  been  covered,  they  buried  the  remains  of  the  children  and 
returned  to  their  homes.  But  after  the  lapse  of  a  few  days, 
circumstances  pointed  to  the  suspicion  that  the  savages 
were  still  in  the  vicinity,  and  another  search  was  instituted, 
in  which  the  trail  was  followed  to  the  mouth  of  the  cave 
and  lost.  But  Major  Robinson,  being  familiar  with  the  forest, 
and  after  dwelling  upon  the  incidents  of  the  day,  remem- 
bered the  cave,  and  upon  investigation,  on  the  following  morn- 
ing, found  that  it  had  been  their  hiding  place,  but  was  now 
deserted.  They  had  resumed  their  journey  during  the  night, 
ha\ing  been  detained  here  by  the  wounded  Indian,  who,  Mrs. 
Cunningham  said,  was  borne  from  the  cave,  and  she  never 
saw  him  again.  She  supposed  that  he  was  dead,  and  that 
his  remains  were  sunk  in  a  pool  near  by. 

She  said  that  the  whites  were  so  near  several  times  that 
she  could  distinctly  hear  their  \'oices  ;  that  they  stood  -upon 
the  rock  above  her  head.  But  a  savage  stood  over  her  with 
an  uplifted  tomahawk,  commanding  silence,  and  forcing  her 
to  keep  the  child  to  her  breast,  lest  its  cries  slundd  lead  to 
their  apprehension. 


68  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COINTY 

Owing-  to  this  delay,  they  did  not  reach  their  own  coun- 
try for  some  time,  and  the  poor  captive's  sufifering  from  hun- 
ger, fatigue  and  grief,  was  ahnost  beyond  human  endurance ; 
and  the  helpless  infant  at  the  breast,  sought  milk  and  ob- 
tained blood  instead.  The  Indians,  observing  this,  ended  its 
sufferings  by  the  tomahawk,  while  it  clung  to  its  mother's 
bosom,  and  then  cast  its  lifeless  form  beside  Lhe  pathway, 
without  leaf  or  branch  to  protect  it  from  the  beasts  of  prey. 

No  tongue  or  pen  can  describe  the  anguish  of  the  suffer- 
ing mother,  whose  only  sustenance  for  ten  days  was  the 
head  of  a  Avild  turkey  and  three  pawpaws.  B}-  the  frequent 
wading  of  streams,  her  feet  had  become  so  scalded,  that  when 
she  reached  the  village  of  the  Delawares  and  was  permitted 
to  remove  her  stockings,  the  nails  and  skin  came  with  them. 
Yet,  on  the  follow'ing  day,  she  was  compelled  to  continue 
her  journey.  A  humane  Indian  of  the  village  somewhat  al- 
leviated her  pain  by  an  application  of  sanative  herbs. 

One  incident  of  this  dreadful  march,  which  has  been 
omitted  by  the  historian,  but  which  will  doubtless  add  inter- 
est here,  we  glean  from  the  Autobiography  of  the  late  Rev. 
James  L.  Clarke,  who  heard  it  from  her  own  lips,  and  who 
tells  it  in  the  following  language : 

"It  was  during  the  painful  march  after  the  murder  of  her 
babe,  that  she  was  converted.  Overwhelmed  and  horrified 
at  the  murder  of  her  children,  and  the  terrible  suffering  she 
was  then  undergoing,  she  longed  to  die.  and  wished  the 
savages  would  kill  her. 

"One  day  while  wishing  for  death,  the  question  was 
forced  into  her  mind,  'Are  you  prepared  to  die?'  It  awakened 
her,  she  saw  that  she  was  a  sinner,  and  if  she  died  as  she 
had  lived,  she  would  be  lost  and  would  have  to  endure  suf- 
fering forever  to.  which  the  sufferings  of  the  present  would 
bear  no  comparison,  and  that  she  must  be  forever  separated 
from  her  children,  whom  she  had  no  doubt  were  now  in 
Heaven. 

"She  now  became  very  much  alarmed  and  feared  that 
they  would  kill  her  before  she  was  |)repared  to  die.  fler  sins 
became  a  burden  too  intolerable  to  be  borne,  and  she  went 


THOMAS   AND   PHEBE   CUNNINGHAM  63 

lo   liini   who  said  'Come  unto  me  all  ye  that  labor  and  are 
heavy  laden,  and  I  will  give  you  rest.' 

"One  night  after  the  Indians  had  lain  down  in  a  circle 
around  the  fire,  with  her  inside  the  circle,  she  kneeled 
down  at  the  root  of  a  tree  and  in  her  agony  wrestled  with 
God  in  prayer,  and  taking  Jesus  as  her  Savior,  the  blessing 
came  in  power.  She  sprang  to  her  feet  clapping  her  hands, 
and  shouting  at  the  top  of  her  voice,  'Glory  to  God.'  The 
savages  raised  upon  their  elbows,  gave  the  Indian  'yough,' 
watched  her  for  a  while,  and  lay  down  again.  She  con- 
tinued to  shout  for  some  time,  the  fear  of  death  was  gone, 
and  her  soul  was  exceedingly  happy."  And  from  this  time 
until  Jicr  death,  she  continued  a  faithful,  devoted  Christian. 

When  the  home  of  her  captors  was  reached,  she  received 
no  barbarous  treatment,  but  she  was  filled  with  fear  and  the 
apprehension  of  some  impending  doom.  Everything  about 
her  seemed  to  bode  evil.  She  was  delivered  into  the  hands 
of  the  father  of  the  wounded  and  missing  Indian,  and  was 
compelled  to  wear  her  soiled  clothing,  whicli  was  regarded 
as  a  bad  omen  for  a  captive.  And  thus  for  three  years  her 
captivity  continued. 

A  conference,  preparatory  to  a  treaty  between  the  Whites 
and  the  Indians,  was  pending,  when,  one  evening,  she  noticed 
an  unusual  commotion  in  the  village,  and,  upon  inquiry, 
learned  that  the  presence  of  the  great  Simon  Girty  occasion- 
ed it. 

She  determined  to  ask  him  to  intercede  for  her  release, 
and  on  the  following  day,  seeing  him  passing  by  on  horse- 
back, she  went  to  him  and  lay  hold  of  his  stirrup,  and  im- 
plored his  interference  in  her  behalf,  which,  at  first,  was  only 
met  with  derision  ;  but  though  the  heart  of  this  chieftain  had 
long  been  a  stranger  to  tenderness  and  sympathy,  her  en- 
treaties finally  succeeded  in  touching  his  better  nature,  and 
he  made  intercession  for  her,  secured  her  release,  made  pro- 
visions for  her  ransom,  and  had  her  conveyed  to  the  commis- 
sioners who  negotiated  the  treaty. 

During  the  Autumn  of  1788,  having  been  in  captivity  for 
three  long,  weary  years,  she  was  taken  to  a  great  Indian 
conference,  at  the  foot  of  the  Maumee  rapids,  on  or  near  the 


70  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

present  site  of  Perrysburg,  Ohio;  and  while  here,  Captain 
Girty  brought  the  case  before  the  British  agent,  McKee, 
who  furnished  the  trinkets  for  the  ransom,  and  she  was  set 
free  :  and  from  here,  she  went  to  Kentucky  with  two  gentle- 
men, w^ho  came  to  this  conference  in  quest  of  their  captive 
children. 

After  much  difficulty  and  no  little  delay,  she  finally 
reached  her  old  home — the  home  of  Edward  Cunningham-  - 
in  Harrison  county,  and  found  that  her  husband,  on  hearing 
of  her  release,  had  gone  in  fjuest  of  her.  Depressed  by  the 
disappointment  of  not  meeting  him.  and  by  the  thought  of 
the  danger  and  peril  that  attended  his  every  footstep,  she 
could  not  enter  into  the  spirit  of  rejoicing,  that  her  home- 
coming had  occasioned;  but  in  a  few  days  her  husband,  learn- 
ing that  she  was  homeward  bound,  returned,  and  with  joy 
unspeakable,  clasped  to  his  bosom  again  the  long  lost  wife. 
Though  the  remembrance  of  the  tragic  fate  of  their  children, 
shadowed  the  joy  of  their  reunion,  yet,  time  alleviated  their 
sorrow^,  when  other,  and  more  fortunate,  children  came  to 
bless  their  home.  And  from  these  children  are  descended  no 
small  per  cent  of  the  present  population  of  Ritchie  county. 

The  Cunninghams  are  of  Irish  lineage.  Some  time  be- 
fore the  Revolutionary  war,  Hugh  Cunningham  and  his  wife. 
Nancy,  with  their  family  of  eight  sons  (Adam.  Ephraim, 
Benjamin,  Joseph,  \\'illiam,  \\'alter,  Edward  and  Thomas) 
came  from  Dublin,  Ireland,  and  settled  on  the  banks  of  the 
Potomac,  in  Eairfax  county,  Virginia  ;  and,  shortly  after  the 
close  of  the  Revolutionary  war,  Thomas,  Adam,  Edward, 
Walter,  and,  perhaps,  more  of  the  brothers,  came  to  Harri- 
son county,  where  they  entered  and  patented  large  tracts  of 
land  under  the  "tomahawk  title,"  on  Bingamon  creek.  Here 
they  resided  when  our  tragic  story  opened. 

Thomas  Cunningham  and  his  wife.  Phebe  Tucker  Cun- 
ningham, were  born  across  the  sea.  He,  in  Ireland,  and  she. 
in  England  of  Scottish  parentage,  in  1761.  He  had  served 
as  a  Revolutionary  soldier,  before  becoming  distinguished 
b}'  this  "adventure  among  the  Indians." 


THOMAS   AND   PHEBE   CUNNINGHAM  71 

In  1807,  as  above  stated,  they  came  to  this  county,  and 
settled  on  what  is  now  the  W.  E.  Hill  and  the  Frederick 
homesteads.  Here  they  continued  to  reside  until  the  death 
of  Mr.  Cunningham,  in  l.S"i!).  He  was  the  first  Methodist 
Episcopal  minister  in  iliis  part  of  the  count_v.  and  at  his 
home  the  first  class  was  organized.  He  was  only  a  lay  min- 
ister at  this  time,  but  he  was  licensed  to  preach,  at  Zaues- 
ville,  Ohio,  on  September  5,  1817 ;  and  this  license,  which 
was  written  upon  parchment,  is  now  a  cherished  possession 
of  his  great-grandson,  John  C.  Cunningham,  of  Eva. 

On  the  Frederick  homestead,  not  far  from  the  present 
Frederick  residence,  he  sleeps,  in  an  almost  nameless  grave. 
Mrs.  Cunningham  spent  the  last  years  of  her  life  in  Calhoun 
county  with  her  daughter,  Mrs.  Isaac  Collins;  and.  here,  ni 
1845,  she  passed  away  in  triumph.  "The  voice  that  shouted 
'Glory  to  God'  in  the  midst  of  the  savages,  shouted  victory 
in  death."  On  the  Collins  homestead,  near  Freed,  she  is 
sleeping. 

The  late  Rev.  James  L.  Clarke  delivered  the  memorial 
sermon  at  her  funeral,  and  in  dwelling  on  her  triumphant 
death  afterwards,  he  said,  'T  could  not  help  thinking  of  the 
joyful  meeting  she  had  with  her  children  in  the  presence  of 
Him  who  had  said,  'Suffer  little  children  to  come  unto  me, 
for  of  such  is  the  Kingdom  of  God.'  " 

The  late  children  of  these  distinguished  pioneers  were 
as  follows:  Henry,  Lydia,  Walter,  and  Thomas,  who  were 
killed  by  the  Indians  :  and  William — the  first  born  after  their 
reunion — who  became  a  minister  in  1810,  and  two  years  later 
took  a  transfer  to  the  Ohio  conference,  where  he  finished  his 
earthly  career  at  Horner,  in  Licking  county;  John,  of  Spen- 
cer; Mrs.  Rachel  (Isaac)  Collins.  Calhoun  county:  Mrs.  Leah 
(Benjamin')  Ilardman,  Charleston,  W.  Va. ;  Mrs.  Phebe  (Jas.) 
Hardman,  who  sleeps  at  Hardman  chapel;  Mrs.  Barbara  Hill, 
Eddyville,  Iowa:  and  Benjamin,  of  Eva. 

Amon-g  the  late  grandsons  and  granddaughters  of  these 
venerable  people,  who  were  the  heads  of  well  known  families 
of  this  county,  were:  A.  P.,  J.  S..  and  Washington  Hardman, 
Hardman  chapel;  Mrs.  John  Beall,  Leatherbrake ;  Thomas 
Hardman,  Auburn;  Mrs.   George  AVells,  Cornwahis ;   Mrs.  J. 


7-?  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

M.  AlcW  horler,  Lluckhannon;  ]\lrs.  Hannah  Smith,  Smith- 
ville  ;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wilson  B.  Cunningham  ;  and  EH  R.  Cun- 
ningham, of  Eva.  Among  the  surviving  ones  are:  John  R. 
Cunningham,  Gihner  county;  Airs.  Xancy  Dilworth,  Eaton; 
and  Mrs.  Ira  S.  Goff,  Walker  station.  Besides  quite  an  army 
of  great-grandchildren,  who  are  well  known  citizens — Martin 
Smith,  Mrs.  Alfred  Barr,  Mrs.  M.  A.  Ayres,  and  Alvis  Smith, 
of  Smithville,  Mrs.  James  Rexroad,  of  Den  run,  and  the  late 
Airs.  W.  E.  Hill,  of  Fonzo,  are  among  them. 

Airs.  Hill  enjoyed  the  privilege  of  residing  almost  on  the 
very  spot  where  the  cabin  of  her  illustrious  great-grand- 
parents stood  for  several  years  just  before  her  death  in  lUlO. 

Edward  Cunningham. — Edward  Cunningham  and  his 
wife,  Sarah  Price  Cunningham,  wdiom  he  married  in  Fairfax 
county,  A^irginia,  lived  and  died  in  Harrison  county,  where 
"they  fought  the  redskins  ;"  and  here  on  their  old  homestead, 
they  sleep ;  but  some  of  their  lineal  descendants  belong  to 
the  present  citizenship  of  this  county. — To  their  grandson, 
Perry  J.  Cunningham,  of  Pennsboro,  we  are  indebted  for  this 
sketch. 

Their  children,  William,  Joseph,  Thomas,  Benjamin,  and 
Airs.  Alary  Aloore  sleep  in  Harrison  county  ;  Airs.  Elizabeth 
Robinson  at  Fairfield,  Ohio;  Airs.  Keturah  Hill,  in  Gilmer 
count}' ;  and  Enoch  AI.  Cunningham,  in  Randolph  county. 

Joseph,  better  known  as  'Tnjun  Joe,"  was  captured  by 
the  vShaw^nee  Indians,  while  hiding  under  the  treadles  in  the 
loom  house,  when  he  was  but  a  lad  of  eight  summers,  and 
was  adopted  by  an  Indian  family,  and  remained  among  then, 
for  sixteen  years,  or  until  a  short  tune  after  Gen.  AX'ayne's 
treat}^  w^ith  the  Indians.  Fie  became  a  great  hunter  while 
among  them,  and  after  his  return  liome,  he  served  as  pilot 
for  the  pioneer  stirveyors  of  the  large  and  original  tracts  of 
land  in  this  and  adjoining  counties:  and  on  one  of  these  ex- 
peditions, with  John  Alurphy,  he  experienced  a  dreadful  hand 
to  hand  encounter^  wdth  a  huge  black  bear,  which -he  finally 
succeeded  in  killing  with  his  knife;  and  then  pried  its  jaws 
open  to  relieve  his  knee,  which  had  been  the  victim  of  bruinV 


'The  scene  of  this  fight  was  on  Bear  run,  a  branch  of  Goose  creek, 
in  this  county;  hence  the  name  of  this  .=  tream:  this  bear  weighed  600 
pounds   when   dressed. 


THOMAS  AND   PHEBE   CUNNINGHAM  73 

last  stuggle,  and  which  was  lamed  for  the  remainder  of  his 
life. 

He  afterwards  married  a  Miss  Ayres,  and  became  the 
father  of  two  daughters,  and  one  son;  viz.,  the  late  Mrs. 
Samuel  Warne.  of  Parkcrsburg;  Mrs.  George  Sires,  of  Clarks- 
burg; and  the  late  Dr.  John  Cunningham,  of  Illinois. 

Enoch  M.  Cunningham  was  the  only  one  of  Edward's 
children  that  figured  among  the  early  settlers  of  this  county. 
In  1820,  he  married  Miss  Jane  Stuart,  daughter  of  William 
Stuart,  an  early  settler  on  Hughes  river  above  Goff's.  and 
from  the  Stuart  homestead,  in  1S40,  he  moved  to  Smithville. 
He  was  the  father  of  the  following  named  children  :  Harrison 
B.  Cunningham,  an  early  merchant  of  Harrisville ;  Martha 
became  Mrs.  Barnes  Smith,  of  Smithville ;  and  her  twin  sis- 
ter, Sarah  Salina,  married  Jonathan  H.  Haddox,  of  Smith- 
ville, later  of  Harrisville ;  Amy  married  Hannibal  C.  Brannon, 
and  Edna  M.,  Williams  Moats,  of  Harrisville. 

Amonc:  his  oreat-s:randchildren,  who  are  well  known  in 
this  county,  are  the  late  C.  E.  Haddox,  of  Moundsville  ;  C.  M. 
Haddox,  of  Charleston  ;  Mrs.  Van  A.  Zevely,  of  Cairo ;  and 
Mrs.  Joseph  Foster,  of  Pennsboro. 


CHAPTER  V 


The  Westfalls  and  Whites 


HE  Westfalls  were  early  settlers  in  the  Fred- 
erick's mill  vicinity,  they  having  taken  the 
place  of  some  of  the  original  settlers  some 
time  in  the  forties. 

Joel  J.  Westfall,  who  is  now  spending 
the  eventide  of  his  long  life  with  his  only 
son,  J.  R.  Westfall.  at  Smithville,  was  the 
fii-st  of  the  family  to  arrive.  He  came  as  early  as  lSi3,  and 
took  the  place  of  James  Malone,  on  the  Kennedy  farm,  above 
the  mouth  of  Lamb's  run  ;  and  during  the  following  winter 
he  taught  school  in  an  old  house  on  the  Tingler — now  the 
B.  H.  Wilson — farm,  having  for  his  pupils,  "the  Wasses," 
the  Hardmans,  the  Elliotts,  the  GofFs  and  the  Tinglers.  After 
one  year's  residence  on  the  Kennedy  farm,  he  rented  what  is 
now  Frederick's  mill,  and  the  W.  E.  Hill  farm,  and  two  years 
later  his  father,  John  W.  Westfall,  purchased  both  the  mill 
and  the  farm,  and  moved  his  family  here,  where  lie  spent  the 
remainder  of  his  life.  He  sold  the  mill  in  1857,  to  the  late 
Joseph  Frederick,  but  the  farm  remained  in  the  h.ands  of  his 
heirs  until  a  few  years  since,  when  it  passed  into  the  hands 
of  W.  E.  Hill,  who  sold  it  to  Henry  Barker,  in  1909. 

The  Westfalls  are  of  Irish  lineage.  They  emigrated 
from  New  York  to  Beverly  (West)  Virginia ;  and  from  there, 
Joel  Westfall,  senior,  and  his  wife, Mrs.  Elizabeth  AA'hite  West- 
fall,  removed  to  near  the  present  site  of  Buckhannon,  where 
their  son,  John  W.  Westfall,  was  born,  and  where  he  was 
married  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Simon,  a  Dutch  maiden,  of  Penn- 
sylvania, who  was  the  mother  of  his  six  children,  .'ill  of  whom 
were  born  at  Buckhannon,  before  the  familv  came  to  Ritchie: 


THE    WEST  FALLS   AND    WHITES  75 

Joel  was  tlie  eldest  son  ;  Jacob,  and  the  late  James,  of  Slab 
creek ;  and  Jasper  N.,  who  was  laid  on  the  Frederick  home- 
stead in  his  youth  ;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Margaret  (John)  Core, 
of  Buckhannon ;  and  Mrs.  Mary  E.  (Robert)  Stuart,  of  Iris, 
were  the  other  members  of  the  fam.ily.  The  two  alone  sur- 
vive. Side  by  side  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Westfall  sleep  on  the  Fred- 
erick homestead.  She  survived  him  by  a  number  of  years, 
and  with  her  daughter,  Mrs.  Stuart,  spent  her  last  hours, 
at  Iris.  (The  other  Westfalls  in  tliis  and  adjoining  counties 
are  descended  from  the  same  family.) 

Joel  J.  Westfall  was  born  at  Buckhannon,  on  August  24, 
1(S19,  and  here  in  the  wilds  of  the  torest,  he  grew  to  man- 
hood, having  every  opportunity  to  indulge  his  love  for  hunt- 
ing and  adventure ;  and  some  of  these  boyish  adventurers  are 
scarcely  less  thrilling  than  those  of  "Robinson  Crusoe,"  or 
Stanley  in  the  jungles  of  Africa: 

When  he  was  but  a  small  lad  of  seven  summers,  on  July 
2G,  1826,  he  killed  the  largest  rattle  snake  on  record  in  West 
Virginia,  while  alone  in  the  forest  Avatching  the  horses  for 
his  father.  This  mammoth  snake  measured  nine  feet  four 
inches,  with  rattles  one  one-half  inches  broad.  At  the 
age  of  eleven  years,  he  killed  three  deer  by  moonlight  in  the 
forest  near  Buckhannon  ;  and  the  following  year  three  pan- 
thers fell  as  his  victims,  and  at  the  age  of  fourteen,  he  slew 
a  bear  with  his  tomahawk.  This  was  only  the  beginning  of 
a  hunting  record,  which,  perhaps,  can  hardly  be  duplicated 
by  another  lad  among  the  early  settlers  of  the  State.  At  one 
time  he  killed  a  bear  and  a  panther,  which  had  just  taken 
the  life  of  a  deer.  So  famous  did  these  earl}^  adventures 
make  him,  that  he  was  known  far  and  wide,  as  the  "Boy 
Hunter."  On  one  occasion  when  he  came  into  possession  of 
a  new  gun,  as  a  reward  for  his  skillful  marksmanship,  he 
was  asked  by  his  father  what  he  wished  to  do  with  this  gun. 
He  replied  that  he  wished  to  kill  wild  animals,  but  that  he 
especially  desired  to  find  a  bear  cave  that  he  had  heard  much 
about  through  his  uncle.  So  with  his  father's  consent,  one 
fine  morning  he  set  out  in  quest  of  this  cave,  which  he  finall}' 
reached  after  a  long  and  perilous  search.     It  was  in  a  large 


7'-  HISTORY   OP   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

ledge  of  rocks,  miles  distant  frojn  his  home,  and,  searching 
out  the  entrance,  he  at  once  started  to  explore  the  interior, 
but  finding  the  darkness  so  dense,  he  was  forced  to  retreat. 
However,  securing  a  pine  torch  and  taking  his  gun  in  hand, 
he  again  crawled  inside,  expecting  to  find  the  bear  asleep, 
but  by  the  time  he  had  proceeded  fifty  or  sixty  feet,  he  real- 
ized the  fallacy  of  this  expectation,  when  he  saw  the  glare 
of  bruin's  eye  coming  toward  him.  Stepping  to  one  side,  he 
prepared  to  fire,  but  for  fear  of  being  forced  out  of  the  cave, 
he  slid  into  a  crevice,  and  the  anirnal  dashed  by  him  vvith 
force,  and  presently  he  heard  him  fall  from  the  clifif  outside, 
a  distance  of  thirty  feet,  and  he  knew  that  he  must  l^e  dead  ; 
and  going  outside,  he  joyfully  claimed  his  prey  and  set  out 
for  home,  which  he  reached  after  several  days'  absence  to 
the  relief  of  his  mother,  who  had  been  greatly  annoyed  by 
his  prolonged  stay.  In  after  life  his  hand  did  not  "lose  its 
cunning."  for  while  a  resident  of  California,  he  killed  the 
largest  bear  on  record  in  that  State.  It  having  weighed  one 
thousand  pounds. 

At  the  age  of  seventeen  years,  he  was  made  lietitenant 
of  Co.  D,  133rd  Regiment  of  the  Virginia  Alilitia,  an  office 
which  he  held  for  seven  years  ;  and  he  was  Captain  of  the  r^>Iili- 
tia  after  he  came  to  this  county.  On  January  V'3,  1813,  he 
was  married  to  Miss  Eliza  B.  Mills,  daughter  of  W.  R.  Mills, 
of  Pocahontas  county,  the  marriage  being  solemnized  at  the 
home  of  her  brother  at  ^Veston ;  and  J.  R.  Westfall,  of  Smith- 
ville,  was  the  one  child  of  this  union  •  and  when  he  was  still 
in  "the  frocks  of  babyhood"  his  young  mother  passed  on,  and 
on  the  Frederick  homestead  she  sleeps. 

On  April  4,  185 !,  leaving  his  young  son  with  his  ])arents, 
Mr.  Westfall  started  for  California — lured  there  b}'  the  gold 
excitement — where  he  amassed  quite  a  fortune,  and  where 
he  rose  to  prominence  in  State  affairs.  At  one  time,  while 
digging  for  gold,  he  unearthed  a  nugget  that  weighted  nine- 
teen ounces,  and  was  valued  at  one  thousand  dollars.  He 
served  as  Deputy  Sheriff  at  Mariposa  for  four  years,  at  the 
end  of  which  time  he  was  elected  Road  Commissioner  and 
Supervisor,  an  office  which  he  held  for  sixteen  consecutive 
years,  and  one  that  is  higher  in  point  of  importance  than  that 


THE    WESTFALLS   AND    WHITES  77 

of  our  sheriff.  Politically  he  is  a  Democrat,  and  he  enjoyed 
the  honor  of  being  a  member  of  the  committee  that  escorted 
William  Jennings  Bryan,  and  his  distinguished  party  on  their 
tour  through  the  "Golden  State,"  during  Mr.  Bryan's  first 
ciDmpaign  for  the  Presidency  ;  and  he  had  the  pleasure  of  eat- 
ing several  lunches  that  were  prepared  by  the  hand  of  Mrs. 
Bryan.  On  October  6,  1906,  he  bade  adieu  to  his  adopted 
state  and  returned  to  Smithville,  where  he  is  quietly  spend- 
ing" the  evening  hours  of  his  life  with  his  son.  Pie  is  now  a 
nonagenarian,  but  his  memory  is  a  remarkable  store-house 
of  interesting  reminiscences  of  pioneer  days.  Later,  he  died 
on  October  30,  llllO,  and  was  laid  away  at  Smithville,  on  the 
homestead  of  his  son. 

William  White,  wliose  heroic  deeds  "crov/n  history's 
pages,"  was  his  great-grandsire,  and  few  more  valuable 
stories  of  early  times  have  come  under  our  notice  than  the 
ever  interesting  one  of  the  life  of  this  distinguished  Indian 
fighter,  which  was  told  to  Mr.  Westfall  by  his  great-grand- 
mother, Mrs.  William  White,  when  he  was  a  child  of  seven 
years,  and  she,  a  venerable  woman  of  one  hundred  two 
years.  This  is  the  only  time  that  he  remembers  seeing  this 
great-grandmother,  but  he  has  long  treasured  the  story  that 
she  told  him  on  that  memorable  day,  which  we  here  repro- 
duce in  her  own  language,  in  part: 

The  Grandmother's  Story. — She  called  him  to  her  and 
said  that  she  wished  to  tell  him  the  story  of  the  life  and  the 
cruel  death  of  his  great-grandfather,  William  White,  and  that 
she  hoped  that  he  would  remember  what  she  this  day  should 
tell  hini : 

vShe  said  "I  was  a  Wallace,  a  relative  of  Sir  William 
Wallace,  of  Scotland,  and  I  am  the  wife  of  William  White, 
the  great  scout  and  Indian  fighter.'"  There  were  three  of 
the  White  brothers  that  came  from  Scotland  to  America, 
William,  David  and  Jonathan. 

Jonathan  went  South  and  was  never  heard  of  again,  it 
being  supposed  that  he  was  killed  by  the  Indians;  and 
William  and  David  settled  near  Winchester,  Virginia. 


7S  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

While  out  hunting-  here  one  day,  A\'illiam  came  upon 
some  Indians,  and  thinking  that  they  were  seeking  his  life, 
killed  three  of  them  ;  but  among  the  number  was  a  squaw, 
and  as  he  could  not  think  of  taking  her  life,  he  let  her  go, 
feeling  confident  that  she  would  not  know  him.  But  she  did 
recognize  him,  however;  and  as  it  was  in  time  of  peace  and 
was  a  grave  violation  of  the  terms  of  the  treaty,  he  was  ar- 
rested and  put  in  prison  ;  but  his  people  raised  such  a  storm 
about  his  confinement,  and  gathered  around  the  jail  and  beat 
it  down,  and  let  him  out  the  next  dav.  He  and  a  man  bv 
the  name  of  Pringle  then  escaped  to  Buckhannon,  and  made 
their  home  in  a  hollow  sycamore  tree,  near  the  mouth  of 
Turkey  run,  on  the  Buckhannon  river,  near  three  miles  below 
the  present  site  of  Buckhannon.  She  added,  "Joel,  you  will 
doubtless  see  this  tree.  Your  Grandmother  Westfall  is  gone 
too  early  for  you  to  remember  her.  Your  father,  your  uncles, 
and  your  aunts  are  all  living,  but  I,  your  great-grand- 
mother, must  soon  pass  over."  I  am  now  one  hundred  two 
years  old.  Among  m}-  children,  grandchildren  and  great- 
grandchildren, I  see  none  that  resembles  your  great-grand- 
father, but  I  see  him  in  the  blare  of  your  eye,  the  shape  of 
your  head,  and  in  your  movement,  and  my  little  grandson, 
I  hope  that  you  will  be  able  to  remember  what  your  great- 
grandmother  says  to  you  today,  and  that  you  will  be  able 
to  punish  the  foul  perpetrator  and  his  allies  for  the  cowardly 
murder  of  your  great-grandfather,  'Billy  White,'  my  hus- 
band. 

■'Your  Uncle  Heniy  is  next  in  resemblance  to  'Billy.' 
Your  father  and  uncles  have  all  treated  me  kindly,  and' I 
might  have  been  living  with  them  today,  but  I  wished  to 
live  and  die  in  the  home  that  'Billy'  and  I  had  impro\'ed,  here 
on  Hickory  flat,  with  my  son.  I  shall  not  be  here  long.  Tr>- 
and  remember  the  words  of  your  great-grandmother.  Eliza- 
beth Wallace  White,  my  little  sonny.  I  traveled  alone  from 
\\inchester,  Virginia,  to  Buckhannon  to  join  my  husband  in 
his  tree  house — over  hills,  deep  rivers,  and  through  lone 
forests,  carrying  my  fire  rolled  up  in  a  wet  cloth,  on  horse- 
back, by  day,  that  I  might  have  it  to  kindle  at  night,  in  some 
secluded  place,  where  I  could  roast  my  meat  and  drink  the 


THE    UESTFALLS   AND    WHITES  79 

pure  water  tliat  gurgled  there.  Your  great-grandfather  and 
I  lived  many  days  here.  I  was  many  times  alone  in  the  fort 
or  out  on  our  little  farm  tending  my  garden,  beans  and  corn, 
while  Billy  would  be  out  on  some  scout,  or  fighting  the  In- 
dians back  from  the  settlement.  Your  grandmother  West- 
fall  and  I  have  spent  many  lonely  days  while  our  husbands 
were  away,  some  times  for  months  at  a  time,  that  they  could 
not  be  at  home. 

"About  five  weeks  after  I  joined  Billy  in  his  'tree  house,' 
two  or  three  of  the  Cutrights,  two  Prmgles.  and  ^mother  per- 
son came  and  stopped,  and  a  week  or  so  later  seven  or  eight 
more  came,  and  they  all  took  up  farms  and  wenc  to  building- 
stout  log  houses,  in  which  they  would  retreat  when  the  In- 
dians would  come  near  us,  as  there  were  always  scouts  out 
looking  for  the  Indians.  Billy  had  to  be  out  most  of  his  time, 
but  would  come  in  and  bring  his  furs  and  pelts,  and  sell  them 
so  as  to  keep  me  plenty  to  eat  and  wear;  and  I  could  raise 
plenty  of  corn,  beans  and  potatoes  for  the  scouts  when  they 
'vvould  come  in.  Billy  and  his  brother,  David,  the  Pringles 
and  the  Cutrights  generally  kept  in  touch  with  one  another  so 
as  to  give  the  alarm  in  case  of  danger.  Some  of  them  would 
run  in  and  give  us  warning,  so  we  had  easier  times."  It  was 
the  duty  of  the  scouts  to  warn  any  post  in  danger 

■'Billy  was  taken  prisoner  by  the  Indians,  but  soon  made 
his  escape,  and  things  went  along  tliis  way  for  som.e  time, 
when  the  Indians  began  gathering  and  concentrating  their 
forces  around  Cincinnati.  Governor  Dunmore  and  General 
Andrew  Lewis  had  command  of  the  Government  forces,  and 
they  were  called  out  to  meet  the  Indians,  who  uere  said  to 
be  gathered  in.  great  numbers.  Billy,  David,  and  mosi  of 
the  other  men  vvcnt,  leaving  us  women  with  a  few  old  and 
crippled  men  to  occupy  the  cabins  and  care  for  the  stock,  but 
we  knew  that  the  scouts  would  look  after  us,  so  the  troops 
Avere  preparing  for  a  big  contest — " 

Here  a  childish  voice  interrupted  with.  "Novv^,  grandma. 
I  want  you  to  tell  me  all  about  the  Battle  of  the  Point."  The 
grandriia  replied,  "Well,  do  you  think  you  can  remember 
what  I  tell  you?  as  you  are  not  more  than  five?  However, 
I  will  try.     Well,  you  see,  my  little  sonny,  but  I  will  tell  you 


so  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

what   Pringle  and   Cutriglit   told   me   on    the  .morning  of  the 
Battle  of  the  Point: 

"  'General  Lewis  had  detailed  Billy  White  and  John 
Cutright  to  go  out  and  hunt,  so  as  to  procure  meat  for  the 
troops.  After  being  out  a  short  time,  they  heard  firing  at 
the  camp,  and  White  said,  'John,  there's  a  battle  on,  let's  go 
in,'  and  immediately  they  started,  but  when  they  got  inside 
of  the  lines,  word  reached  White  that  his  brother,  David, 
had  been  shot,  and  that  he  was  lying  under  a  certain  tree. 
They  went  at  once  to  the  tree  and  found  him  begging  for  a 
drink  of  water,  and  having  no  canteens,  AVhite  and  three 
other  men  went  and  carried  water  to  the  dying  man  in  their 
hats.  They  had  to  go  between  the  lines — the  two  fires  as 
they  termed  it,  and  the  pawpaw  bushes  fell  thick  all  around 
them,  but  they  got  back  in  safety.  White,  taking  the  cleanest 
looking  hat  in  his  hand  said,  'Here,  brother,  is  water,  but 
when  you  drink  you  will  die.'  He  then  took  him  in  his  arms, 
and  held  him  until  he  was  dead,  and  laying  him  down  gently, 
took  up  his  gun  as  calmly  as  if  going  to  do  a  day's  work,  and 
said,  'Come,  John,  let  us  go.'  Cutright  said  he  was  a  little 
at  a  loss  to  knowf  w^hich  way  to  go,  as  the  Indians  had 
already  began  to  retreat  across  the  creek,  but  he  follo\^■ed, 
somewhat  cautiously.  'White  was  watching  to  get  a  sliot  at 
the  Indians,  and  I  (Cutright)  had  just  heard  him  fire,  and 
had  sent  one  shot  across  the  creek  myself,  when  1  noticed 
three  Indians  that  were  attempting  to  cross  the  cieek.  White 
fired  and  one  fell,  then  another  shot  from  his  gun  brought 
the  last  one  down,  and  the  three  went  floating  down  the 
creek  into  the  broad  Ohio.  He  turned  to  me  and  said,  'I 
have  had  bad  luck,  John;  I've  lost  three  scalps,  so  let  us  gr 
for  more.'  And  that  evening  he  showed  me  seventeen  scalps 
that  he  had  taken  with  his  own  hand  Avith  my  knowledge." 

"  'The  Indians,  being  scattered  a  little,  we  went  aroimd 
to  where  we  heard  some  firing,  I  stopped  to  get  a  shot  at 
one,  but  he  dodged  me,  and  hearing  White  fire  several  shots, 
I  went  toward  him.  He,  seeing  me,  said,  'Come  here,  and  let 
me  show  you  how  to  kill  Indians.'  There  close  by  a  log  he 
lay  upon  his  back  loading  his  gun.  He  said,  'Lie  down,  or 
they'll    shoot    you.'      He    lay    there    for    some    time    popping 


THE    JVESTFALLS   AND    WHITES  Si 

one  over  now  and  then,  that  chanced  to  stick  his  head  above 
the  log;  and  cautioning  me  to  beware,  that  there  were  still 
ip.ore  in  ambush,  h^inally  the  eneni)'  began  shooting  under 
the  log,  and  finding  the  bullets  coming  too  close,  he  moved 
farther  away,  but  lying  flat  on  the  ground  a,ll  the  while,  until 
he  felt  confident  that  the  last  one  was  dead.  When  the  In- 
dians were  all  scalped,  he  declared  his  intention  to  mvesti- 
gate  the  firing  of  a  large  gun.  that  he  said  he  believed  an  In- 
dian was  behind.  So,  off  he  went,  and  soon  I  heard  no  more 
of  the  big  gun,  but  heard  several  shots  in  that  direction,  and 
in  about  an  hour  I  saw  him  coming  with  two  guns  and  two 
scalps.  I  said,  'Well,  Bill,  did  you  get  the  gun?'  and  he 
replied,  'Yes,  and  the  hair,  too,'  holding  up  the  scalps.  He 
then  asked  me  (John  Cutright)  what  my  success  had  been, 
and  remarked  that  they  were  getting  scarce  here,  only  one 
here  and  there  that  had  been  detained  b}^  a  wounded  Indian. 
VVe  then  counted  our  scalps,  and  he  had  seventeen,  as  before 
stated,  and  three  got  away.  By  that  time  the  signals  were 
calling  the  troops  together,  and — '  " 

Here  again  the  little  grandson,  who  had  been  an  inter- 
ested listener,  interrupted,  saying,  "Now,  grandma,  I  have 
heard  the  story  of  the  Battle  of  the  Point  (Point  Pleasant), 
now  please  tell  me  of  the  cowardly  murder  of  my  great- 
grandfather, William  AVhite.  that  you  asked  me  to  avenge; 
and.  grandma,  if  you'll  tell  me  the  story  I'll  promise  you  if 
such  a  chance  ever  comes,  I'll  be  there." 

"W^ell,"  the  grandmother  resumed,  "I  will  give  you  a 
sliort  history  of  it:  "y\fter  WHiite  had  built  the  fort  at  Buck- 
hannon,  and  had  been  in  command  of  it  and  the  troops  for 
several  years,  a  man  by  the  name  of  Potros  came  into  the 
fort  and  said  that  he  had  just  come  from  near  the  mouth  of 
the  Little  Kanawha  river,  and  that  he  had  seen  signs  of 
Indians  crossing  and  coming  toward  the  settlement;  that  he 
felt  sure  they  were  lurking  about  in  ambush ;  and  Ihat  he 
wanted  to  have  his  family  and  household  goods  removed  to 
the  fort  on  the  next  day.  W'hite  replied  that  he  Avould  send 
a  company  of  men  and  wagons  to  bring  them,  but  the  man 
said,  *Oh!  I  couldn't  trust  my  family  out  without  your  pres- 


83  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

ence.'  White  said,  'Well,  be  ready,  we'll  be  there  in  the 
morning.' 

'■'When  they  were  fixing  to  start,  I  said,  'Billy,  don't 
you  go  out  today,  send  others.  If  you  do  you  will  be  killed. 
I  dreamed  last  night  that  I  saw  Indians  pointing  red  hot 
guns  at  you.  If  you  do  go,  Billy,  you'll  never  get  back  alive.' 
But  he  replied,  'Well,  Betty,  if  I  don't  go  they  will  say  that 
I  am  a  coward,'  and  he  thought  it  only  a  dream,  and  he  went. 
When  they  reached  their  destination,  all  was  right,  there 
were  no  Indians  to  be  seen.  But  he,  going  into  the  yard, 
discovered  signs  of  the  enemy  there,  and  mentioned  it  to  the 
rest.  He  said,  'They  have  been  grinding  their  knives  and 
tomahawks  on  the  grindstone,  and  here  is  the  fray  of  an  In- 
dian blanket.  Let  us  load  up  and  get  away.'  After  every- 
thing was  loaded,  and  the  wagons  started,  the  trader  or  ren- 
egade, said,  'White,  you  and  I  and  the  girls  will  ride  over 
the  trail  to  the  fort.  It  will  not  be  much  more  than  a  mile, 
and  we'll  get  there  before  the  wagons.'  "  Just  as  the  four 
reached  the  top  of  the  hill,  the  Indians  fired  on  them,  and 
White  was  shot  through  just  above  the  hips  ;  but  did  not  fall 
from  his  horse,  but  as  he  turned  down  the  hill  they  fired 
again,  striking  him  in  the  back.  His  horse  taking  fright, 
started  to  run,  and  its  foot,  becoming  entangled  in  the  limb 
of  a  fallen  tree,  it  fell  throwing  the  rider,  who  was  noted  for 
being  able  to  remount.  But  the  Indians  ran  down  the  hill. 
and  scalped  him.  and  were  ofif  before  any  defense  could  be 
made. 

He  was  placed  in  a  boat,  but  he  breathed  his  last  just 
as  the  boat  reached  the  fort,  and  thus  ended  the  life  of  one 
of  the  most  renowned  and  intrepid  leaders  of  Indian  times. 
This  fatal  day  was  March  the  8,  in  1781  or  '82,  and  the  scene 
was  near  the  present  site  of  Buckhannon. 

Though  the  Indians  were  pursued,  they  had  secreted 
their  canoes,  and  made  good  their  escape  across  the  Ohio, 
before  they  could  be  overtaken. 


(Though  varied  versions  of  the  life  and  death  of  Wliite  have  hereto- 
fore been  told,  this  is  doubtless  the  only  authentic  one.  Mr.  Westfall 
not  only  possesses  a  remarkable  memory,  but  he  has  kept  notes  throug'h- 
out  his  life,  and  to  these  notes  and  to  his  memory,  we  are  indebted  for 
those  early  reminiscences,  he  having  .«pent  several  months  in  writing  them 
up  for  us. — Autlior.) 


CHAPTER  VI 


South  Fork  Settlers—Continued 


LARGE  number  of  the  original  settlers  along 
this  river  lost  their  lands  owino-  to  defective 
titles,  and  when  they  were  laid  away,  the 
families  of  not  a  few  of  them  sought  homes 
in  other  parts  of  the  country,  and  new  and 
permanent  setlers  took  their  places.  Hence 
the  large  number  of  early  families  along  this 


river. 


A  man  by  the  name  of  Purviance,  who  resided  in  Balti- 
more, had,  in  Indian  times,  entered  large  tracts  of  land  in 
this  wilderness  ;  and  an  individual,  claiming  to  be  his  repre- 
sentative, came  here  and  sold  these  lands  to  the  early  set- 
tlers, and,  near  a  score  of  years  afterwards,  wdien  the  right- 
ful owner  sent  his  agent  did  these  worthy  pioneers  learn  of 
the  fraud  that  had  been  practiced  upon  them. 

Henry  Jackson. — Among  the  first  to  arrive  after  the  orig- 
inal settlers  was  Henry  Jackson,  who  came  from  his  native 
county — Upshur,  in  1830,  an.d  purchased  the  slight  improve- 
ment made  by  the  Belt  family  at  the  forks  of  Hughes  river, 
of  a  man  by  the  name  of  Byrd. 

Mr.  Jackson  was  born  near  Buckhannon  in  1813,  and 
there  he  was  married  to  Miss  Lydia  Reger;  and  from  there 
he  came  to  this  county  and  settled  on  the  old  homestead 
where  his  son  Ulysses  now  lives.  Here  he  spent  the  re- 
mainder of  his  life,  with  the  exception  of  a  two  years'  resi- 
dence in  Mason  county,  and  here  he  has  been  sleeping  since 
1865.  His  wife  rests  by  his  side.  He  was  the  father  of  three 
sons  and  one  daughter  besides  the  one  above  mentioned: 
^^rauville  died  in  childhood;  Virginia  is  Mrs.  B.  F.  Alarshall. 


-.i  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

and  Cisko  and  Isaac  have  passed  on,  leaving  families  who 
occupy  their  former  estates,  which  lie  near  the  old  home. 

The  Jacksons  have  an  unusually  interesting  ancestral 
history.  '  They  are  of  Scotch-Irish  origin. 

John  Jackson,  the  progenitor  of  this  famil}'^,  was  born 
near  Londonderry,  in  the  north  of  Ireland,  near  the  beginning 
of  the  second-quarter  of  the  eighteenth  century,  and  with 
his  parents  removed  to  London,  England,  when  he  was  but 
a  boy.  Here,  he  grew  to  manhood,  and  in  1748,  he  emigrated 
to  America  and  settled  in  Calvert  county,  Maryland,  where 
he  was  married  to  Aliss  Elizabeth  Cummins,  of  London,  who 
crossed  the  water  on  the  same  ship  with  him. 

For  a  time  after  their  marriage,  thev  resided  on  the 
South  branch  of  the  Potomac  river,  but  near  the  year  1T68, 
they  removed  across  the  mountains  to  what  is  now  Upshur 
county,  A\'est  Virginia,  and  settled  at  the  mouth  of  Turkey 
run — just  below^  Jackson's  fort,  and  not  far  from  the  present 
site  of  Buckhannon,  where  they  figured  prominently  in  sav- 
age warfare. 

Mrs.  Jackson  was  a  woman  of  strong  mind  and  of  in- 
domitable courage,  and  she,  as  well  as  her  husband,  rendered 
most  valuable  service  in  times  of  Indian  invasion.  Patents 
are  still  in  existence,  which  conveyed  lands  to  her  in  her  own 
right. 

These  hardy  pioneers  were  the  parents  of  five  sons  and 
three  daughters  whose  descendants  are  a  mighty  host 
throughout  the  country: 

George,  Edward,  John,  Samuel  and  Henr}-,  were '  the 
sons  :  and  Elizabeth,  Mary  and  Sophia  the  daughters — • 

Elizabeth  was  the  late  Mrs.  Abram  Brake,  and  ^lary,  the 
late  Mrs.  Philip  Reger,  of  Upshur  county;  and  Sophia  mar- 
ried Josiah  Davis  and  lived  and  died  at  the  old  home,  near 
Buckhannon. 

George,  Edward  and  John,  with  their  father,  were  Revo- 
lutionary soldiers  and  noted  Indian  fighters,  their  heroic  deeds 
being  recorded  on  the  pages  of  "Border  ^^^arfare." 

Near  the  year  1770,  George  Jackson  settled  on  the  Wtst 
Fork  river  in  the  vicinity  of  Clarksburg  where  he  rose  to  emi- 
nence as  a  statesman,  as  well  as  a  militarv  man. 


SOUTH   FORK   SETTLERS— CONTINUED  85 

Early  in  the  Revolution  he  was  commissioned  colonel  of 
a  Virginia  regiment,  this  commission  having  come  direct 
from  the  hand  of  General  Washington ;  and  after  Harrison 
count}^  was  formed  in  1784,  he  represented  his  county  in  the 
House  of  Burgesses  at  Richmond.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
distinguished  body  that  ratified  the  Constitution  of  the  United 
States,  in  1789,  and  he  subsequently  served  several  terms  in 
Congress,  being  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son,  John  G.  Jackson. 

George  was  the  grandfather  of  the  late  Judge  John  Jay 
Jackson,  of  Parkersburg ;  of  the  late  Governor  Jacob  B.  Jack- 
son, and  of  the  late  Judge  J.  Monroe  Jackson,  they  being  the 
sons  of  General  John  G.  Jackson,  who  married  the  only 
daughter  of  Governor  Meggs,  of  Ohio. 

General  Jackson  was  a  close  friend  of  President  .Madison 
and  the  marriage  took  place  at  the  White  House  during  the 
Madison  administration. 

Edward  Jackson  married  a  ]\Iiss  Hadden,  of  Randolph 
county,  and  his  son,  Jonathan  who  married  Miss  Julia  Xea!, 
of  Parkersburg,  was  the  father  of  the  late  renowned  "Stone- 
wall" Jackson,  of  Clarksburg. 

Henry  Jackson.- — And  from  Plenry  Jackson,  senior,  who 
was  born,  lived  and  died,  near  Buckhannon  where  he  sleeps, 
the  Ritchie  county  family  come.  He  was  the  father  of  twenty- 
five  children — fourteen  of  whom  were  born  of  his  union  with 
Mary  Hire,  and  eleven  of  his  marriage  with  Elizabeth  Shreve. 

The  children  of  the  first  marriage  were:  Esther,  Permilia 
Elizabeth,  (Mrs.  Plugh  Pribble,  senior,  mother  of  the  Rev. 
U.  Pribble,  of  Harrisville;  Hugh  Pribble  of  Cisko  ;  and  the 
late  Mrs.  Charles  Plarrison),  Amanda  Melvina  (Mrs.  Daniel 
Pribble),  both  of  this  county;  William  Vandwater.  Hire, 
Edward,  Mariah,  Henry,  junior,  (the  Ritchie  pioneer),  Rachel 
Esta  (who  died  in  her  young  womanhood),  John  Henderson 
Brake,  Jacob,  Ulysses,  Mary  (who  married  and  went  to  Cali- 
fornia) and  Cecelia  who  became  Mrs.  Louis  Miller  and  also 
went  to  California. 

The  children  of  the  second  marriage :  Decatur,  Samuel 
Dexter,  James  Alonzo,  Marion  Orlando,  Melissa  (Mrs.  James 


SC  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Lowe),  Roxana.  George  Washington.  Artemeshia   (Airs.  An- 
drew Martinee),  Clispo  Mero,  and  Draper  Camden  Jackson. 

The  Hostetters. — The  Hostetters  were  among  the  next 
arrivals.  They  are  of  German  origin.  Ulwrick  Hostetter 
crossed  the  sea  with  his  family  and  settled  near  York,  Penn- 
sylvania, and  from  there  removed  to  Rockbridge  county, 
Virginia,  where  he  spent  the  remnant  of  his  days,  near  Lex- 
ington. He  was  an  Indian  fighter,  and  with  a  party  cf 
scouts,  pursued  a  band  of  red  men  from  Rockbridge  county 
to  Marietta,  Ohio,  on  one  occasion,  where  he  shot  one  of  the 
number  that  Avas  across  the  river  from  him.  On  his  return, 
with  the  rest  of  the  part}^,  he  went  down  to  the  mouth  of 
the  Little  Kanawha,  and  up  this  river,  and  thus,  became  the 
discoverer  of  the  far-famed  Burning  springs  in  A\'irt  county. 

John  Hostetter,  his  son,  was  born  in  the  Fatherland,  and 
married  Miss  Elizabeth  Riprogal,  of  Virginia,  a  sister  of 
Mrs.  Daniel  Ayres,  and  came  to  this  county  in  1832,  and 
spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  in  the  Smithville  vicinity, 
where  he  and  his  wife  sleep.  He  served  as  captain  in  the 
w^ar  of  1812  ;  and  was  the  head  of  a  family  of  four  sons  and 
three  daughters : 

David,  Andrew,  John,  jvmior,  and  Jacob,  the  last  two 
being  twins  ;  Sallie,  the  eldest  daughter  became  Mrs.  Ford  of 
V^irginia,  and  went  to  Jamestown,  Ohio  where  she  died : 
Mary  became  Mrs.  Welhellam,  and  remained  in  Rockbridge 
county;  and  Elizabeth  married  Alexander  Glover  and  came 
to  this  county. 

John  R.  Hostetter  married  Miss  Louisa  Webb,  daughter 
of   Benjamin    Webb,    and    lived    and    died    in    the    Smithville 


Note. — This  family  are  cloubtle.ss,  connected  to  the  late  PresldenL  An- 
drew Jackson,  of  Tennessee;  for  when  George  Jack'^on  was  in  Congress  he 
formed  a  friendship  with  Andrew  Jackson  and  they  were  able  to  trace 
their  ancestry  to  the  same  parish  in  Londonderry,  although  they  were 
unable  to  positively  establish  the  connection;  but  similar  characteristics 
and  other  circumstances  almost  establish  the  fact  beyond  cavil. 

To  I?-aac  Newton  Brake  of  Buckhannon  who  is  a  first  cousin  of 
"Stonewall"  Jackson,  and  a  second,  of  Henry  Jackson,  junior,  we  are  in- 
debted for  the  greater  part  of  this  valuable  sketch.  And  while  there  ib 
a  little  disagreement  on  the  names  in  this  record,  as  some  cannot  recall 
the  names  of  Esther  and  Mariah  and  add  that  of  Cecelia  Miller  to  the 
children  of  the  first  union  of  Henry  Jackson,  senior,  it  is  quite  likely 
that  these  two  died  in  cliildhood.  For  Mr.  Brake  asserts  that  this  gentle- 
man was  the  father  of  twenty-five  children,  and  if  John  Henderson  Brake 
is  meant  for  two  sons  (we  were  unable  to  tell)  doubtless  Cecelia  belongs 
to  the  last  family  as  one  name  is  missing  'nere. 


SOUTH  FORK   SETTLERS— CONTINUED  S? 

vicinity.  He  was  the  fallier  of  Mrs.  Martha  (Martin)  Smith, 
Mrs.  Minerva  Parl<er,  and  of  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Alvus) 
Smith,  of  Smithville. 

David  married  Miss  Cathrine  Fisher,  of  Rockbridge 
county,  and  came  to  this  county  at  an  early  day  and  spent 
the  remainder  of  his  life.  His  children  were — -Mrs.  VV.  A. 
Valentine,  Goff's ;  Mrs.  Mary  A.  Leason,  Pennsboro ;  Mrs. 
V'erna  Thorne,  Buckhannon ;  the  late  Mrs.  Martha  Smith,  of 
the  West;  Davidson,  of  Smithville;  and  Elizabeth,  who  died 
in  youth. 

Alexander  Glover  and  Miss  Elizabeth  Hostetter  were 
married  in  Rockbridge  county,  Virginia,  in  1833,  and  three 
years  later,  they  came  to  this  county,  and  settled  on 
the  Glover  homestead,  above  Smithville,  where  they  re- 
mained until  they  were  borne  to  the  Smithville  ceme- 
tery. He  was  a  carpenter  by  trade  and  was  one  of  the  earliest 
in  the  county.  He  was  the  constructor  of  the  firsi  jail  build- 
ing at  Harrisville.  Mrs.  Glover  survived  him  by  many  years, 
and  the  old  home  is  still  owned  by  tlie  heirs,  though  now  in 
the  hands  of  tenants:  They  were  the  parents  of  nine  sons 
and  one  daughter,  who  died  in  childhood:  John,  the  eldest 
son  never  married,  and  in  the  Smithville  cemetery  he  was 
laid  at  a  ripe  old  age.  Jacob,  and  Taylor,  also  slumber  here. 
Williams,  sleeps  in  Arkansas,  where  his  family  reside;  Robert 
lives  at  Clarksburg;  Asa,  at  Fairmont;  Charles,  at  Spencer; 
Samuel  is  unmarried ;  and  Dr.  J.  R.  at  Morgantown. 

Jacob,  William,  and  Robert  were  soldiers  of  the  Civil 
war. 

Samuel  Hyman  was  another  early  settler  from  Rock- 
bridge county,  Virginia.  Here  he  was  born  on  Novem- 
ber 12,  1812,  and  he  came  to  this  county  in  his  early  man- 
hood, and  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Webb,  daughter  of  Benja- 
min Webb,  and  settled  on  the  Hyman  homestead,  below 
Smithville,  which  is  still  owned  by  hi?  heirs. 

He  was  a  blacksmith  by  trade  and  a  noted  hunter.  He 
died  on  April  6,  1904,  at  the  home  of  his  daughter,  Mrs, 
Martha  Holt,  near  Morgantown  ,and  was  laid  at  rest  in  the 
Webb  cemetery  by  the  side  of  his  wife. 


88  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

The  children  of  this  family  were  as  follows :  Mrs. 
Minerva,  late  wife  of  John  P.  Kennedy,  of  Smithville  ;  Mrs. 
Mary  Roberts,  Mrs.  Martha  Holt,  wife  of  the  late  William 
Holt,  of  Morgantown ;  Hattie  died  in  youth  ;  Benjamin,  in  the 
Civil  war ;  and  John  resides  near  Smithville. 

Mr.  Hyman  was  the  son  of  Hyman  and   Mrs. 

Rachel  Hostetter  Hyman — his  mother  being  the  sister  of 
John  Hostetter,  senior.  Both  his  parents  sleep  in  Virginia. 
His  mother  was  married  a  second  time  to  Aldridge  Evans,  of 
Rockbridge  county,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  the  late  A. 
J.  Evans,  of  the  Cross-roads ;  J.  M.  of  Lamb's  run ;  Mrs.  Mar- 
garet (Morgan)  Rexroad,  Mrs.  Martha  Mitchell,  and  Eliza- 
beth, who  died  single.  After  the  death  of  the  mother  all  the 
rest  of  the  family  came  to  this  county,  and  here  they  sleep. 
The  father  lies  on  the  McNeill  homestead  where  most  of  the 
other  members  of  the  family  rest. 

The  Ayreses. — The  year  1836  brought  Daniel  A3a-es  with 
his  family,  which  incliKJed  his  parents,  his  sister,  Mrs.  Polly 
Campbell,  and  his  son-in-law,  Henry  Webb,  from  Rockbridge 
county.  Virginia  to  the  McNeill  homestead.  They  started 
on  their  long  and  perilous  journey  over  the  Allegheny  mount- 
ains in  November  in  three  large  covered  wagons  with  their 
household  efit'ects,  driving  their  cows  before  them,  and  not 
imtil  the  first- week  in  Januar}^  after  seven  weeks  of  suffer- 
ing and  hardships,  did  they  reach  their  destination. 

Mr.  Ayres  had  purchased  two  hundred  acres  of  land  here 
of  the  Purviance  survey  with  a  small  improvement  upon  it — 
a  two-roomed  log  house  and  a  few  acres  of  cleared  land.  The 
location  which  is  to-day  a  most  beautiful  one  with  its  mod- 
ern conveniences  and  improvements,  is  said  to  have  been  a 
picturesque  one  at  that  time  in  its  sylvan  beauty  with  its  his- 
toric surroundings. 

The  river  had,  in  prc-historic  times,  evidently  formed  a 
bend  entirely  round  the  farm,  but  had  changed  its  course  at 
a  later  period  ;  and  at  the  time  of  the  coming  of  Mr.  Ayres. 
the  channel  had  filled  up,  making  a  beautiful  level  bottom, 
though  the  ancient  river  bed  was  still  "visible  and  interest- 
ing." A  mound  supposed  to  contain  relics  of  an  unknown 
and  pre-historic  race  was  another  feature  of  special   interest 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  89 

on  this  farm,  and  but  a  few  hundred  yards  from  the  house 
were  the  ruins  of  an  ancient  fortification — an  excavation  of 
several  feet  having  been  made  and  the  earth  thrown  up  into 
an  embankment.  Flints,  darts  and  arrow  heads  were  found 
in  large  numbers  about  the  ground — serving  as  silent  re- 
minders that  this  had  once  been  the  "happy  hunting-ground 
of  a  vanished  race"  whose  history,  however  interesting,  will 
never  be  known. 

Mr.  Ayres  was  of  Irish  lineage.  His  grandfather,  Daniel 
Ayres  came  from  Ireland  and  settled  on  the  Susquehannah 
river  in  Pennsylvania,  where  Daniel  Ayres,  junior,  (father  of 
Daniel  of  the  McNeill  homestead)  we.s  born  in  1745. 

In  1773.  Daniel  Ayres,  junior,  was  married  to  Miss  Ellen 
McGee,  who  was  born  in  Baltimore  of  Irish  parentage  in  1745, 
and  from  this  city,  they  went  to  Rockbridge  county,  Virginia, 
where  they  established  their  home  and  reared  a  family,  which 
were  as  follows : 

lohn,  the  pioneer  school-teacher  of  this  county  ;  Charles, 
Lewis,  Mrs.  Polly  (VVm.)  Campbell,  and  Daniel  (IH)  who 
was  the  youngest  son,  and  the  head  of  the  Ritchie  county 
family. 

Daniel  and  Ellen  McGee  Ayres  came  to  this  county  with 
their  son,  as  already  mentioned,  and  on  the  McNeill  home- 
stead they  lie  in  their  last  sleep.  He  died  at  the  age  of  ninety- 
seven,  and  she,  at  the  age  of  ninety-five. 

Daniel  Ayres  (III)  was  born  in  1789,  and  he  was  married 
to  Miss  Hannah  Riprogal,  who  was  born  of  German  parentage 
in  Virginia,  in  1787. 

Mr.  Ayres  served  as  captain  in  the  war  of  1812,  and  while 
at  Norfolk  in  1814  where  he  had  been  ordered  with  his  com- 
pany to  assist  in  the  defense  of  the  city,  he  was  stricken  with 
yellow  fever  and  when  able  to  be  out  again,  after  spending 
sixteen  weeks  in  the  hospital,  the  enemy's  vessels  were  still 
hovering  about  the  city  in  a  threatening  manner,  though  no 
attack  was  made. 

He  served  as  justice  of  the  peace  almost  throughout  his 
residence  here,  and  was  one  of  the  chief  factors  in  the  organ- 
ization of  the  county,  in  1843 — a  short  time  before  his  death. 


;"•  mSTORV    OF   RITCHIE    COUXTY 

whicli  was  clue  to  typhoid  fever.  He  and  his  wife  both  died 
oi  this  malady  near  the  same  time,  and  side  by  side  they  He 
at  rest  on  the  JNIcNeill  homestead.  Their  children  were  nine 
in  number ;  viz.,  Jackson  died  in  early  manhood,  and  one  in 
infancy.  Margaret  married  Henry  Webb  and  went  to  Mis- 
souri where  she  rests.  Ellen  was  the  wife  of  John  Starr,  Eliza, 
of  James  Starr;  Sarah,  of  Dr.  Wm.  R.  Lowther ;  and  the  late 
John  B. 

John  B.  Ayres,  the  3roung-est  son  of  this  family,  abo\'e 
mentioned  was  long"  prominently  known  in  this  county.  He 
was  born  in  the  Old  Dominion  almost  within  the  shadow  of 
historic  old  Lexington,  and  not  far  from  the  Natural  bridge, 
in  1831,  and  was  a  child  of  but  five  summers  when  his  parents 
came  to  the  McNeill  homestead.  Six  years  later  they  both- 
passed  on,  and  he  being  thrown  upon  the  world,  bound  him- 
self to  J.  J.  Vandivort,  the  Harrisville  saddler  and  harness- 
maker,  in  1847,  and  worked  as  an  apprentice  in  his  shop  for 
the  next  fotir  one-half  years.  He  was  then  a  journeyman 
saddler,  and  merchant  for  several  years,  before  settling  down 
to  his  trade  at  Harrisville,  in  1870,  where  he  remained  until 
19'>3,  when  his  declining  health  prompted  him  to  seek  a 
change  of  climate,  which  he  found  in  Colorado,  after  visiting 
Zion  City,  the  far-famed  domain  of  the  late  Alexander  Dowie, 
for  a  brief  time.  After  a  short  stay  in  the  West,  he  then  re- 
sided near  Washington  City,  and  at  Grafton  for  a  time  before 
going  to  Spencer  in  Roane  county.  He  died  at  his  home  at 
Sapulpa,  Oklahoma,  in  November,  1910,  and  there  his  remains 
were  interred. 

He  married  Miss  Anna  Hall  daughter  of  llannibal  Hall, 
who  was  twenty-three  years  his  junior,  and  the  two  sons. 
Edgar  and  Charles,  born  of  this  union  both  died  in  infancy. 

The  Princes. — The  name  Prince  became  identified  with 
the  Webb's  mill  vicinity,  in  the  year  1850,  when  the  late  John 
H.  Prince  married  Miss  Drusilla  Webb,  daughter  of  Benja- 
min Webb,  and  became  the  partner  of  his  father-in-law  in  the 
mill  and  the  mercantile  business.  The  store  was  destroyed 
in  I860,  by  the  Jones'  raid,  but  he  remained  in  connection 
with  the  mill  luitil  his  death,  near  1877.  He  sleeps  by  his 
wife  in  the  Webb's  cemetery.     He  was  born  in  1815;  and  was 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  91 

the  father  of  three  sons  and  two  daughters :  B.  F.  Prince, 
Cantwell ;  and  John  Willian,  and  Robert  J.,  who  with  their 
sister,  Mrs.  Anna  E.  M.  (John  P.)  Kennedy,  have  passed  on: 
and  Mrs.  Martha  Frances  (E.  S.)Byrd,  is  of  Wood  county. 

Captain  AVilliam  Prince  came  from  Prince  William  coun- 
ty, Virginia,  and  settled  near  Claysville  in  Wood  county  at 
an  early  day.  Fie  was  born  on  August  the  31,  17TJ:,  and  died 
on  September  4,  1825. 

He  married  Miss  Frances  Groves,  and  was  the  father  of 
Elizabeth  Prince,  who  married  David  Sleeth,  the  founder  of 
Smithville;  of  William  R.,  Mary  A.,  Robert  K.,  Nancy  J., 
John  H.,  Benjamin  G..  and  Frances,  J.  G.  Prince.  John  Fl. 
and  Mrs.  Sleeth  were  the  two  that  were  identified  here.  After 
the  death  of  Captain  William  Prince  his  widow  was  married 
to  Mr.  Vandiver,  of  Wood  county,  and  the  late  James  V.  B. 
and  Jerome  A.  Vandiver.  of  Louisville,  Kentucky  were  the 
fruits  of  this  union. 

The  Tinglers.— The  year  1836,  brought  Henry  Tingler 
and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Mary  Phryne  Tingler  from  their  native 
county — Harrison,  to  the  B.  H.  Wilson  homestead,  which  for 
long  years  after  his  death  was  known  as  the  ''Tingler  farm." 
Mr.  Tingler  remained  in  this  part  of  the  county  until  his 
death,  and  on  the  E.  R.  Tibbs'  farm,  beside  his  companions, 
he  found  a  resting  place.  After  his  first  wife,  passed  on,  he 
married  Miss  Jane  Campbell,  and  on  Indian  creek,  spent  his 
last  hours. 

He  was  the  father  of  ten  children,  all  by  his  first  mar- 
riage except  one  son,  Thomas,  who  lived  in  some  other  pare 
of  the  country. 

The  children  of  his  first  union  were  as  follows :  Granville, 
Cebart,  John,  the  late  Mrs.  Tabitha  (Daniel)  Ayres,  the  late 
Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Wm.)  Collins,  Mrs.  Matilda  (Washington) 
Elliott,  Mrs.  Julia  Westfall— mother  of  W'.  H.  Westfall,  of 
Flarrisville ;  Mrs.  John  Ayres,  of  Long  Run  ;  and  Mrs.  Rosetta 
Prunty  Martin  Gardner  Schoolcraft. 

John  married  Miss  Eveline  Marlm  and  was  the  father  of 
Peyton  Tingler  and  of  Mrs.  Safronia  Propts  Tibbs,  of  Lamb's 


92  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

run.     He  was  a  L  nion  soldier  during  the  war,  as  was  Gran- 
ville, but  he  died  in  the  Saulsbury  prison  in  North  Carolina. 

Cebart,  who  resides  on  Macfarlan  was  a  Confederate  sol- 
dier. 

Granville  married  Miss  Mahala  Schoolcraft,  daughter  of 
Aaron  Schoolcraft,  and  was  the  pioneer  on  tlie  farm  where 
he  still  resides,  on  Dry  run  near  Juna.     He  is  the  father  of : 

Morgan,  of  Eva ;  Aaron,  Mrs.  John  Flemming,  Mrs. 
Thamer  Newlon,  and  Miss  Addie  Tingler,  and  the  late  Mrs. 
Samantha  M.  (R.  W.)  Goff,  all  of  Juna. 

A.  P.  Hardman. — Asbury  Poole  Hardman  was  the  first 
CO  mark  the  forest  on  the  Osbourne  farm  east  of  Hardman 
chapelf  He  was  born  on  the  old  homestead  that  is  now  his 
estate,  on  January  18,  1827 ;  and  shortly  after  his  marriage  to 
Miss  Thankful  Ann  Gofif,  daughter  of  Thomas  Goff,  in  1850, 
began  to  carve  out  his  fortune  on  the  Osbourne  farm.  He 
inherited  the  faith  of  his  fore-fathers,  and  was  long  a  pillar  in 
the  church  at  Hardman  chapel.  He  died  on  July  30,  1903  on 
the  sixth  anniversary  of  the  death  of  his  wife,  having  spent 
his  entire  life  within  the  bounds  of  the  community  where  he 
was  born  ;  and  in  the  churchyard  at  Hardman  chapel,  by  the 
side  of  his  wife,  he  sleeps. 

He  was  the  father  of  thirteen  children  :  His  sons,  Jehu 
R.,  Charles  F.,  James  H.,  and  his  daughters,  Mrs.  Nora  Hen- 
dershot,  and  Mrs.  Louella  Carder  Sutherland,  all  reside  in  the 
West;  and  Mrs.  Paulina  Smith,  Misses  Verna  and  Vedella  A., 
all  rest  there;  T.  A.  and  A.  K.  are  of  Fonsoville ;  and  A.  L., 
of  Burnt  House;  the  other  two  died  in  childhood. 

The  Osbournes. — John  Osbourne,  senior,  was  the  second 
owner  of  the  Osbourne  farm  which  is  now  the  home  of  his 
grandson,  M.  R.  Osbourne. 

Mr.  Osbourne  came  from  the  "Buckeye  State"  to  this 
vicinity  more  than  sixty  years  ago,  and  purchased  what  is 
now  the  A.  P.  Hardman,  the  A.  K.  Hardman,  the  Otis  Mc- 
Neill and  the  Cumberledge  farms.  (He  also  owned  what  is 
now  the  Lowther  homestead)  ;  and  some  years  later  he  and 
]\Ir.  Hardman  traded  farms,  and  by  this  exchange  they  each 
obtained  permanent  homes;  for  here  they  remained  until  they 


SOUTH  FORK   SETTLERS— CONTINUED  'Jlj 

were  borne  to  their  final  resting  places.  It  will  be  remem- 
bered that  the  late  Rev.  James  Hardman,  father  of  A.  P.,  had 
owned  and  lost  the  A.  P.  Plardman  homestead  owing  to  a  de- 
fective title  before  the  coming  of  the  Osbournes. 

The  Osbournes  are  of  English  descent.  John  Osbourne, 
senior,  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812  ;  he  served  under  a  cap- 
tain by  the  name  of  Christopher  Columbus,  and  was  in  the 
engagement  at  Bladensburg.  He  was  a  bricklayer  by  trade, 
and  was  one  of  the  number  that  helped  to  lay  the  first  wing 
of  the  Capitol  building"  at  Washington  City ;  and  the  old 
trowel  that  he  used  in  this  historic  M'ork,  is  now  a  cherished 
possession  of  his  grandson,  M.  R.  Osbourne. 

He  was  three  times  married,  but  the  name  of  his  first 
wife  is  missing.  The  second,  however,  was  Miss  Sarah  Bald- 
win, of  Washington  city,  who  died  at  their  home  in  Knox 
county,  Ohio,  in  August,  1849 ;  and  the  third  was  Mrs. 
Augusta  Henry  Welsh,  of  New  York,  who  was  the  mother  of 
one  daughter,  Carrie  Osbourne,  the  late  wife  of  j.  R.  Hard- 
man,  of  Missouri. 

Mr.  Osbourne  died  on  February  11,  1871,  and  filled  the 
first  grave  in  the  Hardman  chapel  churchyard ;  and  after  his 
death,  bis  widow  married  the  late  Rev.  Eli  Riddel,  of  Riddel's 
chapel,  and  there  she  sleeps. 

The  sons  of  the  first  marriage — Frank  and  Daniel  went  to 
Kansas  where  their  descendants  live. 

The  children  of  the  second  marriage  were  as  follows  : 

The  late  J.  William,  and  Addison,  of  Hardman  chapel 
vicinity;  Mrs.  Kathrine  (Levi)  Kirkpatrick,  of  Slab  creek;  the 
late  Mrs.  Matilda  Welsh,  and  Joshua,  Iowa ;  the  late  Mabray, 
Kansas ;  Marion,  who  lost  his  life  In  the  Union  cause ;  and 
James,  who  died  shortly  after  his  marriage,  to  Miss  Hila  Cun- 
ningham, the  late  Mrs.  John  Modisette,  sleep  on  the  A.  P. 
Hardman  homestead.  Mary  became  the  wife  of  Perry  Cun- 
ningham, and  was  the  mother  of  Mrs.  Phebe  Foster,  of  Penns- 
boro ;  Addison,  who  was  the  father  of  J.  M.,  of  Parkersburg; 
and  Joshua,  and  Mabray,  were  also  Union  soldiers. 

James  S.  Hardman,  brother  of  A.  P.,  succeeded  his  father 
on  the  old  homestead  west  of  Hardman  chapel,  where  his  son, 
Sherman   Hardman,  now  resides.     He  was  born  on  October 


94  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

31,  1829;  and  near  the  year  1856,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Hila 
Ann  Gofif,  daughter  of  George  Goft",  who  was  born  on  May 
5,  1836,  and  at  the  old  home  above  mentioned  he  Hved  and 
died. 

The -same  old  hills  that  were  resonant  with  the  funeral 
notes  of  the  bell  when  he  was  borne  to  his  final  resting  place 
in  the  Hardman  churchyard,  on  June  21,  1900,  reverberated 
the  first  sound  that  fell  from  his  childish  lips  seventy  years 
before.  For  here  he  was  born :  here  Nature  smiled  upon  him 
in  youth,  and  in  the  pride  of  manhood,  and  looked  on  in  sym- 
pathetic silence  when  the  mantle  of  sorrow  fell  heavily  upon 
him  in  "manhood's  middle  day,"  and  from  here  he  passed  into 
the  presence  of  the  great  King. 

He  was  a  soldier  of  the  Union  army,  an  exhorter  and  a 
pillar  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church. 

On  March  9,  1879,  the  wife  of  his  youth  bade  adieu  to 
earth,  and  a  little  later  he  was  married  to  3iliss  Elizabeth 
Frederick,  daughter  of  Joseph  Frederick,  who  only  survived 
the  nuptial  hour  by  twelve  weeks.  Fie  then  married  Aliss 
Edmonia  Rogers,  daughter  of  John  B.  Rogers,  who  died  after 
a  few  brief  years,  leaving  two  little  sons,  Sherman,  and  Creed, 
who  died  at  the  age  of  four  years.  Mrs.  Sarah  Jane  Galloway 
Flesher  widow  of  Asa  Flesher  was  the  next  wife,  and  Mrs. 
Ruama  Starcher  Northcraft,  widow  of  the  Rev.  Richard 
Northcraft  is  the  surviving  one.  His  first  wife,  only,  sleeps 
by  his  side. 

The  children  of  the  first  union  are  as  follows:  F.  C.,  G. 
C.,  Fremont,  Sheridan,  T.  E.,  Mrs.  Safronia  Dailey,  the  late 
Ulysses,  and  Rosa  A.,  and  one  that  died  in  infancy. 

The  Tibbses. — The  Tibbses,  too  have  have  been  identi- 
fied with  this  part  of  the  county  for  more  than  sixty  years, 
and  their  ancestral  history  is  one  of  exceptional  interest. 
Their  antecessor,  whose  first  name  is  wanting,  came  from  Ire- 
land, some  time  during  the  last  half  of  the  eighteenth  century, 
and  settled  in  the  Virginia  colon}-,  where  his  son,  James 
Tibbs  was  born  ;  and  where  he  was  married  to  a  Miss  Wor- 
Icy.  On  the  morning  following  the  marriage,  Jarnes  with  his 
bride,  set  out  for  what  is  now  IMonongalia  county.  West  Vir- 
ginia, where  he   made  a  pioneer  settlement,   a   little  west  of 


SOUTH  FORK   SETTLERS— CONTINUED  95 

Morgantown,  not  long  after  the  close  of  the  Revolution.  He 
was,  perhaps,  a  soldier  of  this  war,  and  was  a  captain  in  the 
war  of  1812,  being  present  with  his  company  at  the  seige  of 
Fort  Meiggs. 

Here,  near  Morgantown.  his  first  wife  died,  and  he  mar- 
ried Miss  Jennie  Morgan,  sister  of  the  renowned  Indian 
fighters.  David,  Levi,  and  James  Morgan.^ 

Mr.  Tibbs  was  a  slave  owner,  and  at  one  time  he  was  the 
possessor  of  twenty  slaves,  half  of  which  were  the  heritage 
of  his  wife  ;  but  sixteen  of  this  number  in  a  body  managed  to 
make  their  escape  across  the  Pennsylvania  line.  He  spent  his 
last  days  in  Monongalia  county  where  he  sleeps. 

He  was  the  father  of  three  sons  b}^  the  first  marriage: 
Joseph  was  a  soldier  under  General  Harrison,  and  fell  at  the 
battle  of  Big  Bend  in  Indiana.  John  was  also  killed  in  Indian 
warfare  ;  and  Robert  was  tlie  remaining  son. 

Robert  Tibbs  married  Miss  Castilla  Burris,  of  Monon- 
galia county,  a  cousin  of  the  late  Waitman  T.  Willey, 
of  Morgantown,  and  came  to  this  county  in  1848,  and 
settled  on  the  Hatfield  farm  at  Gofif's,  where  Mrs.  llbbs 
was  laid  to  rest  in  1852 ;  and  from  there,  he  removed 
to  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  his  son,  E.  R.  Tibbs.  He 
figured  in  the  early  afl:'airs  of  the  county  as  justice  of  the 
peace — an  office  which  he  held  for  many  years.  He  died  in 
1876,  while  on  a  visit  with  his  sons  in  the  West,  he  being  past 
eighty  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  his  death  ;  and  in  the  Snow 
Hill  cemetery  in  Missouri,  his  ashes  lie.  He  was  the  father  of 
seven  sons : 

Boaz  B.  Tibbs,  the  eldest  son.  was  graduated  from  Ihe 
Virginia  Military  Institute,  at  Lexington  with  high  honors — 
the  title  of  Colonel  being  conferred  upon  him  by  this  institu- 
tion. He  was  a  member  of  the  order  of  Freemasons,  and  held 
the  highest  ofihce  in  this  brotherhood  in  the  State,  at  the  time 


'David  Morgan  is  said  to  liave  slvinned  and  dre-sed  the  liide  of  one 
of  the  Indians  that  lie  killed.  However,  the  writer  has  a  stereopticon 
picture  of  the  monument  that  the  descendants  of  David  Morgan  erected 
to  his  memory,  a  few  years  since,  on  the  site  where  his  most  famous 
combat  with  the  red-skins  occurred.  Tlie  shot-pouch,  saddle-skirt,  etc. 
made  from  the  skin  of  the  Indian  were  on  exhibition  at  the  unveiling  of 
the  monument,  which  stands,  just  across  the  river  from  the  little  villajre 
of  Catawba  in  Marion  county,  on  the  Morgan  estate.  The  knife  with 
which  the  Indian  was  killed  is  still  in  the  hands  of  the  Morgan  descend- 
ants, who  own  a  large  estate  near  Catawba. 


i'U  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

of  his  death,  in  ]853.  He  resided  near  Fairmont  at  this  tnne. 
and  his  remains  were  placed  in  a  metalHc  casket,  and  covered 
with  alcohol,  and  buried  in  the  ground,  at  Fairmont;  but 
some  years  after  they  were  dis-interred  and  removed  to  a  vault, 
at  the  mouth  of  Indian  run,  near  six  miles  below  Fairmont, 
on  land  belonging  to  his  heirs;  and  long  after  their  removaal. 
the  features  are  said  to  have  presented  a  perfectly  natural  ap- 
pearance, so  well  had  they  been  preserved  b}^  the  alcohol. 

John,  the  second  son,  went  to  Missouri,  where  he  sleeps. 
He  was  a  soldier,  and  a  non-commissioned  ofificer  of  the  Civil 
war. 

Eugene,  who  Avas  an  early  deputy  sheriff  of  this  county, 
resides  in  South  Dakota.  He  was  commissioned  as  captain 
in  the  secret  service  of  the  Southern  Confederacy,  but  the  war 
came  to  a  close  before  he  was  called  into  active  service. 

William  went  to  Missouri,  and  there  enlisted  in  the  Union 
cause,  and  rose  to  the  rank  of  captain.  He  now  resides  in  the 
Virginia  colony  in  Texas. 

Francis  M.,  who  was  a  Confederate  soldier  resides  at 
Paris,  Missouri ;  T.  D..  and  E.  R.  Tibbs,  are  of  this  part  of  the 
county.  The  latter  was  a  non-commissioned  officer  of  the 
Union  army. 


Other  pioneers  along  this  river,  whose  names  belong  to 
our  history  were  John  W.  Mitchell,  John  W'ass  and  Jeremiah 
Snodgrass. 

John  W.  Mitchell  made  his  settlement  at  Pleasant  hill. 
He  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Leanna  Haddox  Mitchell,  were  both 
natives  of  Barbour  county;  and  shortly  after  their  marriage 
in  1835,  they  came  to  this  county  and  settled  in  a  pole  cabin 
at  the  mouth  of  Bone  creek,  on  the  farm  that  was  later  desig- 
nated as  the  "'Butcher  farm" — now  owned  by  the  heirs  of  the 
late  Alex  Pru.nty  ;  and  from  here,  they  removed  to  the  farm 
that  is  now  the  estate  of  the  late  Joseph  Haddox — Mrs." 
Mitchell's  brother,  and  thus  became  the  first  citizens  of  the 
forest  at  Pleasant  hill.  They  afterwards  resided  at  different 
points  in  the  county,  but  both  sleep  in  the  "Old  Pleasant  hill" 
cemetery.  Mrs.  Mitchell  died  at  Eva  in  1892,  and  he,  at 
Pennsboro  in  January  1898,  at  the  age  of  eighty-three  years. 


SOUTH   FORK   SETTLERS— CONTINUED  97 

These  venerable  people  were  the  parents  of  twelve 
children,  two  of  whom  died  in  infancy,  and  one,  Jerome,  at 
the  age  of  four  years. 

Few  parents  have  been  called  upon  to  mourn  more  deep- 
ly. Their  daughters  Xancy  (Mrs.  Reilly  Mason),  Mrs.  Sarah 
(C.  F.)  Beall,  Mrs.  Mary  (Phonso)  Welsh,  Mrs.  Huldali 
(Charles)  Zickafoose,  all  died  of  consumption  ;  and  the  three 
sons  that  reached  the  years  of  maturity — -B.  F.,  Marion  and  J. 
Marshall,  all  met  tragic  deaths;  Mrs.  Kathrine  (Lemuel)  Wil- 
son, of  Smithville  ;  and  Tabitha,  who  first  married  Jonathan 
Baker,  but  is  now  Mrs.  Eber  Mason,  of  Pennsboro,  alone  sur- 
vive. 

The  three  sons  were  all  soldiers  of  the  Union  army,  and 
Marion  was  injured  by  the  bursting  of  a  shell,  while  in  battle, 
which  resulted  in  his  being  an  invalid  for  the  remaining"  six 
years  of  his  life. 

J.  Marshall  was  brutally  murdered  in  Somerset  county, 
Pennsylvania,  the  body  being  dragged  near  a  mile  and  a  quar- 
tei  from  the  scene  of  the  tragedy,  and  placed  upon  the  rail- 
road track,  where  it  was  dreadfully  mutilated  by  the  train. 
It  was  thought  that  a  jealous  rival,  assisted  by  tl;e  father  ot 
the  girl  in  question,  was  the  perpetrator  of  the  crime,  but  no 
one  was  ever  brought  to  justice.  The  remains  were  sent 
home  and  laid  away  at  Pleasant  hill,  but  the  broken-hearted 
loved  ones  were  not  permitted  to  take  a  last  look. 

Banjamin  Franklin  Mitchell  met  liis  death  by  drowning. 
While  piloting  a  raft  down  the  river,  he  was  overtaken  by  a 
\'iolent  storm,  and,  in  the  darkness,  he  was  lost.  The  tragedy 
occurred  in  October,  1884,  and  though  every  efifort  was  made 
to  find  the  body,  it  lay  concealed  in  its  watery  hiding  place, 
just  above  the  forks  of  Hughes  river,  for  nine  months  :  being 
accidentally  discovered  at  Jast,  by  u  citizen  of  the  vicinity, 
who  having  missed  his  aim  at  a  hawk,  turned  his  attention 
to  the  fish  in  the  water.  The  features  were  beyond  recogni- 
tion, but  he  was  identified  by  his  watch,  in  which  his  name 
was  engraved,  and  b}^  letters  that  were  found  upon  his  per- 
son, llie  remains  were  taken  to  the  Kendall  burying-ground 
for  interment;  and  as  the  dear  old  mother,  sorrowfully  bent 
over  the  casket  unable  to  look  within,  she  spoke  of  the  other 


98  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY- 

son  that  had  been  sent  home  in  a  Hke  manner — that  she  could 
not  see,  and  she  sadly  exclaimed  and,  '"This  is  no  better!" 

B.  F.  Mitchell  was  at  one  time  sheriff  of  this  county,  and 
he  was  the  only  son  of  the  family  that  left  issue.  He  was 
married  to  Miss  Sarah  Cathrine  Kendall,  daughter  of  Ransom 
Kendall  in  1867,  and  was  the  father  of  S.  H.  Mitchell,  editor 
of  the  Kanawha  News  of  Elizabeth,  Wirt  county  ;  of  B.  F. 
Mitchell,  who  is  employed  in  "The  Youth's  Copmanion"  office 
at  Boston  ;  of  Roy.  and  Miss  Agnes,  of  Pullman  ;  Mrs.  Ella 
Riddel,  and  Mrs.  Daisy  Reynolds,  of  Harrison  county.  His 
widow  is  now  Mrs.  FI.  B.  Mason,  of  Pullman. 

John  Wass  settled  on  the  farm  that  is  known  as  the 
Harrison  AA'ass  homestead,  above  Goff's — now  the  home  of 
Peter  Wass,  where  Cornelius  Wyers  had  made  a  slight  ini- 
provement.  He  was  the  son  of  George  Wass,  an  Englishman, 
wdic  came  across  the  sea  and  settled  in  Somerset  county,  Penn- 
sylvania, where  he  (John)  was  born,  and  where  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Aliss  Barbara  Boyers,  a  German  maiden.  In  the  spring 
of  184:1.  he  and  his  wife  with  their  several  children,  came  from 
near  Petersburg,  to  the  "Wass  homestead,"  where  they  re- 
mained until  they  were  laid  in  the  Pleasant  hill  cemetery.  Mr. 
Wass  met  his  death  at  the  hand  of  an  assassin  in  July,  1863, 
while  on  his  way  home  from  Harrisville.  He  was  taken  back  to 
that  place,  where  he  died  from  the  eft'ects  of  the  bullet  wound 
a  few  hours  later,  but  not  until  he  had  made  a  statement  con- 
cerning the  tragedy. 

He  was  the  father  of  ten  children  ;  all  of  whom  reared 
families  of  their  own  save  one  son,  who  died  in  childhood. 

Mrs.  Lucinda  (Eugene)  Barker,  and  Mrs.  Mahala  (R.  H.) 
Rogers,  are  now  numbered  with  the  dead,  but  the  rest  survive. 
Mrs.  Elizabeth  (H.  B.)  Tharpe.  resides  near  Holbrook;  Mrs. 
Amanda  (Ebeneezer)  Tharp,  near  Auburn:  Mrs.  Sarah 
(Joseph)  Haddox,  Berea ;  Mrs.  Larue  (E.  R.)  Tibbs,  and 
William,  at  Goff's;  Mrs.  Luvina  (J.  R.)  Westfall,  at  Smith- 
ville  :  and  Harrison  Wass,  at  Harrisville. 

Jeremiah  Snodgrass  took  up  his  residence  below  Berea. 
where  his  daughter,  Mrs.  John  Colgate,  now  lives.  He  and 
his  wife,  Mrs.  Euphamy  Clayton  Snodgrass,  came  from 
Marion  county  in  1845,  and  redeemed  this  farm  from  its  primi- 


SOUTH  FORK   SETTLERS— CONTINUED  99 

tive  wilderness.  Here,  they  passed  from  earth — he,  in  1880, 
and  she,  four  years  later,  and  side  by  side  they  slumber  in  the 
Old  Pleasant  hill  burying-ground.  He  was  the  son  of  Frank- 
lin and  Rachel  Burr  Snodgrass,  and  was  the  father  of  thirteen 
children : 

B.  F.,  and  Jeremiah,  Harrisville;  Ezekiel,  of  Marion 
county;  the  Rev.  Elisha,  of  Auburn,  Mrs.  Nancy  (Greenbury) 
Hammond,  Berea ;  Mrs.  Isabel  (Thomas)  Baker,  of  Hale, 
Missouri ;  and  Mrs.  Rachel  Wagner,  of  Newberne,  are  all 
numbered  with  the  dead.  E.  C,  resides  at  Smithville;  John, 
ai  Harrisville ,  Mrs.  Sarah  Colgate,  at  Berea ;  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
(Thomas)  Prather,  at  Mt.  Zion;  David  L.,  in  Marion  county; 
and  W.  C,  in  Florida. 

This  pioneer  was  the  grandfather  of  the  distinguished 
pulpit  orator,  the  Rev.  Winfield  C.  Snodgrass,  of  the  Methodisl 
Episcopal  conference  of  New  Jersey,  who,  while  on  a  tour  in 
Europe,  some  years  ago,  was  accorded  the  honor  of  an  invita- 
tion to  fill  Spurgeon's  pulpit.  He  is  the  son  of  the  Rev.  Elisha 
and  Mrs.  Mary  Cox  Snodgrass,  and  near  Auburn  he  first  saw 
the  light,  on  December  37,  1849.  He  began  his  ministerial 
career  as  a  member  of  the  West  Virginia  conference,  and 
from  here  went  to  the  Kansas  conference,  where  he  remained 
for  some  years,  before  going  to  New  Jersey,  where  he  has 
added  new  laurels  to  his  brow.  * 

The  Rev.  Hall  Snodgrass,  who  is  now  serving  a  Baptist 
church  in  Oklahoma ;  and  the  Rev.  McClellan  Snodgrass  of 
the  New  York  M.  E.  conference  are  also  grandsons  of  this 
pioneer. 

William  Snodgrass. — William  .Snodgrass,  an  uncle  of 
Jeremiah,  was  the  first  one  of  the  name  to  come  to  Ritchie 
county.  He  was  a  native  of  Pennsylvania  and  a  soldier  of 
the  war  of  1813.  In  1807,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Nancy  King, 
who  passed  on  in  1834,  from  their  home  in  Marion  county, 
leaving  eight  children  to  his  care.  Two  years  later,  he  was 
again  married  to  Miss  Mary  Pritchard — half-sister  of  Peter 
Pritchard,  and  in  1841  he  came  to  this  county,  and  penetrated 
the  unbroken  forest  on  Turtle  run — a  small  tributary  of  the 
South  fork — above  Berea,  and  reared  the  first  cabin  on  the 
farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  his  youngest  son,  T.  C.  Snod- 


t:  «)  <k  n  f  /' 


100  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

grass  ;  and  here  he  died  in  1879,  at  the  age  of  ninety-six  years, 
and  at  W^liite  Oak,  he  sleeps. 

The  children  of  his  first  marriage  were :  John  Wesley 
Snodgrass,  who  died  in  Iowa,  a  few  years  ago.  at  the  age  of 
ninet3^-one  years — having  been  a  minister  of  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  church  for  seventy-three  years ;  Mrs.  Frances 
(Nicholas)  Baker,  and  Mrs.  Alartha  (Elijah)  A'lorgan,  who 
sleep  in  Marion  county;  Mrs.  Naoma  (Davis)  Meredith,  late 
of  T3der  county;  Mrs.  Nancy  Pierce,  Mrs.  Comfort  Ewins, 
and  Airs.  Isabel  (Jared)  Hawkins,  of  Ohio  ;  and  Sarah,  who 
married  Solomon  Hawkins  and  lived  and  died  in  this  county. 

The  children  of  the  second  marriage  were  five  in  number 
and  were  as  follows:  W.  F.,  who  rests  in  Kansas;  B.  F.,  in 
the  State  of  Washington;  Eliza,  who  died  in  infancy;  Mrs. 
Margaret  A.,  who  married  George  Carder  and  lives  in  Ohio  : 
and  T.  C.  Snodgrass,  who  lives  at  the  old  homestead.  Mrs. 
Snodgrass  died  at  the  home  of  her  daughter  in  Ohio,  and 
there  she  sleeps. 

The  Snodgrasses  are  of  Irish  origin.  Three  brothers. 
W'illiam,  James,  and  Michael  Snodgrass,  came  from  Ireland 
and  settled  in  W'^ashington  county,  Pennsylvania.  Michael 
wandered  away,  and  was  never  heard  from  again,  and  W^illian-. 
and  James  removed  to  Monongalia — now  Marion — county 
{\\.)  Virginia,  in  1787;  and  three  years  later  James  met  a 
tragic  death  at  the  hands  of  the  Indians,  on  Fishing  creek  in 
W'etzel  county,  while  in  quest  of  his  horse  that  he  had  lost 
while  on  a  bufifalo  chase.  His  remains  were  afterwards  found 
and  buried,  but  not  until  the  flesh  had  been  torn  from  the 
bones  by  the  fangs  of  wolves. 

William  married  Miss  Kathrine  Yost,^  a  German  maiden, 
ar.d  from  his  sons.  William,  junior.  Isaac,  and  Franklin,  the 
Ritchie  county  Snodgrasses  are  descended. 

Isaac  was  the  father  of  the  lace  ]\Irs.  John  Parker,  of 
Nathan,  who  went  W  est,  and  of  Elias  Snodgrass,  who  died  in 
Doddridge  county. 

John  Harris. — John  Harris  was  another  worthy  pioneer 
of  Tin"tle  run.  He  was  born  in  Flarrison  county,  on  January 
25,  1814,  and  there  in  1838,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Dorinda 


SOUTH   FORK   SETTLERS— CONTLXUED  101 

Coburn,  who  died  a  few  years  later,  leaving  one  son,  Geary 
Harris,  who  is  now  a  citizen  of  Harrison  count3^  He  then 
married  Miss  Elizabeth  Pritchard,  sister  of  Peter  Pritchard, 
who  was  born  on  February  20,  1812,  and  in  1846,  when  Tur- 
tle run  was  almost  a  wilderness  they  came  to  this  county  and 
settled  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  their  son,  A.  F. 
Harris.  Flere  they  passed  from  earth — she,  on  March  25, 
1876,  and  he,  on  March  23,  1904.  Both  sleep  at  White  Oak. 
He  reached  the  venerable  age  of  ninety  years,  and  was  revered 
by  all  who  knew  him,  as  was  his  companion. 

Their  children  were :  Eliza  J.,  who  died  in  youth  ;  George 
W.,  of  Harrison  county;  the  late  Mrs.  Martha  (H.  C.)  Cox, 
and  Mrs.  Millie  F.  (G.  W.)  Hayhurst,  and  Alpheus  F.  Harris, 
Pullman;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Nancy  Rebecca  (Wesley)  McCor- 
mick,  of  Tyler  county. 

Jacob  Ehret. — The  Ehrets  were,  also,  early  peoplf^  on  this 
stream.  Jacob  Ehret,  senior,  came  from  his  native  land — Ger- 
many, in  1810,  when  his  son,  Jacob,  junior,  was  but  a  child  of 
six  summers,  and  settled  at  Philadelphia.  Jacob,  junior,  niar- 
ried  Miss  Joanna  Seizer,  a  German  lassie,  of  the  Keystone 
state,  and  near  the  year  1845,  they  migrated  to  West  Virginia 
and  settled  in  Doddridge  county,  for  a  few  months,  before  coni- 
ing  to  Hughes'  river,  where  they  sojourned,  for  a  time  on  land 
now  owned  by  G.  M.  Ireland;  and  from  there  they  removed 
to  Turtle  run,  where  they  remained  until  they  were  laid  in 
the  Pine  Grove  cemetery,  at  P>erea.  They  were  the  parents 
of  the  late  William  Ehret,  Mrs.  Hannah  Bee,  Mrs.  Mary  John- 
son, and  John  Ehret,  all  of  this  county  ;  and  of  Mrs.  Cathriue 
Bee,  of  Massachusetts. 

Benjamin  Prather  was  born  in  Washington  county,  Mary- 
land, in  1798,  and  there  he  was  married  in  ISilO,  to  Miss 
Cathrine  Dick,  who  was  born  in  1800,  and.  in  the  year  1845, 
they  joined  the  little  colony  on  Turtle  run,  and  here  they 
remained  until  they  were  borne  to  the  Pullman  cemetery. 

They  were  the  parents  of  James  Prather,  of  Spruce  creek : 
Thomas,  of  Slab  creek;  the  late  Jacob  Prather,  and  Mrs.  Frank 
Snodgrass,  and  Mrs.  John  Snodgrass. 


CHAPTER  VII 


South  Fork  Settlers—Continued 

RESTON  ZINN,  brother  of  Maniy,  was  the 
first  settler  at  Berea,  on  the  Ezekiel  Bee 
farm.  He,  with  his  wife,  Mrs.  Nancy  Rogers 
Zinn,  came  from  Preston  county,  in  1849. 
and  erected  his  cabin  almost  on  the  very  site 
that  is  now  marked  by  the  residence  of  Min- 
ter  Fox ;  and  from  here  he  removed  to  the 

J.  E.  Meathrell  farm,  where  he  came  to  his  death  by  the  '"kick" 

of  a  plow. 

After  he  was  laid  away  in  the  Pine  Grove  cemetery,  his 

family  went  to  Illinois  and  there,  and  in  California,  they  now 

reside. 

His   children   were  ten   in    number;   viz.,   Mrs.   Elizabeth 

Kuhn,  the  late  Mrs.  Angelina  (David  ) Clayton,  the  late  Mrs. 

Adaline  (Ishmael)  Clayton,  Thomas,  Ginevera,  Perdilla,  Biba, 

Elendar,  Phedora,  and  Ruth  but  several  of  the  last  ones  named 

died  in  childhood. 

Thomas  D.  Pritchard,  also  came  to  Berea  this  same 
year — 1849 — and  erected  his  dwelling  where  the  J.  M.  Mere- 
dith residence .  now  stands — (formerly  the  Job  Meredith); 
and,  from  here,  he  removed  to  Slab  creek— to  the  farm  that  his 
son,  T.  T.  Pritchard  recently  sold  to  Samuel  Haddox.  Here  he 
continued  to  reside  until  a  short  time  before  his  death,  when 
he  went  to  Lewis  county,  and  there,  at  Gaston,  he  lies  at  rest. 

He  was  born  in  Monongalia  county,  on  February  25, 
1818.  and  was  the  son  of  Thomas,  ^enior.  and  Mary  Moody 
Pritchard.  On  February  11,  1843,  he  was  married  to  Miss 
Mary  Lowther,  daughter  of  Major  Elias  Lowther  and  sister 
of  Jonathan  Lowther,  of  Berea,  and  six  children  were  the  re- 
sult of  this  union:  Rebecca,  Silas  and  Mary  died  in  child- 
hood, and  beside  their  mother  they  rest  on  the  old  homestead 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  103 

on  Slab  creek.     T.  T.  resides  at  Hyattsville,  Wyoming;  Elias 
R.,  in  Roane  county ;  and  Jerusha,  at . 

Alexander  Ireland. — Near  the  year  1818,  Alexander  Ire- 
land, senior,  with  his  family  came  from  the  vicinity  of 
Clarksburg-  and  settled  just  above  the  mouth  of  Otterslide, 
on  the  farm  that  was  formerly  designated  as  the  "Joshua 
Davis" — now  a  part  of  the  Flannagan,  homestead.  Here  he 
remained  until  some  time  in  the  early  thirties  when  he  re- 
moved to  Tyler  county,  where  he  passed  from  earth  on  July 
18,  1843,  at  the  age  of  seventy-one  years. 

Mr.  Ireland  was  a  native  of  Maryland,  and  with  his 
father,  William  Ireland,  who  was,  also,  a  Maryland  product, 
migrated  to  Harrison  county  in  his  boyhood.  Little  else  is 
known  of  his  early  family  ties  other  than  that  he  had  one 
half-sister,  who  became  A-Irs.  Sheets,  and  that  his  father  died 
near  Clarksburg. 

His  wife,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Ragan  Ireland,  was  of  German 
lineage — the  daughter  of  a  Revolutionary  soldier.  She  was 
born  at  West  Milford  in  1771,  and  died  at  her  home  in  Tyler 
county,  on  September  7,  1855,  at  the  age  of  eighty-four  years. 

They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  named  sons  and 
daughters  whose  posterity  are  scattered  throughout  the 
Union : 

John,     Jacob,     Thomas,     Jonathan,     Jesse,      Alexander,- 
William,  Mary.  Eliza,  Sarah,  Margaret,  and  Priscilla  Ireland. 
All  of  whom  have  passed  on  leaving  families  except  Jacob, 
who  married   Miss   Martha   Wells   and   died   childless,   at   his 
home  in  Tyler  county. 

John  first  married  Miss  Agnes  Maxwell,  and  his  second 
wife  was  Miss  Amy  Joseph.  Mary  became  Mrs.  Robert  Doak, 
and  Eliza  married  Alexander  Doak,  and  all  lived  and  died  in 
Tyler  county,  where  many  of  their  descendants  reside. 

Thomas  and  Sarah,  who  was  the  wife  of  Alexander  Low- 
ther,  of  Oxford,  lived  and  died  in  Ritchie  county.  (See  other 
chapters). 

Jonathan  (niarried  Jane  Rose),  Jesse  (Sarah  Wells),  Alex- 
ander .(Sarah  Bond),  William  ( ),  Margaret  (Thomas 

Bond),  and  Priscilla  (William  Wells),  and  all  went  West. 


104  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

The  Ireland  ancestral  line  is  not  traceable  to  the  land  be- 
yond the  sea,  as  are  many  of  the  other  pioneer  lineages,  but 
a  very  interesting-  legend  as  to  the  origin  of  this  family  in 
America  has  been  handed  down  by  tradition  for  generations; 
and  although  its  authenticity  cannot  be  verified,  it  is  given 
credence  by  some  and  will,  doubtless,  add  interest  here: 

A  lad  whose  parents  had  evidently  been  "lost  on  the 
deep,"  and  whose  name  and  history  \v'cre  unknov^-n.  grew  up 
on  board  a  ship  at  sea,  and,  as  his  appearance  suggested  the 
Irish  nationality,  he  was  called  "Ireland"  for  the  want  of  a 
better  name. 

On  one  occasion,  when  this  lad  had  reached  manhood's 
estate,  the  vessel  which  had  so  long  been  his  home  la}^  at 
anchor  in  a  harbor  on  the  eastern  coast  of  the  Ignited  States, 
and  he  decided,  for  the  first  time,  to  venture  on  shore,  and 
being  so  delighted  with  the  land,  could  not  be  induced  to  re- 
turn to  the  ship,  and  thus  America  became  the  home  of  his 
adoption.  He  married  and  from  him  Alexander  Ireland  is  said 
to  have  been  descended. 

Circumstances  point  to  the  fact  that  this  family  are  con- 
nected to  other  families  of  the  name  in  the  United  States  who 
can  trace  their  ancestry  to  the  land  across  the  water,  but  this 
connection  has  not  been  made  clear,  however.  And  this  lit- 
tle tradition  still  retains  its  former  Aveight  and  interest. 

Dr.  William  R.  Lowther. — The  late  Dr.  \\'illiam  R.  Low- 
ther  was  the  first  settler  at  the  mouth  of  Turtle  run,  on  the 
farm  that  is  now  owned  by  Edward  J.  Lowther. 

He  was  born  near  West  Milford,  in  Harrison  county,  in 
1809,  and  with  his  wife,  Airs.  Saiah  Randall  Lowther,  of  Ohio, 
came  here  in  1838.  Here  Mrs.  Lowther  and  their  infant  child 
passed  away ;  and  some  time  after,  he  married  jNIiss  Sarali 
Ann  Ay  res,  daughter  of  Daniel  Ayres,  and  sister  of  John  B. 
AA'res  :  and  resided  on  the  Ayres — nov.^  the  McNeill — home- 
stead, near  Smithville  for  a  short  tif»ie,  before  removing  to 
the  Holbrook  vicinitv  where  he  mace  the  first  improvement 
on  the  Thomas  Grifhn  farm.  He  finally  removed  to  Mt.  Zion 
where  his  daughter,  Airs.  Margaret  Glover  now  lives,  and 
from  here  he  crossed  to  the  other  side  in  1881,  and  at  Pullman 
he  lies  at  rest. 


SOUTH   FORK   SETTLERS— CONTINUED  105 

Mrs.  Lowther,  who  survived  him  by  several  years,  rests 
at  his  side. 

Dr.  Lowther  was  a  very  successful  physician,  a  school- 
teacher of  merit,  and  a  man  of  more  than  ordinary  talent. 

Ills  children — all  of  tlie  second  marriage — are  as  follows: 

Mrs.  Hannah  E.  Parker  (widow  of  Frank  Parker),  Mrs. 
Orvilla  (J.  H.)  Nichols,  and  George  W.  Lov;thcr  (ex-mayor 
of  Grafton),  all  of  Grafton;  Mrs.  Margaret  (Taylor)  Glover, 
Miss  Sarah  Ann  Lowther,  D.  A.,  and  D.  S.  Lowther,  all  of 
Mt.  Zion  ;  and  John  A.  Lowther,  of  Ark?nsas. 

William  B.  Lowther.— In  1840,  William  B.  Lowther, 
father  of  Dr.  William  R.,  with  his  wife,  Mrs.  Margaret  Co- 
burn  Lowther,  and  their  family,  came  from  his  native  Llar- 
rison  county,  and  succeeded  his  son  on  the  Edward  J.  Low- 
ther farm,  at  the  mouth  of  Turtle  run.  Here  the  remainder 
of  his  life  was  spent,  and  in  the  Puliman  churchyard  by  the 
side  of  his  wife,  he  lies  at  rest. 

He  was  the  son  of  Robert,  the  eldest  son  of  Col.  William, 
and  his  children  are  as  follows: 

James  R.,  Edward  J.,  and  Mrs.  Mandane  (Robert)  Wil- 
son, Pullman;  Mrs.  Rosetta  (Granville)  Zinn,  of  Harrisville. 
who  lately  celebrated  her  ninetieth  birthday ;  the  late  Dr. 
William  R.,  Napoleon,  Mrs.  Juliet  (Wm.  S.)  Wilson,  and 
Misses  Julia  and  Rebecca  Lov/ther,  all  of  this  county,  who 
have  joined  the  throng  over  there;  and  Lemuel  of  Michigan. 

Ellas  Lowther,  the  youngest  son  of  Col.  William,  whose 
history  will  be  found  in  an  earlier  chapter,  came  from  West 
Milford,  in  18'c!0,  and  erected  the  first  cabin  on  the  Zimri  Flan- 
nagan  farm,  above  iScrea. 

William  J.  Lowther,  son  of  Jesse,  and  grandson  of  Col. 
William,  was  the  pioneer  on  the  Bee  farm  at  Oxford,  near 
the  year  1825. 

He  married  his  cousin.  Alary  Lowther,  daughtei  of 
Robert,  the  eldest  son  of  Col.  William,  and  witljin  the  bounds 
of  this  county,  at  some  unknown  point,  he  and  his  wife  sleep. 

He  was  the  father  of  the  Rev.  Perry  Lowther  a  late  min- 
ister of  the  West  Virginia  Methodist  Protestant  conference; 


106 


HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 


Archiliald  Wilson. 


of    Henderson    Lowther    and    several    other    children    whose 
names  are  not  at  hand. 

The  Wilsons.^ — The  year  1828,  brought  Archibald  Wilson 
with  his  family  from  Harrison — now  Taylor — county,  to  the 
Broadwater  farm  near  Oxford. 

Mr.  Wilson  was  a  native  of  Ran- 
dolph county,  he  having  been  born 
near  Beverly,  in  1801.  Near  the  year 
1825,  he  v\^as  married  to  j\Iiss  Eliza- 
beth Hudkins,  daughter  of  Barton 
Hudkins,  of  Simpsons  creek,  Taylor 
county ;  and  after  spending  the  first 
years  of  his  married  life  there,  he  came 
to  Oxford,  and  ten  years  later,  changed 
his  place  of  residence  to  the  Edmond 
Taylor  farm,  at  the  mouth  of  L3'nn 
Camp,  on  the  North  fork  of  Hughes 
river,  where  his  life  came  to  a  close 
in  1866. 

His  remains  filled  the  first  grave  that  was  made  in  the 
U.  B.  church  cemetery  at  Pennsboro,  he  having  been  inter- 
ested in  the  erection  of  this  church  at  the  time  of  his  death. 

He  was  a  man  of  marked  ability,  and  was  one  of  the 
prominent  citizens  of  his  day  in  state  afifairs.  He  was  a 
school-teacher,  and  was  the  first  county  surveyor.  He  served 
as  a  member  of  the  first  Constitutional  convention  of  the  State, 
and  was  the  first  individual  to  suggest  that  the  counties  be 
divided  into  districts  for  educational  purposes ;  and  was  the 
author  of  the  resolution  making  snch  provisions,  which, 
though,  perhaps  somewhat  altered,  became  a  clause  of  the 
Constitution. 

His  wife  died  in  1892,  at  the  ape  of  eightv-three  A-ears. 
and  was  laid  by  his  side. 

Their  children  were  as  follows  : 

Mrs.  Temperance  (T.  W.)  Ireland,  Morgantown ;  [Mrs. 
Josephine  (Jesse)  Hammond,  Portsmouth,  Ohio ;  W.  S.  Wil- 
son. Texas;  Mrs.  Eveline  (Smith)  Bee,  Mrs.  Love  (Alex) 
Prunty,  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (C.  M.)   Collins,  J.  M.,  Bazil 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  '     107 

H.,  the  late  II.  N.,  A.   B.,   Barton  H.,  and   L.  P.,  all  of  this 
county.     The  last  four  have  all  passed  on. 

John  Wilson. — Along  with  Archibald  Wilson  came  his 
brother,  John  Wilson,  who  was.  then  a  single  man,  but  who 
married  Miss  Charlotte  Dotson,  of  Tollgate,  a  little  later, 
and  settled  in  Doddridge  county  for  a  short  time,  before  re- 
moving to  Lynn  Camp,  where  he  made  the  pioneer  settlement 
on  the  James  Tucker  farm,  where  he  passed  from  earth. 

His  family  consisted  of  seven  daughters  and  two  sons ; 
viz.,  Eda,  who  married  Calvin  Haynes ;  Eliza,  who  was  Mrs. 
Jehu  Shinn  ;  Almira,  Mrs.  David  Hogue :  and  Angeline,  Retta, 
Francis,  and  another  daughter;  Jasper  went  west;  and  Black- 
burn was  killed  by  a  log  at  the  old  home. 

Wilson  Ancestry. — The  Wilsons  have  a  remarkably  inter- 
esting ancestral  line.  One,  which,  in  part,  belongs  to  National 
History.  They  are  of  Scotch-Insh  descent.  Their  antecessor, 
William  Wilson,  was  born  in  Ireland,  on  November  16,  Yi'l'l. 
He  vv^as  the  son  of  Davis  Wilson,  and  the  grandson  of  David 
Davis  Wilson,  of  Scotland.  He  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Black- 
burn, who  was  also  a  native  of  "Old  Erin,"  she  having  been 
born  on  February  2,  1725  ;  and  near  the  year  1755,  they  came 
to  America,  and  settled  in  Shenandoah  county,  Virginia.  Here, 
Mr.  Wilson  died  on  June  12,  1801,  and  his  wife,  on  September 
2,  1806. 

They  were  the  parents  of  eleven  children,  four  of  whom 
were  born  before  they  crossed  the  sea : 

I.  Benjamin  born  November  30,  1747. 

2.  Archibald  born  June  13,  1749. 

3.  David  born  September  8,  1751. 

4.  A\'illiam  born  February  8,  1754. 

5.  John  born  April  12,  1756. 

6.  Moses  born  May  1,  1758  and  died  in  1760. 

7.  Moses,  2nd  born  April  8,  1761. 

8.  James  born  July  25,  l'(63. 

9.  Solomon  born  July  2,  1766. 

10.     Elizabeth  (twin)  born  July  2,  1766. 

II.  Margaret  born  April  7,  1768. 


]('K  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

John  Wilson,  the  fifth  son,  and  the  first  one  born  in  Amer- 
ica, was  a  native  of  Shenandoah  cottnty,  Virginia.  He  married 
Miss  Mary  Wathin,  a  French  maiden,  and  from  him  the 
Ritchie  county  branch  of  the  family  is  descended.  He  being 
the  father  of  Archibald,  John,  and  Mrs.  Dorcas  (Augustus) 
Modisette,  of  this  county;  Blackburn,  of  Walker;  Mrs.  Tem- 
perance (Moses)  Thompson,  Harrison  county;  and  Mrs. 
Mary  (G.  W.)  Shinn,  Doddridge  county. 

He  (John  Wilson)  lived  and  died  at  Beverly  in  Randolph 
county,  where  he  served  as  clerk  of  the  County  court  for 
more  than  thirty  years.  He  was  engaged  in  a  desperate  In- 
dian fight  at  Wheeling  when  he  was  a  lad  of  eighteen  years, 
and  was  severely  wounded. 

His  final  resting  place  is  at  Beverly. 

Benjamin  Wilson. — Benjamin  Wilson,  the  eldest  son  of 
William  and  Elizabeth  Blackburn  \A"ilson,  who,  as  before 
stated,  was  born  in  Ireland,  on  X'ovember  'M\  1717,  was  not 
only  a  man  of  great  abilit}-  and  prominence,  but  he  had  the 
most  remarkable  progeny  that  has  come  under  our  notice 
since  the  days  of  the  ancient  patriarchs,  he  being  the  father 
of  thirty  children. 

On  September  4,  1770,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Anne  Rud- 
del,  who  was  born  on  September  20,  1754,  and  twelve  children 
were  the  result  of  this  union.  On  June  18,  1795,  the 
mother  passed  on;  and  on  December  15,  1795,  he  married  Miss 
Phebe  Davidson,  who  was  the  mother  of  the  other  eighteen. 
And  at  the  time  of  his  death,  on  January  "?,  1S58,  his  posterity 
numbered  one-hundred  thirty-six  persons — twenty-four  chil- 
dren, seventy-three  grandchildren,  thirty-two  great-grandchil- 
dren, and  one  great-great-grandchild. 

"Air.  A\'ilson  served  as  lieutenant  in  the  expedition  of 
Lord  Dunmore  against  the  Indians  in  1774,  and  acquired,  by 
his  zeal  and  attention  to  duty,  ihe  confidence  of  his  superior 
officers. 

"Early  in  the  Revolution,  he  was  appointed  captain  in 
the  Virginia  forces,  and  in  1781,  he  received  the  appointment 
of  colonel. 

"During  the  entire  war,  he  was  the  organ  through  whicli 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  109 

most  of  the  military  and  civil  business  of  that  part  of  the  State 
in  which  he  resided  was  transacted. 

"He  was  a  member  of  the  Legislature  from  the  County  of 
Monongalia  for  several  sessions  previous  to  the  year  17S4,  in 
which  year,  the  County  of  Harrison  was  established  ;  and  at 
the  organization  of  this  county,  he  became  the  clerk  of  the 
County  court.  The  duties  of  this  ofitice,  however  did  not  with- 
draw him  from  the  theater  of  politics-  -as  he  was  selected  as 
a  delegate  to  the  convention,  in  1788,  which  ratified  the  Con- 
stitution of  the  United  States." 

Another  incident  worthy  of  mention  in  this  connection  is 
the  fact  that  Col.  Wilson  was  present  at  Camp  Charlotte-- 
eight  miles  east  of  Chillicothe,  Ohio — on  the  occasion  when. 
Cornstalk,  the  renowned  Indian  chief,  visited  T_.ord  Dunmore 
in  the  interests  of  peace,  and  had  the  p:easure  of  listejiing  to 
this  great  chieftain's  v>^onderful  gift  of  oratory,  which  he  com- 
ments on  in  the  following"  language: 

"When  he  (Cornstalk)  arose,  he  was  in  no  wise  confused 
or  daunted,  but  spoke  in  a  distinct  and  audible  voice  without 
stammering  orTepetition,  and  with  a  peculiar  emphasis.  His 
looks  while  addressing  Dunmore  were  truly  grand  and  ma- 
jestic— yet  graceful  and  attractive.  1  have  heard  the  first 
orators  of  Virginia,  Patrick  Henry  and  Richard  Henry  Lee, 
but  never  have  I  heard  one  whose  powers  of  delivery  sur- 
passed those  of  Cornstalk  on  that  occasion." 

The  first  county  seat'  of  Randolph  county  is  said  to  have 
been  kept  at  the  home  of  Col.  Ben  W^ilson  four  miles  from 
Beverly,  and  the  following  amusing  anecdote  is  told  of  his 
transference  of  this  local-seat  of  government  to  another 
individual,  and  of  his  removal  to  Clarksburg  where  he  finally 
passed  to  the  confines  of  the  tond:),  at  the  age  of  eighty  years : 

"During  the  Civil  war  when  the  soldiers  Avere  stationed  at 
Beverly  (in  1864)  a  short  time  after  their  arrival,  George 
Renscrift,  one  of  the  number,  noticed  a  peculiar  hole  in  the 
ground  around  which  the  soldiers  and  the  civilians  gathered 
from  day  to  day  to  pitch  horse-shoes.  His  attention  being 
especially  attracted  to  the  size  of  this  hole,  he  remarked  to  an 
•^^j^g'-'^entleman  standing  near,  that  this  ground  must  have  been 
the '^^^^'  '■^^^  purpose  before  the  war;  and  the  old  gentleman. 


110  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

heaving  a  reminiscent  sigh,  said,  ''Yes,  my  young  man,  I  am 
nigh  unto  seventy,  and  I  was  not  born  when  the  first  horse- 
shoes were  pitched  into  that  hole.'  And  he  then  proceeded 
to  tell  him  its  unique  history: 

lie  said,  as  above  mentioned,  that  the  county  seat  was 
kept  at  the  home  of  Col.  Ben  Wilson,  and  that  at  Beverly, 
lour  miles  distant  lived  one  Jacob  Westfall.  One  da}^  Col. 
Wilson  came  riding  down  the  path  past  the  Westfall  residence 
and  found  Mr.  Westfall  out  pitching  iicrse-shoes  in  his  yard 
all  alone. 

"Having  a  good  game?"  asked  Col.  Wilson.  "Good 
enough,"  was  the  reply.  "I'll  bet  T  can  beat  you,"  said  the 
Colonel.  "I'll  take  the  bet,"  replied  Westfall.  "How  much?" 
asked  Col.  Wilson. 

"Whoever  beats  gets  the  court  house,"  replied  Westfall. 
"It's  a  bargain,"  replied  Col.  Wilson,  who  had  everything  to 
lose  and  nothing  to  gain  as  he  already  had  the  court  house, 
but  he  was  a  great  old  codger  to  take  chances.  So  the  game 
began  and  continued  until  night  and  Westfall  flaxed  the  Colo- 
nel on  every  proposition,  and  won  the  l:)eL." 

This  same  evening  Col.  Wilson  made  Jacob  Westfall  deed 
a  quarter  of  an  acre,  which  included  this  play-ground,  to  the 
public  forever,  and  according  to  the  provisions  of  this  deed  an 
individual  could  play  when,  and  as  long,  as  he  pleased,  and  no 
one  could  hinder  him. 

The  next  day  Col.  Wilson  sent  Westfall  the  county  seat, 
i)ooks,  papers  and  so  on,  to  Beverly,  and  shortly  after  sold  out 
and  removed  to  Clarksburg. 

This  piece  of  ground  is  still  used  as  a  horse-shoe  play- 
ground and  will  doubtless  continue  to  be  thus  used  until  the 
end  of  time,  as  no  one  has  the  power  to  molest  this  lot. 

This  is  said  to  be  the  only  piece  of  real  estate  in  the  world 
that  has  such  a  title.  When  the  new  court  house  at  Beverly 
was  under  contract,  the  court  undertook  to  sell  this  lot,  but 
found  upon  investigation  that  it  belonged  to  the  public,  and 
that  the  county  had  no  authority  over  it.  Consequenth',  it 
lies  there  vacant  as  it  did  a  century  ago — a  monument  c' 

'^ich 


SOUTH  FORK   SETTLERS— CONTINUED  111 

cated  to  the  simple  game  of  horse-shoe — and  the  men  and  boys 
haunt  it  to-day  as  they  did  in  the  days  of  Col.  Wilson. 

Record  of  the  Family  of  Col.  Ben  Wilson. — Children  of 
Col.  Ben  and  Anne  Ruddle  Wilson : 

Mary  Wilson  born  June  7,  1771,  married  John  Haymond. 

William  Wilson  born  January  36,  1773,  married  Miss 
Martin. 

Stephen  Ruddle  Wilson  born  October  21,  1775,  married — 

Benjamin  Wilson  born  June  13,  1778,  married  Miss  Mar- 
tin. 

Sarah  Wilson  born  September  11,  1780,  married  Benjamin 
Bryce. 

Elizabeth  Wilson  born  August  17,  1782,  died  September 
3,  1782. 

Anne  Wilson  born  January  17,  1786,  married  Dr.  Brice. 

John  W^ilson  born  July  5,  1788,  married  Miss  Martin  and 
Miss  Caldwell. 

Archibald  Blackburn  born  July  25,  1790,  married  Edith 
Roby. 

Cornelius  AV'ilson  born  April  7,  1795,  married  Rachel  Mar- 
tin. 

And  two  children  died  without  n^mes. 

Children  of  Col.  Ben  and  Phebe  Davidson  Wilson  : 

Josiah  Davidson  Wilson  born  October  12,  1796,  married 
Miss  Martin  and  Miss  Despard. 

David  Wilson  born  February  18,  1798,  died  umuarried. 

Edith  Wilson  born  November  9,  1799,  married  James 
Martin. 

Elizabeth  Wilson  born  October  18,  1801,  died  unmarried. 

Thomas  W.  Wilson  born  May  12,  1803,  married  Miss 
O'Bannon,  of  Ohio. 


(The  language  of  Col.  Wil.son  concerning  his  impre-sion  of  Cornstalk 
is  taken  from  the  foot-notes  of  the  revised  edition  of  Withers'  Border 
Warfare;  the  anecdote  concerning  the  Beverly  court  house,  from  an  old 
newspaper  clipping  furnished  us  by  ISIrs.  Susan  Collins,  of  Pennsboro — 
his  granddaughter;  and  tlie  part  concerning  his  public  career,  is  quoted 
from  the  National  Intelligencer,  of  January  29,  1828,  in  whicli  the  ac- 
count of  his  death  appeared.  And  to  his  great-great-granddaughter,  Mrs. 
.Jessie  Norris  Tierney,  of  Glenville,  who  is  a  member  of  the  Daughtei's  of 
the  American  Revolution,  we  are  indebted  for  this  rare  account. 

Col.   Wilson   was    the   Couhty    clerk  of  Randolph  county  at  the  time  of 
the  incident  herein  narrated. 


112  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUXTY 

Alaro'aret  A\'ilson  born  March  26,  1805.  married  Hiram 
Haymond. 

Deborah  A\  ilson  born  October  IT,  l&OG,  married  Abel 
Smith. 

James  Pindall  Wilson  born  June  9,  1808,  married  Rowcna 
Haymond,  daughter  of  Thomas. 

Daniel  Davisson  born  January  30,  1810,  married  Miss 
O'Bannon. 

Phebe  Wilson  born  August  "29,  1811.  married  Amos  Gil- 
bert. 

]\lartha  ]\Iartin  AA'ilson  born  June  'i?>.  181o,  married  Caul- 
der  Ha3'mond. 

Philip  Doddridge  born  June  29,  1814.  married  Penelope 
Sinnett. 

Noah  L.  AA'ilson  born  March  9,  181(3,  married  Miss  Gilpin, 
of  Baltimore. 

Julia  Anne  AVilson  born  September  28,  1817,  married 
James  Robinson. 

Harriett  Baldwin  Wilson  born  November  13,  1818,  mar- 
ried Jonathan  Haymond. 

Rachel  AA'ilson  born  July  20,  1820,  married  Lewis  Hay- 
mond and  Dr.  AA'.  D.  AA'ilson. 

Two  died  in  infancy. 

William  Hall. — AA'illiam  Hall,  the  progenitor  of  another 
prominent  Ritchie  count}^  family,  found  a  home  on  the  river 
above  Oxford,  across  wdiat  is  now  the  Doddridge  county  line, 
as  early  as  1830,  but,  ere  the  lapse  of  many  years,  he  removed 
to  the  Flannagan  farm  above  Berea,  and  later  resided  at  both 
Pullman  and  Harrisville.  He  finally,  in  his  old  age,  went  to 
Roane  county  where  be  died,  at  the  home  of  his  daughter, 
Airs.  Thomas  McKinley,  during  the  spring  of  18T3. 

Mr.  Hall  was  born  in  Loudin  county,  Virginia,  in  1797, 
and  from  there  he  emigrated  to  Harrison  county  in  his  young 


The  descendant?  of  Col.  Ben  Wilson  in  this  county  are  not  a  few  but 
among  the  nearest  in  line  are  F.  H.  ;Martin  and  Mrs.  Susan  Collins — 
grandchildren,  of  Pennsboro.  Mr.  Martin  being  t'ne  son  of  his  daughter 
Edith,  and  Mrs.  Collins  of  Rachel.  Mrs.  .Jolm  Hallani  of  Cairo  is  another 
granddaughter,  she  being  the  daughter  of  Thomas.  See  Haymond  and 
;Maxwell  liistory  for  descendants  of  !Mary  Wilson. 

Conflicting  records  of  this  family  have  been  furnished  us  but  we 
have  used  the  one  sent  us  by  Mi^s  Genevieve  Collins  of  Pennsboro,  it 
being  taken  from  Col.  Wilson's  old  Bible. 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLERS— COXTINUED  113 

manhood  where  he  met  and  married  Miss  Mary  Ann  Lowther, 
eldest  daughter  of  Jesse,  and  Mary  Ragan  Lowther,  and 
granddaughter  of  Col.  William,  and  from  West  Milford,  they 
came  to  Oxford. 

Mrs.  Hall  survived  him  by  three  years,  dying  at  the  home 
of  her  daughter  in  Roane  county  in  1876.  And  there  by  his 
side  she  lies  at  rest. 

Their  children  were  as  follows  : 

Jesse  L.  Hall,  William,  Celina,  Lucinda,  Mar^^  Elizabeth, 
Elias,  Robert  Hannibal,  Lemuel,  Smith,  and  Judge  Cyrus  Hall, 
all  of  whom  have  now  crossed  the  tide,  with  the  possible  ex- 
ception of  Elias. 

Jesse  L.  Hall  married  his  cousin  Miss  Alcinda  Lowther, 
and  was  the  father  of  Cyrus,  William  E..  Robert  G.,  I\Iarietta, 
Ellen,  and  ^lartha  Hall,  and  after  the  death  of  his  first  wife, 
he  married  again,  and  went  to  Elizabeth,  Wirt  county  Avhere 
he  died  and  where  some  of  his  descendants  still  reside.  Mrs. 
Rosa  Connolly  was  a  daughter  by  the  second  marriage. 

William  Hall  died  in  his  youth,  and  Mary  remained 
single,  dying  at  the  home  of  her  sister  at  Point  Pleasant  at 
an  advanced  age. 

Selina  married  the  Rev.  George  Monroe  of  the  West  Vir- 
ginia Methodist  Episcopal  conference,  and  died  childless.  She 
sleeps  at  Point  Pleasant. 

Lucinda  married  Jesse  AL  Lowther,  son  of  Elias  Lowther, 
senior,  and  lived  and  died  in  this  county.  She  was  the  mother 
of  Johnson  J..  Stillman  F.,  Mrs.  Mandane  (Hiram)  Wilson, 
and  Airs.  Similda  Randolph,  of  Salem ;  Mansfield  and  Syl- 
vanus  Lowther  and  Mrs.  Salina  Bee,  of  the  West ;  Thomas,  of 
Harrison  county  ;  Lucinda — and  the  late  Mrs.  Dorinda  (Eli) 
McKinley,  of  Harrisville — mother  of  the  late  lamented  Homer 
McKinley. 

Elizabeth  married  Thomas  McKinley,  and  went  to  Roane 
county,  where  she  sleeps.  Their  children  were  Lee,  Walter, 
Rector,  Jer>nie  and  Sarah. 

Smith  Hall  married  Miss  Jennie  Scott,  of  Hardy  county, 

and   lived   and  died   at   Harrisville.     His   family   consisted   of 

two  sons,  John  and  Charles,  and  of  one  daughter,  Mrs.  Laura 

^'^  bhert,  of  Ellenboro. 
"seci  f 


114  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUXTY 

Robert  Hannibal  married  Miss Bennett,  of  Wes- 
ton, and  was  the  father  of  Mrs.  John  B.  Ayres,  formerly  of 
Harrisville,  but  now  of  Spencer,  and  of  one  other  daughter. 
He  died  in  Virginia  a  few  years  since. 

Elias  Hall  married  Aliss  Margaret  Kirkpatrick,  sister  of 
Ichabod,  and  was  an  early  settler  on  the  Alason  farm  near  the 
Pisgah  church,  in  the  Pullman  vicinity.  He  finally  went  to 
Roane  county  where  he,  perhaps,  is  sleeping.  A\'illiam  Smith, 
Neal,  Hannibal,  Lee  and  Landora  Pfall  were  among  his  chil- 
dren, but  this  is  not  all  of  them. 

Lemuel  Hall  married  here  and  went  A\'est  where  he  was 
identified  as  an  able  barrister. 

Judge  Cyrus  Hall. — Judge  Cyrus  Hall  married  ]\Iiss 
Amelia  Scott,  sister  of  his  brother  Smith's  wife,  and  principally 
spent  his  long  life  at  Harrisville,  Parkersburg,  and  Charleston. 
His  family  consisted  of  two  daughters,  and  three  sons  :  viz.. 
Flora  died  in  childhood ;  Louella  became  Mrs.  Chancellor,  of 
Parkersburg,  but  after  the  death  of  her  first  husband  she  mar- 
ried H.  T.  Shefit'ey,  of  Charleston  ;  the  late  Judge  Cyrus  Hall, 
B.  B.  and  Thomas  C,  all  of  Charleston,  are  the  sons. 

Judge  Hall  was  one  among  the  prominent  men  that  this 
county  has  produced. 

Born  in  Harrison  county  early  in  the  century,  he  came  to 
this  county  with  his  parents  in  the  "log  cabin  days''  and  strug- 
gled up  through  the  many  disadvantages  that  surrounded  the 
ambitious  lad  in  those  davs  of  untold  orivation  and  toil. 

He  was  graduated  from  college,  studied  law,  and  at  the 
age  of  thirty  years  went  to  Woodsfield,  Ohio,  where  he  was 
admitted  to  the  bar;  and  after  a  brief  stay  here,  he  returned 
to  this  county  and  took  up  his  residence  at  Harrisville,  where 
he  practiced  his  profession  for  a  number  of  years.  He  was 
Ritchie  county's  first  Prosecuting  Attorney,  and  was  at  c<ne 
time  her  representative  in  the  Legislature  at  Richmond. 

He  was  a  member  of  the  Richmond  conve^iition  that 
passed  the  ordinance  of  secession,  and  with  one  exception 
was  the  last  survivor  of  that  stormy  body.  He  went  there 
as  an  opponent  of  secession,  but  in  the  heat  of  the  fight,  was, 
won  over  and  cast  his  vote  for  the  measure — the  passing  of 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  115 

which  sounded  the  bugle-note  for  the  formation  of  the  "Little 
Mountain  state." 

For  a  number  of  years  after  the  birth  of  West  Virginia, 
he  was  the  judge  of  the  County  court  of  Wood  coiinty.  He 
practiced  in  the  courts  of  Virginia  and  West  Virginia  for 
almost  sixty  years,  rising  to  distinction  at  the  bar.  It  is  said 
that  he  never  lost  a  case  before  the  Supreme  Court  of  the 
State.  He  died  at  Charleston  early  in  the  year  1909,  at  the  age 
of  ninety  years.  His  wife  preceded  him  to  the  grave  by  fifteen 
}'ears. 

The  Norrises. — Along  with  William  Hall,  from  Harrison 
county,  came  his  brother-in-law',  William  Norris.  who  settled 
near  him  on  the  river  above  Oxford. 

]*\Ir.  Xorris  was  born  in  Fauquier  county,  Virginia,  on 
August  8,  1792,  and  on  April  20,  1817,  he  w^as  married  to  Miss 
Sallie  Lowther,  daughter  of  Jesse  and  granddaughter  of  Col. 
William  Lowther,  whose  natal  day  w^as  October  5,  1795 ;  and 
after  a  brief  residence  on  the  river  here,  in  1833,  they  removed 
to  Gilmer  county  where  their  lives  came  to  a  close.  His  on 
November  24,  1861,  and  hers,  on  Alay  22.  1870.  And  both  lie 
at  rest  in  the  Xorris  bmying-ground  on  Cedar  creek. 

Their  family  were  as  follows : 

Emily  (1818-1906,  unmarried),  Milton  (1819-1896).  John 
G.  (1821—),  Jesse  (1823—).  Mary  (1824-1825).  Caroline 
(LS25— ).  Lucinda  (182S-] 888,  unmarried),  Drusilla  (1832—, 
Mrs.  Kerns,  of  Gilmer  county),  Elizabeth  (1835 — ).  Edward 
(1837 — ),  and  Elias  Xorris. 

Milton  G.  Norris,  who  was  born  on  X^o\'ember  10,  1819, 
was  married  in  1869,  to  Miss  Maria  Louise  Campbell,  daughter 
of  John  C.  and  Anne  Wilson  Campbell  of  Clarksburg,^  and 
lived  and  died  at  the  "Beeches"  near  Glenville.  He  passed 
from  earth  on  July  30,  1896,  and  Mrs.  X^orris  survived  imtil 
Jul}-  3,  1908,  and  both  rest  in  the  family  burying-ground  at 
the  "Beeches."  Their  family  consisted  of  four  daughters;  ^•iz., 
Mrs.  Jessie  Campbell  Tierney,  and  ]\frs.  Anne  Wilson  Lewas, 
are  of  Glenville;  Sallie  Lowther  is  the  wife  of  the  Hon.  E.  M. 


'The   Campbells  were   from  AVinchester,    Virginia,    and    the    old    home 
there   i&  still   owned   by   the   family. 


116  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Showaller,  of  Fairmont ;  and  Miss  Rebecca  Lupton  X'orris  is 
lying"  with  her  parents  in  the  family  burying-ground,  she  hav- 
ing passed  from  eartli  at  San  Francisco,  California  in  190?, 
while  on  a  tour  m  the  AVest. 

The  Norrises  are  of  English  origin,  and  the  name  is  an 
ancient  and  prominent  one  in  the  "Old  World"'  to-day.  Gen- 
eral Sir  John  Norris  was  commander  of  the  British  array  in 
the  sixteenth  century,  and  was  sent  by  Queen  Elizabeth  to 
aid  the  Hollanders  in  their  struggle  against  the  Spaniards,  at 
this  time.  Tradition  says  that  three  brothers  crossed  to 
America  about  the  year  1760,  and  that  one  settled  in  Pennsyl- 
vania, one  in  Maryland,  and  the  other,  William  Norris,  who 
was  an  English  school-master,  in  Virginia ;  and  from  William, 
the  different  families  of  this  state  are  descended. 

His  son,  John  Norris,  was  born  in  Fauquier  county,  Vir- 
ginia, on  July  4,  1760,  and  at  the  age  of  seventeen  years  (in 
February  1777),  enlisted  as  a  volunteer,  for  three  months,  in 
the  company  of  Captain  James  Scott,  which  was  organized  at 
the  Fauquier  Court  House,  and  marched  by  way  of  Lewisburg 
(now  West  Virginia)  across  the  Potomac,  at  Noland's  Ferry 
to  Frederick,  Maryland,  thence  to  Philadelphia,  and  on  to 
Ouibbletown  (now  New  Market)  in  New  Jersey.  And  in 
March,  1781,  he  was  drafted,  for  two  months,  into  the  com- 
pany of  Captain  Morehead,  who  was  stationed  at  Williams- 
burg, Virginia,  and  from  this  point,  on  April  20,  1781,  they 
were  driven  by  the  enemy,  and  retreated  to  Richmond. 

Again,  in  September,  1781,  he  was  drafted  for  three 
months,  and  was  appointed  as  orderly  sergeant  of  a  company 
of  militia,  commanded  by  Captain  Hel,  which  was  sent  from 
Fauquier  county  to  join  the  main  army  under  General  Wash- 
ington at  Yorktown,  and  here  he  remained  until  the  surrender 
of  Lord  Cornwallis,  on  October  19,  1781,  and  after  this  he 
was  detailed  as  a  member  of  the  guard-force  which  conducted 
a  band  of  prisoners  to  Winchester. 

Flis  service  on  the  battle-field  being  at  an  end,  he  re- 
turned home,  and  on  March  26,  1782,  was  married  to  Miss 
Mary  Jones,,  of  the  "Old  Dominion,"  who  was  in  some  way 
closely  connected  to  the  Washington  family  ;  and  about  the 
year  1807,  they  removed  to  what  is  now  Lewis  county  (then 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  117 

Harrison),  and  settled  near  the  old  Jackson  mill,  five  miles 
below  Weston ;  and  here  death  overtook  him  on  February  12, 
1836,  and  here  with  his  wife  he  lies  at  rest. 

Their  family  consisted  of  the  following  children:  Juliet, 
Hannah,  Polly,  Nancy,  Eliza,  Lucinda,  Caroline,  John,  junior, 
and  AA'illiam  Norris,  the  Ritchie  county  pioneer. 

Juliet  Norris,  born  on  December  22,  1783,  was  married  to 
David  Jackson.  She  passed  on,  on  March  16,  1865,  leaving 
four  children:  Edward  J.,  Wm.,  Pitt,  Nancy  and  Mary  J. 
Jackson. 

Hannah  Norris  (born  on  October  13,  1787,  and  died  on 
May  26,  1879),  married  Daniel  O'Brien,  and  her  children  were: 
Melville,  Emmett  J.,  Mary,  Daniel,  Nancy,  Hannah,  and  Juliett 
O'Brien. 

Polly,  born  July  22,  1785,  died,  unmarried,  on  December 
29,  1848. 

Nancy  Norris  (bprn  October  13,  1794,  and  died  on  July 
17,  J 876)  was  married  to  Godfrey  Hille,  and  Frederick,  the 
one  child  of  this  union  died  in  boyhood. 

Eliza  Norris  was  born  in  August,  1798,  and  died  on  Dec- 
ember 20,  1860,  unmarried. 

Lucinda  (born  on  November  2-1,  1796,  and  died  on  Octo- 
ber 14,  1885)  was  the  late  Mrs.  Benjamin  Bassel,  of  Clarks- 
burg, and  the  mother  of  John  Bassel,  a  graduate  of  West 
Point,  and  James  Bassell,  both  prominent  attorneys  of  Clarks- 
burg. 

Caroline,  vvho  was  born  on  December  15,  1800,  died  on 
September  4,  1894,  unmarried. 

John  Norris,  junior,  was  born  in  1805,  and  died  at  the  age 
df  twenty  years.  And  the  family  of  William  has  already  been 
given. 

Felix  Prunty,  and  Alexander  Lowther,  junior,  were  later 
pioneers  in  the  Oxford  vicinity. 

Mr.  Prunty  was  the  son  of  Jacob  Prunty,  and  was  a 
native  of  Taylor  county.  He  married  Miss  Emily  Great- 
house,  and  took  up  his  residence  where  his  son,  Jacob,  now 
lives,  perhaps  in  the  early  forties,  and  to  the  day  of  his  death, 
on  September  22,  1895,  he  was  prominently  identified  with 
the  afi^airs  of  this   communitv,  both   in   church    and   in   state. 


1]8  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

He  represented  this  county  in  the  Legislature,  at  one  time 
and  was  long  a  pillar  in  the  White  Oak  church  :  and  in  this 
church-yard  he  sleeps.  Mrs.  Prunty  died  in  190S,  and  she 
sleeps  by  his  side. 

Their  children :  Mrs.  Cynthia  (wife  of  the  late  Rev. 
Sylvester  Lowtherj,  Parkersburg ;  Mrs.  Salina  Bee,  Tennessee; 
Mrs.  Fannie  (Lewis)  Pritchard,  Parkersburg;  Jacob,  and 
^Marshall,  Oxford,  are  the  surviving  ones ;  and  Alary  Jane, 
John  W.,  Alexander,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Leach,  and  Mrs.  Rosetta 
Ross,  have  passed  on. 

Alexander  Lowther,  junior,  made  his  settlement  on  the 
farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  his  daughter,  ]\Irs.  John 
Allender. 

yiv.  LoAvther  was  a  native  of  Harrison  county,  having 
been  born,  near  West  Milford  on  May  1,  1816.  He  was  the 
son  of  Alexander  and  Sarah  Ireland  Lowther,  and  the  great- 
grandson  of  Col.  A\'illiam. 

In  1838.  he  was  married  to  Miss  Emily  Prunty,  daughter 
of  Jacob  Prunty,  and  shortly  after  this  event,  he  established 
his  home  here,  and  remained  until  1864,  when  he  removed 
to  Ellenboro,  where  he  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business 
for  the  next  two  years.  From  here  he  went  to  Graham  Sta- 
tion, Mason  county,  and  in  1872,  to  Elizabeth,  Wirt  county, 
where,  for  more  than  twenty  years,  his  interests  were  identi- 
fied with  the  town  ;  his  services  to  both  church  and  state  being 
of  a  high  order. 

Here,  in  1891,  Death  entered  his  home  and  carried  away 
his  wife,  and,  not  long  after  this  sad  event,  he  went  to  Park- 
ersburg, where  his  life  came  to  a  close,  on  March  28,  1903,  at 
the  home  of  his  daughter,  Mrs.  Roana  L.  Kendall;  and  here 
in  the  Riverview  cemetery  beside  his  wife,  he  sleeps. 

He  was  one  of  the  early  school-teachers  of  the  county, 
and  at  different  times  held  county  offices.  He  said  "At  one 
time  I  knew  every  man  in  Ritchie  county."  As  long  as  he 
lived,  he  spoke  fervently  of  his  love  for  Ritchie  county,  which 
had  been  his  home  for  sixty-six  years. 

Their  children:  M.  R.  Lowther,  who  has  been  promi- 
nent in  political  circles  in  this  state  for  a  number  of  years, 
and  who  served  as  State  Senator  for  one  or  more  terms,  is  the 


SOUTH  FORK  SETTLERS--CONriXUED  liy 

only  surviving  son.  He  and  Mrs.  Roana  L.  Kendall,  wife 
of  the  late  Dr.  J.  E.  Kendall,  are  both  of  Parkersburg,  and 
Mrs.  Sallie  Allender,  is  of  Oxford.  Wilson,  the  eldest  son 
died  at  the  age  of  seventeen,  and  one  daughter,  in  infancy. 

The  Allenders. — Jacob  Allender  was  an  early  settler  on 
tiie  Marshall  Prunty  homestead.  He  and  his  wife  Mrs. 
Elizabeth  Vangrift  Allender,  were  natives  of  Hampshire 
county,  he  being  of  English,  and  she,  of  German  descent.  He 
was  the  son  of  James  Allender,  and  his  grandsire  crossed 
the  sea  from  England.  After  their  marriage  they  resided  in 
Marion  county  for  four  years  before  coming  to  Ritchie  in 
1<S51,  where  the  remnant  of  their  days  were  spent,  and  where 
they  sleep  side  by  side  in  the  White  Oak  cemetery.  Mrs. 
Allender  passed  away  a  number  of  years  before  he  did ;  and 
some  time  after  her  death  he  married  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Sinnett 
Lowther,  widows  of  John  A.  Lowther,  and  daughter  of  the 
late  George  Sinnett,  of  Harrisville,  who  still  survives. 

His  children  were  born  of  the  first  union,  and  w'ere  as 
follows :  T.  K.  Alexander,  Sistersville ;  Mrs.  Sarah  Xutter, 
mother  of  Okey  Nutter,  Pennsboro ;  John  Allender,  of  Ox- 
ford ;  Christopher,  James,  Rachel,  and  Iva,  and  two  others  all 
died  of  diphtheria  in  childhood.  All  died  within  one  week, 
and  tW'O  were  borne  to  the  grave  at  one  time. 


CHAPTER  VIII 


North  Fork  Settled 

ACOB  COLLINS  was  tlie  first  settler  on  the 
liead  of  the  Xorth  fork  of  Hughes  river. 

He  came  from  the  Shenandoah  valley, 
Virginia,  early  in  the  century  with  his  wife, 
Phebe  Stuthard  Collins,  and  several  chil- 
dren, and  reared  his  humble  dwelling  on  the 
farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  his  grandson, 
W.  J.  Collins. 

The  wilderness  at  this  time  was  unbroken,  and  they  lived 
in  their  wagons  until  they  could  construct  a  cabin,  and  kept 
fires  out  so  as  to  protect  themselves  and  their  stock  from  the 
wild  beasts. 

Fearful  storms  occasionally  visited  this  section,  and  their 
home,  at  one  time,  was  almost  demolished  bv  one  of  cvclonic 
fury. 

]\Ir.  Collins  is  said  to  have  been  a  man  of  strong  Christian 
character  with  an  innate  love  for  doing  good  to  his  fellow- 
men,  but  of  his  ancestral  history  we  know  nothing  except 
that  he  was  of  Welsh  descent,  and  that  he  was  probably  a 
native  of  the  "Old  Dominion." 

But  ]\Irs.  Collins  was  of  Revolutionary  stock,  her  father, 
and  his  only  brother  having  served  as  soldiers  in  the  Con- 
tinental army,  (the  latter  dying  before  his  return  home). 

Here  on  the  old  homestead  where  they  settled,  they  spent 
their  last  hours,  and  here  they  rest. 

They  were  the  parents  of  a  large  family  of  children,  who 
were  also  identified  among  the  early  settlers  of  this  part  of 
the  county,  and  who  are  as  follows:  William,  Jacob,  junior, 
Henry  B.,  Xancy,  Margaret,  Phebe,  Frances,  James  and  John. 
All  of  whom  reared  families  except  James  who  died  single. 

William  Collins. — AMlliam  Collins,  the  eldest  son,  mar- 
ried j\Iiss  Ellendor  Britton,  and  settled  near  three  miles  from 
the  old  homestead  where  he  died  in  1871  at  a  ri]:)e  old  age. 


NORTH   FORK    SETTLED  121 

The  fruits  of  this  union  were  five  children:  Cohniibus. 
of  Pennsboro;  Cordelia,  the  late  wife  of  John  Maulsby,  of 
West  Union ;  Mrs.  Charlotte  (Joab)  Martin,  Pennsboro : 
Lafa3'ette  Collins,  and  ]\Irs.  Helen  (Silas)  Taylor,  who  reside 
a:  Tollgate. 

After  the  birth  of  these  children  the  Avife  passed  on,  and 
he  married  Miss  Harriett  Allen,  who  was  the  mother  of  the 
late  Airs.  Ida  Martin,  wife  of  Dr.  Edgar  Martin,  of  Oxford : 
the  late  Mrs.  Salome  (Wm.)  Hudkins,  of  Greenwood:  and  of 
George  and  Alice,  who  died  in  infancy. 

Death  again  robbed  him  of  his  companion,  and  he  mar- 
ried Miss  Talitha  Lynch,  of  Harrison  county,  for  his  third 
wife,  and  she  was  the  mother  of  Mrs.  Maggie  (Omer)  Garner, 
and  i\Irs.  Ora  (Banks)  Martin,  both  of  Tollgate;  Mrs.  Lora 
(Dorsey)  Browne,  of  West  Union;  Mrs.  Lona  (John)  Har- 
per, Pennsboro;  and  Hiram  Collins,  of  the  North  Fork,  and 
of  the  late  Draper. 

Jacob  Collins,  Junior. — Jacob  Collins,  junior,  married 
Miss  Sarah  Ripley,  of  Tyler  county,  and  settled  near  the  old 
homestead,  wdiere  he  reared  a  large  family  and  where  he 
spent  his  last  hours. 

He  was  a  soldier  of  the  Union  army  during  the  Civil  war. 
and  his  ten  children  were  as  follows: 

Kenner,  George,  and  Benjamin  died  in  the  West  and 
Floyd  resides  there ;  Mary  is  Mrs.  Edgar  Keys,  and  Lurena, 
Mrs.  Andrew  Cunningham,  both  of  California ;  Frances  is 
Mrs.  Ellis  Thomas,  of  Pennsylvania;  Eveline,  Mrs.  Thomas 
Dillon,  and  Eliza.  Mrs.  Simon  Bradford,  both  of  Parkersburg; 
and  Amelia  is  Mrs.  Richard  A\'ilson,  of  Pennsboro. 

Henry  B,  Collins. — Henry  B.  Collins  married  Miss  Eliza 
Britton,  and  also  settled  near  the  old  home. 

He  was  quite  prominent  in  public  affairs,  and  was  one  of 
the  early  representatives  of  the  county  in  the  Richmond  Leg- 
islature. And  though  he  did  not  take  up  arms  in  the  Civil 
war,  he  was  a  strong  advocate  of  the  Southern  cause.  He 
died  near  1895  at  his  old  home  here,  and  in  the  family  biny- 
ing-ground  he  sleeps. 

He  was  the  father  of  eight  children :  Mortimer,  the 
eldest  son,  lost  his  life  in  the  Confederate  cause  at  the  battle 


]22 


HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 


of  Rich  Mountain.  Richard,  Jasper,  Casandra,  who  married 
the  Rev.  A.  Jones,  and  India,  who  was  Mrs.  Perry  Flesher, 
of  Shiloh,  have  all  joined  the  throng-  over  there.  F.  li.  Col- 
lins, Drusilla,  the  wife  of  Dr.  Bartlett,  and  Alniira  who  first 
married  A.  Archbold,  and  after  his  death  Mr.  Wilcox,  of  Har- 
risville,  are  the  surviving  members  of  the  family. 

John   Collins,   the   youngest   son   of   this   pioneer   family, 
was  married  to  Miss  Phebe   Brice,  of  Harrison  county,  and 

settled  four  miles  north  of  Penns- 
boro,  where  he  died  in  1874. 

Pie,  too,  represented  the 
county  in  the  Legislature  at  Ricli- 
mond  when  this  state  was  a  part 
of  the  "Old  Dominion,"  and  was 
ever  prominent  in  public  afifairs. 
He  was  an  ardent  advocate  of  the 
Southern  cause  during  the  Civil 
war,  though  not  a  soldier. 

Mrs.   Collins  came  of  an  old 
and     aristocratic    Welsh     family, 
she    being    descended    from    the 
John  Collins.  g^j.]  ^f  Carmarthen,  through  his 

daughter,  Lady  Janet  Griffiths,  who  married  a  Pirice. 

Her  grand-sire,  Captain  William  Brice,  who  was  born  in 
Kent  county,  Maryland,  in  1740,  was  one  of  the  few  patriots 
that  helped  to  establish  our  American  Independence.  He 
served  at  Valley  Forge  and  Trenton  and  died  in  1783,  at 
Blandenburg,  Maryland,  from  the  effects  of  the  hardshi)>s 
endured  during  that  memorable  winter  at  V^alley  Forge.. 
His  sons,  Benjamin,  and  Dr.  Brice  both  married  the  daughters 
of  Col.  Ben  Wilson,  senior,  and  Benjamin  was  the  father  nf 
Mrs.  Collins. 

The  family  of  John  and  Phebe  Brice  Collins  consisted  of 
eight  children;  viz.,  Sarah,  the  eldest  daughter,  is  Mrs.  E. 
Thomas,  of  Blacksville,  Pennsylvania;  y\nna  was  the  late 
wife  of  John  B.  McKinley;  Angle  is  Mrs.  P.  B.  Michaels,  of 
Oxford;  Jennie  L.  is  the  widow  of  the  late  Dr.  J.  B.  Crum- 
rine.  of  Pennsboro;  the  late  Creed,  and  William,  of  Peims- 
borc ;  and  Benjamin  and  Virginia  who  both  died  in  childhood. 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLED  123 

Nancy  Collins,  the  eldest  daughter  of  this  pioneer  family, 
married  Elias  Marsh,  and  they  too  lived  and  died  in  the  vicin- 
ity of  the  old  home  on  the  North  fork.  She  having  passed 
away  near  the  year  1895. 

They  were  the  parents  of  eight  children  ;  viz.,  V^ictoria, 
who  married  John  Lantz,  and  went  to  Pennsylvania ;  Eliza 
married  Sydney  Joseph  and  v^^ent  to  Missouri,  where  she  died 
in  1910:  Margaret  v.-as  the  late  Mrs.  Saul  Thomas,  of  Pennsyl- 
vania; Isabel  is  Mrs.  James  Hickman,  of  Pennsboro :  Adaline 
was  the  late  Mrs.  Jacob  Lantz,  of  Mole  Hill ;  Laura  became 
Mrs.  John  Steele,  and  at  the  old  homestead,  she  resides  ;  and 
the  only  son.  Napoleon  Marsh,  lives  at  Centreville. 

Margaret  Collins  married  a  Mr.  Doak,  and  lived  and  died 
on  Middle  Island,  in  Tyler  county,  near  the  year  1890,  leaving 
one  child. 

Frances  Collins  married  Eli  Cline  and  settled  at  the  head 
of  the  North  fork  of  Hughes  river,  wliere  she  died  near  the 
year  1849. 

She  was  the  mother  of  Helen,  (wife  of  the  late  M.  H. 
Tarlton),  of  Nicklin,  who  died  as  a  prisoner  of  war  at  Camp 
Chase,  in  the  sixties;  and  of  Jacob  Cline,  who  married  Jane 
Ridgeway. 

Phebe  Collins  married  James  Hammond,  and  for  many 
years  they  were  identified  among  the  early  settlers  of  Bond's 
creek,  where  she  died  in  1866.  Their  children  w^ere  ten  in 
number:  Cornelius,  Granville,  Iiwin.  the  late  Rev.  William 
Hammond,  of  the  West  Virginia  Methodist  Episcopal  con- 
ference;   Mrs.    Fannie    Markle,    Mrs.    Berthena    Crum,,    Mrs. 

Sarah  Whitecotton,  and  Mrs.  Mary of  Ohio ;  Mrs. 

Anna  Clayton,  of  White  Oak,  and  Mrs.  Libby  Whitecotton. 

MOLE  HILL. 

Daniel  Raymond  was  the  first  settler  at  Mole  Hill.  He 
came  here  from  his  native  county — Harrison — near  the  year 
1817,  and  found  a  home  on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  by 


124 


mSTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 


Daniel   Haymond. 


Benson  Cunningham,  where  the 
remainder  of  his  life  v/as  spent. 
He,  being  a  man  of  a  high  degree 
of  intelligence,  played  an  import- 
ant part  in  the  early  affairs  of  the 
county. 

He  twice  occupied  a  seat  in 
the  State  Legislature  (being  Sen- 
ator), and  narrowly  missed  being 
a  successful  candidate  for  Con- 
gress. 

He  was  born  near  Clarksburg, 
on  April  28,  1787— on  Saturday 
morning  at  5  o'clock — and  here 
he  grew  to  manhood,  and  married  ?iliss  Mary  Ann  Bond,  sis- 
ter of  Lewis  Bond,  who  passed  from  earth  at  her  home  at 
Mole  Hill  in  1822,  after  having  given  birth  to  five  children. 

In  1821  he  was  again  married  to  JNIiss  Elizabeth  Griffin, 
who  passed  on  a  few  years  later,  leaving  three  daughters. 
He  then,  in  1835,  married  Miss  Hannah  Pindale,  who  only 
survived  a  short  time ;  and  in  1838,  he  again  took  the  marri- 
age vow  when  he  claimed  Miss  Mary  Ann  Moore,  of  Harrison 
county  as  his  bride. 

The  one  child  born  of  this  union — Anna  L. — is  now  Mrs. 
James  C.  Cline,  of  Minneapolis,  Kansas,  and  the  only  sur- 
vivor of  Daniel  Haymond's  family. 

]\Ir.  Haymond  died  on  December  10,  1874,  and,  beside 
his  first  three  companions,  sleeps  at  ]\Iole  Hill.  The  last  wife 
rests  in  the  Cloverdale  cemetery  in  Doddridge  county. 

The  children  of  his  first  marriage  were,  Mansfield  B., 
Eveline,  A\'illiam,  Daniel  C.  and  Rowena.  The  last  two  men- 
tioned died  in  infanc3^ 

Mansfield  lost  his  life  in  his  early  manhood,  by  an  ex- 
plosion on  board  a  steamer,  while  on  his  way  home  from 
Texas,  he  being  so  badly  scalded  that  he  only  sur\ived  the 
accident  bv  a  few  hours. 


NORTH   FORK   SETTLED  125 

Eveline  Haymond  was  married  to  Elijah  Tarleton/  and 
their  children  were  the  late  ex-Sheriff  M.  H.  Tarleton,  and 
the  late  Reeves  L.,  Thomas,  Creed  H,  and  Edgar  Tarleton, 
all  of  whom  have  passed  on. 

William  C.  Haymond,  the  one  son  that  reached  the  years 
of  maturity,  went  to  Texas  in  his  young  manhood,  and  there 
served  in  the  Texan  army  during"  some  trouble  with  Mexico, 
but  he  afterv/ards  returned  home,  and  married  Miss  Eleanor 
Cline,  of  Tollgate,  and  remained  a  substantial  citizen  of  his 
native  county  until  he  was  borne  to  his  final  resting  place. 
Elis  family  consisted  of  nine  children:  viz..  Marsh  Haymond, 
Mrs.  Florence  Peirpoint,  Mrs.  Lina  Lantz,  and  Mrs.  Ella 
Stuart,  all  of  Mole  Hill,  are  the  surviving  ones  ;  and  the  late 
ones  were  Josephine,  who  died  in  youth;  Buena  (Mrs.  Henry 
Davis),  Reeves  Haymond  who  met  a  tragic  death  at  Mole 
Hill  a  number  of  years  ago;  and  Ida  (Mrs.  F.  G.  Pyle  of 
Tyler  county). 


The  three  daughters  of  Daniel  and  Elizabeth  Grifftn  Hay- 
mond were  Casandra,  and  Frances,  who  died  single,  and  Mary 
Ann,  the  late  wife  of  Saul  Thomas,  who  was  the  mother  of 
Mrs.  Mary  Cooper,  Mrs.  Laura  Kysor,  and  Mrs.  Fannie  Mc- 
Cullough,  all  of  A/[ole  Hill. 

The  Haymonds,  like  not  a  few  of  the  other  pioneer  fami- 
lies, have  a  distinguished  ancestral  history.  John  Haymond 
emigrated  from  England  before  the  year  1734 — as  the  records 
show  that  he  had  land  patented  to  him  in  that  year — and 
settled  in  the  Maryland  colony.  Tradition  says  that  he  was 
a  skillful  mechanic,  and  that  he  came  to  Am'erica  to  build  a 
fine  residence  for  a  Maryland  planter,  and  being  so  well 
pleased  with  the  appearance  of  the  country,  he  decided  to 
adopt  it  as  his  home.  It  is  not  known  whether  he  was  mar- 
ried before  he  came  to  this  country  or  not.  But  his  wife's 
name  was  Margaret  and  he  first  settled  on  a  large  plantation, 
known  as  "Constant  Friendship,"  in  what  is  now  Montgom- 


^Elijah  Tarleton  wa.s  first  married  to  Miss  Casandra  Haymond,  daugli- 
ter  of  William,  and  one  son.  William  Tarleton,  was  the  result  of  this 
union.  His  second  wife  was  Eveline  Haymond,  above  mentioned,  and  his 
third,  Miss  Rowena,  daughter  of  Thomas  Haymond,  and  one  daughter 
Helen,  was  the  result  of  this  union. 


126  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUXTV 

cry  county,  iMaryland — near  the  present  site  of  Rockville,  and 
fourteen  miles  from  Georgetown.  Here,  he  died  during  the 
autumn  of  1750.  Six  children,  which  are  as  follows,  were 
named  in  his  will,  which  was  dated  September  '^^7,  1750,  and 
was  probated  on  October  "^Oth  of  the  same  3-ear:  Nicholas, 
Calder,  AVilliam,  Hannah,  who  was  the  wife  of  John  Jones, 
Ann  and  Alary,  who  afterwards  married — one  a  Kenton,  and 
the  other,  a  Jarbo  or  Kelly. 

Nicholas  died  in  17G7  leaving  a  son  and  daughter.  Calder 
married  and  resided  in  Alarion  county  until  about  the  year 
1812,  when  he  went  to  Ohio,  to  join  his  son.  He  finally  went 
to  Indiana  where  he  died  in  1817,  and  where  many  of  his 
descendants  live.  His  son,  Edward,  was  a  soldier  of  the  Rev- 
olution, and  was  in  the  battles  of  Monmouth,  Saratoga  and 
other  fierce  engagements,  and  his  name  was  added  to  the  pen- 
sion roll  in  1818.  And  from  William,  the  youngest  son  of 
John  Playmond,  the  Ritchie  county  families  come. 

William  Haymond. — William  Haymond  was  born  on  the 
old  plantation  —  "Constant  Friendship"- — in  Montgomery 
county,  ^Maryland,  on  January  4,  1740  (old  style)  and  here 
his  youthful  days  were  spent.  A\^hen  he  was  only  a  lad  of 
fifteen  summers,  he  accompanied  the  army  of  General  Ed- 
^var(i  Braddock  on  its  expedition  to  Fort  Duquesne  (now 
Pitts1)urg)  where  it  met  with  such  dreadful  defeat  on  July 
9,  1755  ;  and  in  1758,  he  was  a  member  of  the  successtul  ex- 
pedition led  by  General  Forbes  against  the  same  point,  when 
the  name  was  changed  to  Fort  Pitt,  in  honor  of  the  English 
prime  minister.  -     • 

In  February,  1750,  he  enlisted  in  the  Virginia  regiment, 
commanded  by  Col.  George  Washington,  which  iiad  been  de- 
tailed to  garrison  the  territory  captured  from  the  French, 
and  served  along  the  Aionongahela  and  AUegheu}-  rners.  and 
as  far  North  as  Lake  Erie.  AMien  the  regiment  had  been 
Avithdrawn  from  the  west,  it  was  marched  up  the  Shenan- 
doah valley,  and  on  to  the  Holstein  river  to  suppress  an  out- 
break among  the  Cherokee  Indians,  after  which  it  was  dis- 
charged. The  date  of  William  Haymond's  discharge  was 
February  24,  1762,  and  the  place  was  Fort  Lewis,  uear  Staun- 
ton, A'irginia. 


NORTH    FORK   SETTLED  127 

Shortly  after  his  return  home,  on  April  19.  1763,  he  was 
married  to  Aliss  Casandra  Clelland,  who  was  born  on  Octo- 
ber 25,  1T41,  and  settled  down  to  the  life  of  a  planter;  but  in 
May,  1773,  he  sold  his  possessions  in  Maryland  and  removed 
to  the  District  of  ^^'est  Augusta,  Virginia,  and  settled  on  the 
Monongahela  river,  near  where  Morgantown  now  stands. 
Here  he  engaged  in  farming,  and  is  said  to  have  raised  a  crop 
of  corn  on  the  very  site  that  is  noAV  marked  by  the  pretty  lit- 
tle City  of  Morgantown. 

After  the  formation  of  Monongalia  county  in  177G,  he 
filled  various  positions  of  honor  and  trust — such  as  that  of 
justice  of  the  peace,  deputy  surveyor,  coroner  and  sheriff; 
and  at  the  commencement  of  the  Revolution,  he,  being  an 
ardent  advocate  of  the  Colonial  cause,  was  appointed  captain 
of  the  militia,  and  was  frequently  called  into  active  service 
by  the  hostility  of  the  Indians.  In  1777,  he  was  placed  in 
comvnand  of  Prickett's  Fort  with  a  detachment  at  Scott's 
mill ;  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  major  in  1781,  and  per- 
formed the  duties  of  an  officer  of  the  militia  throughout  the 
Revolution.  He  was  just  on  the  eve  of  leaving  for  a  i)oint 
east  of  the  mountains  to  join  the  regular  army  when  the  news 
of  peace  reached  him. 

He  was  a  member  of  the  official  body  that  administered 
the  oath  to  the  male  citizens  of  Virginia  over  sixteen  years 
of  age  requiring  them  to  renounce  all  future  allegiance  to  the 
British  Crown. 

When  Harrison  county  was  born  in  17S4,  Mr.  Haymond 
vv'as  made  the  first  principal  surveyor  of  the  new  county.  He 
tra\  eled  on  horse-back  to  Williamsburg  in  order  to  be  ex- 
amined by  the  professors  of  William  and  Mary's  College.  The 
test  was  a  satisfactory  one,  however,  and  he  was  commis- 
sioned by  the  Governor  of  Virginia ;  and  as  this  office  de- 
manded his  removal  to  Clarksburg,  he  purchased  a  few  acres 
of  ground,  near  this  town,  where  he  took  up  his  residence 
that  same  fall  (1784). 

He  was  a  member  of  the  commission  that  built  the  first 
two  court  houses  in  Harrison  county — one  in  1787,  and  the 
other  in  1813,  and  as  surveyor,  he  assisted  in  marking  out 
the  State  road  from  the  Vallev  river  to  near  Marietta,  Ohio 


V?8  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

In  1791,  he  purchased  a  tract  of  one  hundred  ninety-lour 
one-half  acres  on  Elk  creek,  six  miles  from  Clarksburg,  and 
to  this  place  he  changed  his  residence,  and  here,  on  Xovem- 
ber  12,  1821,  his  long  and  useful  career  came  to  a  close.  This 
old  time  mansion-house,  which  has  been  transferred  by  will 
from  father  to  son,  since  its  purchase,  still  stands  and  is  occu- 
pied by  his  descendants. 

His  Avife,  Casandra  Clelland  Raymond,  died  at  Clarks- 
burg, on  December  23,  1788;  and  on  December  2U,  1789,  he 
was  again  married  to  Mrs.  Mary  Pettyjohn  Powers,  who  died 
on  March  20,  1830,  and  sleeps  by  his  side  in  the  Ilaymond 
burying-ground  on  the  old  homestead,  near  Clarksburg. 

John  G.  Jackson  in  paying  tribute  to  his  memory 
through  the  columns  of  the  "National  Intelligencer"  of  Dec- 
ember 13,  1821 — on  the  occasion  of  his  death — says: 

"This  excellent  man  was  the  surveyor  of  his  county,  and 
a  justice  of  the  peace  therein,  from  its  first  formation  until 
his  decease,  and  such  was  the  purity  of  his  life,  notwithstand- 
ing the  tendency  of  his  official  duties  to  excite  the  ill  will  of 
the  disappointed  speculator,  and  suitor,  that  he  lived  and  died 
without  an  enemy  :  and  his  virtues  became  so  proverbial  that 
when  excellence  was  ascribed  to  a  great  and  good  man,  it 
was  said  of  him,  "Pie  was  almost  as  perfect  as  Major  Hay- 
mond." 

He  also  says,  that  "He  died  in  the  presence  of  his  wife 
and  his  children.  He  had  nineteen  children  of  Avhom  eleven 
survive  him;  eighty-one  grandchildren,  sixty-two  of  whom 
are  living;  thirtA'-two  great-grandchildren,  thircy-one  of  whom 
are  living;  nine  sons-in-laws,  six  of  whom  are  living;  and 
four  daughters-in-law,  all  of  whom  survive." 

Family  Record. — Children  of  William  and  Casandra  Hay- 
mond : 

William,  born  Alay  14,  ]764,  and  died  September  17.  1769. 

John  born  December  7,  1765,  and  married  Mary  \Wlson' 
July  3,  1787. 


'Mary  W^ilson  Haymond  was  tlie  daughter  of  Col.  Benjamin  TA'ilson, 
senior,  and  her  daughter  Sarah  Haymond  became  the  wife  of  Le\i  yiax- 
well,  and  tlieir  son  Rufus  Maxwell  was  the  father  of  tne  Hon.  Hu  ilax- 
well. 


NORTH   FORK   SETTLED  12Vj 

Ann  born  August  3,  1767,  and  married  Thomas  Douglas, 
May  jO,  1787,  and  after  his  death,  she  became  the  wife  of  Dr. 
Isaac  Miller  Johnson. 

Margaret  born  September  6,  1769,  and  married  Jacob 
Polsley,  May  31,  1791. 

William  born  June  11,  1771,  and  married  Cynthia  Car- 
roll, on  ^larch  12,  1793. 

Elizabeth  born  on  Easter  Sunday,  April  11,  1773,  and 
died  June  30,  1773. 

Walter  born  May  30,  1774,  and  died  November  16,  1774. 

Thomas  born  January  11,  1776,  and  married  Rebecca 
Bond  on  January  6,  1803. 

Sarah  born  January  24,  1778,  and  married  Allison  Clarke 
January  3,  1796,  and  Thomas  Bond,  November  21,  1813. 

Susannah  born  June  — ,  1780,  and  married  Robert  Bart- 
lett,  January  12,  1797,  and  moved  to  near  New  Madrid,  Alis- 
souri. 

A  son  was  born  on  February  22,  1783,  that  died  on  the 
29th  day  of  the  same  month  without  a  name. 

Rowena  born  June  17,  1784,  and  married  Daniel  Davis- 
son  on  March  30,  1802. 

Daniel — born  April  28,  1787 — was  the  Ritchie  county 
pioneer,  whose  history  has  already  been  given. 

Children  of  William  and  Mary  Raymond. — His  second 
wife  : 

Cyrus  born  SepLember  8,  1790,  and  married  Jane  Somer- 
ville,  on  April  18,  1822,  and  Polly  Carpenter  on  November  17, 
1851. 

Ruth    born    November    20,    1792,    and    married    Joshua. 
Nixon  on  September  24,  1811.  and  went  to  Illinois. 

Maxa  born  March  14,  1795,  and  married  Robert  Robin- 
son on  August  8,  1816,  and  went  to  .Illinois. 

Julia  born  July  28,  1799,  and  died  June  30,  1801. 

A  daughter  born  July  30,  1804,  died  the  same  day. 

Thomas  Haymond,  son  of  William,  who  married  Miss 
Rebecca  Bond — twin  sister  of  Lewis  Bond,  was  a  scout  dur- 
ing the  latter  part  of  the  Indian  wars,  and  was  surveyor  of 
Harrison  county  for  thirty-two  years,  and  held  other  offices 
of   public   trust   and    honor.      His    son    Lewis,    married    Miss 


130  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COVNTY 

Rachel  Wilson,  youngest  daughter  of  Col.  Ben  Wilson,  senior, 
and  was  the  father  of  Mrs.  Creed  Collins,  of  Pennsboro. 

He  (Thomas)  died  in  Harrison  county  on  August  31, 
1853,  rich  in  the  love  and  esteem  of  his  fellow-countrymen. 
He  was  also  the  father  of  the  late  Luther  Haymond  of  Clarks- 
burg, who  almost  reached  the  centur}^  mark. 

The  descendants  of  William  Haymond,  senior,  which  are 
prominently  known  in  different  parts  of  the  Union,  are  in- 
numerable, but  among  them  we  find  the  name  of  one  which 
is  familiar  to  us  all — that  of  the  Hon.  Hu  Maxwell,  the  well 
known  A\^est  Virginia  historian,  who  now  holds  a  position 
in  the  Forestry  Service  at  Washington  city. 

John  Raymond's  Will.— "In  the  name  of  God,  Amen.  I 
John  Haymond,  of  Frederick  county.  Carpenter,  being  in 
good  health  of  Body  &  of  sound  mind  &  perfect  mind  &  mem- 
ory, praise  be  therefore  given  to  Almighty  God,  do  make  and 
ordain  this  my  last  will  and  testament  in  manner  and  form 
following,  that  is  to  say,  First. 

First  and  principally,  I  recommend  my  soul  into  the 
hands  of  Almighty  God,  hoping  through  the  merits.  Death 
and  passion  of  my  Savior  Jesus  Christ,  to  have  full  pardon  & 
forgiveness  of  all  my  sins  &  inherit  everlasting  life,  and  my 
body  I  commit  to  the  Earth  to  be  decently  hurried  &C. 

First  Item.  I  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  well-beloved 
wife  Margaret  Haymond,  a  tract  of  land  called  the  "Constant 
Friendship,"  Avith  the  Plantation  that  I  now  live  on,  the  tract 
of  land  containing  one  hundred  fifty  acres  during  her  natural 
life,  then  the  said  Plantation  &  land  to  be  my  dear  son 
William  Haymond's  forever. 

Item.  I  give  and  bequeath  vmto  my  well-beloved  wife, 
Margaret  Haymond.  a  negro  man  named  Sam,  and  also  a 
negro  man  Cesar,  and  also  a  negro  woman,  named  Jenny  & 
also  a  negro  woman  named  Poll,  and  also  a  negro  girl  named 
Nell  «&  and  also  a  negro  Girl  named  P"illas  and  also  a  negro 
girl  named  Lucy,  and  also  a  negro  girl  named  Gate  &  also  a 
negro  boy  named  Robin  &  also  a  negro  boy  named  Sampson, 
and  also  a  negro  girl  named  Sail  &  also  a  negro  girl  named 


(To  jMrs.  Creed  Collins  of  Pennsboro  we  are  incletjted  for  this  valu- 
able information,  wliich  we  gleaned  from  a  record  of  tlie  Haymond  family 
published  in  1903.) 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLED  131 

Dyner.  Ye,  said  negroes  my  well-beloved  wife,  to  enjoy  dur- 
ing her  natural  life,  then  the  said  negroes  to  be  divided  be- 
tween my  children,  my  dear  son  Nicholas  Haymond  to  have 
negro,  Poll  &  also  a  negro  boy  named  Robin,  forever.  My 
dear  son  Calder  Haymond  to  have  a  negro  man  named  Sam, 
and  a  negro  woman  named  Jenny  &  a  negro  girl  named 
Dyner,  forever.  My  dear  daughter  Hannah  to  have  a  negro 
man  named  Cesar  and  a  negro  girl  named  Lucy  &  a  negro 
girl  named  Alice  forever.  My  dear  son  William  Haymond 
to  have  a  negro  boy  named  Sampson  &  a  negro  girL  named 
Gate  &  a  negro  girl  named  Sail,  forever.  My  dear  daughter 
Ann  Haymond  to  have  a  negro  girl  named  Fillis  and  a  negro 
girl  named,  Nell,  forever. 

Item.  I  give  and  bequeath  to  my  dear  son,  Nicholas 
Haymond,  all  that  tract  of  land  called  Constant  Friendship, 
containing  one  hundred  fifty  acres,  being' the  other  part  of 
the  tract  of  land  that  I  now  live  on.  to  be  the  said  Nicholas 
Haymond's  and  his  heirs  forever,  as  soon  as  the  said  tract 
of  land  is  made  over  by  Mr.  Thomas  Lucas  and  wife,  which 
land  is  now  in  the  prosecion  of  will  the  said  Thomas  L>ucas' 
wife  is  at  age,  to  make  the  land  over,  and  I  also  give  my  dear 
son  Nicholas  Haymond  a  negro  man  named  Will  forever. 

Item.  I  give  and  bequeath  to  my  dear  daughter.  Alary 
Haymond  a  negro  boy  named  Nacy,  and  one  negro  girl  named 
Candeth. 

Item.  I  give  and  bequeath  a  negro  girl  named  Alice  to 
my  dear  daughter,  Hannah  Jones,  forever,  the  said  negro  is 
now  in  the  possession  of  her  husband,  John  Jones. 

Item.  I  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  dear  son,  Calder 
Haymond,  part  of  that  tract  of  land  called  "Haymond's  addi- 
tion," beginning  at  the  end  of  the  first  line  of  Constant  Friend- 
ship, forever.  Calder  to  have  that  part  that  lies  next  my  own 
Plantation  and  to  go  with  the  main  Road  by  Lawrence 
Owens,  and  to  the  Church  Road. 

And  my  dear  daughter,  Ann  Haymond,  to  have  the  other 
part  that  lies  above  Mr.  Lawrence  Owens,  next  to  Mr.  Alex- 
ander Barricks,  running  right  up  to  the  main  road,  to  join 
with  Mr.  Owen's  line. 

Item.     I   give  and  bequeath  unto  my  dear  and   vveil-be- 


]32  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

loved  wife,  all  my  household  goods,  and  all  ye  stock  of  every- 
thing, Cattle,  Sheep  Horses  Hoggs,  during  her  natural  life, 
and  then  the  stock  and  household  goods  to  be  divided  alike 
between  my  dear  sons  Nicholas  and  Calder  and  William  and 
Ann  Haymond. 

Item.  I  give  and  bequeath  unto  my  dear  and  well-be- 
loved wife,  the  House  called  the  "Alill  House,"  during  her 
natural  life,  and  then  the  said  House  to  be  for  the  use  of  m}' 
dear  sons,  Nicholas  Haymond,  Calder  Haymond,  and  W^illi-im 
Haymond  during  their  lives  and  their  heirs  forev^er,  and  each 
son  to  have  as  good  a  part  as  the  other." 

"JOHN  I-iAYMOND,  fSeal) 
Semptr.  27,  1750. 
Test: 

JOHN  RAWLINS, 
.    ROBERT  EN\NIS, 
His 
WILLIAM  X  O'NEAL. 
Mark. 

The  Garners. — John  Garner,  senior,  Avas  among  the  very 
first  pioneers  of  the  North  fork  of  Hughes  river.  He  married 
Miss  Elizabeth  Grigsby  and  came  from  New  Jersey  early  in 
the  century  and  entered  land  in  the  vicinity  of  Tollgate, 
wdiere  he  remained  until  his  death  in  1841.  Not  many  years 
after  his  arrival  here  his  wife  died,  and  he  then  married  Mrs. 
Eleanor  Hurst  Marsh.  His'  last  hours  were  spent  at  the 
home  of  Notley  Willis  at  Tollgate,  and  here  he  lies  in  his  last 
sleep,  as  do  his  two  companions. 

He  was  the  father  of  two  sons  and  three  daughters  all 
of  the  first  union;  viz.,  John,  junior,  William,  Nancy,  Eliza- 
beth, and  Delila  Garner. 

John  Garner,  junior,  was  born  near  Tollgate  in  1808,  and 
in  1830  he  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  Ann  Williams  and 
established  his  home  on  Ruck  run  (a  tributary  of  this  river), 
on  the  farm  that  is  still  in  the  hands  of  his  heirs.  Here  Mrs. 
Garner  passed  from  earth  in  1885,  and  the  following  3-ear  lie 


(This  unique  piece  of  antiquity  will  doubtless  be  of  Interest  to  not  a 
few  of  tlie  readers  of  this  book  besides  the  lineal  descendants.) 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLED  133 

was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  A.  Shepherd,  who  still  survives. 
He  died  in  1893,  and  at  Mole  Hill  he  lies  at  rest. 

He  and  his  first  wife  were  the  parents  of  seven  children : 
Isaiah  (1831-1901),  Julia  Ann,  who  is  Mrs.  J.  C.  Jones,  of 
Mole  Hill;  Hester  (Mrs.  Edward  Ferribee).  Loftus  P.,  and 
Francis  A.  Garner,  all  of  Buck  run ;  Rebecca  (Mrs.  Amos 
Thomas),  and  William  A.,  who  died  in  infancy. 

William  Garner  went  West  and  there  married  and  reared 
a  family, 

Delila  Garner,  also  went  West  and  married  a  man  by  the 
name  of  Maddox.  Nancy  was  Mrs.  Underwood ;  and  Eliza- 
beth, Mrs.  Williams. 

The  Marshes. — James  Marsh  was  another  very  early  set- 
tler on  this  river  in  the  Tollgate  vicinity.  Nothing  definite 
as  to  the  origin  of  this  family  in  America  is  in  our  possession, 
except  that  they  came  from  England  in  Colonial  times  and 
settled  in  Maryland,  where  James  Marsh  was  born.  How- 
ever, he  married  Miss  Eleanor  Hurst,  a  beautiful  English 
maiden,  who  crossed  the  deep  to  Baltimore  with  her  parents 
in  her  girlhood,  and  was  the  founder  of  one  of  the  oldest  and 
best  families  of  the  county. 

Near  the  beginning  of  the  nineteenth  century,  he  came 
from  Baltimore,  and  purchased  (of  Richard  Dotson)  the  farjii 
that  is  now  owned  by  J.  M.  Wilson,  near  one-half  mile  east 
of  Tollgate,  and  took  up  his  residence  here,  where  he  died  in 
1810.  And  only  a  few  paces  from  the  scene  of  his  settlement 
on  his  own  homestead,  he  lies  in  his  last  sleep.  After  his 
death,  his  widow  became  the  wife  of  John  Garner,  senior,  and 
at  Tollgate  she  reposes. 

The  family  of  James  and  Eleanor  Hurst  Marsh  consisted 
of  five  girls  and  five  boys;  viz.,  Eli,  Enoch,  Elias,  Elijah, 
James,  Epha,  Elizabeth,  Eliza,  Edith  and  Charlotte  Marsh. 
James  died  in  childhood,  and  Elijah,  in  youth,  but  all  the  rest 
married  and  reared  families. 

Eli  Marsh  was  born  on  April  4,  1791,  and  with  his  parents 
came  to  this  county  in  his  boyhood.  On  March  1,  18'?."),  he 
was  married  to  Miss  Drusilla  Turner  Israel,  who  was  born 
in  Harrison  county,  on  June  17,  1811,  and  at  the  old  Israel 
homestead,  six  miles  from   Clarksburg,  they  lived   and  died. 


i:u  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUXTY 

He  was  one  of  the  prominent  men  of  his  clay,  and  his  wife 
was  noted  for  her  many  beautiful  traits  of  character,  and 
their  comfortable  home  at  "Roselawn  farm"  was  known  far 
and  wide  for  its  hospitality.  Mrs.  Marsh  died  on  March  13, 
1873,  and  he  followed  her  to  the  grave  on  November  twenty- 
seventh  of  the  same  year. 

Their  little  family  consisted  of  two  daughters ;  viz.,  Mary 
Rebecca,  and  Susan  Jane  Marsh. 

In  March,  18-14,  Mary  Rebecca  became  the  wife  of  L'riel 
M.  Turner,  a  lawyer,  of  Culpepper  county,  Virginia,  who 
practiced  his  profession  at  Clarksburg  after  their  marriage ; 
and  the  one  child  of  this  union  was  the  late  Prof.  Eli  Marsh 
Turner,  of  the  Morgantown  University,  who  died  on  March 
1,  1908,  at  the  age  of  sixty-four  yeais,  leaving  a  wife,  (nee 
Miss  H.  Georgia  Jackson,  of  Newark,  Ohio)  and  four  chil- 
dren ;  viz.,  Mary  R.,  Phoebe,  James  J.,  and  Wirt  M.  Turner, 
all  of  Morgantown. 

The  other  daughter,  Susan  Jane  Marsh,  was  married,  to 
Ccl.  Benjamin  Wilson,  junior,  of  Clarksburg,  in  June,  1848, 
and  the  two  children  born  of  this  union  are:  Buena  M.,  who 
is  Mrs.  John  W.  Brown,  of  Clarksburg;  and  Drusilla,  the  late 
Mrs.  George  Funy,  of  W^heeling,  who  passed  on  a  number  of 
years  ago,  leaving  one  child. 

Including  the  six  children  of  Mrs.  Brown  above  men- 
tioned (Wilson,  Lilian,  Gertrude,  Roscoe,  Benjamin,  and 
Marj^  Brown)  we  have  the  entire  line  of  the  descendants  of 
Eli  ]Marsh. 

Enoch  Marsh  was  born  near  Tollgate  in  1804,  and  in  his 
young  manhood,  was  married  to  Miss  Mar}^  Ann  Cline, 
daughter  of  Abraham  Cline,  who  was  born  in  January,  1808  ; 
and  after  spending  the  first  few  years  of  their  married  life  at 
the  old  homestead  near  Tollgate.  in  March,  1836,  they  re- 
moved a  little  farther  up  the  river  and  settled  on  the  farm 
that  is  now  the  home  of  Ben  Wilson,  and  from  here  they 
passed  to  their  final  home.  He  died  on  March  31,  18(i5,  and 
his  wife,  on  September  19,  1878,  and  both  rest  on  their  old 
liomestead. 

Their  children  were:  Sarah  Jane  (Mrs.  David  McGin- 
nis),  Eli,  Elizabeth  (Mrs. -John  Douglass,  of  Cairo),  Clarinda 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLED 


135 


(Mrs.  J.  H.  B.  Cunningham,  of  Mole  HilH,  James,  of. near 
Ellenboro ;  the  late  Jefferson  Marsh,  of  Harrisville ;  and  Mary, 
Cathrine,  Angelina,  Eliza,  and  Ellen  P.  Marsh,  who  all  died 
unmarried. 


"Marsh  Cabin." 
This  cabin  was  constructed  from  the  logs  of  the   old  Enoch   Marsli 


:abin. 


A  large  number  of  prominent  young  people  in  the  vari- 
ous v¥alks  of  life  in  this  and  sister  counties  are  descended 
from  this  branch  of  the  Marsh  family.  Among  them  are  H. 
E.  McGinnis,  the  honorable  County  clerk ;  Prof.  J.  F.  Marsh, 
one  of  the  leading  young  educators  of  the  State ;  Guy  Young, 
of  Glenville;  and  Harvey  Marsh,  of  Ohio.  Calvin  Marsh, 
an  editor  in  Washington  state;  Newton  Marsh,  of  Cairo,  etc. 

Elias  Marsh  married  Miss  Nancy  Collins,  eldest  daughter 
of  Jacob  Collins,  and  settled  on  "Marsh's  run"  below  Mole 
Hill,  where  he  lived  and  died.  (See  Collins  family  for  farther 
account.) 

Epha  Marsh  was  first  married  to  AVilliam  Cline,  and  at 
Tollgate  they  took  up  their  residence,  perhaps  on  the  Marsh 
homestead,  and  the  two  children  of  this  union  were  Eli  Cline, 
and  Eleanor,  who  married  William  Haymond.  After  the 
death  of  Mr.  Cline,  Epha  Marsh  became  the  wife  of  Notley 
Willis,  and  the  one  child  of  this  union  is  N.  G.  Willis,  of  Mole 
Hill. 

EHzabeth  Marsh  was  married  to  Amos  Keys,  and  her 
home  was  on  Middle  Island  creek,  where  she  sleeps,  in  the 
Ripley  cemetery. 


i;^6  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COi'NTV 

Her  children  were  seven  in  number;  viz.,  Helen  (died 
young),  Eveline,  John  and  James,  who  are  all  single,  reside 
at  the  old  home.  Jacintha  is  Airs.  Norvel  Joseph,  of  Middle 
Island;  and  Bert  and  Alarsh  Keys  are  the  other  two  sons. 

Edith  Marsh  married  James  Franks,  and  after  the  birth 
of  their  first  child,  Angelina,  they  removed  to  the  Ohio  river 
below  Parkersburg,  and  here  their  liistory  ends. 

Eliza  Marsh  was  the  late  Airs.  Thomas  Eastlack.  of  Har- 
rison county,  and  her  children  were  Eli,  Alstorphus,  Elias, 
and  Carminta,  who  became  Z\Irs.  liarney  Bond,  of  Middle 
Island  creek. 

Charlotte  Marsh  was  married  to  Richard  "Britton,  and 
for  a  time  after  their  marriage  they  resided,  in  the  "Buckeye 
state,"  but  they  later  removed  to  Greenwood,  in  Doddridge 
county,  and  here  we  lose  sight  of  them.  Air.  Britton  Avas  a 
newspaper  editor,  and  their  family  consisted  of  three  children: 
Richard,  the  son,  died  in  his  young  manhood  :  Eleanor  was 
the  late  Airs.  William  Collins,  of  the  North  fork  of  Hughes' 
river;  and  Eliza  was  the  wife  of  Henry  B.  Collins,  of  Alole 
Hill.     (See  Collins  history.) 

Raleigh  Haddox. — Raleigh^  Haddox  was  another  very 
early  settler  on  the  waters  of  the  North  fork  of  Hughes  river. 
He  was  of  Scotch-Irish  descent.  His  father,  Jonathan  Had- 
dox, crossed  the  sea  from  Ireland  during  the  latter  part  of 
the  eighteenth  century  and  settled  at  Richmond,  Virginia. 
As  dates  are  wanting,  it  is  not  known  to  a  certainty  where 
Raleigh  Haddox  was  born,  but  it  is  probable  that  the  "Old 
Dominion"  was  the  place  of  his  nativity.  He  enlisted  as  a 
soldier  late  in  the  war  of  '12,  but  saw  no  service.  His 
wife,  Miss  Sarah  Ferrell,  was  the  daughter  of  Alajor  Ferrell. 
of  the  Continental  army,  who  afterwards  served  as  captain 
in  the  war  of  181"2,  and  received  from  the  Government,  in 
recognition  of  his  services,  a  grant  of  land  where  the  county 
seat  of  Culpepper  is  now  located ;  but  failing  to  prosecute 
his  claim,  received  no  benefit  from  the  grant  which  is  now 
valued  at  one  million  dollars. 


^This  name   has  been  spelled   in  three  different   ways   in  the   data  sent 
us:     "Raley,"  "Rollo,"  and  "Raleign,"  and  we  preferred  the  latter. 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLED  .  137 

In  1825,  Raleigh  Haddox,  with  his  family,  emigrated 
from  the  valley  of  Virginia  to  Monongalia  county,  and  from 
near  Morgantown,  four  years  later,  he  came  to  this  county, 
and  settled  below  Mole  Hill  on  the  run  that  still  bears  his 
name,  where  the  remainder  of  his  life  was  principally  spent. 
Mrs.  Haddox  died  in  lS.5(i.     She  was  of  Scotch  descent. 

His  children  were :  George  Haddox,  whose  family  is 
mentioned  with  the  Hushers.  Mary  who  became  the  wife  of 
Matthew  Riggs,  of  Tyler  county.  B.  H.,  Enoch  S.,  and 
Jonathan  J.  Haddox.  (The  Riggs  children  were:  James, 
Manda,  Oliver,  Raleigh,  Enoch,  Dock  and  Agnes  Riggs.) 

B.  H.  was  married  to  Miss  Nancy  Haddox,  daughter  of 
Elijah,  a  cousin  of  Raleigh,  and  Louis  C.  Haddox,  a  promi- 
nent clergyman  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  of  Colum- 
bus, Ohio,  is  his  only  son.  This  son  (Louis  C.)  married 
Caroline  B.  Ireland,  daughter  of  Alexander,  and  niece  of  G. 
M.  Ireland,  of  Pullman. 

Enoch  S.  Haddox  was  first  married  to  Miss  Caroline 
Pickens,  of  Pleasants  county ;  and  his  second  wife  was  Miss 
Eliza  Chambers,  of  the  same  county.  One  son  of  the  first 
union  and  two  sons  and  three  daughters,  of  the  second,  made 
up  his  household :  O.  M.,  Kinie,  Victory,  Wm.,  and  Tudie. 

Jonathan  J.  Haddox's  first  wife  was  a  Miss  Robinson, 
and  his  second.  Miss  Amanda  McCoy,  of  Tyler  county,  and 
one  daughter  and  one  son.  both  of  the  second  union  were  his 
children  :    John  T.  and  Marie. 

Allen  Calhoun. — Allen  Calhoun  was  the  pioneer  on  the 
farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of  the  late  Edmund  Taylor,  a  lit- 
tle east  of  Pennsboro.  He  was  the  first  blacksmith  of  the 
town,  but  at  the  coming  of  the  railroad,  he  sold  out  his  in- 
terest here,  and  removed  to  Spruce  creek,  Avhere  he  passed 
away  during  the  civil  war;  and  in  the  old  Pleasant  Hill  bury- 
ing-ground  he  lies  at  rest. 

He  was  of  Irish  origin,  his  parents  having  crossed  from 
the  "Emerald  Isle,"  shortly  before  his  birth,  and  settled  in 
Pennsylvania. 

He  (Allen)  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Powell  Calhoun, 
were   both   natives   of   the   "Keystone"   state.      Mrs.   Calhoun 


338  HISTORY    OF   RITCHIE    COUXTV 

died  near  the  }-ear  1S45,  and  was  laid  at  rest  in  the  Pioneer 
cemetery  at  Pennsboro. 

Their  cliildren  were:  Samuel  Calhoun,  of  Beason ; 
Robert,  who  died  in  early  manhood ;  Powell,  formerly  of  this 
county,  but  now  one  of  the  nonegarians  of  T3der;  John,  who 
spent  his  last  hours  at  the  old  homestead,  on  Spruce  creek; 
Elizabeth,  who  married  James  Wright,  of  Spruce  creek,  and 
was  the  late  mother  of  the  Rev.  Allen  \\' right,  of  Parkers- 
burg;  and  Mary,  who  married  ^Villis  Wright  (brother  of 
James),  of  Barbour  county. 

The  Taylors. — Edmund  Taylor  V\'as  another  earl}'  settler 
on  this  river.  He  and  his  wife,  ]\Irs.  Rachel  McKinney  Tay- 
lor, were  both  natives  of  the  "Old  Dominion,"  but  they  came 
here  from  Harrison  county,  near  the  year  1820,  and  erected 
their  humble  dwelling  on  the  bank  of  the  river  near  the 
mouth  of  Lynn  Camp,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of 
their  late  son  Edmund.  He  was  a  typical  pioneer  of  gigantic 
stature,  and  was  a  large  land  owner.  The  first  sermon  in 
Clay  district  is  said  to  have  been  delivered  within  the  walls 
of  his  home  here. 

Mrs.  Taylor  was  born  on  Alay  29,  1791,  and  was  a  de- 
scendant of  the  Tucker  family,  her  mother  being  a  sister  of 
Phebe  Tucker  Cunningham,  of  Indian  fam.e.  She  preceded 
Mr.  Taylor  to  the  home  beyond  by  a  number  of  years,  and 
his  second  wife  was  Mrs.  ]\Iary  Sherwood  Howard.  He  was 
born  on  April  15.  lT9fi,  and  died  at  a  little  home  near  Penns- 
boro some  time  during  the  seventies,  and  b}-  the  side  of  his 
first  wife  he  lies  at  rest  on  the  old  homestead. 

Camden  and  Joseph  Taylor  were  the  children  of  iiis 
second  marriage  and  those  of  the  first  were  :  Lovina,  James, 
Mary  Ann,  Nancy,  Sarah,  Michael,  Edmund,  junior,  and 
Rachel  Taylor. 

Lovina  Taylor,  the  eldest  child,  who  was  born  on  April 
15,  1815,  married  Peter  Broadwater  and  lived  and  died  in  this 
county.     (See  Broadwater  Family.) 

James  Taylor,  whose  natal  day  was  October  7,  1818,  was 
a  man  of  more  than  ordinary  ability.  He  was  one  of  the 
early  Sherifrs  of  the  county  and  served  as  a  member  of  the 
State  Legislature.     He  resided  on  Lynn  Camp,  at  Harrisville, 


XORTH   FORK   SETTLED  139 

and  finally  went  to  Cornwallis,  where  death  overtook  him. 
But  he  rests  in  the  Taylor  burying-ground  on  the  old  home- 
stead. 

He  was  first  married  to  Miss  Lovisa  Dotson,  and  his 
second  wife  was  a  Miss  Windom.  The  children  of  the  first 
marriage  vveie;  Phelps,  who  died  in  childhood;  the  Rev.  E. 
J.  Taylor,  and  James  D.,  of  Lynn  Camp ;  Stonewall,  of  Park- 
ersburg-;  the  late  Mrs.  Lovina  (Patrick)  Monohan,  of  Cairo: 
Mrs.  Hannah  Broadwater;  Mrs.  Rachel  (Ocran)  Corbin,  of 
Pennsboro ;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Victoria  M.  (H.  N.)  Wilson, 
of  Burnt  House. 

The  two  children  of  the  last  marriage  were  John  and 
William  Taylor. 

Mary  Ann  Taylor,  l:)orn  September  23,  1820,  married 
Henson  Merrifield,  and  after  she  was  laid  in  the  Pennsboro 
cemetery,  the  family  went  to  the  State  of  Washington.  Avhere 
they  married,  and  where  they  now  reside.  Helen,  James, 
Adaline  and  Edlee  Merrifield  were  the  names  of  the  children. 

Nancy  Taylor,  born  on  November  24,  1822,  married  Bar- 
ton H.  Hickman,  and  in  the  Gnat's  run  cemetery  she  lies  at 
rest.  Mr.  Hickman  still  survives,  and  their  children  are: 
James,  Jack.  Luster,  Edmund,  ]\Irs.  ]\Iaggie  Dotson,  ]\Irs. 
Jenning  Strosnider,  Airs.  Fannie  Rogers,  Mrs.  Viola  Woofter, 
and  Mrs.  Rose  Taylor. 

Sarah  Taylor  was  born  on  January  29,  1825,  and  died 
(unmarried)  on  June  9,  LS95,  and  was  buried  in  the  Taylor 
cemetery. 

Michael  Taylor,  born  July  12,  1827,  married  Miss  Eliza 
Broadwater,  daughter  of  Jefiferson  Broadwater,  and  died  a 
number  of  years  ago,  but  his  widow  survived  until  1909.  when 
she  was  laid  by  his  side  in  the  Taylor  burying  ground. 

Their  children  are  as  follows : 

Mrs.  Adaline  Calhoun,  Mrs.  Mary  (A.  P.)  Meredith, 
Ashford,  Peter,  James,  Waldo,  Edmund,  Airs.  Jennie  Bucke- 
lew,  and  Mrs.  Ella  Nay.  Mrs.  Aleredith  and  Mrs.  Nay  reside 
in  Washington,  on  the  Pacific  coast. 

Edmund  Taylor,  junior,  born  on  October  5,  1829,  mar- 
ried Ermany  Jane  Baker,  daughter  of  William  and  Ruth 
Deacon  Baker,  and  lived  and  died  on  the  old  homestead  where 


lAQ  HISTORY   Of  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

his  parents  settled,  on  January  31,  1903.  His  wife  survived 
him  by  several  years,  and  both  rest  in  the  Taylor  cemetery. 
Their  family  consisted  of  thirteen  children : 
Elizabeth,  the  first  born,  is  Mrs.  Charles  Cunningham, 
Boggess,  Marcus  B.,  William,  Brent,  Gluck.  Grover,  Ben, 
Ralph,  Mrs.  Addie  Moore,  Mrs.  Sarah  Bernard,  Mrs.  Daisy 
Moore,  and  Mrs.  June  Dotson. 

Rachel  Taylor,  the  youngest  daughter,  born  on  March 
15.  1834,  married  Ashford  Broadwater,  and  spent  her  last 
hours  on  McKim,  but  rests  in  the  Tollgate  cemetery.  Her 
children  are  twelve  in  number :  James,  Howard,  Harvey, 
Ralph,  Waldo,  Okey,  Morris,  Harris,  Sedwick,  Mrs.  Mary 
Hill,  Mrs.  Amanda  Peebles,  and  Miss  Ida  Broadwater. 


CHAPTER  IX 


North  Fork  Settlers— Continued 

SAIAH  MARSHALL  was  an  early  pioneer 
on  the  river  above  Tollgate — on  the  farm 
that  was  until  quite  recently  a  part  of  the 
late  Creed  Collins  estate ;  and  here  where 
he  formed  his  settlement,  he  spent  the  clos- 
ing hours  of  his  life;  but  if  he  had  any  de- 
scendants (and  some  say  that  he  had  not) 
we  have  been  unable  to  get  any  trace  of  them. 

Helmick, — Philip  Helmick  made  the  first  improvement 
on  the  river  below  Tollgate.  He  came  from  Harrison  county 
near  the  year  1805,  and  established  his  home  on  the  Broad- 
water farm,  where  he  saw  the  last  of  earth,  but  of  his  poster- 
ity we  know  nothing.  Li  1839,  not  long  after  his  death,  Eli 
Tucker,  senior,  purchased  this  farm,  which  passed  into  the 
hands  of  the  late  Jefferson  Broadwater,  in  1844. 

Tucker. — Eli  B.  Tucker  was  born  in  what  is  now  Taylor 
county  in  1797,  and  shortly  after  his  marriage  to  Miss  Eliza- 
beth Jaco,  in  his  early  manhood,  he  came  to  the  South  fork 
of  Hughes  river  and  founded  his  home  on  the  Michael's  farm, 
at  Oxford ;  and  from  there  removed  to  what  is  now  the 
Broadwater  farm.  In  1856,  he,  with  his  family,  went  to 
Mason  county,  Missouri,  where  he  fell  asleep  in  1876. 

He  three  times  took  the  marriage  vow,  Ruth  Scott  being 
his  second  wife,  and  Margaret  Dotson,  sister  of  Emmanuel, 
his  third. 

The  children  of  the  first  union  were :  Harrison  J.,  Mary 
who  died  in  youth,  Rachel  (Mrs.  Henry  E.  Dotson),  Orlinda 
(Mrs.  Solomon  Dotson),  Phebe  (Mrs.  John  Sears),  and  Nel- 
son. 

Those  of  the  second  v/ere :  Eli  B.,  who  is  now  spending 
his  old  age  just  across  the  Doddridge  county  line  near  Toll- 
gate;   James    R.,    of   Tollgate;     Booth,     Harrison,     Thomas, 


143  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   GOV  NT  Y 

Samuel  and  Michael,  who  went  West  where  they  rest. 

Those  of  the  third  marriage :  Jackson,  Preston,  Elizabeth 
and  Ruhama,  who  died  single;  Adaline  (Mrs.  Thomas  Nich- 
olson), Loiiise  (Mrs.  Henry  Luck). 

The  Tuckers  are  said  to  be  of  Scotch  lineage,  and  they 
belong  to  the  same  family  as  Phebe  Tucker  Cunningham,  of 
Indian  fame,  but  we  have  been  unable  to  determine  the  exact 
connection. 

The  Dotsons. — Some  time,  perhaps,  in  the  early  twenties, 
the  Dotsons  found  homes  in  the  Tollgate  vicinity,  and  a  long 
line  of  their  descendants  still  lay  claim  to  this  soil. 

The  original  spelling  of  this  name  in  the  Old  World  was 
"Dodson,"  but  for  some  unknown  reason  (probably  from  the 
natural  inclination  for  mis-pronouncing  names)  it  became 
changed  to  its  present  form. 

Two  brothers,  James  and  William  Dotson,  came  frou! 
England  in  colonial  day?;  and  settled  near  Richmond,  Vir- 
ginia; and  from  James  (or  some  say  his  name  was  Richard) 
the  different  families  of  this  part  of  the  county  trace  their 
lineage. 

AVilliam  Dotson,  son  of  James  (or  Richard)  married 
Miss  Alary  Franks,  and  settled  at  Greenwood,  in  Doddridge 
county,  in  his  3^ounger  days,  where  he  reared  quite  a  family 
of  sons  and  daughters,  who  were  as  fellows  : 

Emmanuel,  William,  junior,  John,  Squire,  Henry,  Saul, 
Nancy  (Mrs.  Griggs),  Jane  (Mrs.  Elefrits),  Cynthia  (Mrs. 
Scott),  Charlotte  (wife  of  John  Wilson),  Elizabeth  (Mrs. 
Ruley)-,  Mary  Ann  (Mrs.  Dougherty),  and  Alargaret  (Airs. 
Eli  B.  Tucker,  senior). 

Emmanuel  Dotson  was  born  at  Greenwood,  on  Alarch  1, 
1798  ;  and  in  his  early  manhood,  was  married  to  Miss  Hannah 
Sears,  and  on  Cabin  run  where  Thomas  Dotson  now  lives, 
they  established  their  home  near  they  year  1830.  Here  they 
remained  until  they  crossed  to  the  other  side,  and  at  Tollgate 
they  rest.  Air.  Dotson  died  on  February  12,  1881,  at  the  age 
of  eighty-two  vears. 

He  and  his  wife  Hannah,  were  the  parents  of  three  sons 
and  one  daughter;  viz.,  Hiram  S.,  John  W..  Granville,  and 
Lovisa  Dotson. 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED 


143 


John  W.,  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Amy  Pool  Dotson,  went  to 
Minnesota  many  years  ago,  but  they  now  live  in  California. 

Granville  married  Sarah  Cross,  and  they  also  went  West, 
where  they  sleep,  and  where  their  descendants  live. 

Lovisa,  the  only  daughter,  married  James  Taylor  and 
lived  and  died  in  this  county.     (See  Taylor  Family.) 

Hiram  S.  Dotson,  the  one  son  that  remained  here,  was 
born  on  Cabin  run,  in  1832,  and  spent  his  entire  life  within 

the  bounds  of  his  native  county, 
where  his  ashes  lie. 

He  was  first  married  to  Miss 
Susan  Markwell.  who  died  while 
he  was  serving  as  a  Union  soldier 
in  ISGo,  leaving  eleven  children ; 
and  his  second  wife  was  Miss 
Melvina  Poole,  who  was  the 
mother  of  his  other  five  children. 
On  October  26,  1863,  he  was 
honorably  discharged  from  the 
army  service  because  his  orphan 
children  demanded  his  presence 
at  home. 
The  children  of  the  first  union  were:  Mansfield  S., 
Spence  B.,  Perry  E.,  Amos  A.,  Wm.  F.,  Alpheus  R.,  Charles 
G.,  Mrs.  Alice  J.  Ash.  Mrs.  Sarah  G.  Kyger,  and  Mrs.  Susan 
Smith — one  name  is  missing.  Those  of  the  second  marriage 
were:  J.  W.,  David  V.,  Thomas  J.,  Mrs.  Annabella  Nutter, 
and  Mary,  who  became  the  wife  of  Henry  Miller. 

William  Dotson  (brother  of  Emmanuel)  was  married  to 
Miss  Anne  Ankrum,  and  settled  across  the  Doddridge  count}^ 
line,  where  he  lived  and  died.  His  children  were :  Daniel, 
Jerusha  (Mrs.  Joseph  Dougherty),  William,  Owen,  Rose 
(Mrs.  Samuel  Copendofl:"er),  Caroline  (Mrs.  Hickman),  Rilla 
(Mrs.  Francis  Waldo),  and  Israel  Dotson. 

John  Dotson  (brother  of  Emmanuel)  married  Miss  Susan 
Sears,  sister  of  Hannah  Sears  Dotson,  for  his  first  wife;  and 
his  second,  was  M'iss  Mahala  Myers.  He,  too,  settled  across 
the  Doddridge  county  line,  but  removed  to  the  Harris\^ille 
vicinitv    in    the    ante-bellum    davs.    and    there    he    rests.      His 


Emmanuel  Dotson. 


144  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COU.VTY 

children :  Oliver,  Lloyd,  Mrs.  Minerva  Stinespring,  Mrs. 
Cindona  (Daniel)  Malone,  Clinton,  Leeman,  Noble  and  Rufns 
Dolson. 

Thomas  J.  Dotson,  another  brother  of  Emmanuel,  was 
one  of  the  early  settlers  on  Buck  run  (a  small  tributary  of 
the  head  of  the  North  fork,  which  took  its  name  from  the 
large  number  of  male  deer  found  here  by  the  pioneer  hunters). 
He  and  his  wife  Ruth  Griggs  Dotson,  were  the  parents  of 
five  children;  viz.,  Elza,  the  late  Ellis,  the  late  ]\larshall, 
Armstrong,  and  Clara  who  married  George  Elefritz. 

"Aunt  Polly"  Dotson,  a  widow  whose  identity  we  have 
been  unable  to  learn,  was  another  early  settler  on  Buck  run, 
but  the  names  of  her  children  have  been  given  us  as  follows: 
Benjamin,  Robert,  Thomas,  John  S.,  Joseph,  and  l\frs.  Alary 
Griggs. 

And  from  these  two  pioneers  the  numerous  families  of 
the  name  on  Buck  run  to-day  are  descended.  Like  the  oilier 
r)otsons  they  are  said  to  be  a  peaceable,  law-abiding  race 
of  people.  Many  of  them  are  religiously  inclined,  and  not  a 
lew  of  them  have  entered  the  ministry  of  the  Christian 
church,  and  some  of  the  younger  generations  are  identified 
in  the  teaching  profession. 

Zachariah  Dotson,  brother  of  William,  senior,  w^as  a  very 
early  settler  in  the  Tollgate  vicinity.  He  possibly  came  as 
early  as  1(S10,  and  remained  until  death,  but  of  his  family 
we  have  no  record. 

Richard  Dotson,  the  head  of  another  branch  of  the  fam- 
ily, was  also  a  brother  of  William,  senior,  and  Zachariah 
Dotson.  He  removed  from  the  Old  Dominion  to  the  Monon- 
galia glades,  and  from  there  to  Doddridge  county,  where  he 
met  the  destroyer.  Though  he  is  said  to  have  owned  land 
in  the  Tollgate  vicinity  as  early  as  1800,  we  have  no  account 
of  his  ever  having  made  any  improvement  here.  His  home, 
however  was  in  Doddridge  county,  and  in  a  burying-ground 
on  Arnold's  creek  his  ashes  lie. 

He  twice  took  the  marriage  vow  but  the  names  of  his 
wives  are  missing ;  but  the  children  of  the  first  union  were  as 
follows:  Thomas,  Mann,  and  John  Dotson;  and  those  of  the 
second,  Jackson,  Elisha,  Joseph,  Michael,  Ruth   (Mrs.  James 


NORTH   PORK   SETTLERS— COXTIN LED  U3 

Cain),  Lizzie  (Mrs.  Johnson  Childers).  and  Stacy  (Mrs.  John 
Haggle). 

Elisha  Dotson  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812,  and  his 
wife  was  Miss  Nancy  Wineger.  Their  family  consisted  of 
t!ie  following  named  children:  Trvin  Dotson,  of  Rusk,  is  the 
only  survivor  of  the  family  and  he  is  now  seventy-four  years 
of  aee.  Richard,  who  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Deem,  was  the 
head  of  the  Pllizabeth  (Wirt  county)  family,  who  have,  since 
his  death,  removed  to  Parkersburg.  Albert  rests  in  Wood 
county;  Hiram,  on  Goose  creek;  Jackson,  in  Oregon;  Mary 
(Mrs.  John  Hustage,  and  Mahala  (Mrs.  John  Flemming), 
both  in  Wood  county;  and  Clarinda  (Mrs.  George  Elefritz), 
on  Goose  creek. 

David  Cox,  though  not  so  early  as  some  of  the  rest,  was 
Lhe  first  to  establish  a  home  on  the  head  of  Buck  run,  and 
John  Garner,  whose  history  has  already  been  given,  was 
another  pioneer  here. 

Mr.  Cox  was  a  native  of  Maryland,  but  Avith  his  father 
came  to  W^etzel  county  at  the  age  of  eighteen  A^-ears,  where  he 
engaged  in  farming  with  Presley  Martin  on  the  very  site 
where  New  Martinsville  now  stands.  At  the  age  of  twenty- 
six  years  he  claimed  Miss  Rachel  Hawkins  as  his  life  com- 
panion ;  and  in  1845,  they  came  to  Hughes'  river  and  settled 
on  the  William  Collins  farm  until  they  could  find  a  desirable 
location  for  a  permanent  home;  and  the  year  following  (1846) 
they  removed  to  Buck  run.  where  they  died  and  wliere  their 
heirs  still  hold  sway.  Their  remains  lie  in  the  Oak  Grove 
churchyard  on  their  old  homestead. 

Their  family  consisted  of  five  daughters  and  five  sons : 
Mrs.  Mary  Kloy,  Mrs.  Tiester  A.  Porter,  Mrs.  Nancy  M. 
Hawkins,  and  Caleb  H.  Cox  now  own  the  old  homestead. 
Jesse  died  in  Missouri  in  1870 ;  Edward  is  of  Oklahoma ;  James 
is  a  silver-smith  and  school-teacher,  of  Doddridge  county ; 
William,  who  formerly  wielded  the  birchen  rod,  and  later 
figured  as  a  minister  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  is 
now  a  successful  tiller  of  the  soil  in  the  Buckeye  state :  and 
of  the  rest  we  have  no  mention,  but  they  are  probably  dead. 

Caleb  H.  Cox  is  a  distinguished  pulpit  orator  of  the 
United  Brethren  church  in  Christ,  and  is  now  in  charge  of 
the  Valley  Mill  church  at  Waverly,  West  Virginia.     Pie  is  a 


116  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

'"six-fold"  graduate,  and  one  of  his  college  degrees  is  that  of 
Doctor  of  Divinity  from  the  Kansas  City  University. 

He  is  also  an  author  of  considerable  note — "The  Manual 
of  Theology,"  and  the  "History  of  the  West  Virginia  Annual 
Conference  of  the  United  Brethren  Church  in  Christ,"  being 
the  Avork  of  his  'pen.  He  has  written  a  number  of  sacred 
songs,  too,  among  which  are  "Stay  with  Me,  Lord,"  and  the 
"Silver  River." 

He  has  presented  fifteen  amendments  to  the  "Book  of 
Discipline"  of  his  church  before  the  General  conference,  thir- 
teen of  which  have  been  adopted;  has  served  as  secretary  of 
the  Conference  for  twenty-eight  years,  and  has  been  a  meni- 
ber  of  the  Minister's  Examining  committee  for  thirty-two 
3-ears. 

Gamaliel  Waldo  made  the  first  settlement  on  the  farm 
that  is  known  as  the  Flannagan  homestead  near  the  year  1815. 
Traces  of  his  old  cabin  vvhich  stood  only  a  few  liundred  vards 
from  the  present  W.  A.  Flannagan  residence,  are  still  visible. 

Mr.  Waldo  and  his  wife,  Nancy  Bartlett  Waldo,  came 
from  Harrison  county  and  remained  here  until  about  tlie  year 
1844,  when  they  removed  to  Indiana  witli  all  their  family, 
except  three  members  who  were  established  in  homes  of  their 
own,  and  there  they  saw  the  last  of  earth.  They  were  ad- 
herents of  the  Baptist  church  faith  and  Mr.  Waldo  was  the 
first  clerk  of  the  "Mab  Zeal"  Baptist  class  at  Harrisville  in 
1825. 

Their  children  were  as  follows :  Hickman,  Bartlett, 
Phipps,  John,  Zedediah,  Melinda.  Matilda,  Harriett.  Emily. 
Amy  and  Elizabeth  Waldo,  the  daughters  ha^'ing  all  married 
in  the  West. 

Hickman  Waldo,  who  married  Miss  Mary  AVilliams, 
daughter  of  Foster  and  Mrs.  Nellie  Pritchard  Williams,  of 
Doddridge  county,  remained  in  the  Tollgate  vicinity  until  he 
crossed  to  the  other  side ;  and  here,  on  the  Doddridge  county 
side,  some  of  his  children  still  live.  His  family  are:  John. 
Oscar,  Jasper,  James,  and  George,  of  Doddridge  county :  Syl- 
vester and  Francis,  of  Fairmont ;  Newton,  of  Colorado :  and 
Grant  died  in  youth.  His  daughters  are  Mrs.  Susan  (John 
W.)    Debrular,   of  Holbrook ;   Mrs.   Alice    (Joseph)    Ankruni, 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  147 

Fairmont;  and  Mrs.  Sarah  (Wilford)  Collins,  Ohio. 

■  Bartlett  Waldo  was  married  to  Miss  Jane  Gray,  daughter 
of  James  Gray,  of  Oxford,  and  spent  his  life  in  Doddridge 
county.  His  children  were  Arthur,  Sarah,  the  late  Mrs.  Eliza- 
beth (Christopher)  Lipscomb,  of  Clarksburg;  Mrs.  Emily 
Norris,  Wetzel  county;  Thomas  Waldo,  of  Grantsville;  and 
Miss  Victoria  W"aldo,  of  Clarksburg. 

The  Taylors. — Eli  Taylor  was  the  head  of  another  old 
and  worthy  Clay  district  family. 

He  was  descended  from  English  (or  Irish)  emigrants, 
who  crossed  to  the  Western  world  in  Colonial  times  and  set- 
tled in  New  Hampshire.  The  time  of  their  coming  is  not  de- 
finitely known,  but  it  is  probable  that  his  grandsire,  Daniel 
Taylor,  was  among  the  first  to  cross.  HoAvever  this  may  be, 
our  history  begins  with  Daniel  Taylor,  who  married  Miss 
Sarah  Larue  for  his  second  wife,  and  migrated  from  the 
"Hampshire  hills"  to  what  is  now  Hampshire  county,  West 
Virginia,  where  he  established  a  permanent  home,  and  reared 
a  family;  and  from  his  two  sons,  Eli  and  John  Taylor,  quite 
a  number  of  the  citizens  of  this  part  of  the  county  are  de- 
scended. 

Eli  Taylor  was  born  in  Hampshire  county  in  1813,  and 
his  wife,  Mary  Sigler  (born  1812)  was  a  native  of  Allegheny 
county,  Maryland. 

They  were  married  on  May  16,  1833  ;  and  in  184:1  they 
removed  to  this  county,  and  settled  near  Tollgate,  where  their 
son,  Silas  J.  Taylor,  now  resides.  Here  death  closed  his  eyes 
in  1855,  but  Mrs.  Taylor  survived  until  1876,  when  she  was 
laid  by  his  side  in  the  Tollgate  cemetery. 

Their  children  were  seven  in  number,  viz.,  John  William 
(1834-1847),  Aseneth  Ellen  (1836-1861  unmarried),  Phillip 
(1839-1834),  who  died  at  Clarksburg,  where  he  sleeps,  (from 
smallpox)  while  serving  as  a  Union  soldier;  Dan'iel  E. 
(1841—),  lives  in  Texas;  Sarah  Martha  (1843-54),  Silas  J. 
(1845),  of  Tollgate;  and  Eli  Griffin,  (1849)  who  was  formerly 
a  teacher  of  this  county,  is  now  of  Morgantown.  lie  (Griffin 
Taylor)  was  married  in  1880  to  Miss  Camora  Barcus.  of  In- 
diana. 

Silas  J.  Ta3dor,  who  still  occupies  the  old  home,  where 
he   was  born   sixty-five  years  ago,   is   one  of  the   substantia! 


148  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

citizens  of  this  community.  He  is  a  successful  tiller  of  the 
soil,  and  was  at  one  time  a  member  of  the  honorable  County 
court. 

On  Januar}^  1,  186T,  he  deserted  single  life  when  he 
claimed  Miss  Eleanor  Cathrine  Collins,  daughter  of  William 
Collins,  as  his  bride  ;  and  the  five  children  born  of  this  union 
are  as  follows  : 

Vida  A.  is  Mrs.  A.  J.  Zinn,  of  Tollgate ;  and  William  C. 
and  Otha  R.  are  business  men  of  this  town ;  Miss  Faye  is  at 
home;  and  Silas  Reuben  lives  in  Wirt  county. 

John  Taylor,  the  elder  brother  of  Eli,  was  born  in  Hamp- 
shire county  in  1810,  and  there  in  1832,  he  was  married  to 
Aliss  Deborah  Monroe,  who  was  also -born  in  Hampshire 
county  of  Scotch  parentage ;  and  on  October  18,  1833,  twins 
were  born  of  this  union — a  son  and  a  daughter;  and  four  days 
after  the  birth  of  these  children  the  young  mother  was  borne 
to  her  final  resting  place. 

The  daughter,  Mary  E.  Taylor,  grew  to  womanhood  and 
married  Mr.  Cornwell,  and  she  is  the  venerable  mother  of 
Hon.  J-  J-  Cornwell,  the  noted  lawyer  and  politician,  of  Rom- 
ney. 

The  son,  John  Monroe  I'aylor,  remained  in  his  native 
county  until  he  had  reached  the  age  of  eighteen  years,  when 
he  went  to  Bridgeport,  in  Harrison  county.  There  he  met 
and  married  Miss  Huldah  Pool,  daughter  of  Thomas  Pool,  a 
descendant  of  the  Waldos  and  Gofifs,  of  Harrison  county,  and 
from  there  they  removed  to  Tollgate  in  the  ante-bellum  days. 

At  the  breaking  out  of  the  Civil  war,  Mr.  Ta3'lor  joined 
the  "Home  Guards,"  and  while  on  duty  at  the  Baltimore  and 
Ohio  railroad  bridge,  contracted  typhoid  fever,  which  finall)' 
resulted  in  his  death  thirty  years  later.  In  February,  189:2, 
he  sufifered  a  slight  injury  to  the  limb  that  had  been  affected 
by  the  fever  during  his  military  service,  and  his  wife  was  the 
victim  of  an  attack  of  la  grippe,  and  both  began  to  decline; 
and  on  a  beautiful  Sunday  in  May  (1,  1892)  they  both  passed 
into  the  land  of  eternal  day.  He  preceded  her  by  one  brief 
hour,  and  both  lie  at  rest  in  one  grave  in  the  Gnat's  run  ceme- 
tery. 

They  were  the  parents  of  six  children :  Ira  Taylor  is 
one  of  the  oldest  and  most  successful  teachers  of  the  county ; 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  149 

Thomas  \\'.,  and  J.  Hammond  are  also  of  this  county;  Albert 
is  of  Alorg-antown  ;  and  Anna  T.  (Mrs.  Taylor),  and  Vietta 
(Mrs.  Flanagan),  ixith  of  Mineral  county. 

The  Lantzes. — The  venerable  Jacob  Lantz,  who  is,  per- 
haps, at  this  time,  the  oldest  resident  of  the  county,  has  been 
identitied  with  the  citizenship  of  this  river  for  more  than 
seventy  years. 

He  was  born  at  Blacksville,  West  Virginia,  on  August 
22,  1814;  and  there  his  parents,  John  and  Elizabeth  Bonnett 
Lantz,  spent  their  lives.  On  December  8,  1836,  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Minerva  Miner,  of  Blacksville,  and  two  years 
later,  they  came  to  this  county  and  settled  on  the  "Simon 
Lantz  farm"  (now  owned  by  ex-Sheriff  Okey  E.  Nutter)  ;  and 
from  here,  in  1863,  he  removed  to  Mole  Hill,  where  he  still 
survives. 

Mrs.  Lantz  died  on  March  2,  1860,  and  was  laid  at  rest 
in  the  Mole  Hill  cemetery.  And  on  April  14,  1861,  Mr.  Lantz 
was  again  married  to  Mrs.  Lettie  Smith  Jones,  daughter  of 
Isaac  Smith,  of  Tyler  county,  and  widow  of  James  Jones; 
but  on  March  3,  1906,  Death  laid  his  icy  hand  upon  her,  and 
slie,  too,  rests  in  the  Mole  Hill  cemetery.  His  granddaughter, 
Miss  Lettie  Marsh,  now  lives  with  him. 

The  children  of  his  first  marriage  were  five  in  number, 
and  were  as  follows : 

John  Lantz,  born  November  23,  1837,  and  died  on  Febru- 
ary 10,  1861. 

Simon  Miner,  born  October  26,  1839,  and  died  on  January 
10,  1863. 

Louisa,  born  June  25,  1841.  and  in  1860,  married  Lycur- 
gus  Hill,  and  died  at  her  home  in  Tyler  county  on  October  30, 
1903.  She  was  the  mother  of  ex-Sheriff"  B.  F.  Hill ;  and  ex- 
Senator  T.  P.  Hill. 

Emeline  Lantz,  born  on  February  16,  1843.  married  Peter 
Stuart,  on  August  27,  1865,  and  resides  at  Mole  Hill. 

Allison  Price  Lantz,  born  on  May  16,  1848,  married  Miss 
Lina  LTaymond.  on  October  24,  1869,  and  died  at  his  home  at 
Mole  Hill  on  April  20,  1870. 

The  children  of  the  second  union  are  Minerva  A.,  the 
wife  of  Reeves  Haymond;  and  Ida  Lantz.  wife  of  John  R. 
Maish.  both  of  Mole  Hill. 


150  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

The  Cunninghams. — Though  not  pioneers,  the  families 
of  Joseph  and  James  Larkin  Cunningham  liave  long  been 
identified  with  the  leading  citizens  of  this  part  of  the  county. 
These  brothers  were  the  sons  of  John  and  Sarah  King  Cun- 
ningham, and  from  Marion  county  they  came  during  the 
spring  of  1857. 

Joseph  Cunningham  and  his  wife,  Luvina  ^^IcCray,  set- 
tled on  the  Lewis  Bond  farm  on  Gnat's  run,  where  their  son 
now  lives.  Here  he  passed  from  earth  during  the  summer  of 
1890,  and  his  venerable  widow  survived  until  February  10, 
1904.  Both  rest  in  the  family  burying-ground  on  the  old 
homestead. 

Their  children  were  as  follows:  Harriet  (Mrs.  L.  S.  Sill, 
Pennsboro)  ;  Rebecca  (Mrs.  D.  M.  Hayhurst,  Beech  Grove)  ; 
Jane  (Mrs.  \\\  A.  Duckworth,  Duckworth  Summit)  ;  Ang- 
elina (widow  of  Jefiferson  Marsh,  of  Harrisville)  ;  Sarah  (I\Irs. 
A\'.  A\'.  Collins,  Pennsboro)  ;  Mary  (Mrs.  D.  Z.  Taylor,  Hamp- 
shire county)  :  Ellen  (unmarried),  who,  with  her  brother, 
Robert,  resides  at  the  old  home  ;  the  late  Andrew,  of  Okla- 
homa:  Joseph  H.  B.,  of  Mole  Hill;  and  the  late  James  Frank- 
lin, whose  family  now  live  at  Huntington. 

Jay  E.  Cunningham,  of  Pennsboro,  wdio  is  so  well  known 
in  Prohibition  circles ;  J.  Frank  Marsh,  Harvey  Marsh,  and 
numerous  other  prominent  young  people  that  might  be  men- 
tioned, are  the  grandchildren  of  Joseph  Cunningl]am. 

James  Larkin  Cunningham  was  married  to  Miss  Eliza- 
betli  Fox  (sister  of  E.  C.  Fox,  of  Harrisville),  on  January  16, 
1815,  who  was  born  in  Greene  county,  Pennsylvania,  un 
December  23,  1831,  and  on  their  arrival  in  this  county,  they 
established  their  home  near  Beech  Grove,  where  their  son, 
D.  B.  Cunningham,  now  resides.  Here  ~Slr.  Cunriingham  died 
in  March,  1888,  and  Mrs.  Cunningham  joined  him  on  the  other 
side  on  October  1,  1909. 

They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  naiiied  sons  and 
daughters:  D.  B.,  who  was  long  a  teacher  in  this  county. 
v.ath  his  lister,  Mrs.  ElizaDeth  Smith,  resides  at  the  old  home ; 
G.  Fillmore  met  a  tragic  death  by  drowning  in  the  South  fork 
of  Hughes'  river  not  far  from  his  home,  at  Flazelgreen,  near 
twelve  years  ago;'. A..  S.   is  of  Beech  Grove;  Eli,  of  Illinois; 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLERS—COXTIXUED  151 

I\Irs.  Lyda  Whitehill,  of  Parkersburg ;  Edith  married  Devvit 
Richardson,  and  after  her  death  at  her  home  in  Athens  coun- 
ty, Ohio,  her  sister,  Mary,  became  the  wife  of  Mr.  Richardson, 
and  they  reside  in  Ohio  still. 

John  Cunningham,  another  brother  of  Joseph  and  James 
Larkin,  and  his  wife,  who  was  Mjss  Mahala  McCray,  sister 
of  I\Irs.  Joseph  Cunningham,  were  also  residents  of  Gnat's 
run,  but  they  died  childless. 

While  the  connection  has  not  been  established  between 
this  family  and  the  older  pioneer  families  of  this  name  in  the 
county,  there  is  but  little  doubt  that  they  are  a  collateral 
branch  of  the  same  race. 

David  Allen  McGinnis,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was 
born  in  Cabell  county,  on  October  1,  1823  ;  and,  there,  on  a 
farm  and  in  his  father's  store,  the  days  of  his  boyhood  were 
principally  spent.  He  early  developed  a  fondness  for  books, 
and  was  a  student  of  Marshall  college  in  its  academic  days. 
At  the  age  of  seventeen  years,  he  entered  the  profession  of 
teaching  (first  in  W^ayne  county),  and  thus  continued  for  a 
number  of  years.  Being  naturally  of  a  religious  turn  of  mind, 
lie  united  with  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  at  the  age  of 
thirteen  years,  and,  on  August  17,  1844,  was  licensed  to 
preach  the  gospel ;  and  at  once  entered  the  field  of  the  itiner- 
ancy, where  he  continued  his  labors  for  seven  years — luitil 
his  failing  health  compelled  him  to  take  a  local  relation  with 
the  conference. 

He  was  a  man  of  pronounced  views  and  of  a  deeply  relig- 
ious character,  and  the  influence  of  this  character  has  left  its 
impress  upon  his  descendants,  who  ever  stand  for  something 
in  the  communities  where  they  reside. 

On  October  8,  1849,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  Jane 
Marsh,  daughter  of  Enoch  Marsh,  who  was  also  a  teacher 
and  a  woman  of  high.  Christian  character;  and  the  following 
year  they  came  to  this  county,  and  settled  at  Mole  Hill,  where 
his  life  came  to  a  peaceful  close,  on  Sunday,  May  17,  1896. 
Mrs.  McGinnis  was  borne  to  the  family  burying-ground  on 
the  old  Marsh  homestead  at  Tollgate,  in  November,  1876,  and 
after  her  death  he  was  married  to  Miss  Nancy  Hammett,  of 
Wood  county.    His  body  rests  in  the  Mole  Hill  cemetery. 


152  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUXTV 

He  was  the  father  of  twelve  children — all  of  the  first 
union:  viz.,  P.  M.  ]\IcGinnis,  Donahue;  Asbury  H.,  TA'ler 
county  ;  Enoch  M.,  Texas  :  John  H.,  Gofif's ;  Sarnantha,  who 
first  married  Warren  Cophn.  is  now  Airs.  Aaron  Younge,  of 
Wirt  county  ;  ]\Iary  Anne  is  Airs.  Isaac  Lambert,  of  Ellen- 
boro ;  Alelcena  J.,  the  wife  of  Dr.  A.  S.  Grimm,  of  St.  Alary's; 
Clarinda,  Airs.  Francis  AlcCullough,  of  Alole  Hill;  Sarah,  the 
late  Airs.  Leonard  Doak,  of  Harrisville;  Armedia,  the  late 
Airs.  John  Britton.  of  Alole  Hill ;  Eliza  J.,  and  Lina,  Avho  both 
died  in  youth,  rest  in  the  Alole  Hill  cemetery.  Eliza  died  in 
1885,  and  Lina,  the  following  year.  This  family  figured 
prominently  among  the  teachers  of  former  years,  five  mem- 
bers being  thus  identified. 

Clerk  H.  E.  AIcGinnis,  of  the  Circuit  court,  is  the  grand- 
son of  David  A.  AIcGinnis,  he  being  the  eldest  son  of  P.  AI. 
AIcGinnis. 

McGinnis  Ancestry. — This  family  is  of  Irish-AIalesian 
origin  and  its  history  dates  back  so  far  that  it  has  almost  be- 
come lost  in  the  "haze  of  antiquity."'  But  the  authentic  his- 
tory, however,  begins  with  the  year  1000. 

The  name  comes  from  two  Irish  words — "Alag,"  meaning 
son,  and  ''Agensha,"  meaning  great  strength,  and  from  these 
two  ancient  words,  its  various  spellings,  "AIcGennes,"  '"AIc- 
Ginnis," "Alagennis,"  etc.,  originated. 

The  family  migrated  from  the  Xorth  of  Ireland  to  the 
Western  A\'orld — from  County  Down  of  Ulster,  where  they 
were  a  powerful  clan  in  early  times,  and  the  "Red  Hand  of 
Ulster"  is  on  their  coat-of-arms.  They,  with  their  rivals,  the 
O'Neills,  ruled  the  province  of  Ulster  until  the  coming  of  the 
English,  in  1600,  when  many  of  them  left  their  homes,  going 
to  foreign  lands — some  to  the  Highlands  of  Scotland,  and 
some  to  other  climes.  But  the  first  record  we  have  of  the 
family  in  the  Occident  is  near  the  year  1700,  when  some  of 
them  entered  the  Indian  w^ars  in  the  New  England  colonies. 

Captain  AIcGinnis.  commander  of  a  company  of  New 
Hampshire  troops,  routed  the  French  at  Rock}^  Brook,  near 
Lake  George,  in  1755,  and  w^as  killed  a  little  later  by  a  spent 
ball,  but  he  was  unmarried.  Soon  after  this,  several  families 
of  the  name  settled  at  Philadelphia,  and  from  them  the  Ale- 


NORTH  FORK   SETTLERS— COS TI\U ED  153 

Ginnises  of  Kentucky,  Virginia  and  West  Virginia  come. 
They  are  to-day  very  numerous  throughout  the  Union,  the 
entire  number  being  estimated  at  two  thousand  five  hundred, 
but  Pennsylvania  claims  the  larger  share. 

The  Rev.  Edmund  McGinnis,  who  was  born  in  Cabell 
county  (West)  Virginia,  on  November  25,  1798,  and  with  his 
parents  removed  to  Guyandotte,  in  Cabell  county,  in  1811, 
was  the  progenitor  of  the  Ritchie  county  family.  He,  too, 
was  a  zealous  worker  in  his  Master's  vineyard.  He,  havmg 
been  converted  at  the  age  of  seventeen  years,  was  licensed  to 
preach  in  1827. 

On  June  12,  1821,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  Hough- 
land,  of  Washington  county,  Ohio,  who  was  a  relative  of 
George  Washington,  Eli  Whitney  and  Robert  Fulton.  He 
removed  to  Texas  late  in  life  and  there  passed  away  in  the 
"full  triumphs  of  faith"  on  June  9,  1865. 

He  delivered  his  last  sermon  on  March  fifth  and.  while 
thiis  engaged,  was  seized  with  the  fatal  illness,  which  con- 
tinued until  June,  as  above  stated.  His  wife  died  on  July  0. 
1S7(),  and  by  his  side  she  sleeps.  They  were  the  parents  of 
ten  children,  all  of  whom  have  crossed  the  tide — six  preceded 
him  home:  Among  them  were  David  \.  McGinnis,  wdio  lived 
and  died  at  Mole  Hill ;  Oliver  A.,  Milville,  and  Fletcher,  and 
Mrs.  Melcena  Beurhing,  who  all  went  to  Texas ;  and  Mrs. 
Mary  Johnson,  who  sleeps  at  Huntington. 

The  Rev.  F.  AI.  Malcolm,  of  the  West  Virginia  M.  E. 
Conference,  is  descended  from  this  family,  he  being  a  son  of 
A-Irs.  Virginia  McGinnis  Malcolm,  and  the  grandson  of  Col. 
John  McGinnis,  of  Cabell  county. 

To  Herbert  P.  McGinnis,  brother  of  Clerk  H.  E.  AIcGin- 
nis,  we  owe  our  thanks  for  this  valuable  sketch.  He  having 
gleaned  it  from  a  publislicd  record  of  the  family. 

Abraham  Cline  was  a  very  early  settler  on  Avhat  Avas 
locally  known  as  "Dry  Ridge,"  not  far  from  the  Pleasants 
county  line,  but  he  changed  his  place  of  residence  to  High- 
land about  the  year  1822,  where  he  kept  a  house  of  pul:)lic 
entertainment,  for  a  time,  and  here  our  information  concern- 
ing his  history  ends,  though  it  is  quite  probable  that  he  has 
descendants  in  this  county.     His  daughter,  Polly,  who  is  said 


154  HISTORY   or  RITCHIE   COUXTV 

to  have  been  the  first  white  child  born  on  this  side  ot  the 
Bhie  Ridge  mountains,  became  the  wife  of  John  Douglass  and 
went  West.  This  pioneer  was  of  German  origin,  and  was  the 
son  of  William  Cline,  senior,  who  made  the  first  improve- 
ment where  the  little  town  of  Smithville  now  stands,  and  who 
afterwards  removed  to  near  Gallipolis,  Ohio,  where  he  prol)- 
abiy  found  a  resting  place. 

One  of  the  Clines  is  said  to  have  killed  the  last  Indian 
that  met  his  death  at  the  hands  of  a  white  man  in  this  section 
of  West  Virginia,  he  having  shot  the  intruder  while  he  was 
attempting  to  steal  his  horse. 

William  Cline,  junior,  brother  of  Abraham,  was  married 
to  Aliss  Epha  Marsh,  daughter  of  James  Marsh,  and  after  a 
brief  residence  near  Gallipolis,  Ohio,  removed  to  Middle 
Island  creek,  Doddridge  county  ;  and  from  there,  to  Tollgate, 
this  county,  where  he  died  and  where  he  lies  buried.  He  left 
two  children,  Eli,  aged  twelve,  and  Eleanor,  aged  eight  years : 
and  after  his  death  his  widow  married  Notley  G.  Willis,  and 
one  son,  N.  G.  Willis,  of  Mole  Hill,  was  the  result  of  this 
union.  (For  farther  history  of  Cline  descendants  see  Hay- 
mond  history.) 

Eleanor  Cline  became  the  wife  of  William  C.  Haymond, 
and  has  a  long  line  of  descendants  in  this  county. 

Eli  Cline,  who  first  married  Miss  Frances  Collins,  daugh- 
ter of  Jacob,  and  afterwards,  Mrs.  Bradford  (widow  of  Jacob 
Bradford),  died  at  Pennsboro  near  the  year  19()0.  For  the 
children  of  the  first  marriage,  see  Collins  history,  and  of  the 
three  sons  born  of  the  second  union,  William  alone  grew  to 
the  years  of  maturity. 

CORNWALLIS  SETTLED. 

Jesse  C.  Lowther  (son  of  Thomas  and  grandson  of  Col. 
William),  was  the  first  to  break  the  forest  at  Cornwallis.  He 
came  from  his  native  county — Harrison,  and  married,  Phebe. 
the  daughter  of  William  Cunningham,  of  Revolutionaiy  fame, 
in  1811,  and  settled  on  the  "Horner  farm,"  on  the  Harrisville- 
Cornwallis  road,  the  following  year.  He  later  purchased  an 
additional  tract  of  land  at  the  mouth  of  Bear  nui,  and  built  a 
cabin  on  the  site  that  is  now  marked  by  the  Naughton  resi- 
dence; and  here  he  died  in  1842  at  the  age  of  fifty  years,  and 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  155 

in  the  Pioneer  burying-ground  at  Harrisville,  beside  his  wife, 
he  rests. 

He  and  his  wife  were  the  parents  of  twelve  children : 
VVm.  H.  Lowther,  who  rests  in  UHnois  ;  John  G.  J.,  of  Corn- 
wallis ;  Margaret,  who  first  married  a  Cunningham,  and  later, 
Ichabod  Kirkpatrick ;  Lydia,  was  the  late  Mrs.  John  Elliott, 
and  Barbara,  the  late  Mrs.  Jacob  Elliott;  Jane  married  \Xm. 
Hardman,  and  went  to  Nebraska;  Mary  Ann  Avas  the  late 
Mrs.  G.  W.  Hardman,  of  this  county;  and  Matilda,  the  only 
survivor  of  the  family  (who  first  married  Maxwell  Lowther, 
of  Cairo),  is  now  the  widow  of  the  late  David  McGregor,  of 
Cairo.    The  rest  died  in  youth. 

Wolvertcn.— A  man  by  the  name  of  Wolverton  built  the 
second  cabin  at  Cornwallis.  Then  in  1840  came  William  Cun- 
ningham (whose  interesting  history  occupies  a  place  in  an 
earlier  chapter),  from  Harrisville,  and  purchased  near  one 
thousand  tv/o  hundred  fifty  acres  at  the  mouth  of  Bond's 
creek,  which  is  now  divided  up  into  several  farms,  and  erected 
his  humble  dwelling  near  the  present  site  of  the  Roland  resi- 
dence. 

John  G.  Skelton  and  George  Wells  were  the  other  early 
settlers  in  this  section. 

John  G.  Skelton  (a  deaf  mute)  was  the  son  of  Edward 
Skelton,  an  English  pioneer  of  the  Harrisville  vicinity.  And 
his  wife,  Miss  Prudence  Chidester.  was  also  a  deaf  mute. 
They  went  from  here  to  Cairo,  and  from  there  to  Illinois, 
where  they  both  lie  at  rest  in  the  Litchfield  cemetery. 

They  had  three  daughters  and  two  sons,  all  of  whom 
could  hear  and  talk.  Kathrine,  the  eldest  daughter,  married 
at  Litchfield,  and  there  perhaps  the  descendants  of  the  family 
live. 

George  Wells  is  still  a  resident  of  this  community,  though 
helpless  from  the  weight  of  years  and  ill-health.  He  is  the 
son  of  the  late  Isaiah  Wells,  of  the  Ilarrisville  vicinity,  and  a 
native  and  life-long  resident  of  this  county.  His  natal  day 
was  August  31,  1S34;  and  he  came  to  Cornwallis  in  1858, 
shortly  after  his  marriage  to  Miss  Barbara  Hardman,  daugh- 
ter of  the  late  Rev.  James  Hardman,  of  Hardman  chapel ;  and 
erected  the  first  mill  in  this  section,  that  same  year ;  and  con- 
tinued to  operate  it  until  1875,  when  its  wheels  became  silent, 


156  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUXTV 

and  its  pulses  refused  to  beat.  Here  in  1S71,  the  wife  of  his 
youth  passed  from  sight,  and  in  18?5,  he  was  married  to  Miss 
Virginia  Dilworth,  daughter  of  Asa  Dilworth,  and  niece  of 
his  first  wife,  who  is  the  companion  and  stafl:  of  his  "decHning 
years." 

l"he  children  of  his  first  marriage  are  Mrs.  Jennie  Xew- 
land,  of  Boreland ;  Mrs.  C.  A.  Kearns,  Rusk ;  Tip  Wells, 
Cairo  ;  C.  L.  Wells,  Grafton  ;  and  Edw^ard,  Harrisville. 

The  children  of  the  second  union  are  two  sons :  C.  C.  and 
Bert,  both  of  Cornwallis. 

SILVER  RUN. 

"Little  streamlet  fair  and  free 
Sing  your  song — so  sweet  to  me! 
Of  your  onward  rushings  to  the  far  off  sea; 
'Cause  I  love  your  bonnie  dankg. 
Silver  streamlet — take  my  thanks! 

^  ^  ^  ^  ^  :;: 

"Fair  Stream  of  Silver  run, 
Lightly  laughing  playful  run 
From  the  snowlands  to  the  southern  sun; 
Let  the  shine  of  silvered  sands, 
Glinting,  glean  upon  my  hands. 
In  remembrance — fairest  lands!" 

HERBERT  P.  :\rGINNIS. 

"Silver  Run"  is  but  a  mere  speck  on  the  map,  "a  flag 
station,  a  by-place  of  the  county,  and  of  the  State — an  un- 
known corner  of  the  v/orld,"  a  stream  three  niiles  in  length, 
yet  with  all  its  insignificance,  it  has  a  history  worthy  of 
record,  a  place  in  our  sonnets  :  it  ha^  ing  inspired  the  pretty 
lines  above  quoted  from  the  pen  of  our  Box'-Poet,  who  is  one 
of  its  most  familiar  friends. 

It  is  supposed  to  have  been  settled  near  the  year  I80O  b}- 
some  unknown  Nimrod,  who  dug  his  cave  in  a  hill,  but  its 
first  permanent  settlement  was  made  by  Mr.  Campbell,  who 
came  from  Baltimore  in  the  ante-bellum  days  and  improved 
the  fine  farm  that  is  now  owned  by  his  son,  William  Camp- 
bell. Other  Irish  families  arrived  later,  principally  from  the 
I  '  East,  and  finding  work  on  the  railroad  and  in  the  timber  in- 
dustry, a  colony  was  soon  formed.  The  community  is  still 
distinctively  Irish,  and  among  these  families  are  the  Camp- 
bells, the  Donohues,  the  McTights,  the  McGinnises,  and  others 
that  might  be  mentioned.     A  German  familv  bv  the  name  of 


I 


NORTH  FORK  SETTLERS— CONTINUED  157 

Alink  was  also  among  the  earlier  settlers,  they  having  come 
from  the  Fatherland  during  the  first  years  of  the  Civil  war. 

The  name  of  the  stream  originated  about  the  year  1857, 
while  the  railroad  tunnel  was  being  arched,  when  something 
that  resembled  silver  was  unearthed. 

P.  M.  McGinnis,  who  now  owns  the  Hall  lands,  settled 
here  near  1876,  and  Avas  instrumental  in  securing  the  first 
regular  station  at  this  point;  and  erected  the  first  real  store- 
house in  which  B.  F.  Hill,  of  Tyler  county,  later  Sheriff  of 
this  county,  opened  a  general  store.  The  post-office  uiider 
the  name  of  "Donohue"  came  in  the  eighties,  and  near  this 
time  a  more  modern  store  building  was  erected. 

"Silver  Run"  w-as  now  a  central  lumber  shipping  point 
for  Goose  creek  and  Sheep  run,  and  tram  roads  extended  for 
eight  or  ten  miles  back  into  the  wilderness.  Oil  seekers  had 
already  been  prospecting  on  the  Hall  (McGinnis)  lands,  but 
this  fluid  was  not  found  in  paying  quantities  until  much  later. 

Speakeasies  flourished  in  an  early  day,  and  one  old  Irish 
lady(?)  became  quite  familiar  with  the  scenes  at  the  jail  and 
the  court  house  at  the  County  seat,  but  these  times  have  long 
since  past,  and  the  community  is  now  quiet  and  law-abiding. 

The  Catholics,  "ever  loyal  and  hardworking  people,"  con- 
structed a  log  church  on  "'Tunnel  hill"  in  early  days,  but  a 
modern  structure,  the  largest  of  this  denomination  in  the 
county,  now  adorns  the  site.  Here,  in  this  churchyard,  the 
first  graves  of  the  community  were  hollowed  out,  and  the 
dates  on  the  stones  show  that  some  were  laid  here  in  the  fifties 
and  others  during  the  dark  days  of  the  Civil  war. 

The  Silver  Run  of  to-day  is  a  paying  oil-center.  Its 
entire  population,  including  oil-field  laborers,  section  hands 
and  residents  is  not  more  than  two  hundred,  and  the  little 
hamlet-station  consists  of  three  dwellings,  a  store-house,  a 
blacksmith-shop,  a  telegraph  office,  a  school-house,  and  a 
platform.  Here  our  boy-poet-author-editor,  to  whom  we  are 
indebted  for  this  sketch,  lives ;  and  here  his  print-shop  is 
located;  and  it  is  not  at  all  unlikely  that  in  the  time  we  call 
some  day,  that  this  little  corner  of  the  universe  will  be  dis- 
tinguished as  the  birthplace  of  a  modern  Longfellow  or  Bay- 
ard Taylor. 


158  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Rusk. — Isaac  Nutter,  as  stated  in  an  earlier  chapter,  was 
the  first  settler  at  Rusk,  his  old  cabin  having  stood  on  the 
farm  that  is  now  owned  by  W .  J.  Moats.  And  the  next 
notable  landmark  here  was  the  old  Pribble  mill,  which  came 
upon  the  stage  as  early  as  1839,  with  Daniel  Pribble  as 
builder  and  operator,  but  the  wheels  of  this  old  mill  ceased 
to  turn  before  its  owner  crossed  to  the  other  side,  and  the  site 
is  now  marked  by  the  Moats'  mill,  which  was  built  by  the 
late  William  Meredith,  father  of  the  Rev.  Thomas  Meredith, 
of  the  West  Virginia  Methodist  Episcopal  conference,  per- 
haps, thirty-five  years  ago.  But  Mr.  Moats  has  been  the 
owner  and  proprietor  for  the  past  quarter  of  a  century,  and 
during  the  year  1909,  he  rebuilt  and  enlarged  this  mill,  and 
added  his  store  to  the  structure. 

The  Pribbles. — Our  information  concerning  Daniel  Prib- 
ble is  very  meager,  but  he  was  a  native  of  Greene  county, 
Pennsylvania,  and  removed  from  there  to  Wirt  county  before 
coming  to  this  commimity,  where  he  died.  He  married  Aliss 
Amanda  Melvina  Jackson,  sister  of  Henry  Jackson,  and  was 
the  father  of  several  children,  whose  names  are  missing. 

His  brother,  Hugh  Pribble,  senior,  who  married  Miss 
Permilia  Elizabeth  Jackson,  another  sister  of  Henry,  was  also 
an  early  settler  here.  He  was  the  father  of  Hugh  Pribble.  of 
Cisko  ;  the  Rev.  U.  Pribble,  of  Harrisville  ;  Mrs.  Herilda  Hall, 
of  Washington  state ;  the  late  Mrs.  Charles  Harrison,  senior, 
of  Cantwell ;  the  late  Mrs.  Henrietta  Mason,  and  other  chil- 
dren. 

The  hamlet  of  Rusk,  which  is  little  more  than  a  thickly 
settled  community,  came  into  existence  near  the  year  ISSO, 
when  the  post-office  v/as  established.  It  was  named  in  honor 
of  the  maiden  name  of  the  late  Mrs.  Charles  Levv'is,  her  name 
being  spelled  "Russ." 

Frank  Davis,  son-in-law  of  Mr.  Meredith,  erected  the  first 
dwelling,  and  was  the  first  merchant  and  post-master.  The 
first  school-house  stood  on  the  farm  of  C.  A.  Kearns.  There 
are  now  six  or  seven  residences  close  enough  together  to 
resemble  a  hamlet,  two  stores,  a  mill,  one  church  (M.  P.).  a 
school-house,  blacksmith-shop,  and  no  post-office,  as  the  rural 
route  has  swallowed  it  up.  J.  W.  Heck  is  the  other  merchant,, 
besides  Mr.  Moats,  and  he  is  also  the  telephone  operator. 


^arrpb  tn  tljf  iipmnry 


of 


tUtam  mh 


Jrattr^fi  f  tatt  ii'2Ctntt^g 


Time  conquers  all,  and  we  must  time  obey. 

— Pope. 

And,  oh!  the  crowning  joy  of  life, 

Where'er  that  life  may  be, 
Is  the  true  heart  that  through  all  strife 

Still  living,  trusts  in  me. 

— Donn  Piatt. 


CHAPTER  X 


First  Settlers  In  the  Cairo  Vicinity 

HE  first  settlers  in  the  Cairo  vicinity  were, 
Isaac,  Levi,  John,  and  Thomas  Nutter — ■ 
four  brothers,  and  Richard  Gilhspie,  who, 
early  in  the  century,  took  up  their  abode  at 
the  mouth  of  Addis'  run  ;^  but  they,  having 
no  title  for  the  land,  were  only  teniporar}'' 
settlers,  and,  at  the  coming  of  W^illiani  ]\Ic- 
Kinney,  in  1818,  they  found  homes  elsewhere. 

Richard  Gillispie,  being  compelled  to  flee  from  the  indig- 
nation of  his  neighbors,  owing  to  a  difficulty  which  had  arisen 
over  the  killing  of  a  cow,  had  sought  refuge  on  the  stream 
that  bears  his  name — "Gillispie's  run,"  before  the  coming  of 
the  McKinneys  ;  but  tlie  Nutter  Brothers  remained  here  until 
that  time. 

The  Nutters. — This  family  of  Nutters,  like  the  ones  of 
Oxford  and  Holbrook,  were  descended  from  the  traditional 
four  brothers,  that  came  from  England  and  settled  in  Harrison 
county  in  Colonial  times. 

Isaac  Nutter  married  Miss  Elizabeth  \A  ebb.  who  Vv-as, 
perhaps,  the  sister  of  Nutter  Webb,  of  Webb's  mill,  and  after 
leaving  Addis'  run,  made  the  first  scttlem.ent  where  the  vil- 
lage of  Rusk  now  stands ;  and  in  1844,  having  lived  at  dififerent 
other  points  in  the  meantime,  he  removed  to  the  farm  just 
below  the  mouth  of  Gillispie's  run,  and  from  here,  in  185(i, 
went  to  Indiana,  where  he  fell  asleep. 

He  was  the  father  of  several  children,  and  not  a  few  of 
his  descendants  are  still  citizens  of  this  county. 

Margaret,  the  eldest  daughter,  married  Jesse  Cain,  of 
Rusk,  and  was  the  mother  of  E.  A.  Cain,  and  Siotha  Cain,  of 


^This  stream    took   its  name   from   a   man   by   the   name   of  Addis,    who 
owned  tlie  land  here  at  the  time  of  the  arrival  of  the  Xuttery. 


FIRST   SETTLERS   LX    THE   CAIRO    HCIXITV  161 

Rusk;  J.  W.  Cain,  of  Harrisville — the  County  surveyor; 
Frank  Cain,  of  Ellenboro ;  and  Mrs.  Simon  Tenant,  of  Petro- 
leum. 

John  Nutter,  the  eldest  son,  went  to  Indiana  ;  Matthew, 
to  Missouri;  George,  to  Wisconsin;  jane  was  the  late  Mrs. 
VV^illiam  Enoch,  of  Indianapolis  ;  Elizabeth  married  Alexander 
Bickerstaff,  and  resides  at  Mellin ;  David  rests  in  California; 
and  Mrs.  Nancy  Clarke,  the  youngest  daughter,  who  married 
again  after  the  death  of  Mr.  Clarke,  resides  in  California.  She 
and  Mrs.  Bickerstafif  being  the  only  survivors  of  the  family 
(of  Isaac  Nutter). 

Levi  Nutter  married  Miss  Margaret  Webb,  sister  of  his 
brother's  wife,  and,  after  leaving  Addis'  run,  went  to  Goose 
creek,  where  he  became  the  pioneer  settler  of  the  well-known 
"Nutter  farm."  he  having  purchased  near  one  thousand  acres 
of  land  in  this  wilderness. 

Here  he  reared  a  large  family,  and  here,  he  found  a  rest- 
ing  place,  more  than  a  half  century  ago.  Some  of  his  des- 
scendants  still  lay  claim  to  a  part  of  this  old  homestead, 
though  part  of  it  is  now  the  estate  of  the  late  "Dick"  W^ilson. 

His  only  daughter  married  Sylvester  Webb,  and  some  of 
her  family  live  on  the  old  homestead. 

Three  of  his  sons,  Thomas,  Math,  and  Tone,  met  tragic 
deaths.  John  was  another  son  ;  and  Benjamin,  the  youngest, 
and  last  survivor  of  the  family,  died  a  few  years  since,  in  the 
Hospital  for  the  Insane  at  Weston. 

When  Mr.  Nutter  first  settled  here,  he  had  a  wife  and 
one  child,  a  cow  and  calf  .and  one  horse;  and  when  he  went 
to  visiL  his  brother,  Isaac,  seven  miles  distant,  he  rode  on 
horse-back  and  carried  the  calf,  the  cow  follov/ed  behind,  and 
the  wife  walked  and  carried  the  child  ;  this  manner  oi  pro- 
cedure being  necessary  to  protect  the  calf  and  the  child  from 
tl;e  wolves. 

John  Nutter  married  Miss  Mary  Mounts  and,  from  the 
Cairo  vicinity,  the}^  removed  to  Calhoun  county,  in  1818,  and 
settled  on  the  West  foi'k  of  the  Kanawha  river,  just  below 
Richardsonville,  where  he  spent  his  last  hours :  His  children 
were  as  follows : 

James  and   Humphrey,  who  have  both  passed  on,   were 


162     .  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

the  sons.  Sarah  (Mrs.  Jonathan  Nicholas),  Elizabeth  (Mrs. 
yVbraham  Starcher),  and  Basha  (Airs.  Jeremiah  Hickman") 
v.ere  the  daughters.  T.  J.  Nutter,  of  Rusk,  is  a  son  of 
Humphrey,  as  is  James  Nutter,  of  Wirt  county. 

Thomas  Nutter,  the  last  one  of  the  four  pioneer  brothers, 
went  from  the  Cairo  vicinity  to  x*\thens  county,  Ohio,  and  set- 
tled on  the  banks  of  the  Little  Hocking  river,  and  here  his 
history  ends. 

William  Nutter. — From  "The  Recollections  of  a  Life- 
Time.'"  a  little  sketch  of  early  days  in  Calhoun  and  Gilmer 
counties,  we  learn  that  Mrs.  Mary  Starr  Nutter,  the  widow 
of  William  Nutter,  another  brother  of  the  four  above  men- 
tioned, came  from  Ritchie  county  with  John  Nutter,  in  1818, 
and  settled  where  Richardsonville  now  stands,  but  her  name 
escaped  the  early  settlers  of  this  county,  as  William  Nutter 
is  not  remembered  among  the  pioneers  here.  However,  her 
children  were  David,  Isaac,  Thomas,  Levi,  A\'il]iam,  and 
Nancy,  who  became  the  wife  of  Jacob  Starcher,  senior. 

The  McKinneys. — The  Nutters,  as  above  stated,  were 
only  squatters  at  the  mouth  of  Addis'  run,  and,  in  1818,  the}' 
were  dispossessed  by  William  McKinney,  who  purchased  a 
tract  of  three  thousand  nine  hundred  twenty  acres  in  this 
section,  of  Mathias  j\Iattenly,  for  the  small  sum  of  eight 
thousand  forty  dollars.  He  afterwards  bought  another 
tract  of  one  thousand  eighty  acres,  and  after  giving  each  one 
of  his  children  a  large  farm,  he  sold  the  remainder  to  a  colony 
of  Scotch  settlers,  who  came  later. 

Mr.  McKinney  came  from  the  ."Keystone  state,"  with  his 
wife  and  large  family  of  children,  and  founded  his  home 
where  his  late  grandson,  Jacob  McKinney,  resided  until  his 
death.  He  figured  prominently  in  the  early  history  of  the 
county,  both  in  church  and  state  aiTairs ;  and  for  a  number  of 
years  after  his  coming,  this  was  known  as  the  "McKinney 
settlement,"  the  former  name  "Egypt,"  being  gradually 
dropped. 

William  IMcKinney  was  born  of  English  parentage  in 
Lyconing  county,  Eastern  Pennsylvania,  on  September  4, 
1760.  He  was  the  son  of  William  and  Hannah  McKinney, 
and  was  next  to  the  voungest  member  of  a  familv  of  six  chil- 


FIRST  SETTLERS   IX    THE   CAIRO    J-IC1\ITV  16:! 

dien  (viz.,  Sarah,  who  married  a  Mr.  Haggerty,  Jemima. 
Jacob,  John,  and  Cathrine).  Though  so  young,  he  served  as 
an  American  soldier  during  the  latter  part  of  the  Revolution  ; 
and  on  July  14,  1789,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Frances  Piatt, 
and  from  this  time  until  he  came  to  Ritchie  county,  his  home 
was  at  White  Deer  valley,  on  the  Susquehannah  river. 

Mrs.  McKinney  was  of  French  descent.  She  was  the 
daughter  of  John  and  Jane  Williamson  Piatt,  and  the  grand- 
daughter of  John  Piatt,  of  France ;  and  at  historic  old  Tren- 
ton, she  was  born,  on  March  7.  1770,  when  the  bugle  notes  of 
the  Revolution  were  being  sounded,  but  her  parents  later 
removed  to  White  Deer  valley,  Pennsylvania,  where  she  met 
and  married  Mr.  McKinney. 

In  1789,  when  General  Washington  was  enroute  from 
Mt.  Vernon  to  New  York  city,  for  his  first  inauguration  to 
the  Presidency,  when  he  reached  the  old  bridge  at  Trenton 
over  'which  lie  had  retreated  before  Lord  Cornwallis'  army, 
a  few  years  before,  a  beautiful  triumphal  arch  under  which 
he  was  to  pass,  greeted  his  eye.  This  arch  had  been  prepared 
by  the  ladies  of  the  town  in  honor  of  the  occasion,  and  was 
supported  by  thirteen  pillars,  wreathed  with  flowers  and 
evergreen,  and  it  bore  the  inscription,  "The  Defender  of  the 
Mothers  will  be  the  Preserver  of  the  Daughters." 

''Beneath  the  arch  stood  a  party  of  thirteen  loyal  young 
ladies,  laden  with  baskets  of  flowers,  and  as  the  hero  of  the 
Revolution  approached,  they  showered  the  flowers  in  his 
pathway — singing  as  they  did  so,  the  following  ode,  which 
had  been  composed  for  the  occasion  : 

"Welcome  mighty  Chief  once  more, 
Welcome  to  this  grateful  shore; 
Now  no  mercenary  foe 
Aims  again,  the  fatal  blow, 
Aims  at  thee,  the  fatal  blow. 

"Virgins  fair,  and  matrons  grave, 
Those  thy  conquering  arm  did  save, 
Bu:ld  for  thee,  triumphal  bowers. 
Strew  ye  fair,  his  way  with  flowers, 
Strew  your  hero's  way  with  flowers." 


164  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

"Frances  Piatt  Avas  one  of  this  number,  and  in  tlie  ]ne>- 
ence  of  the  writer/  in  later  years,  she  sang  this  little  o.le, 
reviving  the  feeling  of  her  youth  and  her  loyalty  to  her 
Chieftain." 

Mrs.  ]\IcKinney^  was  a  woman  of  strong  mind,  and  ot  a 
cheerful,  happy  disposition,  and  her  husband  being  ever  kind 
and  generous,  "the  Avorld  went  well  with  them."  When  they 
hrst  came  to  this  wild  country  the  younger  members  of  the 
family  were  very  much  dissatisfied,  and  they  would  say,  ■'Oh, 
dear,  mother,  you  have  brought  us  to  a  wilderness !"'  But 
vv'ith  her  characteristic  cheerfulness,  she  would  reply,  "'O  chil- 
dren, you  will  sec  railroads  running  through  your  farms,  yet, 
some  day."  At  the  absurdity  of  such  a  prediction  all  would 
break  into  a  laugh,  thus  dispersing  the  shadow  occasioned 
by  their  undesirable  surroundings.  And  though  the  dear  old 
mother  never  lived  to  see  it,  the  prophesy  has  long  since  been 
fulfilled.  The  Baltimore  and  Ohio  railroad  runs  through  what 
was  at  that  time  the  "Mc Kinney  estates"  for  miles,  and  the 
busy  town  of  Cairo  stands  on  the  farm  that  once  belonged  to 
their  daughter,  Kathrine  McKinney  McGregor. 

Mr.  McKinney  was  the  first  mill-owner  in  this  section. 
He  was  a  Presbyterian  in  religious  faith,  and  was  a  man  of 
a  strong  influential  character.  He  passed  to  his  reward  on 
June  24,  1848,  on  the  first  anniversary  of  the  death  of  his  wife. 
(She  died  on  June  24,  1847.)  Both  sleep  in  the  Egypt  ceme- 
tery. 

Their  children  were  as  follows:  William,  John  Piatt, 
Jacob,  Hannah  (Mrs.  Joseph  Marshall),  Jane  (Mrs.  Edward 
Skelton),  David  and  Kathrine  (Mrs.  David  McGregor)  were 
twins,  vSarah  (Airs.  Richard  Wanless),  and  James. 

Nearly  all  these  sons  and  daughters  were  in  turn,  the 
heads  of  pioneer  families  of  this  county. 

William  McKinney,  junior,  the  eldest  son  of  William  and 
Frances  Piatt  McKinney,  was  born  in  Pennsylvania,  on  ]\Iay 
17,  1790.  and  there,  on  January  22.  1818,  he  was  married  to 
Mary    Wilson    Miller;    and,    a    few    months    later,    \\ith    his 


T'or  the  ancestral  history  of  the  Piatt  family  see  chapter  on  Schools. 

(Her  grand-daughter,  Mi.ss  Fannie  McKinney,  of  Williamstown,  con- 
tributed this  sicetch,  and  the  above  quotation  is  reproduced  in  her  own 
language.) 


FIRST  SETTLERS   IX    THE   CAIRO    VICINITY  16r. 

parents,  they  came  to  this  county  and  settled  on  the  farm 
that  is  now  the  estate  of  the  late  Jacob  Hatfield,  senior.  After 
a  twelve  years'  residence  here,  the}^  went  to  Harrisville, 
where  ]\lr,  McKinney  purchased  the  Mathias  Cline  store,  and 
engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  for  eight  years  before  re- 
moving to  Waverly,  in  Wood  county,  where  he  died,  in  IS"*  1),  at 
the  age  of  eighty-nine  years.  Here  Mrs.  McKinney  died  at 
the  age  of  eighty  years.  Both  rest  in  the  Bethel  cemetery, 
near  the  old  home. 

Thev  were  the  corner  stones  of  the  Bethel  church  at 
Waverlv,  the  first  organization  being  made  at  their  home,  in 
April,  1845,  when  Mr.  McKinney  was  ordained  as  Elder — an 
office  which  he  filled  until  his  death. 

Their  family  consisted  of  ten  children,  all  of  whom 
reached  the  years  of  maturity  except  one  that  died  in  infancy; 
viz.,  Robert  Simpson,  William  Piatt,  Frances  S.  (unmarried), 
Eliza  J.  (Mrs.  Thomas  Miller),  Abram  F.,  Hannah  M.  (Mrs. 
James  Sharps),  Festus  H.,  Mary  S.  (unmarried),  and  Jacob, 
all  of  whom  have  joined  the  parents  on  the  other  side,  save 
Miss  Mary  S.,  who  resides  at  Parkersburg. 

Robert  Simpson  and  William  Piatt,  the  two  eldest  sons, 
were  the  victims  of  a  most  thrilling  experience  while  the 
family  resided  on  the  "Hatfield  farm,"  they  being  but  five 
and  two  years  of  age,  respectively,  at  the  time  of  the  incident : 

Their  father  being  absent  from  home,  their  mother  sent 
them  to  drive  the  young  cattle  to  the  forest,  and,  uncon- 
sciously, they  wandered  too  far  to  find  their  way  back ;  and 
when  they  failed  to  return  home  in  a  reasonable  length  of 
time,  she  became  alarmed,  and,  taking  her  babe  in  her  arms, 
went  to  the  home  of  her  father-in-law  and  made  the  sad  truth 
known — that  her  children  were  lost. 

All  the  able-bodied  men,  with  her  husband,  were  at  Park- 
ersburg— thirty  miles  distant,  "at  muster,"  but  she  gathered 
together  what  help  she  could — both  men  and  women — and 
went  in  search  of  the  little  wanderers.  But  they  being  un- 
familiar Avith  the  forest,  could  not  venture  far,  and  all  night 
long  they  searched  to  no  avail,  and  on  the  following  day  the 
father  was  called  home,  and  he,  too,  joined  in  the  quest,  which 
was  continued  throughout  the  next  night  all  to  no  purpose; 


166  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COiW'TV 

but  during"  the  thirfl  day.  however,  they  were  found  near 
three  miles  from  tlic  home  ahnost  perished  from  hunj^er  and 
cold — the  elder  being  in  a  state  of  unconsciousness.  They 
had  been  out  almost  two  days  and  nights  without  food,  with 
the  exception  of  a  few  berries  that  they  had  found.  It  was  in 
the  month  of  October,  and  during  the  first  night,  a  cold  rain 
had  fallen,  and  the  elder  brother  had  taken  ofif  his  coat  and  put 
it  on  the  little  one  to  keep  him  warm,  and  their  dog  helped  to 
keep  them  from  freezing  at  night.  They  said  that  their  dog 
drove  a  "big  black  dog"  away  from  them  one  night,  but  it 
was  supposed  to  have  been  a  bear,  by  the  older  people. 

The  mother  could  never  speak  of  the  pathetic  incident  in 
after  years  without  tears. 

John  Piatt  McKinney,  the  second  son  of  William  and 
Frances  Piatt  McKinney,  was  born  in  the  Keystone  state,  on 
August  19;  1792;  and  on  July  4,  1826,  he  was  married  to  Miss 
Sarah  A\'.  Lacy,  and  near  Cairo,  they  resided  until  1836,  when 
they  removed  to  Parkersburg,  and  took  charge  of  the  '"United 
States"  hotel — one  of  the  best  in  the  city  at  that  time.  Here 
Mrs.  McKinney  died,  in  1844,  at  the  age  of  forty-seven  years, 
and  two  years  later  their  only  daughter,  Frances  Selina, 
passed  on,  at  the  age  of  thirteen  years.  Aftei  tliis  sad  evenv, 
Mr.  ^SIcKinne}-,  principally,  made  his  home  with  his  brothei. 
David ;  and  here,  on  April  23,  1879,  he  passed  from  earth,  and 
in  the  Odd  Fellows  cemetery,  at  Parkersburg,  he  rests. 

His  three  sons  were  William  Hopkins,  David  P.,^  and 
Thomas  E.  McKinney.  The  last  two  mentioned  reside  at 
Springfield.  Ohio,  and  are  unmarried. 

Jacob  McKinney,  the  third  son  of  William  and  Frances 
Piatt  AIcKinney,  was  born  on  X'ovember  16,  1799 ;  and  on 
June  9,  1828,  he  was  married  to  ]\Iiss  ]\Iary,  daughter  of 
Edward  Skelton,  senior,  and  settled  just  across  the  river  from 
the  old  McKinnev  homestead,  where  he  and  his  wife  saw  the 
last  of  earth,  and  in  the  Egypt  cemetery  their  ashes  lie.  He 
died  on  January  15,  1861. 

Their  nine  children  were  as  follows:  Anne  Eliza  (Mrs. 
Luke  Terrv).  Cathrine  (]\Irs.  H.  B.  McCollum).  fames,  Mary 


•David  p.  died  in  April,   1910. 


FIRST   SETTLERS   IX    THE   CAIRO    I'lCIXITY 


167 


M.,  Sarah,  William  S.,  and  Frances  A.  (who  all  remained  un- 
married) ;  Jacob  B.,  and  John  P.  McKinney. 

Hannah  McKinney,  the  eldest  daughter  of  William  and 
Frances  Piatt,  was  born  in  the  "Keystone  state,"  on  March 
13,  1795;  and  there  she  was  married  to  Joseph  Marshall,  on 
September  23,  1816,  and  from  there  they  went  to  Ohio,  where 
they  remained  for  a  few  years,  before  coming  to  this  comity, 
and  settling  on  the  "Marshall  homestead,"  near  one  mile 
south  of  Cairo.  This  old  pioneer  residence,  with  its  massive 
chimney  and  huge  fire-place,  is  one  of  the  very  few  that  have 
escaped  the  plans  of  the  modern  architect,  and  still  stands, 
undisturbed,  in  its  original  state.  It  is  now  the  property  of 
A.  M.  Douglass,  of  Cairo. 


The    old    Marshall    home   as    it    looks    to-day,    after   almost    the    lap-e    of   a 

century. 

The  first  church  organization  in  the  community  (Pres- 
byterian) was  perfected  at  the  Marshall  home,  and  here,  a 
little  band  of  worshipers  gathered  regularly  until  a  church- 
hotise  was  erected. 

Mr.  Marshall  died  in  1835,  at  the  home  of  his  brother-in- 
law,  James  McKinney,  at  Williamstown,  he  having  been 
stricken  with  the  fatal  illness  while  on  his  wa}-  home  from  a 
business  trip  to  Cincinnati;  and  in  the  "Bukey  cemetery"  at 
Williamstown,  he  rests.  His  wife  died  at  the  old  home  near 
Cairo,  in  1874,  at  the  age  of  eighty  years,  and  she  lies  in  the 
Egypt  cemetery. 


IfiS  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

They  were  the  parents  of  eight  cliildren — seven  sons  and 
one  daughter,  the  late  AJiss  Ellen  Marshall,  of  Cairo,  being- 
the  (laughter.  The  sons  were,  William  M.,  Francis  J.,  John 
P.  (who  never  married).  Robert  R.,  of  Gilmer  county;  Jacob 
W.,  David  H.  (died  in  youth),  and  Hezekiah  B.  Marshall,  of 
Buckhannon,  who  was  a  resident  of  Mining  Flats,  this  state, 
for  fifty-four  years,  and  who  is  the  only  survivor  of  the  family. 

John  W.  Marshall,  formerly  of  Oil  Ridge,  but  now  of 
Wood  county,  is  a  grandson  of  this  pioneer,  and  he  has  not  a 
few  other  descendants  in  this,  and  adjoining  counties. 

Jane  McKinney,  the  second  daughter  of  W  illiam  and 
Frances  Piatt  McKinney,  was  born  on  July  4,  1797,  and  was 
married  to  Edward  Skelton,  junior,  on  January  1,  1822,  and. 
after  a  forty-five  years'  residence  in  the  Cairo  vicinity,  they 
removed  to  Illinois,  where  all  the  family  are  sleeping,  except 
Augustus  D.,  who  resides  in  Kansas  City,  Missouri. 

Their  other  children,  besides  the  one  mentioned,  were, 
John  G.  (a  mute),  who  married  Miss  Prudence  Chidester,  who 
was,  also,  a  mute ;  William  M.,  Frances  (unmarried)  ;  Edward 
A.,  and  Eliza  J.,  who  married  George  Briggs. 

David  McKinney,  the  fourth  son  of  William,  and  Frances 
Piatt,  and  his  sister,  Kathrine,  were  twins.  They  were  born, 
on  August  1,  1801 ;  and  on  December  29,  1831,  David  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Sarah  M.  Henderson,  and  settled  on  the  farm, 
given  him  by  his  father,  in  the  Cairo  vicinity,  where  he  re- 
mained until  1848,  when  he  removed  to  Harrisville,  and  after 
a  three  years'  residence  there,  went  to  Willow  Island,  on  the 
Ohio  river,  in  Pleasants  county,  where  he  was  identified  in 
the  mercantile  business  for  the  next  three  years.  He  tlien 
resided  on  a  farm  in  Pleasants  county  for  tv\^enty  years,  going 
frc>m  there  to  A\'iiliamstown,  where  he  fell  asleep  in  1881.  in 
the  eighty-first  year  of  his  life.  His  wife  preceded  him  to  the 
grave  by  three  years,  she  having  reached  the  age  of  seventy- 
one  years.  Both  sleep  near  the  St.  John's  Episcopal  church 
in  Pleasants  county. 

They  were  the  parents  of  five  daughters  and  one  son. 
John,  who  died  in  infancy.  The  daughters  were:  Nancy,  who 
married  Oscar  L.  Ridgely ;  Miss  Frances  Piatt  AIcKinney. 
of  Williamstown  ;  Alary  J.  (unmarried)  ;  Hannah  Al..  who  be- 


FIRST   SETTLERS   IX    THE   CAIRO    VICINITY  160 

came   Mrs.    Giles    R.    Hanimat ;   and    Sarah   C.   who   married 
John  D.  Sharp.     Mrs.  Sharp  and  Miss  Frances  alone  survive. 

Kathrine  McKinney,  the  third  daughter  of  William  and 
Frances  Piatt  McKinney,  who,  with  her  brother,  David,  first 
saw  the  light  on  August  1,  1801,  was  married  to  David  McGre- 
gor, on  March  17.  1842,  and  settled  at  Cairo,  where  she  died, 
on  September  11,  18G3,  and  was  laid  in  the  Egypt  cemetery. 

Three  children  were  the  fruits  of  this  union  ;  viz.,  William 
A.,  and  John  P.,  the  sons,  both  died  in  infancy,  and  Frances  S., 
the  only  daughter,  is  now  Mrs.  I.  S.  Hallam.  of  x\beline,  Kan- 
sas. 

Sarah  McKinney,  the  youngest  daughter  of  William  and 
Frances  Piatt  McKinney,  married  Richard  Wanless,  senior, 
and  was  the  mother  of  five  children :  John,  A\'illiam  A., 
Richard,  junior,  Frances  and  Mary  Wanless.  (For  farther 
history  of  her  family  see  Wanlesses.) 

James  McKinney,  the  youngest  son  of  William  and 
Frances  Piatt,  was  born,  on  November  26,  1807  ;  and  he  was 
married  to  Miss  Suannah  Bukey,  on  January  1,  1832,  and  the 
first  years  of  their  married  life  were  spent  at  Williamstown. 
from  whence  they  removed  to  Harrisville.  where  Mr.  McKin- 
ney was  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business,  and  wdiere  he 
filled  the  County  clerk's  ofBce  for  a  number  of  years.  Here 
Mrs.  McKinney  died  ;  and  on  Alay  18,  1854,  he  was  married  a 
second  time  to  Miss  Minerva  Stephens,  of  Harrisville,  who 
stiii  survives,  fie  died  on  July  2Q>,  1889,  and  lies  at  rest,  be- 
side the  wife  of  his  youth,  in  the  Harrisville  cemetery. 

The  children  of  his  first  union  were  three  in  number: 
Drusilla  B.,  who  married  William  A.  Wanless;  Mary  Eliza- 
beth, wife  of  Joseph  Arbour;  and  Hezekiah  McKinney,  who 
lives  in  the  West. 

Alma,  the  late  wife  of  Dr.  W.  E.  Talbott,  of  Harrisville, 
was  the  one  child  of  the  second  union. 


170  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

"Hie  hand  of  llic  king  that  the  scepter  hath  borne  ; 
i'he  bruvv  of  the  priest  that  the  mitre  hath  worn  ; 
Tlie  eye  of  the  sage  and  the  heart  of  the  brave, 
Are  hidden  and  lost  in  the  depths  of  the  grave. 

So  the  multitnde  goes,  like  the  flower  or  the  weed 
That  withers  away  to  let  others  succeed  ; 
So  the  multitude  comes,  even  those  we  behold. 
To  repeat  every  tale  that  has  often  been  told. 

For  we  are  the  same  that  our  fathers  have  been  ; 
We  see  the  same  sights  our  fathers  have  seen ; 
We  drink  the  same  stream,  and  view  the  same  sun, 
And  run  the  same  course  our  fathers  have  run. 


®0  tlf^  ii^mnrg 


of 


(S\^t  Bwttl^  S^MtVB 


Richard  and  Eleanor  Rutherford. 


Farewell  to  the  Highlands — farewell  to  the  North, 
The  birth-place  of  valor,   the  country  of  worth; 
Wherever  I  wander,  wherever  I  rove. 
The  hills  of  the  Highlands,  forever  I  love. 

— Burns. 


CHAPTER  XI 


Scotch  Settlers 

HE  year  1819,  brought  a  small  colony  of  per- 
manent and  substantial  Scotch  settlers  to 
the  Cairo  vicinity.  This  colony  included 
Richard  Rutherford  and  his  wife,  Richard 
^^'anless.  senior,  who  was  then  a  young  man 
in  his  teens,  and  his  sister,  Miss  Isabel  Wan- 
less,  and  John  Taylor,  senior,  and  his  wife, 
who  were  all  brothers  and  sisters-in-law. 

The  Rutherfords. — Richard  Rutherford  and  Miss  Eleanor 
A\'anless  were  married  at  Leith,  Scotland,  in  1810,  just  on 
the  eve  of  their  departure  for  America;  and  upon  their  arrival 
here,  they  purchased  a  large  tract^  of  land  near  five  miles 
beloAv  Cairo,  which  is  still  owned  by  their  descendants.  Here 
they  spent  the  remainder  of  their  lives,  and  in  the  Egypt  ceme- 
tery, they  sleep. 

They  were  the  parents  of  ten  children,  whose  descendants 
in  this  county  are  a  host:  Alary,  Ellen,  Ann,  Susan,  Margaret, 
Isabella,  Kathrine,  Jane,  George,  and  Archibald  Rutherford. 

Mary  Rutherford,   the  eldest  daughter,  became  the  wife 
of  \Mlliam  H.  Douglass,  and  died  childless. 
Ellen  Rutherford  married  Andrew  Hall  and  was  the  mother 
of  nine  children. - 

Ann  Rutherford,  who  was  the  wife  of  the  late  James  Har- 
ris, was  the  mother  of  ]\Iiss  Ella  Harris,  of  Xew  Concord, 
Ohio ;  and  of  one  son,  who  died  in  infancy. 

Susan  Rutherford  became  INIrs.  Matthew  Douglass,  and 
died  childless. 

Margaret  Rutherford,  who  was  the  wife  of  the  late  John 
P.  Harris,  of  Harrisville,  was  the  mother  of  three  sons  and 


'This  land  had  formerly  been  settled  by  Benjamin  Butcher,  who,  with 
his  first  wife,  rests  here:  but  little  else  is  known  of  his  history  other  than 
that  he  came  here  early  in  the  century. 

-See   Hall  familv  for  names  of  her   children. 


SCOTCH   SETTLERS  173 

three  daughters^  She  fell  dead  while  walking  on  the  stree^ 
in  New  York  city  several  vears  ago,  and  with  her  husband 
sleeps  at  Harrisville. 

Isabella  Rutherford,  who  is  the  only  survivor  of  the  fam- 
ily, is  now  Mrs.  George  B.  Douglass,  of  Petroleum  ;  and  their 
only  child  is  Dr.  E.  H.  Douglass,  who  resides  with  them,  and 
is  the  village  physician. 

Kathrine  Rutherford  remained  unmarried. 

Jane  Rutherford  married  Jerome  A.  Vandiver,  whose  his- 
tory appears  with  the  Smithville  chapter,  and  her  children 
were  four  in  number. 

George  Rutherford,  who  was  long  a  prominent  factor  in 
business, circles  at  Petroleiun,  married  Miss  Sarah  Griffin,  and 
they  Avere  the  parents  of  the  following  named  children  :  John 
G.,  and  Richard  H.,  of  Ohio;  W.  H.  and  S.  I.,  of  Petroleum; 
Jennie,  Archibald  and  Newton,  who  are  numbered  with  the 
dead:  Alice  (Mrs.  John  McCoy),  of  California;  and  Delia, 
who  is  now  Mrs.  McKinney,  resides  with  her  mother  at  the 
old  home. 

Archibald  Rutherford  was  long  a  leading  citizen  of  the 
Rusk  community.  He  first  married  Miss  Rebecca  Grifim,  of 
near  Harrisville;  and  his  second  vv'ife  was  Miss  Martha  Campy 
bell,  of  Ohio.  His  family,  which  consisted  of  two  sons  and 
two  daughters,  were  all  born  of  the  first  union:  Jennie,  the 
eldest  daughter,  with  her  parents,  lies  in  the  Egypt  cemetery; 
and  the  rest  are  all  married  ;  viz.,  Ellen  is  the  wife  of  H.  E. 
McGregor,  of  Cairo;  Erank  is  a  physician  of  near  Pittsburg; 
and  Richard  W.,  who  was  graduated  from  the  college  at  New 
Concord.  Ohio,  and  who  spent  several  years  in  the  profession 
of  teaching,  resides  at  the  old  home. 

All  the  family  except  the  three  daughters,  Margaret,  Ann, 
and  Jane,  with  their  parents,  slumber  within  the  bosom  of  the 
old  Egypt  cemetery. 

The  first  two  mentioned,  with  their  husbands,  lie  at  Har- 
risville; and  the  last  one,  in  Louisville,  Kentucky. 

While  the  Rutherfords  have  never  been  office-seekers,  and 
have  seldom  held  public  positions,  the  progenitors  of  this 
family,  as  well  as  their  innumerable  descendants,  have  ever 


'See  Harris   family. 


]?4 


HISTORY   or   RITCHIE   COUNTY 


stood  for  the  best  citizenship  of  the  county ;  and  the  name  is 
an  honored  one  in  their  native  "Scotia,"  beyond  the  sea — Anne 
Rutherford,  daughter  of  an  eminent  physician,  of  Edinburgh, 
who  doubtless  belonged  to  this  same  family,  was  the  mother 
of  one  of  Scotland's  greatest  bards — Sir  Walter  Scott — "The 
Wizard  of  the  North." 


The  old  Rutherford  home  as  it  looks  to-day.' 
'This  was  one  of  the  oldest  frame  tauilding.s  in  this  part  of  the  coun- 
ty, it  having  been  built  near  the  year  1839,  by  Richard  Rutherford.  The 
old  log  cabin,  which  was  the  original  home  of  Mr.  Rutherford  and  prob- 
ably the  one  erected  by  Benjamin  Butcher,  the  first  pioneer  here,  still 
stands  and  one  corner  of  it  is  visible  in  this  picture. 

The  Wanlesses. — Richard  Wanless,  senior,  iinarried  Miss 
Sarah  McKinney,  youngest  daughter  of  William  and  I^rances 
Piatt  McKinney,  who  was  born  on  January  15,  1805,  in  the 
Keystone  state.  They  were  married  on  April  17,  1830,  and 
took  up  their  residence  in  this  vicinity  on  land  still  owned  by 
their  heirs  ;  and  here  they  continued  to  reside  until  they  were 
borne  to  the  Egypt  cemetery. 

They  were  the  parents  of  five  children,  all  of  whom  ha^'e 
joined  them  on  the  other  side :  John,  sleeps  in  Kansas;  and 
all  the  rest;  viz.,  William  A.,  Richard,  junior,  Frances,  and 
Mary,  in  the  Egypt  cemetery. 

John  married  and  had  one  son — Dr.  Richard  ^^''anless,  of 
Xew  York  city. 

W'illiam  A.  Wanless  married  Miss  Drusilla  McKinney, 
daughter  of  Jacob  McKinney,  and  was  the  father  of  one  son, 
William  Wanless,  junior. 

Richard,  junior,  and  Frances  remained  unmarried. 

Mar}^  became  IMrs.  Christopher  Douglass,  of  Cornwallis, 
and  was  the  mother  of  two  sons  and  tliree  daughters  ;  viz.. 


SCOTCH   SETTLERS  175 

Richard  W.  is  a  dentist  of  St.  Mary's  ;  and  the  other  son,  E. 
H.  Douglas,  is  a  prominent  pulpit  orator  of  the  Presbyterian 
church,  of  Ohio:  Fannie  is  Mrs.  A.  C.  Rollins,  of  Cornwallis ; 
and  Anna  and  Sarah  are  at  home  with  their  aged  father. 

These  include  the  entire  posterity  of  Richard,  senior,  and 
Sarah  McKinney  Wanless,  to  the  third  generation. 

Isabel  Wanless,  sister  of  Richard,  senior,  who  came  from 
Scotland  with  the  emigrant  part}^  married  Stephen  Outward, 
and  in  the  Egypt  cemetery  she  sleeps.  Her  children  were 
Mary,  Jane,  and  William  Outward. 

George  Wanless,  an  elder  brother,  came  over  at  the  same 
time.  He  married  Miss  Anne  Douglass,  and  lived  and  died  in 
Carroll  county, 'Ohio. 

Miss  Bittie  Wanless,  another  member  of  this  family,  mar- 
ried Robert  Cranston,  and  settled  in  New  York. 

Mrs.  Jennie  Anderson,  Mrs.  Margaret  Browne,  Mrs. 
Susan  Dodds,  and  William,  who  died  in  youth,  with  their 
parents,  Archibald  and  Mary  Rutherford  Wanless,  remained 
in  Scotland.  The  Wanlesses  and  Douglasses,  are  closely  al- 
lied by  nature,  the  mother  of  Archibald  Wanless  being  Miss 
Isabella  Douglass  before  her  marriage. 

John  Taylor,  senior,  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Mary  Wanless 
Taylor,  took  up  their  residence  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the 
estate  of  their  late  son,  John.  Here,  they  remained  until  they 
were  laid  in  the  Egypt  cemetery  Avith  the  many  others  of 
their  race.  They  were  the  parents  of  four  children  :  Archi- 
bald, the  eldest  son,  died  in  infancy ;  Ellen  never  married ; 
John,  who  was  born,  lived,  and  died  under  the  parental  roof, 
niarried  Miss  Lydia  Pew,  but  left  no  issue ;  Sarah  married 
David  Pevv^,  and  was  the  mother  of  several  children;  xxz., 
John  A.,  William,  Archibald,  and  Florence,  who,  with  her 
mother  and  brother.  John,  lives  at  the  old  home,  and  Anna, 
who  has  passed  on. 

The  Douglasses,  who  also  came  from  Scotland,  were  the 
next  settlers  in  this  vicinity.  In  1818,  John  Douglass,  senior, 
and  his  wife  Susan  Howee  Douglass,  with  their  four  daugh- 
ters and  two  sons^   (viz..  Susan,   Belle,  Anna,  Jane,  William, 


'Two  nieinber.s  of  the  family,  Andrew  Douglass  and  Mrs.  Margaret 
Atcheson,  remained  in  Scotland.  Mrs.  Atcheson  died  there,  but  Andrew 
came  to  thi.s  country  later. 


176  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COi'XTY 

and  John,  junior),  bade  adieu  to  their  native  land,  and  set  sail 
for  America,  on  the  "good  ship  Queen  Anne,"  landing  in  Phil- 
adelphia, after  a  long  and  perilous  voyage,  where  the  father 
died  of  fever,  a  week  later,  and  where  he  was  laid  t'j  rest. 

After  the  father  had  passed  from  sight,  the  rest  of  the 
family  went  to  Pittsburg — residing  there  and  at  other  points 
in  the  Keystone  state  for  a  few  years,  before  coming  to  Wheel- 
ing (West),  Virginia,  where  they  met  with  Jack  and  Robin- 
son, two  earh'  settlers  of  Bond's  creek ;  and  through  their 
influence  came  to  Ritchie  county  and  found  a  home  in  the 
Cairo  vicinity — first  on  the  late  David  Pew  homestead,  and  a 
very  little  later,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of  the  late 
John  Douglass.  They  having  purchased  the  latter  tract  of 
William  McKinney,  senior. 

While  residing  here,  the  four  Doviglass  sisters,  above 
mentioned,  were  married:  Susan  became  Mrs.  George  Prater; 
Belle,  Mrs.  James  West :  Anna,  ^Irs.  George  \\^anless ;  and 
Jane,  Mrs.  John  Younge  ;  and  all  went  to  Ohio,  where  they 
answered  the  final  call. 

The  widowed  mother,  Mrs.  Susan  Howee  Douglass,  after- 
wards became  the  wife  of  William  Layfield,  the  first  settler 
on  the  South  fork  of  Hughes  river. 

William  Douglass. — On  board  the  same  "good  ship"  with 
the  Douglasses  was  a  prettv  Scotch  lassie  by  the  name  of 
Ellen  Roberts,  who,  with  her  brother,  William  Roberts,  was 
also  bound  for  America :  and  at  Halifax,  she  and  Wiiliam 
Douglass  were  married,  and  along  with  the  rest  of  the  family, 
they  came  to  the  Cairo  vicinity.  But,  in  the  earl}-  thirties, 
leaving  the  John  Douglass  homestead,  they  went  co  the 
"Schultz  farm,"  in  Pleasants  county  ;  and  later,  to  the  Cline 
farm  on  "Dry  Ridge,"  and  finally,  during  the  construction 
of  the  Xorthwestern  turnpike  in  the  early  forties,  they  re- 
moved to  the  late  Andrew  Douglass  homestead,  on  Goose 
creek,  and  became  the  first  settlers  of  the  forest  in  what  is 
now  the  Glendale  vicinity.  Here,  they  erected  a  large, 
hewed-log  house,  v.hich  served  as  residence,  hotel  and  post- 
ofifice ;  ]Mr.  Douglass  being  the  first  post-master  at  the  "Goose 
creek"  office.  And  here,  in  18?7,  the  lamp  of  his  life  went  out. 
His  venerable  companion  had  preceded  him  to  the  other  shore 


SCOTCH   SETTLERS  177 

by  seven  years,  and  side  by  side,  they  are  sleeping  in  the 
"embracing  mold"  of  tlie  Douglass  cemetery,  not  far  distant 
from  the  U.  B.  church  in  that  vicinity. 

They  were  the  parents  of  ten  children :  Elizabeth,  the 
eldest  daughter — born  in  1S20,  and  died  in  1905 — never  mar- 
ried. Thomas  and  Margaret  died  in  childhood.  Susan  mar- 
ried Harrison  Cornell,  of  Pleasants  county  ;  John  married  the 
daughter  of  his  Uncle  John  Douglass,  and  went  to  Kansas, 
where  he  sleeps ;  and  Mary,  who  is  now  Mrs.  Adami  Robson, 
resides  in  Kansas. 

Jeremiah  R.,  who  was  one  of  the  early  pedagogues  of 
the  Glendale  vicinity,  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Umphrey,  and 
after  residing  on  French  creek,  and  in  the  Cornwallis  com- 
munity for  some  years,  he  went  to  Cabin  run,  near  Tollgate, 
where  he  saw  the  last  of  earth ;  and  beside  his  wife  in  the 
Douglass  cemetery  he  is  resting.  His  only  daughter,  Mrs. 
Mason,  resides  on  Cabin  run ;  his  son,  Thomas,  in  Wirt  coun- 
ty;  D.  E.,  is  a  prosperous  merchant  of  Berea ;  and  William, 
the  other  son,  died  in  youth. 

Andrew  married  Miss  Sarah  M.  Bills,  and  died  at  the  old 
homestead  in  1904.  He  was  the  father  of  fifteen  children: 
Three  died  in  infancy;  John  niet  a  tragic  death  in  Oklahoma 
a  year  or  so  since,  and  the  rest  are  as  follows:  Mrs.  Mary 
J.  Lowther,  Mrs.  Grace  Emerick  Mrs.  Florence  Scott,  Mrs. 
Eva  Templeton,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Irvin,  Minnie  and  Mrs.  iMyr- 
tle  Snyder,  Andrew  R.,  Clarence  W.,  Jeremiah  L..  and  Charles 
E.  Douglass. 

Eleanor  Jane  became  ]\[rs.  William  Flamilton  and  went 
to  Kansas,  where  she  rests. 

William  Douglass,  the  last  surviving  son  of  the  family, 
vv'ho  was  long  a  leading  citizen  of  Highland,  was  laid  in  the 
Highland  cemetery  in  November,  1909.  He  married  Miss 
Sarah  Cornell,  daughter  of  pioneer  John  Cornell,  and  was  the 
father  of  five  children;  viz.,  William,  jimior,  of  Highland,  is 
the  only  son  ;  Cathrine  is  Mrs.  F.  L.  Hamilton,  of  the  same 
place;  Sarah  Elizabeth  is  the  wife  of  the  Rev.  A.  D.  Adams, 
of  the  West  Virginia  Methodist  Episcopal  conference  ;  Mary 
Eleanor  is  Mrs.  D.  W.  Alkire,  of  Tyler  county ;  and  Belle, 
Mrs.  E.  R.  Reed,  of  Parkersburg. 


HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUXTV 

John  Douglass,  junior,  son  of  John  and  Susan  Howee 
Douglass,  married  Aliss  ]\Iary  Chne,  daughter  of  Abraham 
Chne,  a  very  early  pioneer,  who  is  said  to  have  been  the  first 
white  girl  born  west  of  the  Blue  Ridge  mountains,  and  went 
to  Kansas,  where  they  heired  their  "six  feet  of  earth.'' 

William  Roberts,  who  came  with  this  little  band  of  emi- 
grants, married  Aliss  Xannie  Cameron,  and  at  Cairo  they 
sleep.    They  left  no  issue. 


Andrew   and   Catharire   Hall   Douglass. 

Andrew  Douglass. — The  year  1829,  brought  Andrew 
Douglass,  son  of  John  and  Susan  Howee  Douglass,  with  his 
wife,  Catharine  Hall  Douglass,  and  their  five  sons  (viz.,  John, 
Wm.  H.,  Andrew,  junior,  Christopher,  and  Matthew),  from 
Scotland,  to  the  farm  adjoining  Cairo,  which  is  still  in  the 
hands  of  his  heirs. 

This  family  crossed  to  New  York  in  the  '"Jean  Hasty," 
and  from  there,  made  their  way  to  the  Ohio  river,  near  the 
mouth  of  the  Big  Beaver ;  there  they  rested  while  Andrew 
Hall,  who  was  one  of  the  party,  went  to  Pittsburg-  and 
secured  a  keel  boat,  and  on  this  they  drifted  down  the  river 
to  the  mouth  of  Cow  creek,  in  Pleasants  county,  where  they 
were  met  by  William  Douglass  and  his  horses,  as  this  was 
the  only  means  of  conveyance  at  that  time.  Here,  at  Cairo, 
where   they   first   settled,   they   spent   the   remainder  of   their 


SCOTCH  SETTLERS  iro 

lives,  and  in  the  Egypt  bnrying-ground,  they  are  sleeping,  as 
are  the  sons  above  mentioned,  with  the  exception  of  Christo- 
pher, who  lives  at  Cornwallis. 

Three  children  were  added  to  the  family  after  their  ar- 
rival here :  James  R.  died  while  serving  as  a  soldier  in  the 
Civil  war,  and  in  the  Egypt  cemetery  he,  too,  rests.  Ellen 
married  William  Skelton,  and  at  Litchfield,  Illinois,  she  sleeps; 
and  George  13.  is  of  Petroleum. 

John,  the  eldest  son,  was  well  known  throughout  the 
county,  he  having  been  County  surveyor  for  many  years.  He 
married  Miss  Elizabeth  Marsh,  sister  of  the  late  Jefiferson 
Marsh,  and  at  the  old  home  at  Cairo  she  still  survives,  though 
he  has  been  gone  for  several  years.  Matthew  I3ouglass,  and 
Mrs.  Emma  (David)  McGregor,  of  Cairo;  and  Mrs.  Laura 
Crinnmett,  wife  of  the  Rev.  S.  P.  Crummett — the  Superin- 
tendent of  the  Parkersburg  district  of  the  West  Virginia  ^L 
E.  conference,  are  his  children. 

Wm.  H.,  too,  was  widely  known,  he  having  served  as 
Clerk  of  the  Circuit  court  for  many  years.  He  married  "\iiss 
Mary  Rutherford,  and  left  no  heirs. 

Matthew,  who  married  Miss  Susan  Rutherford,  was  killed 
by  the  falling  of  a  tree,  in  the  Cornwallis  vicinity.  He  left 
no  issue. 

Andrew  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being  Miss 
Mary  Hindmarsh,  and  his  widow,  Aliss  Narcissus  Smith.  The 
one  child — of  the  first  union — was  Andrew,  junior,  who  has 
passed  on. 

Christopher,  who  has  long  been  prominently  identitied 
with  the  Cornwallis  community,  married  Miss  Mary  Wariless,^ 
and  five  children  were  the  fruits  of  this  union. 

Ellen,  the  only  daughter,  became  Mrs.  William  Skelton 
and  went  to  Illinois. - 

George  B.  Douglass,  the  youngest  member  of  the  family, 
is  a  leading  citizen  of  Petroleum.  He  is  a  veteran  of  the  Civil 
war,  having  enlisted  in  the  2nd  West  Virginia  Infantry  V^ol- 
unteers  in  1861;  but  owing  to  an  illness  which  immediately 
followed,  was  not  mustered  into  service  until  later  in  the  year, 


"See  Wanless  history. 

-See  Cairo  chapter  for  lier  family. 


IH)  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

when  lie  re-enlisted  in  tlie  Sixth  Virginia,  where  his  services 
continued  for  three  years.  He  married  Miss  Isabella  Ruther- 
ford, and  is  the  father  of  one  son,  Dr.  E.  H.  Douglass,  of 
Petroleum,  as  before  stated. 

The  name,  Douglass,  has  been  a  distinguished  one  almost 
throughout  the  annals  of  Scotland.  History  tells  us  that  they 
were  "territorial  magnates"  before  the  time  of  Bruce  and 
Wallace  ;  that  they  played  a  conspicuous  part  in  the  numer- 
ous wars  that  visited  their  native  land  from  time  to  time;  and 
that  they  early  became  guardians  against  the  encroachment 
of  the  English — as  their  estates  lay  on  the  outer  borders  of 
the  country.  In  the  days  of  feudalism,  they  were  a  powerful 
clan  ;  and  at  the  battle  of  Floddenfield,  when  James  the  Fifth 
of  Scotland  fell,  tw^o  hu.ndred  of  the  name  were  slain. 

The  name  not  only  figures  prominently  in  the  history  of 
"Scotia,"  but  it  holds  a  place  in  its  stories  and  its  songs.  In 
"Marmion,"  the  pretty  little  poetical  tale  that  Sir  Walter  Scott 
has  woven  about  the  Battle-field  of  Flodden,  the  memory  of 
Archibald  Douglass,  the  Earl  of  Angus,  is  enshrined. 

He  being  a  man  of  remarkable  strength  of  body  and  mind 
acquired  the  popular  name  of  "Bell-the-Cat."  At  the  time 
that  the  war  against  England  was  declared,  he  was  an  old 
man,  and  he  protested  earnestly  against  such  a  step  :  and  on 
the  eve  of  the  battle  of  Flodden,  he  remonstrated  so  vehement- 
ly on  the  impolicy  of  fighting  that  the  King  in  a  voice  of  in- 
dignation, told  him  "that  he  might  go  home  if  he  were  afraid." 
At  this  insufiferable  insult,  the  brave  old  earl  burst  into  tears 
and  retired,  leaving  his  sons,  George,  Master  of  Angus;  and 
Sir  William,  of  Glenbervie :  in  command  of  his  followers. 
These  sons  were  both  numbered  among  the  two  hundred  of 
the  name  that  fell  on  that  fatal  day ;  and  the  aged  father, 
broken-hearted  over  the  calamities  that  had  befallen  his  house, 
sought  relief  from  his  sorrow  within  the  friendly  walls  of  a 
religious  castle,  where  he  died  a  year  later. 

To  this  same  Archibald  Douglass,  the  familiar,  ireful  lan- 
guage of  Lord  Marmion  was  directed  when  he  exclaimed : 

"If  thou  said'st,  I  am  not  peer, 
To  any  lord  in  Scotland  here, 
Lowland  or  Highland,  far  or  near, 
Lord  Angus — thou — hast — LIED." 


SCOTCH   SETTLERS  181 

In  the  "Lady  of  the  Lake"  it  was  the  fair  Ellen  Douglass, 
that  sang  the  simple  lay,  "Soldier  Rest  Thy  Warfare  O'er," 
etc.,  to  the  Knight  of  Snowden — to  James  Fitz  James. 

The  Halls. — Andrew  Hall,  who  is  mentioned  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Douglass  emigrant  party,  was  the  son  of  William 
and  Mrs.  Ellen  Brown  Hall,  of  Scotland ;  and  a  brother  of 
Mrs.  Andrew  Douglass,  senior,  and  of  Mrs.  Andrew  Younge. 
He  was  at  this  time  enjoying  single  life,  but  a  little  later,  he 
claimed  Miss  Margaret  Blake  as  his  wife,  and  settled  at  Park- 
ersburg,  where  he  was  a  stone  contractor.  He  finally  re- 
moved to  Wheeling,  and  there  he  and  his  wife  sleep.  They 
were  the  parents  of  six  children,  two  of  whom  have  passed  on. 
and  the  others  reside  at  Wheeling,  and  in  the  far  West. 

Miss  Isabel  Hall,  his  sister,  who  was,  also,  a  member  of 
the  emigrant  party,  lived  and  died  at  Cairo.  She  never  mar- 
ried. 

Mary  Hall,  another  sister  of  Andrew,  married  James 
Browne,  in  Scotland,  and  came  to  the  Cairo  vicinity.  Mr. 
Browne  was  a  miller  by  trade,  and  they  went  from  here  to 
Brooke  county,  where  they  bade  their  final  adieu  to  earth. 
They  had  six  children,  four  of  whom  were  born  in  Scotland, 
and  some  of  their  descendants  still  reside  near  Wheeling. 

John  Hall,  another  brother,  married  Miss  Margaret  Doug- 
lass, in  Scotland,  and  after  her  death,  he,  too,  with  his  family, 
came  to  America,  and  settled  in  the  Cairo  vicinity,  in  the 
year  1836;  and  there  remained  until  he  was  laid  in  the  Egypt 
cemcter3^  He  had  three  sons  and  two  daughters,  who  crossed 
the  sea  with  him.  Eespeth  had  married  AVilliam  Newland 
in  her  native  land,  and  they  settled  in  Pleasants  county,  where 
some  of  their  descendants  live. 

Ellen  Hall  married  James  Pew  and  lived  and  died  at  her 
father's  house.  Her  only  child,  Maggie,  is  now  Mrs.  Milton 
Wall,  of  Pennsylvania.  After  she  was  laid  in  the  Egypt  ceme- 
tery, Mr.  Pew  married  Miss  Nancy  Younge,  and  was  the 
father  of  four  more  children.  The  Pews  are  of  German  de- 
scent and  came  here  from  the  "Keystone  state." 

John  Han,  junior,  son  of  John  and  Margaret  Douglass 
Hall,  married  Miss  Hannah  Pringle,  and  lived  and  tlied  at 
Parkersburg,   and  there,  beside  his   companion,   he   sleeps   in 


182  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

the  Cook  cemetery.  His  youngest  daughter,  Mrs.  John  Dare, 
now  occupies  the  old  home. 

William  Hall  married  Miss  Mary  Taylor,  and  resided  be- 
tween Cairo  and  Cornwallis.  His  children  are  John,  and  Miss 
Margaret,  of  Cairo ;  and  Mrs.  Mary  Jenkins,  of  Petroleum. 

Andrew  Hall,  junior,  married  Aliss  Ellen  Rutherford,  and 
spent  his  life  at  the  old  homestead,  near  Cairo ;  and  in  the 
Egypt  cemetery  beside  his  wife  he  is  sleeping.  He  was  the 
father  of  the  following  named  sons  and  daughters :  John 
Hall,  of  Beliott,  Kansas;  Richard  R.,  of  Harrisville  ;  William, 
a  prominent  merchant,  of  Cairo;  Andrew  and  Archie  L.,  of 
Ohio ;  Misses  Ellen  and  Mary,  of  Cairo ;  and  the  late  ]\Iiss 
Eppie.  and  another  daughter  who,  with  the  parents,  lie  in  the 
quiet  churchyard. 

The  Younges. — Along  with  the  Douglasses,  in  1829,  came 
Andrew  Younge,  and  his  family  from  Scotland.  His  wife, 
Mrs.  Agnes  Hall  Younge,  was  a  sister  of  Mrs.  Andrew  Doug- 
lass, and  they  were  the  parents  of  nine  children — six  daugh- 
ters and  three  sons — all  of  whom  were  born  in  Scotland,  ex- 
cept one  daughter  and  one  son,  who  were  born  at  Cairo.  Mr. 
and  r\Irs.  Younge  spent  the  remamder  of  their  lives  here  and 
with  the  many  other  pioneers,  sleep  in  the  Egypt- cemetery. 

Their  children  :  William  H.  Younge  married  Miss  W- 
meda  Browne,  of  Parkersburg,  and  resided  there  until  after 
her  death,  when  he  went  West,  and  there  re-married.  He 
now  lives  in  Arkansas,  and  is  the  only  survivor  of  the  family. 
He  lost  his  eyesight  six  years  ago  and  now  lives  in  darkness. 
His  family  consists  of  three  sons. 

Andrew  Younge,  junior,  married  Miss  Janet  Smith,  and 
lived  at  Parkersburg.  Pie  had  two  sons,  and  one  daughter. 
Lulu,  Avho  was  the  late  wife  of  U.  B.  Merchant,  of  Cairo. 

Jolm  married  Miss  Rebecca  Lowther,  daughter  of  \M11- 
iam.  of  Cairo,  and  died  childless. 

Xancy  became  the  second  wife  of  James  Pew,  and  her 
children  were  four  in  number ;  viz.,  Preston,  Andrew,  Jessie 
and  Xannie,  who,  after  her  death,  with  their  father,  went 
West.  They  now  reside  at  St.  Louis,  Missouri.  X^annie  is 
married. 

Ellen   Younge   married    Brigham    Wood,   of   ^^'hite   Oak, 


SCOTCH    SETTLERS  1S3 

and  left  no  issue;  and  Mary,  Isabel,  Christiana,  and  Margaret 
never  married. 

John  Layfield,  senior,  eldest  son  of  William  Layfield, 
whose  history  appears  witli  the  South  fork  settlers,  was  an- 
other early  pioneer  in  this  section.  He  was  born  in  the  wilder- 
ness, on  the  S.  H.  Westfall  farm,  above  Smithfield,  on  Febru- 
ary 4,  1803 — was  perhaps  the  first  child  born  within  the  ores- 
ent  limits  of  this  county.  He  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Moats, 
and  first  settled  on  "Dry  Ridge,"  on  Goose  creek,  and  from- 
there  he  removed  to  the  dividing  ridge  between  Addis'  and 
Elm  runs,  v/here  his  grandson,  Noah  Layfield,  now  lives  ;  and 
there  he  passed  from  earth  on  March  5,  1877,  and  in  the  Mt. 
Moriah  churchyard,  he  sleeps.  His  wife  was  laid  by  his  side 
in  1892. 

They  were  the  parents  of  eleven  children.  One  died  in 
childhood,  and  the  rest  are  as  follows:  the  late  Henry,  John, 
junior,  Jacob,  George,  Mrs.  Mary  (Uriah)  Shrader,  ti;e  late 
Mrs.  Margaret  (Milton)  Reger,  Mrs.  Sarah  Furr,  the  late 
Mrs.  Elizabeth  Hilkey,  and  the  late  Miss  Julia  Lavfield.  all 
of  this  county. 

Nearly  all  of  the  Layfields  in  the  county  are  descended 
from  John,  senior.  His  brother,  Sanford,  lived  and  died  near 
Cornwallis,  where  he  was  tTinnel  watchman  on  the  B.  &  O.  rail- 
road for  many  years.  The  others  went  West.  John  Layfield, 
senior,  and  his  sons,  George  and  James,  were  all  Union  sol- 
diers in  the  Civil  war. 

The  Philippses  were  another  worthy  pioneer  family  that 
have  heretofore  been  overlooked. 

They  crossed  the  "briny  deep"  from  the  "Emerald  Isle" 
at  a  date  unknown,  and  settled  at  Norfolk,  Virginia.  Here 
Benjamin  Philipps  was  born  in  1810 ;  and  at  the  age  of  twelve 
years,  with  his  parents,  Thomas  D.  and  Mrs.  Sarah  Lemon 
Philipps,  he  removed  to  Belington,  Barbour  county,  where  he 
grew  to  manhood  and  where  his  parents  fell  asleep. 

In  1830,  he  came  to  this  county,  where  he  met  and  mar- 
ried Miss  Mary  Deem,  daughter  of  pioneer  Jacob  Deem,  wha 
was  born  here  in  1812  ;  and  shortly  after  his  marriage,  set- 
tled on  the  North  fork  of  Hughes  river,  six  miles  below  Cairo,. 
<  n  the  old  homestead   that  is  still  in   the  hands  of  his  heirs. 


184  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COL'XTY 

Here,  he  continued  to  reside,  until  April,  ISQ?,  when  he  was 
borne  to  his  final  resting-  place  in  the  Egypt  cemetery.  Here, 
his  companion  also  rests. 

They,  like  the  other  pioneers,  came  at  a  time  when  the 
forest  was  resonant  with  the  howl  of  the  wild  beast,  and  tlicir 
domestic  animals  were  not  unfrequently  disturbed  by  the  bear 
and  the  wolf. 

This  venerable  couple  were  the  parents  of  a  large  family 
of  sons  and  daughters;  viz.,  Thomas  D..  Lawford ;  Benjamin 
F.,  A.  R.,  Mrs.  Sarah  Dotson,  the  late  Rev.  A.  Id.  Philipps, 
of  the  Baptist  church,  and  the  late  Mrs.  Rachel  (George) 
Twyman,  all  of  Rusk;  D.  M.  V.,  of  Smithville.  who  was  a 
Confederate  soldier;  Philip  C,  wdio  resides  at  Elizabeth;  and 
Mrs.  Cinderilla  (Samuel)  Hatfield,  Cairo. 

Thomas  D.  lost  his  hearing  when  a  small  child,  and  was 
educated  at  the  college  for  the  Deaf  and  Blmd  at  Staunton. 
Virginia,  as  was  his  wife,  Mrs.  Lydia  Bartlett  Philipps. 

The  Sharpnacks. — Sharpnack  is  another  prominent,  pio- 
neer name  that  belongs  to  the  history  of  this  part  of  the  coun- 
ty. This  family  trace  their  ancestry  to  Germany,  where  the 
name  Avas  originally  spelled  "Scharpenack." 

In  the  year  1759,  the  founder  of  this  family,  leaving  his 
native  land — "Prussia" — wdth  his  wife  and  one  child,  Peter, 
set  sail  for  the  New  World  ;  but  he  died  on  board  the  emi- 
grant ship,  and  was,  doubtless,  sunk  beneath  the  waves,  and 
his  widow^  and  child  came  on  to  Philadelphia  alone.  Here,  a 
few^  months  later  (in  1760),  she  gave  birth  to  another  son, 
who  was  known  as  "Henry."  These  two  sons  grew  up  in  the 
"City  of  Brotherly  Love,"  and  became  identified  as  silk 
merchants. 

Peter  returned  to  the  place  of  his  nativity  at  Elberfeld 
Half  Camp,  Prussia;  and  Henry  took  up  his  residence  at 
Rice's  Landing,  in  Pennsylvania,  where  he  met  and  married 
Miss  ]\Iary  Rice  in  the  year  1783.  Here  he  reared  a  large 
family;  and  here  his  last  hours  were  spent — in  1848.  Pie  was 
locally  known  as  "River  Plenry." 

His  sons  were :  Daniel,  Samuel,  Henry,  Peter.  John, 
Jacob,  and  William  ;  and  he  had  three  or  more  daughters. 

John,    with   his    wife    and   brothers,    Samuel    arid    Henry. 


SCOTCH   SETTLERS  185 

crossed  the  plains  to  Pike's  Peak,  in  1819,  in  wagons  drawn 
by  their  cows.  Having  secured  some  gold  there,  they  all  re- 
turned to  Iowa  and  settled  near  Modale,  where  they  reared 
families. 

William  Sharpnack,  who  was  born  near  the  year  1785, 
was  married  near  1808  to  a  Miss  Anderson,  and  settled  in 
Wetzel  county,  on  the  site  that  is  now  marked  by  the  Anthem 
post-office.  Here  he  established  a  mill  and  a  distillery,  and 
reared  a  large  family.  Near  1840,  while  chopping  wood,  he 
met  with  an  accident  that  cost  him  his  life. 

tlis  children  were :  Richard,  Daniel,  Samuel,  William, 
John.  Henry,  Peter.  Hiram,  Jane  and  Hester. 

William  Sharpnack,  junior,  was  born  in  1810,  and  married 
Miss  Sarah  Harris,  daughter  of  Anthony  Harris,  and  removed 
from  Wetzel  to  Ritchie  county  in  1845 ;  and  after  resid- 
ing for  a  brief  time  on  Buffalo  run,  settled  on  a  tract  of  land 
near  the  present  site  of  the  "California  House."  Here,  his 
wife,  Sarah,  died,  leaving  three  children,  Elias,  Anthony  and 
Elizabeth,  who  died  in  her  youth.  Some  time  after  this  sad 
event,  he  married  Miss  Margaret  Cokeley,  daughter  of  Daniel 
Cokeley,  of  near  Harrisville,  who  only  survived  a  short  time. 
He  then  married  her  sister.  Miss  Mary  Cokeley,  and  three 
children  were  born  of  this  union;  viz.,  John  I.,  Frank  D.,  and 
Martha,  who  became  Mrs.  William  Cox,  and  went  to  Hot 
Springs,  Arkansas,  where  she  died  without  issue. 

After  the  death  of  his  third  wife,  William  Sharpnack  mar- 
ried Miss  Eleanor  Pipes,  of  Tyler  county,  who  still  survives. 
He  lived  a  long  and  useful  life,  dying  on  July  8,  1890,  at  the 
age  of  eighty  years.  He  was  a  leader  in  the  Methodist  Epis- 
copal church,  and  was  Captain  of  the  Militia  before  the  Civil 
war.  His  sons  Elias  and  Anthony,  were  soldiers  of  the  Union 
army  for  three  years. 

Hiram  Sharpnack,  brother  of  William,  who  was  born  on 
April  11,  1818,  married  Miss  Lydia  Harris,  daughter  of  An- 
thony, in  1843  ;  and  five  years  later  he  came  to  this  county 
and  settled  on  a  tract  of  land  joining  his  brother,  near  the  Cali- 
fornia House,  where  he  remained  until  his  death  on  November 
20,  1880.  He  was  a  skillful  workman  in  both  wood  and  iron — 
was  a  cabinet-maker,  builder,  and  mill-wright. 


)S(i  HISTORY    or    RITCHIE    COUX'TY 

His  wife  died  in  January,  1886. 

They  were  the  parents  of  nine  children  :  \iz.,  William  H., 
Daniel  M.,  Rachel  A.,  Isaac  N.,  Sarah  F.,  Lucy  J.,  Alary  V'.. 
Ella  P.,  and  Martha  E. 

William  H.  served  as  a  Union  soldier  for  three  one-half 
years  during  the  Civil  war ;  and  then  married  Miss  Kathnne 
Smith,  of  Freeport,  and  settled  there,  where  he  has  been  a 
leading  figure  in  business  and  political  circles  for  forty  years. 
His  wife  died  in  1906,  and  his  two  children  are  ]\Irs.  ^Minnie 
(R.  C.)  Marshall,  and  Joseph  N.  Sharpnack,  wdio  was  for  sev- 
eral years  identified  with  the  Cairo  Bank. 

(For  D.  M.'s  Family  see  Petroleum.) 

Isaac  X.  and  his  wife,  Ida  J.  Huntington,  and  their  onl}- 
son  Fred,  reside  at  Parkersburg,  where  he  is  manager  of  the 
Western  Union  Telegraph  Company. 

Rachel  A.,  the  eldest  daughter,  married  Thomas  Bath- 
gate, of  Scotland,  who,  in  1865,  removed  from  the  old  "Bath- 
gate homestead,"  at  Petroleum,  to  Missouri,  wdiere  she  died  a 
number  of  3'ears  ago,  leaving  several  children,  who  are  prom- 
inently known  in  dilierent  parts  of  the  West.  After  her  deaths 
Mr.  Bathgate  re-married  and  he  now  lives  at  Polo,  Missouri, 
at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-one  years,  surrounded  by  ease 
and  luxurv.  When  he  first  came  to  America,  he  worked  at 
digging  ditches  for  the  small  sum  of  eight  dollars  a  month 
snd  his  board. 

Sarah  F.,  the  second  daughter,  became  Mrs.  James  Lil- 
lie,  of  New  York,  and  went  to  Missouri,  where  her  husband 
died  in  1905,  leaving  a  small  family. 

]\Iary  F.  Sharpnack,  who  died  in  1886,  was  the  wife  of 
the  late  Alfred  B.  Enoch,  and  mother  of  Chester  Enoch,  of 
Parkersburg. 

Ella  P.  married  Winfield  Clarke,  of  \'olcano,  and  resides 
at  Tacoma,  Washington,  and  has  one  son,  AA'infield. 
The  other  daughters  never  married. 

John  Sharpnack,  a  cousin  of  William  and  Hiram,  with 
his  wife,  Hannah,  also  came  to  Ritchie  county  in  the  forties, 
and  settled  on  Bufifalo  run,  where  he  reared  a  large  famii>, 
which  are  as  follows :  Hiram,  Abraham,  Elma,  ]\Irs.  Lydia 
A.    (J.   W\)    Hensley,   Mrs.   Sarah  J.    (John   H.)    A\'endell.   of 


SCOTCH   SETTLERS  187 

AJichigan;  Airs.  Mahala  (John  B.)  Rice,  and  Henry  Sharpnack, 
Seattle,  Washington. 

All  the  different  families  of  this  name  in  the  United  States 
are  said  to  have  been  descended  from  the  same  common 
ancestors  in  the  Fatherland. 


CHAPTER  XII 


Bond's  Creek  Settled 


Bond's  creek  is  a  stream  not  noted  in  song, 

No  pencil  or  tongue  its  beauties  portrayed; 
Unwritten,  unsung  it  glided  along, 

Keeping  time  to  the  music  it  ripples  made. 

'Tis  a  gentle  stream  with  its  winding  way. 

Through  a  woodland  d&U  where  the  wild  flowers  bloom; 

Where  the  trees  their  pliant  branches  sway. 
And  the  air  is  filled  with  a  sweet  perfume. 

—John  S.  Hall. 

OXD'S  CREEK,  with  its  numerous  trib- 
utaries, drains  one  of  the  most  fertile 
regions  in  the  county.  It  has  its  source  in 
the  dividing  ridge  between  Tyler,  Pleasants, 
and  Ritchie,  and  its  confluence  with  the 
Xorth  fork  at  Cornwallis,  eighteen  miles  dis- 
tant. 

Its  name  perpetuates  the  memory  of  one  of  its  earliest 
settlers — "Lewis  Bond." 

Mr.  Bond  has,  hertofore,  been  recognized  as  its  first 
pioneer,  but  careful  investigation  proves  this  to  be  in  error, 
as  George  Husher  was  without  doubt  his  predecessor  here. 
But  as  ]\Ir.  Husher's  improvement  was  slight,  and  liis  stay 
brief,  his  rightful  claim  to  this  distinction  was  lost  to  view 
until  quite  recently,  when  the  facts  were  brought  to  light 
from  their  hiding-place  in  the  cob-webby  past. 

The  Coming  of  the  Hushers. — George  Husher  is  recog- 
nized as  the  second^  pioneer  within  the  present  bounds  of  the 
county,  as  his  settlement  at  Highland  closely  followed  that 
of  John  Bunnell,  at  Pennsboro,  in  1800. 


^But  so  many  came  near  the  same  time  that  it  is  difficult  to  establish 
this  fact  beyond  doubt. 


BONDS    CREEK   SETTLED  189 

Mr,  Husher  was  of  German  origin,  and  was  probably  born 
in  the  Fatherland.  However,  his  natal  day  was  July  6,  K'71, 
and  that  of  his  wife.  Annie  Terrell,  who  was  a  native  of  one 
of  the  New  England  colonies,  was  December  twelfth  of  the 
same  year.  They  were  married  on  February  12,  1793  ;  and  as 
early  as  1801,  came  to  Highland  and  opened  a  blacksmith- 
shop  and  a  house  of  public  entertainment;  but  after  a  brief 
residence  here,  they  removed  to  Husher's  run — to  the  farm 
that  is  now  the  home  of  John  Fowler,  near  three  miles  below 
Elienboro ;  and  from  there,  in  1830,  they  went  to  Cabin  run, 
and  became  the  first  citizens  of  the  forest  where  Tollgate  now 
stands  ;  the  site  of  their  old  cabin  being  marked  by  the  resi- 
dence of  the  late  T.  J.  Broadwater.  Here,  in  1838,  Mr.  Husher 
fell  atleep,  and  in  185G,  his  wife,  Annie,  was  laid  by  his  side 
in  the  Baptist  church  cemetery,  at  that  place. 

Their  family  consisted  of  six  daughters  and  two  sons ; 
viz.,  Elijah,  Mary,  Kathrine,  Elizabeth,  Jacob,  Anna,  Nancy, 
and  Selina  Husher. 

Elijah  Husher  was  born  on  October  19,  1794.  and  on  April 
3,  1818,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  (or  Polly)  Cunning- 
ham, da'ughter  of  Edward  Cunningham,  of  Bond's  creek ;  and 
remained  in  this  part  of  the  county  until  after  the  early  death 
of  his  wife,  when  he  went  West  and  spent  much  of  his  time 
in  traveling  about  until  late  in  life,  when  he  settled  down  v/ith 
his  only  daughter,  Margaret,  at  Terre  Haute.  Indiana,  where 
he  rests. 

Mary  Husher,  born  March  13,  1796,  was  married  to 
Alexander  Sommerville,  on  January  28,  1836  ;  and  near  West 
Union  they  resided  until  1878,  when  they  removed  to  Kansas, 
where  they  rest.  Their  children  were  five  in  number:  Adol- 
phus,  of  West  Union;  the  late  A.  B.,  and  S.  Salome  Lowther 
(first  wife  of  the  Rev.  Oliver  Lowther),  of  Pullman:  Mrs. 
Minnie  Davis,  and  Busie,  who  went  to  Kansas  with  their 
parents. 

Kathrine  Husher,  born  July  31,  1799,  became  Mrs.  Nixon, 
on  October  21,  3  822,  and  went  to  Ohio,  where  she  reared  a 
family  and  died. 

Elizabeth  Husher,  who  was  born  on  October  17,  ISO;*, 
was  the  late  Mrs.  Bond,  of  Indiana.     She  had  one  daughter, 


190  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Selina,  and  one  son,  Lewis  Bond,  who  came  I^ack  to  Ts'ler 
county,  near  twenty-five  years  ago^  and  was  married  to  a  Z^Iiss 
Wilson,  of  the  Pennsboro  vicinity. 

Jacob  Husher  was  born  on  September  1,  1805,  and  went 
to  Ohio  in  his  younger  days,  where  he  met  and  married  Miss 
Nancy  Boran,  of  Washington  county  ;  and  at  Covington,  Ken- 
tacky,  they  established  their  home,  a  little  later.  Here  he 
enlisted  in  the  Union  cause  and  served  for  four  years  ;  and 
here  he  spent  his  last  hours,  near  the  year  1878.  His  only 
child,  Xancy.  became  Mrs.  Ridgeway,  of  Covington. 

Annie  B.  Husher,  born  on  December  28,  1807,  was  first 
married  to  John  Ankrum,  of  Highland;  and  they  settled  near 
Centreville,  in  Tyler  county,  where  Mr.  Ankrum  and  their 
three  sons — George,  Solomon,  and  Augustus,  all  died  Avithin 
a  few  months;  and  her  second  husband  was  William  ]\Ioore, 
of  North  Bend  IMill,  and  this  marriage  was  childless. 

Nancy  Husher,  born,  perhaps,  near  the  year  1809,  was 
married  to  John  Rawson  on  August  26,  1887 ;  and  settled  in 
the  Ellenboro  vicinity,  where  they  both  lived  and  died.  They 
had  no  children  of  their  own,  but  they  reared  three  of  his 
brother's  children  ;  viz.,  Thomas,  Samuel,  and  Mary  Rawson. 
who  was  the  late  wife  of  Eber  Mason,  of  Pennsboro.  ^Ir. 
Rawson  passed  from  earth  in  July,  1861,  and  his  wife,  in 
August  of  the  following  year. 

Selina  Husher  was  born  on  December  13.  1813;  and  on 
May  14,  1843,  she  became  the  v/ife  of  George  Haddox,  son  of 
Raleigh  Haddox,  of  this  county;  but  in  1867,  they  removed 
to  Pleasants  county,  where  their  lives  came  to  a  close.  She 
died  on  April  21,  1894;  and  he.  on  June  19,  1898.  They  were 
the  parents  of  seven  children;  viz., 

Virginia,  Greene,  John  R.,  Mary  Ann,  M.  D..  G.  B..  and 
Cindonia,  who  died  in  early  childhood. 

The  Bonds. — Lewis  Bond,  the  second  settler  of  this  creek, 
whose  memoiy  is  so  fittingly  enshrined  by  its  name,  was  born 
in  Cecil  county,  Maryland,  on  February  16,  1780,  amidst  the 
din  of  the  American  Revolution  ;  and  on  November  15,  1805, 
he  was  married  to  Miss  Lydia  John,  daughter  of  Jehu  and 
Elizabeth  David  John,  and  granddaughter  of  the  Reverend 
Enoch   David,  of  Philadelphia,  who  was  also  a  native  of  the 


BOND'S    CREEK   SETTLED  191 

Keystone  state — of  Fayette  county.  And  in  1813,  with  her,  he 
removed  to  Brookville,  Indiana,  and  three  years  later  (1816), 
came  to  Bond's  creek,  and  established  a  home  north  of  High- 
land ;  but  we  are  without  authentic  information  as  to  the  exact 
scene  of  this  settlement.  However,  he  later  removed  to  Gnat's 
run,  where  he  built  the  "old  brick  house"  that  is  now  owned 
and  occupied  by  Robert  Cunningham — it  being,  perhaps, 
second  only  in  age  to  the  "stone  house"  at  Pennsboro. 

After  a  long  residence  here  he  removed  to  the  wSouth  fork 
of  Hughes  river,  in  Doddridge  county,  where  he  remained  but 
a  short  time,  before  going  to  Quiet  Dell,  in  Harrison  county, 
near  the  year  1860.  There  he  quietly  passed  into  the  land  of 
eternal  rest,  on  April  1-1,  1867.  And  within  the  peaceful  bosom 
of  the  old  Seventh-Day  Baptist  cemetery,  at  Lost  creek,  in 
Harrison  county,  he  lies  in  his  last  sleep. 

He  and  his  wife,  Lydia,  were  the  parents  of  twelve  chil- 
dren, which  are  as  follows :  Alfred  J.,  Edwin  P.,  Ethelbert 
D.,  Benjamin  Franklin,  Thomas,  and  Lewis,  junior,  who  died 
in  youth,  (and  another  son  was  named  Lewis  J.),  and  Richard 
C. ;  Rebecca  E.,  the  eldest  daughter,  married  William  P.  Bond ; 
Casandra,  Simeon  Bond ;  Mary  Ann,  Thomas  Booth  Bond  ;  and 
Lydia,  Daniel  D.  Kildow. 

Two  of  these  sons  were  ministers  of  the  gospel,  and  four 
were  physicians.  All  have  now  crossed  to  the  other  side,  but 
their  descendants  are  widely  scattered  in  this  and  other  states. 

The  original  home  of  the  Bonds  was  in  Cornwell  county, 
England,  where  there  remains  to-day  the  ruins  of  an  ancient 
castle,  which  was  held  by  their  antecessors  for  more  than 
three  hundred  fifty  years. 

They  belonged  to  the  landed  aristocracy  of  their  day,  and 
were  recognized  by  the  higher  castes  in  the  social  realm. 

But  the  first  account  we  have  of  the  family  in  America, 
begins  with  the  year  1700,  when  Richard  Bond  and  his  wife, 
Sarah,  crossed  to  the  colonies. 

Their  son,  Samuel,  married  Miss  Ann  Sharpless,  daughter 
of  John  Sharpless,  of  Chester,  Pennsylvania,  wdio  formerly 
came  from  Cheshire,  England,  and  from  him  the  Ritchie  coun- 
ey  family  trace  their  lineage. 

This  marriage  took  place  in  1736,  and  a  pretty  little  tradi- 


192  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

tional  romance  is  woven  about  it,  which  says  that  they  eloped 
at  the  ages  of  nineteen  and  fourteen  years,  respectively;  and 
that  they  were  pursued  by  the  girl's  father,  who  arrived  too 
late  to  prevent  the  ceremony;  but  he,  seeing  the  fallacy  of 
farther  opposition,  joined,  good  naturedly,  in  the  nuptial  feast 
and  "took  the  children  home." 

Samuel  and  Ann  Bond  were  the  parents  of  four  children: 
Richard  Clayton,  Sarah,  Margaret,  and  Susanna. 

Richard  Clayton  Bond,  this  only  son,  was  born  in  Cecil 
county,  Maryland,  in  1728,  and  was  twice  married  ;  his  (irst 
wife  being  Miss  Mary  Jarman,  of  Cumberland  county,  Mary- 
land; and  his  second  Miss  Mary  Booth.  He  removed  to  Har- 
rison county,  this  state,  later  in  life,  where  he  saw  the  last  of 
earth. 

He  was  the  father  of  fifteen  children :  Samuel,  born  in 
1754,  Richard,  Susana,  Levi,  Lydia,  John,  Abel,  Sarah,  and 
Mary  were  the  nine  children  of  the  first  union.  And  Rachel, 
Thomas,  Lewis,  Rebecca,  Mary  Aim,  who  died  in  infancy,  and 
another  daughter  named  Mary  Ann  were  the  fruits  of  the 
second  union. 

Lewis  Bond,  above  mentioned,  son  of  Samuel  and  Mar\^ 
Booth  Bond,  was  the  Ritchie  county  pioneer,  after  whom 
Bond's  creek  was  named. 

And  Rebecca  Bond,  his  twin  sister,  who  married  Thomas 
Haymond,  of  Harrison  county,  was  the  grandmother  of  Mrs. 
Creed  Collins,  senior,  of  Pennsboro.  (See  Llaymond  family 
history.) 

Sarah  Bond,  the  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Ann  Sharpiess 
Bond,  married  Ebeneezer  Howell,  of  New  Jersey,  in  174:9, 
and  they  were  the  parents  of — Samuel,  Richard,  Lewis,  Sarah. 
Ebeneezer,  Azariah,  Susanna,  Tamar,  Margaret,  Anne,  and 
George. 

Their  son  Richard  Howell  was,  in  1775,  appointed  Cap- 
tain of  the  Fifth  Company  in  the  Second  Battalion  of  the  "Jer- 
sey Line."  He  spent  the  winter  with  his  command  in  the 
Highlands  of  the  Hudson,  and  was  a  participant  in  the  unsuc- 
cessful expedition  to  Canada  in  the  spring. 

He  was  in  active  service  tliroughout  the  Revolution,  and 
was  in  the  noted  engagements  at  Brandywine  and  German- 


BOXD'S    CREEK   SETTLED  193 

town,    and   witnessed    tlie    terrible   suffering"   of   the   patriotic 
army  at  Valley  Forge. 

In   1793,   he   was   chosen   governor  of   his   native   st<?ie-- 
New  Jersey,  and  served  as  chief  executive  for  eight  consecu- 
tive terms. 

He  was  the  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Jefferson  Davis,  the  late 
wife  of  the  only  President  of  the  Southern  Confederacy. 

In  a  biographical  work  on  the  Governors  of  New^  Jersey, 
the  following  beautiful  tribute  is  paid  to  his  memory  : 

"Howell,  for  social  virtue  far-famed, 
Shone  in  the  ranks  and  urged  the  dreadful  war; 
His  graceful  form  expressed  a  noble  mind, 
The  soul  of  honor,  friend  of  human  kind." 

Margaret  Bond,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Ann  Sharpless 
Bond,  married  Jonathan  Davis,  of  New  Castle  county,  Dela- 
w^are,  who  was  the  founder  of  the  Newark  Academy — now 
the  Delaware  college;  and  their  children  were:  Ann,  Samuel, 
David,  Ammi,  Susanna,  Sarah,  Richard,  and  John. 

Susanna  Bond,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Ann  Sharpless 
Bond,  married  Elnathan  Davis,  and  their  children  were : 
Rachel,  Jonathan,  Jacob,  Ebeneezer,  Jebediah,  Susanna,  Sam- 
uel Bond,  Jeremiah,  Elnathan.  Susanna  (the  first  Susanna 
having  died  in  infancy),  and  Margaret. 

Jack  and  Robinson. — The  next  settlers  on  this  creek  were 
an  Englishman  by  the  name  of  Jack,  and  Charles  Robinson, 
a  Scotchman,  brothers-in-law,  who  both  took  up  their  resi- 
dence in  the  same  house,  at  Highland.  Jack  had  been  an  ad- 
miral in  the  British  navy,  and  he  first  came  to  the  "New 
World"  in  his  official  capacity  during  the  war  of  1812.  Rob- 
inson is  also  said  to  have  been  an  officer  in  the  Brittish  army  ; 
and  shortly  after  the  close  of  our  second  conflict  with  the 
Mother-Country,  they  came  to  Bond's  creek.  They  went 
from  here  to  Rock  Island,  Illinois,  some  time  during  the  twen- 
ties, and  there  some  of  their  descendants  still  live. 

The  McGregors. — John  McGregor,  senior,  was  the  next 
settler  at  Highland.  He  was  born  and  reared  near  Edin- 
burgh, Scotland,  and  there  learned  the  blacksmith's  trade,  in 
1809.  he  was  married  to  Miss  Susanna  Blakeley,  of  Glasgow ; 
and  three  years  later,   with  their  little  son,  James,   they  set 


194  HISTORY    OF   RITCHIE    COUXTY 

sail  for  America;  and  after  a  six  month's  voyage,  landed  in 
Philadelphia,  where  the}^  remained  until  April,  1819,  when 
they  went  to  Pittsburg"  in  an  emigrant  wagon.  From  here 
they  floated  down  tlie  Ohio  river  to  the  mouth  of  Bull  creek, 
and  from  there  via  the  "Old  State  road"  found  their  way  to 
Bond's  creek,  where  they  established  a  permanent  home,  and 
reared  one  of  the  most  prominent  and  highly  respected  fam- 
ilies of  the  county. 

]\Ir.  McGregor  was  one  of  the  earliest  blacksmiths  here, 
and  his  great-grandson,  M.  A.  McGregor,  is  the  present  High- 
land blacksmith. 

During  the  latter  part  of  the  year  1830,  he,  being  in  very 
ill  healtli,  went  to  Uniontown.  Pennsvlvania.  to  consult  a 
physician  whose  fame  had  been  wafted  far  and  wide,  but  who 
proved  to  be  a  fake:  and  there,  on  January  3,  1832,  he  passed 
into  the  other  world  at  the  age  of  fiftv-two  vears.  eleven 
months,  ten  days,  and  as  there  were  no  facilities  for  bringing 
the  remains  home,  they  were  laid  away  in  the  old  Presbyterian 
churchyard,  at  Uniontown. 

A  marble  slab  of  antique  design  marks  his  resting  place, 
which  has  only  been  viewed  by  two  of  his  descendants — John 
McGregor,  his  son,  who  accompanied  him  on  his  last  journey, 
and  Charles  L.  Hall,  his  great-grandson. 

Mrs.  ]\IcGregor  rests  in  the  family  burying-ground  at 
Highland. 

This  venerable  couple  were  the  parents  of  eleven  children  ; 
viz.,  James,  John,  junior,  David,  Susan,  AX'illiam,  Jeannette. 
Thomas,  Joseph,  and  Alexander  McGregor.  Elizabeth  and 
another  Thomas  who  died  in  inianc}'. 

James  McGregor,  the  eldest  son,  who  was  born  in  Scot- 
land on  Augvist  16,  18]  0.  was  married  to  Miss  Jane  Morrison, 
of  Marietta  Ohio,  and  settled  on  Bond's  creek,  Avhere  he  re- 
mained until  after  the  death  of  his  wife,  in  1855,  when  he  re- 
moved to  Cairo.  Here  he  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  : 
and  here  he  fell  dead  while  sweeping  his  porch  in  1874.  He 
was  the  father  of  eight  children,  all  of  whom  have  joined  him 
on  the  other  side,  except  three. 

Susan  died  in  youth.  Sarah  was  the  late  Mrs.  Bail  Wil- 
son, of  Pennsboro ;   and   Baxter.   Renic,   and    |ohn   have  also 


BOND'S  CREEK  SETTLED  195 

passed  on.    James,  junior,  William,  and  Florence,  who  is  Mrs. 
Elmer  Devaughn,  live  in  the  West. 

John  McGregor,  the  second  son,  was  born  in  the  "City  of 
Brotherly  Love,"  on  May  14,  1813 ;  and  on  September  11, 
1834,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Delilah  Martin,  who  w^as  born 
on  August  19,  1817 ;  and  at  Hebron,  in  Pleasants  county,  they 
established  their  home  and  reare'd  a  large  family.  Here  he 
died  in  1886,  and  here  many  of  his  descendants  live. 

His  children  are  :  The  Rev.  Silas  McGregor,  of  the  West 
Virginia  Methodist  Episcopal  conference ;  William  M.,  Tyler 
county;  S.  E.  (Mrs.  Asa  Fitzwater),  Pennsboro;  Cathrine 
(Mrs.  Amos  Wagner),  India  D.  (single),  Jeannette  G.  (Mrs. 
John  Odell),  all  of  Plebron  ;  and  Anna  D.,  Susanna  B.,  Elva 
J..  Fanny  R.  (Mrs.  F.  M.  Morgan),  David  W.,  Eliza  J.,  and 
Spencer  B.  McGregor  have  all  passed  on. 

David  McGregor,  the  third  son  of  the  family,  was,  also, 
born  in  the  "City  of  Brotherly  Love,"  on  June  4,  1815,  and 
with  his  parents  came  to  Bond's  creek  in  his  early  childhood. 
Here  he  remained  until  he  had  reached  the  age  of  twenty-two 
years,  when  he  went  to  "the  McKinney  settlement"  and 
formed  a  mill  partnership  with  William  Lowther,  of  Cairo  ; 
but  he  became  the  sole  owner  of  this  mill  property,  a  little 
later  (1838),  and  run  a  store  in  connection  with  it.  The  post- 
office  (with  William  McKinney  post-master),  was  also  kept 
at  this  mill.  Near  the  year  1850.  he  erected  another  mill,  at 
Cairo,  and  opened  a  store  in  the  same  building;  and  for  sev- 
eral years  (until  he  sold  the  lower  one),  he  operated  both 
mills  and  stores.  His  mercantile  business  at  Cairo  continued 
down  to  his  old  age,  and  he  was  prominently  known  in  polit- 
ical, church,  and  lodge  circles.  He  was  a  charter  member  of 
the  Kate  Barclay  L  O.  O.  F.  lodge,  which  was  organized  in 
November,  1848,  and  was  also  a  charter  member  of  the  Good 
Templars'  order,  which  was  instituted  at  Cairo,  in  1870.  Being 
installed  as  Grand  Worthy  Chief  of  the  latter,  he  organized 
mau}^  Good  Templar  lodges  throughout  the  state,  and  was 
the  candidate  for  Governor  on  the  Prohibition  ticket  in  1884. 
He  held  the  commission  of  Colonel  in  the  State  militia  at  the 
breaking  out  of  the  Civil  war,  and  was  profifered  the  Colonency 
in  both  the  Confederate  and  the  Union  armies,  but  declined 


196 


HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUXTY 


to  accept,  as  he  wished  to  remain  on  neutral  grounds.  He 
was  a  life-long  Democrat,  and  three  times  represented  his 
Senatorial  district  in  the  legislative  halls  at  the  State  Capitol 
—  (1878-1882).  And  he  was  one  of  the  earliest  presidents  of 
the  Sunda}'  school  organization  of  the  county. 

On  March  17,  1S4-2,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Kathrine  AIc- 
Kinney,  daughter  of  William  and  Frances  Piatt  McKinney, 
and,  at  their  home  at  Cairo,  she  passed  from  earth,  on  Septem- 
ber 11,  1863,  leaving  one  daughter,  Frances  S.,  who  is  now 
Mrs.  1.  S.  Hallam.  of  Abeline,  Kansas.  The  two  sons,  William 
A.,  and  John  P.,  born  of  this  union,  died  in  infancy. 

On  Xovember  1,  1864,  Mr.  McGregor  again  took  the  mar- 
riage vow,  when  he  claimed  Mrs.  Matilda  Lowther,  daughter 
of  Jesse  Lowther,  of  Cornwallis,  and  widow  of  Maxwell  Low- 
ther, as  his  wife :  and  six  children  were  the  result  of  this 
union ;  viz.,  Lilian  B.,  who  is  Mrs.  Robert  W^ilson,  of  Parkers- 
burg;  David  G.,  of  Cairo;  Rob  Roy,  of  the  South;  Nettie 
Pauline,  F.  Herbert  McGregor,  who  is  a  prominent  young 
barrister  of  Parkersburg,  and  Miss  Lelia  Bertha  McGregor. 

Mr.  McGregor  passed  away  very  suddenly  while  absent 
from  home  on  business  in  1891,  and  was  brought  back  to  the 
Egypt  cemetery  for  burial.  Mrs.  McGregor  still  survives  at 
the  old  home  at  Cairo.  The  one  daughter  oi  her  former  mar- 
riage is  Airs.  Mary  Lowther  Earnest,  of  the  West. 


."■'In, 


William    and    Elizabeth    Hall    McGregor. 


BOND'S  CREEK  SETTLED  197 

William  McGregor,  the  fourth  son  of  the  family,  was  but 
an  infant  when  his  parents  came  to  Bond's  creek,  he  having 
been  born  at  Philadelphia,  on  October  25,  1818. 

On  April  24,  1814,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth 
Gregg  Hall,  daughter  of  Samuel  G.  Hall,  who  was  born  in  Bar- 
bour county,  on  September  25,  1825  ;  and  settled  at  the  old 
homestead  on  Bond's  creek,  which  is  still  in  the  hands  of  his 
heirs. ^  Here  the  sun  of  his  w^ell-spent  life  sank  behind  the 
Western  hills  in  December,  1903.  His  ^  enerable  widow,  who 
was  revered  by  a  legion  of  friends,  survived  until  May  3,  1910, 
when  she  passed  away  at  the  home  of  her  son,  W.  S.  McGreg- 
or, at  Cairo.  Both  rest  in  the  Highland  cemetery.  Few 
women  have  called  forth  a  higher  tribute  than  the  one  paid 
to  her  beautiful  Christian  character  by  the  pen  of  a  grand- 
daughter on  the  occasion  of  her  recent  death  ;  and  few,  per- 
haps, have  been  more  entitled  to  such  a  tribute.  Generous, 
intellectual,  kind  and  loving,  she  was  almost  universally  ad- 
mired. 

The  children  of  this  family  are  as  follows: 

Harlan  P.,  wholesale  china  dealer,  of  Wheeling;  the  late 
Mrs.  Virginia  (John)  Cottrell,  of  Parkersburg,  who  died  in 
1895;  Mrs.  Anna  (G.  F.)  Carroll,  Fairmont;  J.  B.  McGregor, 
Pennsboro :  Burns  and  Clyde,  Salem;  Mrs.  Rose  (Theodore) 
Furbee,  Tyler  county;  W.  S.,  Cairo;  Mrs.  Mary  (James) 
Chestnut,  Ohio ;  Indiana  died  in  infancy,  and  Homer,  who 
was  graduated  from  the  Marietta  College,  and  also  from  the 
Presbyterian  Union  Theological  Seminary  at  Cincinnati,  died 
after  having  served  as  pastor  of  a  church  in  the  South  for  one 
year. 

Thomas  McGregor,  born  on  Bond's  creek,  on  September 
19,  1823,  went  to  Madison,  Indiana,  at  the  age  of  seventeen 
years  to  live  with  his  uncle,  Thomas  McGregor;  and  chere  he 
married  and  reared  a  family  of  six  children  by  his  first  wife, 
and  three  by  his  second. 

Shortly  before  his  death  in  1903,  he  removed  to  Kansas, 
where  he  rests.  His  descendants  principally  live  in  Indiana, 
Kansas  and  New  Mexico. 


''He  purchased  four  thousand  acres  on  this  creek,  in  1838,  at  a  tax 
sale  for  seven  cents  an  acre,  and  tlie  wliole  county  and  state  tax  at  this 
time  was  but  forty  cents  on  the  entire  tract.  Tlie  family  still  own  five 
hundred  acres  of  tliis  tract. 


198  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Joseph  McGregor,  the  youngest  son  of  the  family  that 
reached  the  years  of  maturity,  was  borU;  Hved  and  died  on 
Bond's  creek,  where  he  sleeps.  His  life  began  on  May  11, 
1825,  and  ended  in  1898.  He  married  Miss  Eliza  Jane  Alartin, 
and  was  the  fatlier  of  six  children;  viz.,  Baxter  McGregor, 
Misses  Gallic,  and  Mattie,  Highland:  Bryson,  the  late  Mrs. 
Josephine  Saterfield ;  and  Mrs.  Frankie  (Marion)  Alkire,  who 
now  lives  at  McMechen,  Marshall  county. 

Alexander  McGregor,  born  on  March  7,  1827,  died  in  his 
young  manhood.  And  Susan,  born  March  5,  1817,  died  in 
1876,  unmarried.  Elizabeth,  born  February  2.  1812,  died 
August  12,  1852.  Another  son  named  Thomas,  born  May  25, 
1820,  died  at  the  age  of  five  months  and  fifteen  days. 

Jeanette  McGregor,  the  only  daughter  that  reared  a  fam- 
ily, born  in  1821,  was  married  to  Leonard  S.  Hall,  brother  of 
John  S.  Hall,  the  blind  poet,  who  was  long  a  leading  barrister' 
of  New  Martinsville;  and  after  his  death,  in  1875,  she  went  to 
Wheeling,  where  she  spent  her  last  hours  at  the  home  of  her 
daughter,  Mrs.  Addie  Baggs,  in  1904. 

Her  other  children  are  as  follows:  Mrs.  Sue  Newman, 
Hon.  vSeptimus  Hall,  who  was  a  member  of  the  State  Gonsti- 
tutional  Gonvention  in  18"} 2,  and  who  has  since  been  a  mem- 
ber of  both  houses  of  the  Legislature,  Bruce  Hall,  and  the  late 
William,  all  well-known  lawyers  of  New  Martinsville. 

At  the  time  of  the  coming  of  the  McGregors,  this  country 
was  engaged  in  its  second  war  with  Great  Britain,  and  it  Vv^as 
the  custom  of  the  British  men-of-war  to  take  young  unmar- 
ried men  from  the  emigrant  ships  bound  for  these  shores  and 
press  them  into  their  service;  and  on  board  this  vessel,  as  a 
member  of  the  McGregor  party,  was  a  young  man  b}'  the 
name  of  Ferguson,  who  was  made  the  unfortunate  victim  of 
this  custom ;  he  being  seized  and  taken  on  board  a  British 
man-of-war,  from  which  he  escaped  by  swimming  to  shore 
at  some  point  on  the  coast  of  Florida.  From  here  he  made 
his  way  to  Ganada,  and  finally,  back  to  the  place  of  his  nativ- 
ity at  Edinburgh,  Scotland,  where  he  became  a  prosperous 
business  man. 

Thomas  McGregor,  senior,  an  elder  brother  of  John, 
senior,  came  to  America  also,  and  settled  in  Indiana,  where 


BOND'S  CREEK  SETTLED  199 

he  lived  and  died.  He  married  but  had  no  children  ;  but  as 
above  stated,  he  partl}^  reared  his  nephew,  Avho  bore  his  own 
name — Thomas  McGregor. 

The  Halls. — "About  two  hundred  years  ago  there  was  a 
young  farmer  by  the  name  of  Hall  residing  in  the  Northerp 
part  of  England."  He  fell  in  love  with  a  beautiful  Scotch 
lassie,  wooed  and  won  her ;  and,  doubtlessly,  influenced  by 
the  wonderful  tales  they  had  heard  of  the  New  World,  shortly 
after  their  marriage,  they  crossed  the  ocean  and  settled  at 
Duck  Bridge,  Maryland,  not  far  from  Baltimore.  Here,  after 
rearing  a  family  of  several  children,  they  died  at  an  advanced 
age. 

One  of  their  sons,  Samuel,  married,  and  was  the  father 
of  two  sons,  Thomas  and  Joseph ;  and  when  the  Revolution- 
ary war  broke  out,  the  father  and  the  elder  son,  Thomas,  took 
up  arms  in  defense  of  the  colonies,  and  served  under  the  direct 
command  of  General  Washington. 

Samuel  and  his  wife  died  within  two  days  of  each  other,, 
and  were  laid  in  the  same  grave ;  and  after  their  death,  their 
sons  crossed  the  mountains  and  settled  in  Pendleton  county 
(W.)  Virginia,  on  the  South  branch  of  the  Potomac,  where 
they  v/ere  engaged  in  farming. 

Joseph  was  first  married  to  Miss  Barbara  Dickenson,  and 
David,  John,  Samuel,  Thomas,  and  Nancy,  were  the  children 
of  this  union. 

After  her  death,  he  (Joseph)  removed  to  Harrison  coun- 
ty, where  he  was  again  married  to  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Reger  Tal- 
bott,  who  was  the  mother  of  his  three  sons,  Jacob  R.,  Enoch, 
and  Philip ;  and  his  two  daughters,  Kathrine,  and  Phoebe  Hall. 
Here  he  died  in  1821,  at  the  age  of  eighty  years,  and  his  widow, 
who  survived  him,  lived  to  the  age  of  eighty-seven. 

John  Hall,  a  son  of  his  first  union,  married  Miss  Eliza- 
beth Gregg,  and  was  the  father  of  Samuel  G.  Hall,  the  Ritchie 
county  pioneer,  and  of  four  other  children  ;  viz.,  Louis  Ches- 
tine,  Thomas,  Nancy  and  Elizabeth. 

Samuel  G.  Hall  was  born  in  Harrison  county,  in  1803,' 
and  there  the  days  of  his  youth  and  his  young  manhood  were: 
spent.  In  1823,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Rachel  Hudkins,. 
daughter  of  Barton   Hudkins,  whose  history  appears  among; 


200  HISTORY   Of   RITCHIE    COUXTY 

the  early  settlers  of  U'hite  Oak,  and  after  spending  the  first 
nineteen  years  of  their  married  life  in  Barbour  and  Tyler 
counties,  they  came  to  Ritchie  in  1842,  and  took  up  their  resi- 
dence on  Bond's  creek,  at  the  mouth  of  Dog  Comfort,  on  a 
part  of  the  farm  that  is  now  the  homestead  of  Thomas  Dye. 
Two  years  later  they  emigrated  to  Indiana,  and  there,  in  184('), 
Air.  Hall  fell  asleep,  and  at  X"ew  BuiTalo,  Michigan,  his  ashes 
lie.  In  18-i9,  Airs.  Hall,  with  her  three  younger  children,  re- 
turned to  Bond's  creek,  where  she  continued  to  reside  until 
1874,  when  she  removed  to  St.  Alary's,  where  she  bade  adieu 
to  earth  in  1883,  and  at  Highland  she  lies  at  rest. 

The  children  of  this  family  were  twelve  in  number — seven 
girls  and  five  boys:  Naomi  (who  married  Jacob  Bosler), 
Sacharissa  (x\mos  Gorrell),  and  Rebecca  (W'iibert  Rider), 
have  all  passed  on.  Sarah  A.  is  Mrs.  S.  P.  Howell,  of  Indiana ; 
Elizabeth,  the  late  venerable  widow  of  William  McGregor, 
of  Highland:  and  Misses  Alary  J.,  and  Xannie  P.,  reside  at  St. 
Alary 's.  Aliss  Nannie  has  led  a  very  active  life,  she  having 
taught  school  for  forty-four  years  in  Indiana,  and  Wc-^t  \"ir- 
ginia.  In  1883-4,  she  was  principal  of  the  St.  Alary's  school — 
an  honor  that  has  never  been  conferred  on  any  other  member 
of  her  sex. 

She  has  been  engaged  as  a  teacher  in  Sunday-school  work 
for  more  than  fifty  years,  and  was  President  of  the  St.  Alary's 
organization,  of  the  W.  C.  T.  U.  for  seventeen  years. 

Leonard  S.  Plall,  the  eldest  son  of  the  family,  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Richmond  Convention  that  passed  the  ordinance 
of  secession.  He  took  an  active  interest  in  the  attairs  of  the 
Confederacy  during  the  war,  and  at  its  close  went  to  Wetzel 
county,  where  he  served  as  Prosecuting  Attorne}',  and  rose 
to  eminence  at  the  bar.  Here  he  died  in  1875.  (See  AIcGregor 
Family.) 

Simon  Hall,  who  now  resides  in  Indiana,  took  up  arms 
in  behalf  of  the  Union  cause.  William  A\'.  also  served  as  a 
Union  soldier,  and  was  a  lawyer  of  ability.  He  practiced  at 
the  bar  of  Wetzel  county  until  1870,  when  he  removed  to  St. 
Alary's,  where  he  held  the  oilfice  of  Prosecuting  Attorney  for 
fourteen  years.  Here  he  passed  from  earth  in  September, 
1884. 


BOXD'S  CREEK  SETTLED  201 

Allen  S.,  who  died  at  Fort  Sill,  Indian  territory,  in  1880, 
was  a  Confederate  soldier;  and,  on  comparing  notes  with  his 
brother,  William,  in  after  Hie,  found  that  they  had  unwitting- 
ly "fought  against  each  other  in  seven  different  battles." 

John  S.  Hall,  the  blind  poet,  of  St.  Mary's,  is  the  youngest 
member  of  the  family ;  and  to  his  interesting  career,  which  is 
set  apart  from  all  the  others  in  this  history  by  the  hand-i-cap 
of  blindness,  we  dedicate  a  little  corner  of  this  work — to  Rit- 
chie county's  first  poet.     (See  Poet's  Corner.) 

Hon.  Septimus  Hall,  of  New  Martinsville,  who  has  been 
State  Senator,  and  is  now  a  member  of  the  House  of  Dele- 
gates, is  a  grandson  of  Samuel  G.  Hall,  he  being  a  son  of 
Leonard,  and  Mrs.  Jeannette  ^McGregor  Hall. 

The  Pyles. — This  family  comes  of  English  stock.  Elisha 
Pyles  w^as  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812,  and  tradition  says  at 
its  close  he  was  sent  to  the  Northwest  in  the  campaign  against 
the  Indians,  and  that  he  either  died  or  lost  his  life  in  battle 
in  Ohio  near  the  year  1817.  However,  he  never  returned: 
and  in  1820  his  widow,  Mrs.  Kathrine  Crawford  Pyles,  of 
Monongalia  county,  with  her  two  orphaned  children,  Pene- 
lope, a  daughter  of  a  few  summers;  and  William,  a  child  of 
three,  emigrated  to  Middlebourne,  in  Tyler  county,  where  she 
remained  for  a  few  years — until  she  was  married  to  John 
Cunningham,  son  of  Edward  Cunningham,  an  early  settler 
at  the  mouth  of  Whiskey  run.  And  after  her  marriage  to 
Cunningham  they  settled  at  the  forks  of  Husher's  run,  where 
they  remained  until  her  son  had  established  a  home  of  his 
own;  and  they  then  removed  to  Ohio,  where  death  overtook 
them. 

Five  children  ^vere  born  of  her  union  Avith  Cunningham  ; 

The  late  C.  B.  Cunningham,  of  Ohio;  the  late  B.  F.,  of 
Gilmer  county ;  and  Edw^ard,  of  Missouri ;  and  Micha,  who 
died  at  Mineral,  Ohio  ;  and  Laura,  who  is  married  and  resides 
near  Guisville,  that  state. 

Penelope,  the  daughter  of  the  first  union,  married  against 
her  mother's  wishes  and  went  away  and  was  never  heard  from 


agam. 


William  I.  Pyles,  the  son  of  the  first  union,  who  was  born 


202  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

on  March  31,  1817,  was  the  progenitor  of  the  Ritchie  county 
family. 

After  his  mother  came  to  Middlebourne,  he  lived  with 
two  families  by  the  name  of  Sayre  and  Hayne,  until  she  mar- 
ried again ;  and  on  Husher's  run,  at  the  home  of  his  step- 
father, he  grew  to  manhood. 

On  March  30,  1837,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth 
Cunningham,  daughter  of  Elijah  and  Sarah  Wigner  Cun- 
ningham, and  granddaughter  of  William,  of  Cornwallis,  who 
was  born  on  March  39,  1816.  and  soon  after  their  marriage, 
settled  on  Husher's  run,  where  they  remained  until  1839, 
when  they  removed  to  Bond's  creek  and  settled  on  land  owned 
by  John  Rawson — and  made  the  improvement  that  vv^as  after- 
wards purchased  by  John  Weekly ;  and  also  the  one  that 
passed  into  the  hands  of  John  Lacy  at  an  early  day. 

Mr.  Rawson  entered  a  thousand  acres  of  land  on  this 
creek  at  the  small  cost  of  one  dollar  eighty  cents  for  the 
entire  tract;  and  after  making  the  improvements  above  men- 
tioned on  the  Rawson  land,  Mr.  Pyles  purchased  a  farm  of 
his  own  farther  up  the  creek.  And  from  here  he  went  to  the 
Madison  Lambert  farm,  where  he  resided  for  some  time,  and 
where  he  run  a  water-mill. 

He  finally  removed  to  the  head  of  Big  Knot,  where  he 
fell  asleep  on  March  29,  1892.  His  wife  died  on  August  20, 
1894,  and  side  by  side  they  lie  at  rest  in  the  Beech  Grove 
cemetery  ;  here,  too,  their  eldest  son,  who  died  in  1845,  is  also 
sleeping. 

jNlr.  Pyles  was  noted  for  his  'craze"  for  planting  out  fruit 
trees,  and  wherever  he  lived,  he  left  a  young  orchard  as  a 
memorial. 

His  children  are  as  follows : 

Sarah,  who  is  the  widow  of  the  late  J.  A.  Lacey,  resides 
in  Ohio;  Barbara,  who  married  S.  A.  Rawson,  died  in  1877: 
Serena  B.,  who  resides  at  Hebron,  is  the  Avidow  of  the  late 
John  Wricke  ;  Laura  V.  is  the  widow  of  J.  W.  Hawkins,  and 
at  Parkersburg  she  resides ;  Susanna  is  Mrs.  A.  Bevers,  of 
West  Union  ;  and  W.  Harrison  Pyles,  who  is  unmarried,  is  of 
Hebron. 

The  Weeklys. — The  autumn  of  1847  brought  John  ^^'eek- 


BOND'S  CREEK  SETTLED  203 

ly  from  Tyler  county  to  Bond's  creek,  and  thus  added  another 
good  family  to  the  permanent  citizenship  of  the  county. 

Mr.  Weekly  was  born  in  1790,  and  was  a  veteran  of  the 
war  of  1813.  He  was  first  married  to  a  Miss  Gatrell_,  ^vho 
died  in  early  life,  leaving  two  sons  and  three  daughters  ;  and 
in  1835,  he  again  took  the  marriage  vow,  when  he  claimed 
Miss  Sarah  Garrett  as  his  bride ;  and  seven  children  were  the 
result  of  this  union.  Mr.  Weekly  died  on  July  5,  1878,  and 
his  wife,  Sarah,  who  was  born  in  1804,  on  January  36,  1864. 
Both  sleep  at  Highland. 

The  children  of  the  first  marriage  were :  Stephen,  who 
married  Miss  Nancy  Garrett,  and  lived  and  died  on  Goose 
creek,  where  he  reared  a  large  family.  Thomas,  who  went 
West;  Mary  (Mrs.  Hillery  Pratt),  Rachel  (Mrs.  John  T. 
Lacy),  and  Mrs.  Dorcas  Wright,  all  of  this  county;  with  the 
possible  exception  of  Mrs.  Wright. 

The  children  of  the  second  union:  Richard  (married 
Miss  Ada  Corbin),  Justus  (Miss  Lucreta  Carpenter),  John 
(Miss  Orpha  Slocum),  Rhoda  (Mrs.  George  Corbin),  Jane 
(Mrs.  Henry  Williamson),  Elizabeth  (Mrs.  John  Farming- 
ton),  and  Sarah  (Mrs.  Jacob  Pratt),  all  of  whom  reared  large 
families  except  Justus,  who  died  childless ;  and  all  were  citi- 
zens of  this  county,  but  Jane  and  Elizabeth. 

The  Lacys. — For  more  than  seventy  years  the  name  of 
Lacy  has  had  a  prominent  connection  with  the  citizenship  of 
Bond's  creek. 

John  T.  Lacv,  the  founder  of  this  familv,  was  born  in 
Fauquier  county,  Virginia,  in  1806  ;  and  in  1833  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Rachel  Weekly,  and  a  few  years  later,  came  to 
this  county  and  took  up  his  residence  near  two  miles  north 
of  Highland,  on  the  old  homestead  that  is  still  in  the  hands 
of  his  heirs.  Here,  in  1857,  Mrs.  Lac}^  passed  from  earth 
after  having  given  birth  to  seven  children  ;  and  two  years  later 
he  married  Miss  Naomi  Hudkins,  sister  of  Daniel  Hudkins, 
of  Cabin  run,  and  six  children  were  born  of  this  union. 

Mr.  Lacy  was  an  old  time  pedagogue,  and  he  taught  the 
first  school  on  Bond's  creek;  in  a  log  house  of  "primitive 
style,"  that  stood  where  the  Lac}^  school  house  now  stands. 


204  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

He  was  always  interested  in  educational  and  religious  v/ork, 
and  contributed  liberally  to  both  causes. 

His  father  died  when  he  was  quite  young,  and  his  mother 
then  married  Mr.  Henry  Haddox,^  a  veteran  of  the  Revolu- 
tionary war,  and  they  came  to  Bond's  creek,  and  niade  their 
home  with  Air.  Lacy  for  a  time,  and  then  went  to  Kansas, 
where  ]\Irs.  Haddox  died,  x^fter  her  death  Mr.  Haddox  re- 
turned to  the  home  of  his  step-son,  and  spent  the  remainder 
of  his  days,  dying  at  the  advanced  age  of  ninety  years. 

]\Ir.  Lacy  died  in  18S3,  and  his  second  wife,  in  1900.  All 
sleep  within  the  bosom  of  the  Highland  cemetery. 

The  children  of  his  first  marriage  are :  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
Pratt,  and  Mrs.  Fannie  Pratt,  who  survive  ;  and  j\Iary  Jane, 
the  late  wife  of  William  Bolton,  of  Tyler  county ;  the  late 
Mrs.  Alartha  (Samuel)   Rawson,  and  James,  of  P)Ond's  creek. 

The  children  of  the  second  union  are :  P.  L.  Lacy,  A\'il- 
bur ;  Mrs.  Emma  Hayhurst,  Ellenboro :  A.  L.  Lacy,  Nebraska; 
Mrs.  Ida  Brown,  J.  B.  and  Miss  Ella  Lacy,  Pennsboro. 

]\Irs.  Ida  Brown,  and  perhaps  other  members  of  the  fam- 
ily, haAe  been  teachers. 

Edvi^ard  Cunningham  was  one  of  the  earliest  pioneers 
on  Bond's  creek,  he  having  settled  at  the  mouth  of  Whiskey 
run  at  a  very  early  day.  Pie  w^as  a  native  of  Harrison  county, 
and  a  brother  of  Elijah  M.,  who  married  the  sister  of  Thomas 
Harris.  He  later  removed  to  Husher's  run,  where  he  died, 
and  at  Ellenboro  he  lies  at  rest. 

His  sons  were  Adam,  John,  William,  Thomas,  Elijah, 
and  James ;  and  his  daughter,  Mary  or  Polly,  as  she  was 
called,  became  the  second  Avife  of  Elijah  Husher,  of  Husher's 
run. 

Murphy  Cunningham,  a  grandson  of  this  pioneer,  who  is 
now  very  old,  lives  at  Poynette,  this  state,  and  Mrs.  Laura  Fel- 
lows, a  granddaughter,  resides  in  Ohio,  as  do  a  number  of  his 
other  descendants,  Moses  Cunningham,  of  Ellenboro :  and 
Joseph,  of  Shultz,  are  other  grandsons. 

The  Martins. — Martin,  too,  is  an  old  and  worthy  Bond's 
creek  name. 


'Henry   Haddox   was   a  nephew   of  Raleigh   Pladdox.   of  the  South   fork, 
and  his  only  daughter,  Julia,  married  Frank  Cook,  of  Parkerstjurg. 


BOND'S  CREEK  SETTLED  205 

John  Martin  was  born  in  the  New  Jersey  colony,  of 
Enghsh  parentage,  in  the  first  quarter  of  the  eighteenth  cen- 
tury ;  and  he,  with  his  son,  Joseph,  fought  in  behalf  of  the 
colonies  during  the  American  Revolution.  He  being  a  com- 
missioned officer  in  General  Greene's  army.  Shortly  after  the 
close  of  this  struggle,  he  emigrated  to  what  is  now  West  Vir- 
ginia, and  settled  at  Wheeling,  and  finally,  removed  to  Athens, 
Ohio,  where  he  died  at  the  age  of  ninety-nine  years. 

His  son,  Joseph,  was  born  in  New  Jersey,  in  1758,  and 
during  the  residence  of  the  family  at  Wheeling,  he  married 
Miss  Martha  Br3'son,  an  Irish  lassie,  who  crossed  to  America 
at  the  age  of  twelve  years,  and  near  the  dawn  of  the  nine- 
teenth century,  he  removed  to  Tyler  county,  where  he  died  in 
1833. 

His  son,  Ephraim,  was  born  in  Tyler  county,  on  August 
18,  1803,  and,  in  1831,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  Allen, 
of  Lewis  county,  who  was  of  German  extraction,  and  took  up 
his  residence  in  his  native  county,  where  he  remained  until 
1848,  when  he  came  to  Bond's  creek,  and  settled  on  the  farm 
that  is  now  the  home  of  his  son,  Van  Martin,  near  Pike. 
Here  he  continued  to  live  until  1900,  when  he  Vv^as  laid  in  the 
Highland  cemetery  at  the  age  of  ninety-seven  years.  His 
wife  had  preceded  him  home  by  nine  years. 

He  was  the  father  of  the  following  named  children — some 
of  vv'hom  reside  here  and  are  identified  among  our  leading 
citizens : 

Mrs.  Eliza  J.  McGregor,  Highland,  who  has  passed  her 
seventy-sixth  mile  stone ;  Van  Martin,  of  Pike,  aged  seventy- 
three ,  Joab  Martin,  of  Pennsboro,  aged  seventy-one;  Mrs. 
Susan  Freeland,  Morgan  county,  Ohio,  aged  sixty-nine,  all  of 
whom  bid  fair  to  carry  out  the  traditional  longevity  of  the 
family.  Joseph  Bryson  Martin,  with  his  brother,  Joab,  were 
soldiers  of  the  Union  army,  but  he  lost  his  life  at  Cloyd 
Mountain. 

The  Campbells. — Campbell  is  another  Bond's  creek  name 
that  stands  for  good  citizenship.  This  family  is  of  Irish 
origin.  Robert  Campbell,  whose  ancestors  emigrated  from 
Ireland  to  Scotland,  and  from  thence  to  America,  married 
Miss    Margaret    Bell,   and   settled   in   Hancock   county,    (\V.) 


206  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Virginia,  where  they  reared  nine  children — seven  sons  and 
two  daughters.  Two  of  these  sons,  Archibald  and  William 
Campbell  were  identified  among  the  settlers  of  this  creek. 

Archibald  Campbell  married  Miss  Jane  Adams,  of  Brooke 
county,  who  was  of  Scotch  descent,  and  they  came  to  Bond's 
creek  near  the  year  184:5  ;  but  afterwards  rem.oved  to  Upland, 
in  Mason  county,  where  they  found  a  resting  place. 

Serena  A.  Campbell,  who  was  laid  in  the  Highland  ceme- 
ter}'  in  1905,  was  the  late  wife  ot  Van  A.  Martin,  of  Pike. 
Mrs.  Malinda  A.  Locke  resides  at  the  old  home  near  Upland, 
and  Samantha.  Eliza,  Bradford,  and  Wvlie  lie  in  the  cemetery 
at  Upland. 

William  Campbell  married  ]\Iiss  Susan  Adams,  the  sister 
of  his  brother's  wife,  and  they  came  to  Bond's  creek,  near 
1853,  and  remained  until  they  were  laid  away  in  the  Higliland 
cemetery. . 

^lana  A.,  their  eldest  daughter,  is  Mrs.  J.  F.  Bolton,  of 
Beech  Grove  :  Anne  E.,  who  was  laid  in  the  Highland  ceme- 
tery, in  1891.  was  the  late  Mrs.  Aaron  Stuart ;  and  Emma  G., 
Alilton  A.,  Oliver  H.,  and  William  Lamar,  none  of  whom  were 
married,  all  rest  in  this  cemetery. 

iviilton  A.,  who  served  as  a  soldier  in  the  Union  army  (in 
the  lith  A\'est  Va.  Infantry),  died  in  a  hospital  at  Parkers- 
burg,  in  1864.  And  Oliver  H.,  who  enlisted  in  the  same  regi- 
ment, died  in  the  Danville  prison,  in  Georgia,  in  November, 
1864. 

The  Rollinses. — Moses  Rollins  was  one  of  the  very  earli- 
est pioneers  on  lower  Bond's  creek.  He  was  born  on  July  8, 
1763,  and  died  during  the  winter  of  1858-9,  at  the  age  of 
ninety-six  years.  He  was  a  veteran  of  the  Revolution,  and  a 
Brittish  cannon-ball  had  taken  oft  both  legs,  and  "so  he  laid 
down  his  arms."  And  he  carried  bullets  from  the  enemiy's 
giins  in  his  hip  to  the  hour  of  his  death.  He  lies  in  the  '"'Tay- 
lor burying-ground,"  and  his  wife,  A'ancy,  who  was  born  in 
]795.  probably,  rests  by  his  side. 

From  a  well-worn  old  family  Bible  the  following  record 
was  taken : 

Henry  Rollins  (born  April  1.  1810),  Jeremiah  (January 
30,    1813),    Sarah    (May    9,    1815),    Edward    (June    1.    1817). 


BOND'S  CREEK  SETTLED  207 

Rebecca  (May  6,  1819),  Jemima  (February  15,  1821),  James 
(January  6,  1823),  William  (November  29,  1824),  Lemuel 
(October  15,  1827),  Elizabeth  (January  6.  1830),  and  Jesse  M. 
(September  25,  1832). 

The  data  concerning  this  family  is  very  meager,  but  the 
descendants  are  quite  numerously  scattered  throughout 
Ritchie  and  adjoining  counties.  B.  F.  Rollins,  of  Cairo ;  Amos, 
of  Cornwallis ;  and  the  late  John,  of  Lawford ;  are  grandsons 
of  Moses  Rollins. 

The  Pratts  merit  a  place  among  the  older  {)eople  of  Bond's 
creek,  thouoh  not  so  earlv  as  manv  of  the  rest. 

Thomas  P.  Pratt,  the  head  of  this  family,  was  a  Monon- 
galia county  product :  and  from  there  he  came  to  this  county 
in  185G,  and  settled  on  the  Luke  Hemsworth  farm,  on  Big 
Knot  run,  where  he  spent  his  last  moments  on  April  16,  18(37, 
and  at  Hebron  he  lies  at  rest. 

His  wife,  Mrs.  Cynthia  Anne  Evans  Pratt,  was  born  in 
Monongalia  county,  on  April  29,  1804,  and  died  en  October 
14,  18G9,  and  was  laid  by  his  side. 

Their  family  consisted  of  the  following  named  members: 

Maria  M.  (1831-1852),  unmairied;  William  O.  (1839- 
1868),  unmarried;  John  W.  (1840— died  in  youth);  Phebe 
(1845-1845)  ;  Thomas  B.  (1850-1854)  ;  Martha  A.  (1835-1896), 
married  George  Shingleton,  and  died  in  Pleasants  county, 
leaving  five  children;  Dudley  N.  (1837-1891).  married  Miss 
Fanny  Lacy,  and  spent  his  life  on  Husher's  run,  where  his 
only  heir,  John  B.  Pratt,  now  lives.  Margaret  (1846 — ),  mar- 
ried John  Wricke  and  died  at  Hebron,  leaving  no  issue.  And 
James  E.  Pratt,  the  remaining  member  of  the  family,  spent 
his  life  in  this  county. 

James  E.  Pratt  was  born  in  Monongalia  county,  on  Sep- 
tember 26,  1842,  and  with  his  parents,  came  to  Bond's  creek, 
in  his  boyhood.  At  the  age  of  twenty  years  he  took  up  his 
sword  in  defense  of  the  LInion,  and  served  for  two  years  in 
Company  G,  Fourth  Regiment  West  Virginia  Cavalry.  He 
manifested  quite  an  interest  in  educational  matters  and  was  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Education  of  Clay  district  at  the  time 
of  his  death,  and  was  also  a  member  of  the  Grand  Army  Post 
at  Pennsboro. 


208  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

On  October  24,  1867,  he  was  married  to  Aliss  Sarah 
Elizabeth  Hogue,  and  thirteen  children  were  the  result  of 
this  union.  He  died  at  Beech  Grove,  on  April  12,  1909,  and 
was  taken  to  the  U.  B.  cemetery  at  Pennsboro,  for  burial. 
Mrs.  Pratt  still  survives. 

The  children :  Arah,  the  eldest  daughter,  is  Mrs.  A.  R. 
Horner,  of  Parkersburg- ;  Cynthia  is  the  wife  of  Dr.  L.  H. 
Hayhurst,  of  Pullman;  Bertha  is  INTrs.  R.  L.  Lacy,  of  Mari- 
etta; E.  E.  Pratt,  is  of  Clarksburg":  J.  I.,  of  Charleston;  O.  C, 
of  Parkersburg;  T.  O.,  of  Pittsburg;  Harry,  of  Parkersburg; 
Luther  and  Earle,  are  at  home,  and  Asa,  Andy,  and  Charles 
died  in  childhood. 


CHAPTER  XIII 


Husher's  Run 


HIS  stream  is  a  tributary  of  Bond's  creek, 
and  its  name  perpetuates  the  memory  of  its 
first  settler,  George  Husher,  who  was,  also, 
the  first  settler  of  Bond's  creek.  And 
though  it  is  but  a  small  stream,  it  drains  a 
fertile  region,  and  not  a  few  prominent  pio- 
neer names  have  an  association  with  its  his- 


tory. 


Elijah  Cunningham,  son  of  William,  was  one  of  the 
earliest  settlers  after  Jacob  Husher.  He  was  a  native  of  the 
"Old  Dominion  ;"  and  his  wife  was  Miss  Sarah  Wigner,  sis- 
ter of  John  Wigner,  junior.  Here  they  both  spent  the  greater 
part  of  their  lives,  and  in  the  Ellenboro  cemetery,  they  lie  at 
rest.  He  died  during  the  autumn  of  1868;  and  she,  in  ]883, 
at  the  age  of  ninety  years. 

Their  eldest  daughter,  Elizabeth,  married  \A'm.  I.  Pyles, 
and  was  the  mother  of  W.  H.  P\des,  of  Hebron  ;  Sarah  Ann 
was  the  late  Mrs.  AA'illiam  Wells — mother  of  George  Wells, 
of  Pennsboro ;  Barbara  became  Mrs.  John  A.  Webb,  and  went 
to  Kansas ;  Emeline  is  Mrs.  McLean,  of  Ohio ;  Cathrine  was 
the  late  Mrs.  Van  Cundif¥,  of  Danville,  Illinois  ;  Mary  Jane, 
who  is  still  single,  resides  at  Belpre,  Ohio;  William,  the  only 
son  (married  Alargaret  Curry),  resides  near  Pennsboro. 

John  Wigner  was  the  first  settler  at  Ellenboro.  He  was 
of  German  descent  and  of  Pennsylvania  birth  ;  and  he  came 
to  the  Smithville  vicinit}-,  from  the  "City  of  Brotherly  Love," 
with  his  parents,  ]\Ir.  and  Mrs.  John  Wigner,  senior.  He  was 
first  married  to  Miss  Katherine  Wetzel,  a  near  relative  of  the 
distinguished  Lewis  Wetzel,  vv^ho  was,  also,  of  German  line- 


210  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUXTY 

age ;  and  with  her  took  up  his  residence  on  the  G.  \V.  Lam- 
bert farm,  near  Ellenboro,  about  the  year  1814.  His  second 
wife  was  Miss  Sarah  Ann  Larison.  He  was  a  soldier  of  the 
war  of  1812.  He  sold  his  possessions  here  to  Bazil  William- 
son, and  went  to  Harrison  county,  w^here  Jie  "heired  his  six 
feet  of  earth." 

His  children  were  two  in  number:  Jacob  W'igner,  junior, 
and  Mrs.  Mar}'-  (Andrew)  Johnson. 

George  B.  Johnson,  and  Mrs.  Mary  Wigner,  of  Ellenboro : 
Mrs.  Jabez  Elliott,  junior,  of  Calhoun  county;  and  Jackson 
Johnson,  of  Indiana,  are  his  grandchildren. 

His  two  brothers,  Jacob  and  Henry  Wigner,  also,  found 
homes  in  this  part  of  the  county  near  the  same  time. 

Jacob  Wigner,  senior,  was  married  to  Miss  Leah  Cun- 
ningham, daughter  of  pioneer  William,  of  Harrisville  and 
Cornwallis,  and  settled  on  Stuart's  run,  on  the  farm  that  has 
since  been  known  as  the  "Patrick  Cochran  homestead."  Here 
his  death  occurred  in  185o,  and  at  Riddel's  chapel,  beside  his 
wife,  he  rests.  He  was  the  builder  of  the  lirst  dwellin<j  in  the 
town  of  Ellenboro. 

His  children  were:  Airs.  Joseph  Rush  (the  only  surviv- 
ing one),  the  late  D.  R.  Wigner,  of  Pike;  Elijah,  William, 
James,  Mrs.  W.  B.  Carpenter,  and  Henry,  who  died  in  youth, 
all  sleep  in  this  count}^ ;  and  John  S.  Wigner,  and  Mrs.  Susan 
Clarke,  in  Pleasants  county. 

Henry  Wigner  was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Lowther, 
daughter  of  Jesse  Lowther,  of  Cornwallis,  and  settled  on 
what  is  best  known  as  "the  Hitchcock  farm" — now  the  home 
of  J.  S.  Pratt,  near  Ellenboro.  But  he  afterwards  removed  to 
the  Cairo  vicinity,  where  he  passed  from  earth,  at  a  ripe  old 
age,  and  in  the  Egypt  cemetery,  with  his  companion,  his 
ashes  lie. 

His  children  were :  William,  of  Ellenboro ;  Wesley,  of 
Pennsboro ;  Mrs.  Susan  (John)  Heaton,  of  Harrisville;  and 
Phebe,  who  died  in  youth. 

Michael  Johnson  was  another  early  settler  on  Flusher's 
run.  He  was  born  and  reared  in  "Old  Erin  ;"'  and  there  he 
was  married  to  Miss  Hannah  Hughes,  a  relative  of  Jesse  and 
Elias   Hughes,   and   from    there,   they   fled   to   America   from 


H USHER'S  RUN  211 

religious  persecution  and  settled  in  Virginia.  They  came  to 
the  Ellenboro  vicinity,  in  1827,  where  they  remained  until 
they  passed  to  the  "home  over  there." 

Their  family  consisted  of  eight  children  ;  viz.,  George  and 
Andrew,  were  both  drowned  while  crossing  the  Ohio  river  in 
a  skifl",  in  1834;  William  went  to  Iowa;  ATrs.  Susan  Gaston, 
Misses  Dorcas  and  Rebecca  Johnson  were  all  of  Harrison 
county  ;  and  Maria,  the  wife  of  Ezekiel  Bee,  Avas  of  Berea. 

Andrew  Johnson  married  Miss  Mary  Wigner.  daughter 
of  John  Wigner,  junior,  and  was  the  father  of  the  venerable 
George  B.  Johnson,  and  Mrs.  Mary  Wigner.  of  Ellenboro. 

Mr.  Johnson  is  now  seventy-six  (1909)  years  of  age,  and 
lives  in  the  same  vicinity  where  he  was  born  ;  he  having  never 
been  beyond  the  limits  of  the  state.  His  memory  carries 
him  back  to  the  days  when  the  present  site  of  Ellenboro  was 
a  sugar-camp,  and  the  public  highways  were  little  more  than 
bridle-paths. 

He  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Parks,  daughter  of  Nathaniel 
Parks,  an  early  pioneer  of  this  county,  and  is  the  father  of  one 
son,  W.  A.  Johnson,  of  Pennsboro. 

Nathaniel  Parks  was  born  in  Harrison  county,  on  June 
11,  1803,  and  came  to  this  county  in  his  early  manhood  (near 
1825),  and  married  Miss  Barbara  Cunningham,  daughter  of 
William,  of  Cornwallis,  and  settled  in  the  Harrisville  vicinity. 
He  later  removed  to  near  Ellenboro,  where  his  life  came  to 
a  close  in  1895.  His  wife  was  born  in  1803,  and  died  in  1887. 
Both  sleep  in  the  Ellenboro  cemetery.  They  were  the  parents 
of  the  following  named  children:  The  late  Wm.  H.,  of  Cairo; 
James  M.,  of  Ellenboro;  John  C,  of  Cornwallis;  Mrs.  Edith 
(Benjamin)  Wricke,  Pike ;  Susan  first  married  Wilson  A. 
Gribble,  who  lost  his  life  in  battle  during  the  Civil  war,  and 
she  then  became  Mrs.  Robert  Hancock,  and  went  to  Wis- 
consin, where  she  died;  Mrs.  George  B.  Johnson,  of  Ellen- 
boro, already  mentioned,  is  the  other  daughter ;  Martin  died  at 
Washington  city  during  the  Civil  war ;  John  and  William 
were  also  soldiers  of  the  Civil  war. 

John  Rawson  was  another  very  early  settler  in  the  Ellen- 
boro vicinity,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  John 
Fowler.    He  married  Miss  Nancy  Husher,  daughter  of  George 


212  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Husher,  after  whom  the  stream  was  named,  and  here  spent 
the  remnant  of  his  days.  He  was  one  of  the  earhest  millers 
in  this  section.  He  first  owned  a  horse-mill,  and  later  secured 
steam  power  and  run  a  grist  and  saw-mill  combined.  He 
died  in  July,  1861,  and  his  wife,  in  August  of  the  following 
year,  and  both  rest  on  the  old  homestead.  He  had  no  children, 
and  he  willed  his  property  to  two  of  his  nephews. 

William  Carpenter,  senior,  was  the  first  settler  of  the 
Yerkey  homestead,  on  Husher's  run.  He  was  born  in  Steu- 
ben county,  New  York,  in  1802,  and  there,  in  1821,  he  was 
married  to  Miss  Nancy  T.  Armstrong,  who  was  born  in  the 
same  county  in  1805  ;  and  after  a  few  years'  residence  in  the 
"Empire  state,"  they  emigrated  to  Potter  county,  Pennsyl- 
vania, and  from  there,  came  to  Husher's  run  in  the  spring  of 
18il.  He  was  one  of  the  early  ministers  of  the  Baptist  church 
in  this  pa^t  of  the  county,  and  his  labors  continued  until  a  few 
years  before  his  death,  in  1880.  Here  he  passed  away,  and 
within  the  bounds  of  this  vicinity  he  found  a  resting  place. 
He  was  the  father  of  six  children:  Lovera.  the  eldest  daugh- 
ter, is  Airs.  William  Wigner,  of  Stuart's  run  ;  Lucretia  is  the 
widow  of  the  late  Justus  Weekly,  of  Bond's  creek;  Nellie 
Avas  the  late  wife  of  John  G.  Wigner;  Nancy  J.,  died  in  child- 
hood; Wm.  B.,  late  of  Washburn,  is  now  of  Tyler  county; 
and  J.  W.,  who  married  Miss  Rosalina  Wilson,  resides  at  Bel- 
laire,  Ohio. 

Along  with  Mr.  Carpenter  from  Pennsylvania  came  F'red- 
erick  Tanner,  Truman  Stephens,  and  Daniel  Vancourt. 

Air.  Tanner  was  a  mill-wright,  and  as  he  was  a  bachelor, 
he  remained  as  a  member  of  the  Carpenter  household  until 
his  death,  in  1864,  at  the  age  of  eighty-five  years. 

Truman  Stephens  was  a  native  of  Massachusetts ;  and 
his  wife,  Roena  Kibbee,  was  born  in  New  York;  and  for  a 
short  time  after  their  marriage,  they  resided  in  the  "Empire 
state,"  and  from  there,  emigrated  to  Potter  county,  Pennsyl- 
vania, and  from  thence  to  the  Ellenboro  vicinity — to  the  farm 
now  owned  by  Benjamin  McGinnis — in  1841. 

Here  their  lives  closed  at  the  home  of  their  daughter, 
Mrs.  Vancourt.  and  in  the  Ellenboro  cemetery  they  lie  in 
their  last  sleep. 


H USHER'S  RUN'  213 

Tliey  were  the  parents  of  four  daughters ;  viz.,  Liza  was 
the  late  Mrs.  James  McGee;  Amanda  Miranda  was  Mrs. 
Daniel  Vancourt ;  Jane  first  married  a  man  by  the  name  of 
Calhoun,  and  after  his  death,  she  became  Mrs.  Weekly.  And 
Lucinda,  the  only  survivor  of  the  family,  is  Mrs.  Martin 
Cochran,  of  Tollgate. 

Mr.  Stephens  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812. 

Daniel  Vancourt  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Amanda  Miranda 
Stephens  Vancourt,  settled  on  a  farm  adjoining  the  Carpenter 
homestead,  and  there  remained  until  he  was  laid  to  rest  on 
his  own  farm.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  named 
children : 

Julia  A.,  who  became  Mrs.  Adam  Raley,  and  went  to 
Baltimore;  Amanda  M.,  married  Wm.  Moore,  and  lived  on 
Stuart's  run:  Phebe  L.,  became  Mrs.  William  Parish,  of  Mari- 
etta, Ohio ;  Mary  Cathrine  is  Mrs.  Presley  Rollins,  of  Hush- 
er's  run  ;  Margaret  A.,  Mrs.  James  King,  of  Marietta ;  Tru- 
man D.,  Jane,  and  Mary  Matilda  have  passed  on  ;  and  David 
A.  lives  in  Roane  county. 

Joseph  Cochran  was  another  early  Pennsylvanian  in  the 
Ellenboro  vicinity.  Plis  father,  John  Cochran,  came  from  Ire- 
land during  the  Revolutionary  war,  and  at  once  took  up  arms 
in  behalf  of  the  colonists,  and  served  for  three  years.  At  the 
close  of  this  struggle,  he  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Adams,  of 
Greene  county,  Pennsylvania,  and  settled  at  Pittsburg.  There 
Joseph  Cochran  was  born,  and  there  he  was  married  to  Miss 
Sarah  Gill,  of  Mercer  covmty,  Pennsylvania;  and  in  1844,  they 
removed  to  this  county.  Their  children  were,  Jonathan, 
Samuel,  Martin,  Kathrine  J.,  Sarah,  Nancy,  and  Elizabeth 
(who  married  Elijah  Cunningham).  Martin  Cochran  married 
Miss  Lucinda  Stephens,  and  he  is  the  only  one  of  the  family 
that  lives  in  this  county,  his  residence  being  at  Tollgate.  The 
rest  reside  in  the  West.(?) 

William  Hitchcock  was  the  pioneer  of  the  Pratt  farm,  one 
mile  east  of  Ellenboro,  at  the  mouth  of  the  small  stream  that 
bears  his  name — "Hitchcock  run." 

He  married  Miss  Phebe  McKinney  and  came  here  early 
in  the  century,  and  remained  until  he  answered  the  final  sum- 


214  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

mons.     Here  he  and  his  wife  and  nearly  all  of  their  descend- 
ants shnnber. 

His  children  were  as  follows : 

IMichael,  ^^'illianl,  Waldo,  Nicholas,  ]\Iary,  and  Florence, 
all  of  whom  have  passed  on.  Mary  died  in  youth,  Florence 
in  early  womanhood,  and  Michael,  the  only  one  of  the  house- 
hold who  married,  left  a  family.  But  they,  too,  have  nearly 
all  passed  on. 

The  Corbins  have  been  prominent  citizens  of  the  county 
for  sixty  years,  and  in  this  chapter  they  claim  a  place. 

English  in  origin,  they  came  to  America  in  Colonial  times 
and  settled  in  the  "Old  Dominion."  George  Corbin  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Sallie  Jennings,  of  Virginia,  who  belonged  to 
the  same  family  as  the  distinguished  \Mlliam  Jennings  Bryan, 
and  their  son,  John  W.  Corbin,  was  the  head  of  the  Ritchie 
county  family. 

John  W.  Corbin  Avas  born  in  Culpepper  county,  \  irginia, 
on  October  7,  1786,  and  served  as  a  soldier  in  the  war  of  181'^. 
On  January  14,  1819,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Rebecca 
Williams,  daughter  of  James  and  Barsheba  Williams,  who 
was  born  in  Monongalia  county,  on  February  8,  1803 ;  and 
from  Booth  creek,  Taylor  county,  with  their  large  family, 
they  removed  to  Husher's  run,  in  Xovember,  1850.  Here  they 
passed  away — he,  on  July  24,  1878,  and  she,  on  April  20,  1885, 
and  both  rest  in  the  Ellenboro  cemetery. 

Their  family  consisted  of  thirteen  children ;  viz.,  Sallie, 
Oliver  Perry,  Frances,  Alexander  M.,  George,  Elizabeth, 
Ephatha,  Ada,  Joanna,  Mariana,  Pelina,  Josephus,  and  Ocran 
Corbin,  all  of  whom  married  and  reared  families,  except 
Frances  and  Mariana,  who  died  in  childhood. 

Sallie  Corbin,  the  eldest,  wdio  was  born  on  February  16, 
1820,  married  Hiram  Wilkinson,  and  after  a  long  residence 
here,  they  removed  to  Salem,  where  she  died  in  December, 
1902.  Her  family  consisted  of  nine  children  :  Loman,  of  In- 
diana;  Celia  (Mrs.  Fenton  Elifritz),  of  Ohio;  Mary  (Mrs.  A. 
J.  Pritchard),  of  Parkersburg;  Rachel  (Mrs.  Wm.  Childers\ 
of  Salem;  Frances  (]\Irs.  Benjamin  Grouser),  Parkersburg; 
Benjamin,  Daniel,  Josephus,  and  Ocran  Wilkinson.  The  last 
two  named  died  in  childhood. 


HUSHER'S  RUN  215 

Oliver  Perry  Corbin  was  born  on  November  10,  1821, 
and  on  March  2,  1845,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Nancy  Ann 
Taylor,  who  passed  on  near  the  year  1855,  leaving  six  chil- 
dren; and  in  1857,  he  was  again  married  to  Miss  Mar}^  Lin- 
sey,  and  twelve  children  were  the  result  of  this  union.  After 
calling  Ritchie  county  his  home  for  a  number  of  years,  he  re- 
moved to  Jackson  county,  where  his  life  came  to  a  close. 

The  children  of  the  first  marriage  were :  Gustavns 
Adolphus,  Rebecca  Ann  (Mrs.  Robert  Jones),  Joseph  Taylor, 
Lorenzo  Dow,  Mary  Virginia  (Mrs.  John  Faber),  and  Martha 
Columbia  (wife  of  the  Rev.  W.  H.  Maddox).  The  last  two 
mentioned  were  twins.  All  reared  families  of  their  own,  ex- 
cept L.  D.  Corbin,  who  died  in  youth. 

The  children  of  the  second  marriage :  Arelions  B.,  Alice 
J.  (Mrs.  A.  T.  Maddox),  Florence  Belle  (Mrs.  J.  H.  G.  Win- 
ter), Lizzie  (Mrs.  D.  E.  Kessel),  John  D.,  Julius  C,  Ella 
(Mrs.  E.  D.  Kessel),  Chestinie  M.,  Zorah  (Mrs.  C.  R.  Smith), 
and  one  who  died  in  infancy. 

Alexander  McKra  Corbin,  born  Alarch  13,  1827,  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Margaret  Williams,  and  finally,  removed  from 
this  county  to  Parkersburg,  where  he  spent  his  last  hours. 
His  children  were  twelve  in  number:  Festus,  Belle  (Mrs, 
Theodore  Butcher),  Aliss  Rebecca,  Dean  (who  died  in  youth),, 
Susana  (Mrs.  John  Hudkins),  Luda  (died  in  youth),  Eliza 
(Mrs.  Frank  Riley),  Elizabeth  (Mrs.  ^Maxwell),  Abraham, 
Laura  (Mrs.  John  Fredline),  Arilda  (Mrs.  Edward  Shantaley), 
and  Rufus  Corbin. 

George  W.  Corbin,  born  June  27,  1829.  married  Miss 
Rhoda  Weekly,  daughter  of  John  and  Sarah  Garrett  Weekly, 
and  lived  and  died  in  this  county.  He  w^as  the  father  of  the 
late  Dr.  M.  L.  Corbin,  Arlington,  Mrs.  Bessie  (J.  F.)  Low- 
ther,  and  Wm.  S.  Corbin,  all  of  this  county;  J.  ^I.,  of  Illinois; 
Mrs.  Saccharissa  (J.  M.)  Hughes,  Parkersburg ;  Mrs.  Jane 
Phillips,  wife  of  the  Rev.  Mr.  Phillios,  of  the  Pittsburg  M.  P. 
conference ;  Rev.  O.  L.  Corbin,  of  the  Congregationalist 
church  of  California;  and  the  late  Rev.  J.  D.  Corbin.  of  the- 
Pittsburg  Methodist  Protestant  conference.  This  family  have' 
also  been  prominently  known  in  educational  circles  in  this 
county. 


216  HISTORY    OF   RITCHIE    COUXTY 

Elizabeth  Corbin,  born  June  25,  1831,  was  married  to 
George  Cunningham,  and  removed  to  Tyler  county,  where 
death  overtook  her.  Her  children  :  Martin  Van  Buren  Cun- 
ningham, Mary  Jane  (Mrs.  Michael  Adams),  Andrew  J., 
Pauline  (Mrs.  James  Bell).  Thomas  B.,  John  W.,  Joanna, 
who  died  in  infancy,  Oliver  P..  and  Lettie,  who  is  ]\Irs.  Isaac 
A^^ilHams. 

Ephatha  Corbin,  born  January  IG.  1833,  was  married  to 
James  Cunningham,  and  of  this  union  ten  children  were  born; 
viz..  Jasper  N.  Cunningham,  Permilia  (Mrs.  i\Iary  Hammett), 
Sarah  (Mrs.  Edward  Friends),  John  (died  in  youth), 
Rocellana  (Mrs.  Thomas  Mahoney),  Josephus  (unmarried). 
Amber  (Mrs.  Henr}-  Rexroad),  Viola  (widow  of  the  late  Dr. 
D.  F.  Ireland),  the  late  Edmund  D.,  and  Emily,  who  is  ]\Irs. 
Charles  French. 

Ada  Corbin,  born  on  July  33,  1836.  is  noAv  ]\Irs.  Richard 
Weekly,  of  Bond's  creek.  And  their  children  are  :  Frances, 
who  married  Clarke  Saterfield,  C.  C.  Weekly,  Harlan  P., 
Alosella  (Mrs.  Dudley  Smith),  Theodosia  (Mrs.  F.  Alorgan), 
Albert,  the  late  Emma,  the  late  Draper,  who  died  in  youth, 
Samuel,  Irena  (Mrs.  Earle  Flesher),  and  Dollie  (J\Irs.  Elmer 
Saterfield). 

Joanna  Corbin,  born  February  28,  1838,  was  married  to 
Thomas  Rawson,  and  removed  from  this  county  to  Eliza- 
beth, Wirt  county,  where  she  died.  Her  children:  Wm.  J.. 
Albert  J.,  John  W.,  Burleigh  H.,  Charles  E.,  Frank,  Joseph 
C,  Leslie  B.  Rawson,  INIollie  R.  (Mrs.  Samuel  ^lorris),  and 
Doilie  B.,  who  is  Mrs.  Frank  Wiseman. 

Paulina  Corbin,  born  on  July  37,  1841,  was  married  to 
Alfred  Fowler,  of  Ellenboro,  and  remained  in  this  county 
until  after  the  death  of  her  husband,  when  she  removed  to 
Parkersburg,  where  she  now  resides  with  her  son,  Burleigh 
Fowler.  Her  other  children  are  :  Dexter,  Thomas,  Palmer. 
Lotta,  Avho  is  ]\Irs.  D.  B.  Patton,  of  Harrisville ;  and  Hattie 
(Airs.  J.  D.  Hill),  Williamstown. 

Josephus  Corbin,  born  on  November  3.  1813,  is  still  a 
resident  of  this  county.  He  was  first  married  to  Miss  Juliana 
Hogue,  of  Bond's  creek,  and  eight  children  were  the  result  of 
this  union;  viz.,  Ollie  (Mrs.  W^illiam  Boggess),  Zannie  (Mrs. 


RUSHER'S  RUN  317 

Okey  Hill),  Alonzo  F.  Corbin,  Sallie  (Mrs.  M.  O.  Morgan), 
Lillie  (Mrs.  Samuel  Campbell),  Floyd,  and  Howard,  who  are 
at  home,  and  one  son  who  died  in  infancy.  His  second  wife 
was  Aliss  Drusilla  Petit. 

Ocran  Corbin  was  born  on  September  30.  3  845,  and  died 
at  his  home  in  this  county  two  or  three  years  since.  Flis 
wife  was  Miss  Rachel  Taylor,  daughter  of  James  Taylor  and 
granddaughter  of  Edmund  Taylor,  and  their  children  were 
twelve  in  number;  viz.,  Oliver  P.,  John,  James  (Avho  died  in 
young  manhood),  Charles,  Frank  (a  lawyer).  Wade,  and 
Grover,  who  both  died  in  youth,  Lester,  Josephine  (Mrs. 
Hubert  Moss),  Rosella  and  Kate,  vv^ho  are  at  home  with  their 
mother;  and  one  daugliter  died  in  infancv. 


Since  finishing  the  above  account,  a  bit  of  valuable  in- 
formation concerning  the  Corbin  ancestry  comes  to  us  from 
Miss  Christine  Washington,  of  Charlestown,  West  Virginia, 
which  we  here  add :  ^/ypf^-C^      C-^xO^  t^ 

Henry  Corbin  crossed  to  the  Virginia  colony  near  the 
year  1654,.  and  settled  in  King  and  Queen  county.  He  had 
three  sons  and  five  daughters:  Henry,  Thomas,  Ga^^vvin, 
Letitia,  Alice,  Winifred.  Anne,  and  Frances. 

Henry  died  young.  Thomas  never  married.  Gatvvin 
married  several  times.  Letitia  became  the  wife  of  Richard 
Lee,  of  Mt.  Pleasant ;  Alice  married  Phillip  Lightfoot ;  Wini- 
fred, Leroy  Griffin;  Anne,  William  Taylor;  and  Frances  be- 
came the  wife  of  Governor  Edmund  Jennings,  of  Rippon.  Vir- 
ginia. And  doubtless  from  her  Sallie  Jennings  Corbin,  above 
mentioned,  is  descended. 

Gatvwin  Corbin,  the  one  son  of  the  family  that  left  issue, 
married  for  his  second  wife  Jane,  daughter  of  John  Lane,  of 
York  river,  who  was  probably  the  mother  of  all  his  children, 
but  Miss  Bassett,  daughter  of  Wm.  Bassett,  was  another  wife. 
Flowever,  his  daughter,  Jennie  Corbin,  married  Col.  John 
Bushrod,  and  her  daughter,  Hannah,  was  the  wife  of  John 
Augustine  Washington,  the  brother  of  George  Washington. 

Perhaps  the  present  generations  may  find  this  bit  of  in- 
formation valuable  in  tracing  their  ancestry,  as  it  came  too 
late  for  farther  investigation  on  our  part. 

The  Fowlers. — Another  family  whose  name  has  stood  for 


218  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

good  citizenship  in  this  part  of  the  county  for  sixty  years  is 
that  of  "Fowler." 

Henrv  Fowler,  son  of  Isaac  and  ]\Iarv  Komer  Fowler, 
was  of  German  lineage  and  of  Virgniia  birth.  He  first  opened 
his  eyes  on  earth  on  the  Osage  river,  in  1808;  and  in  18il,  he 
was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Cofifman,  who  was  also  a 
native  of  Virginia ;  and  near  the  year  1850,  they  came  to 
Husher's  run,  and  settled  on  what  is  now  designated  as  the 
"Barnes  farm,"  and  a  little  later,  purchased  the  old  Husher 
homestead,  and  here  the  remainder  of  their  lives  were  spent. 
Air.  Fowler  passed  away  in  1872  :  and  his  wife,  who  was  born 
on  August  15,  1819,  survived  until  1894.  Both  lie  at  rest  in 
the  Husher's  run  burying-ground. 

Their  famih^  consisted  of  the  following  named  children, 
all  of  whom  survive,  except  Albert,  the  eldest  son,  who  died 
in  this  county  several  years  ago :  Thomas  resides  in  Indiana ; 
M.  D.,  in  Calhoun  county ;  Alary  is  the  wife  of  B.  H.  Wilson, 
and  Nancy  is  Airs.  AV.  H.  Aloore,  both  of  Goff's :  J.  X.  resides 
near  Harrisville;  Alartha  is  Airs.  William  Rawson,  of  Alary- 
land  ;  and  John  H.  Fowler,  the  youngest  son,  lives  at  the  old 
home  on  Husher's  run. 

Hamilton. — Almost  sixty  years  have  winged  their  noise- 
less flight  since  the  late  Caleb  T.  Hamilton  joined  the  little 
colon}'  on  Husher's  run  ;  and  his  family  have  ever  since  been 
recognized  among  the  good  citizens  of  the  county. 

Air.  Hamilton  was  born  in  Alonongalia  cotmty,  in  1829, 
and  there  his  youthful  days  were  spent.  His  mother  was  Aliss 
Alargaret  Pratt,  and  his  father  lost  his  life  in  an  accident  on 
the  first  steamboat  that  ever  ascended  the  Alonongahela  river, 
as  far  as  Alorgantown. 

On  October  28,  1852,  he  was  married  to  Aliss  Alary  J. 
Cole,  of  Alarion  county,  and  in  April  of  the  following  year, 
they  came  to  Husher's  run  :  and  after  a  brief  residence  here, 
removed  to  Bond's  creek,  where  he  died  on  August  3,  1889, 
and  where  Airs.  Hamilton,  though  blind,  still  survives. 

He  was  a  lineal  descendant  of  Alexander  Hamilton. 

He  was  a  soldier  of  the  Union  army,  and  his  service  was 
in  Company  F,  Fourteenth  West  Virginia  Regiment  Volun- 
teers. 


H USHER'S  RUN  219 

Seven  children  made  up  the  members  of  this  family,  two 
of  whom  died  in  infancy,  and  the  rest  are  as  follows : 

W.  H.,  and  F.  L.  Hamilton,  are  of  Highland ;  J.  N.,  of 
Parkersburg;  C.  J.,  of  Hebron;  and  S.  H.  Hamilton,  of  Elkins, 
.all  of  whom  have  families  of  their  own. 


CHAPTER   XIV 


Goose  Creek  Settled 

HE  DEEMSES.— Adam  Deem  was  the  pio- 
neer of  Goose  creek.  He  was  of  English 
origin,  but  his  ancestors  migrated  from 
England  i:o  Ireland,  shortly  after  the  con- 
quest  of  this  "Isle"  by  William  of  Orange, 
and  from  there  they  came  to  New  England 
near  the  year  1735. 
But  the  first  connected  and  authentic  history  of  the  fam- 
ily in  the  "New  A\'orld"'  begins  with  Adam  Deem,  senior, 
who  was  born  at  Hagerstown,  Maryland,  in  1T5T,  and  served 
as  a  soldier  of  the  Continental  army  during  the  American 
Revolution.  This  same  Adam  Deem  removed  from  the  place 
of  his  nativity  to  Pennsylvania  in  his  early  manhood,  and 
finally  in  his  old  age,  came  to  this  county,  where  he  spent  his 
last  hours,  on  what  is  known  as  the  old  ''Deem  homestead  '' 
just  across  from  the  mouth  of  Goose  creek.  Here  he  died,  in 
1861,  at  the  great  age  of  one  hundred  four  years,  and  on  this 
homestead,  beside  his  wife,  he  lies  at  rest. 

He  was  the  father  of  seven  sons  and  five  daughters.    The 
•names  of  the  daughters  are  wanting,  but  the  sons  were  as  fol- 
lows:    Adam,  junior,  Phillip,  Jacob,  John,  James,  David  and 
Isaac  G.  Deem.    All  of  whom  married  and  reared  families. 

Adam  Deem,  junior,  married  his  cousin,  Hannah  Deem, 
and  came  here  from  the  place  of  his  nativity — Greene  county, 
Pennsylvania,  near  the  year  1810,  and  settled  on  the  farm 
that  is  now  owned  by  Mrs.  M.  J.  Hall,  near  the  mouth  of 
Goose  creek.  He  was  the  first  denizen  of  the  wilderness  here ; 
was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812,  and  was  a  typical  pioneer 
hunter.  He  died  in  the  "Buckeye  state"  near  the  year  1867, 
and  there  he  rests.  His  wife  also  rests  in  Ohio,  but  not  by 
his  side. 


GOOSE  CREEK  SETTLED  221 

He  reared  a  large  family,  which  were  as  follows :  i\bra- 
ham,  John,  Adam  (III),  Isaac,  Philip,  Jacob,  Alargaret  (Mrs. 
John  Turvey),  Charlotte  (Mrs.  M.  Turvey),  Melissa  (Mrs. 
James  H.  Davidson),  and  Elizabeth  (Mrs.  Adam  Ware). 

Philip  Deem  (son  of  Adam,  senior)  was  born  in  Bedford 
county,  Pennsylvania,  on  January  10,  1785,  and  in  1809.  he 
was  married  to  Miss  Rachel  Kidwiler,  who  was  born  on  April 
1,  1790.  In  1810,  they  came  to  this  county  and  settled  ^.en 
miles  below  Cairo,  on  the  river — on  the  farm  that  is  now 
owneci  by  Cornelius  Bradley,  and  Alexander  Douglass.  Here 
Mrs.  Deem  passed  away,  on  August  5,  1856,  and  on  January 
4,  JSfio,  her  husband  joined  her  on  the  other  side.  They  both 
rest  on  the  Dotson  farm  at  Rusk. 

Philip  Deem  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1813,  and  was 
in  the  fierce  engagement  at  Lundy's  lane  (on  July  25,  1814). 
He  was  the  father  of  a  large  family.  His  son,  Perr}^  died  in 
his  early  manhood ;  James  married  an  Irish  lady  and  settled 
at  the  old  home,  where  he  died  in  1868;  Adam,  who  w^as  a 
minister  of  much  ability,  went  to  Indiana,  where  he  fell  asleep. 
The  rest  of  his  family  Avere  daughters  ;  viz.,  Elizabeth,  Rachel, 
Cathrin'e.  Hannah,  Roena,  Mary,  and  Cinderilla. 

Elizabeth  married  Peter  Coyle  and  her  onl}^  daughter  is 
Mrs.  John  Booth,  of  Barbour  county. 

Hannah  married  James  Marshall  and  lived  in  Wood 
county.     Her  children  were  Jacob,  Frank  and  Alice  Marshall. 

Cathrine  was  the  late  Mrs.  James  Stuart,  of  Goose  creek. 

Roena  \^^as  the  late  Mrs.  Frederick  Lemon,  of  Macfarlan, 
and  Mary  was  the  late  Mrs.  Benjamin  Philips,  of  Rusk.  (See 
Lemon  and  Philips  histories.) 

Rachel  married  Daniel  Donley  and  died  at  her  home  on 
Elm  run,  in  1907.  She  was  the  last  survivor  of  the  family  of 
Jacob  Deem,  and  her  children  are — the  late  James,  Donley, 
Philip,  Thomas,  Joseph,  Rachel,  Bridget,  and  the  late  Mary. 

■  Cinderilla  married  John  Bradley,  and  remained  in  this 
county,  where  she  reared  a  large  family;  viz.,  Philip  met  a 
tragic  death  at  a  picnic  at  the  Ritchie  Mines  in  1882.;  John 
and  Rachel  died  young;  Cornelius  lives  near  Rusk;  Mary  A. 
is  Mrs.  Meyers,  of  Cairo;  Kathrine,  Mrs.  L.  D.  Cain;  Ellen, 
Mrs.  N.  B.  Delaney;  and  Hannah  is  Mrs.  B.  T.  Jackson. 


222  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Jacob  Deem  (son  of  Adam,  senior)  married  Miss  Mary 
Lazier,  of  Pennsylvania,  and  came  to  this  county  not  far 
from  the  year  1810.  and  established  his  home  at  the  mouth 
of  Bear  run,  below  the  Oxbow,  where  he  remained  until  death 
claimed  him.  He  was  one  of  the  contractors  of  the  Parkers- 
burg  and  Staunton  turn-pike,  as  early  as  1838  or  '9.  He  had 
five  sons  and  four  daughters  ;  viz.,  James,  who  was  the  father 
of  John  Deem,  of  Smithville ;  Patrick,  David,  Jacob,  and 
William;  Elizabeth  and  Roue  died  unmarried;  Susan  is  Mrs. 
B.  B.  Nutter,  of  Oxbow  ;  and  Louisiana,  who  was  born  in  1805, 
was  the  late  Airs.  William  Jenkins,  who  was  laid  in  the  Eddy 
graveyard  in  Alarch,  1909. 

It  is  claimed  that  Mrs.  Jenkins  was  born  in  this  countv, 
and  if  this  be  true,  the  Deemses  came  here  earlier  than  1810. 
A/Jrs.  Jenkins  was  married  in  1825,  and  her  husband  died  in 
1863.  Mrs.  Daniel  Eddy,  of  Macfarlan,  is  one  of  her  daugh- 
ters. 

James  Deem  (son  of  Adam,  senior) ^vas  a  famous  story- 
teller and  hunter,  and  the  scene  of  his  pioneer  settlement  was 
across  the  Wirt  county  line,  near  what  is  now  Freeport.  }Icre 
he  lived  and  died,  and  in  the  Freeport  cemetery  he  lies  buried. 

He  married  Miss  Rachel  Sargent,  who,  after  his  dtath, 
with  part  of  her  family,  went  West,  where  she  is  sleeping. 

Their  family  were  as  follows :  Nepthalem,  Jeremiah,  Jef- 
ferson, James,  Franklin,  Lucetta  (Mrs.  H.  D.  Nutter),  Cath- 
rine  i^Mrs.  B.  Mountz).  Sarah  (Mrs.  Jesse  Lee,  of -this  county), 
Angeline  (Mrs.  Edward  Lazure),  Nancy  (Mrs.  Isaac  Thorn- 
ton), Matilda  (Mrs.  Goodnow,  of  the  West).  Armanilla  (Mrs. 
(Mrs.  Charles  Ingrahm),  Sacarissa  and  Rebecca's  married 
names  are  missing,  as  they  went  West,  and  there  chose  their 
life  companions.  The  families  of  these  sons  and  daughters 
are  scattered  throughout  Ritchie,  Wood,  ^\lrt,  and  some 
reside  in  the  West. 

Isaac  G.  Deem  (son  of  Adam,  senior)  married  Afiss 
Nancy  Enoch,  and  found  a  permanent  home,  and  a  final  rest- 
ing place  on  Goose  creek.  He  was  the  father  of  ten  sons  and 
three  daughters :  Abraham,  Calvin,  Commodore,  John  M., 
Jeremiah.  Matthew,  Isaac,  and  tripletts  that  died  in  infancy, 


GOOSE  CREEK  SETTLED  223 

were  the  sons;  and  Margaret,  who  married  Henr}^  Lowther , 
Mary,  wife  of  David  Roberts ;  and  Sarah  Elizabeth,  widow  ot 
the  late  Richard  Dotson.  and  mother  of  Hon.  C.  D.  Dotson, 
formerly  of  Elizabeth,  bnt  now  of  Parkersburg,  are  the  dangh- 
ters.  They,  with  the  two  brothers,  John  M.,  and  Calvin  Deem, 
still  survive. 

John  Deem  (son  of  Adam,  senior)  lived  and  died  at  Free- 
port,  in  Wirt  county.  He  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  ISXi, 
and,  like  the  rest  of  the  Deemses,  came  here  very  early  in  the 
century.  He  married  twice,  and  had  three  sons  at  least. 
George,  John,  and  Jehn  Deem,  and  two  daughters,  Mrs. 
Rachel  Black,  and  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Braden. 

David  Deem  went  West  in  his  early  manhood. 

Other  Settlers. — William  Douglass,  whose  history  occu- 
pies a  place  in  a  former  chapter,  was  the  first  to  mark  the 
forest  in  the  Glendale  vicinity. 

Robert  Armstrong  settled  at  the  foot  of  Goose  creek  liill, 
and  Samuel  Hamilton  was  another  early  pioneer ;  but  we 
have  been  unable  to  learn  anything  definite  concerning  the 
history  of  either  of  these  gentlemen. 

A  man  by  the  name  of  Harris  made  the  iirst  improve- 
ment on  Bear  run,  a  small  tributary  of  this  stream.  He  came 
here  from  the  '"City  of  I'.rotherly  Love,"  and  purchased  a 
tract  of  four  huncfred  acres  of  land  for  sheej)  raising- 
purposes,  but  ovv^ing  to  his  failing  health,  returned  to  his 
former  home,  after  a  brief  stay  here,  and  died  in  a  short  time. 
His  daughter,  Miss  Rose  Harris,  is  a  teacher  in  the  school 
for  the  Deaf  and  Blind,  in  Philadelphia. 

The  Harris  estate  was  divided  up  and  it  is  now  owned 
by  a  number  of  progressive  farmers,  among  whom  are.  John 
and  Joseph  Meshia,  James  Ross,  William  Sheets,  B.  Beail, 
S.  S.  Cowell,  B.  M.  Cowell,  and  others. 

Nathan  and  John  Carter  were  other  early  settlers  of  Bear 
run,  but  this  is  all  v/e  know  of  their  history. 

A  large  tract  of  land  (4000  acres)  known  as  the  "Hark- 
ness  estate,"  which  was  long  under  litigation,  but  which  is 
now  owned  by  Brent  Maxwell,  also,  lies  on  this  stream. 

Mrs.  Cornelia  Storer,  a  very  wealthy  lady  of  New  York 


224  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

city,  also  owns  several  thousand  acres  on  Goose  creek,  and 
the  Bitrnhafns  and  Dr.  Boles  are  other  "landed-lords,"  who 
own  large  possessions  here. 

The  name  of  the  little  stream  of  "Bear  run"  here  had  its 
origin  in  a  fierce  conflict  which  took  place  at  Rock-ford,  be- 
tween "Injun  Joe"  Cunningham  and  a  liuge  black  bear,  which 
resulted  in  the  defeat  of  bruin,  who  weighed  six  hundred 
pounds  when  dressed.     (See  Cunningham  chapter.) 

The  Ross  family,  though  not  so  early  as  the  others  men- 
tioned, have  been  worthy  citizens  here  for,  perhaps,  sixty 
years. 

Robert  Ross  was  born  on  Booth  creek,  in  Harrison  coim- 
ty,  in  1810,  and  being  left  an  orphan  at  the  age  of  fourteen 
years,  went  to  Tennessee  to  live  with  a  married  sister.  At 
this  age  of  the  world,  it  was  the  custom  for  the  farmers  to 
"boat"  their  products  to  New  Orleans  for  market,  and  while 
here,  he  made  several  trips  to  the  Crescent  city  on  a  flat  boat. 
He  served  as  a  soldier  in  the  Mexican  war,  having  enlisted 
from  Harrison  county,  and  at  the  close  of  hostilities,  again 
returned  to  his  native  county,  where  he  was  married  to  Miss 
Elizabeth  Starks,  and  after  spending  the  first  few  years  of 
their  married  life  there,  they  came  to  Goose  creek,  where  thev 
established  a  permanent  home.  Mr.  Ross  died  in  January, 
1880,  and  Mrs.  Ross,  in  April,  1886. 

They  were  the  parents  of  nine  children;  viz.,  Francis  B. 
Ross,  Jehu,  James,  Meshiac,  Joseph  (who  lost  his  life  in  his 
burning  dwelling  early  in  the  year  1910),  Mrs.  Phoebe  Rine- 
hart,  Mrs.  Martha  Webb,  Mrs.  Luna  Williams,  all  of  Goose 
creek ;  and  Mrs.  Sophia  Smith,  of  W^ashburn. 


CHAPTER  XV 


Middle  Fork  Settled 

HOMAS  IRELAND,  son  of  Alexander,  was 
the  first  pioneer  to  find  a  home  on  the  Mid- 
dle fork  of  Hughes  river.     In  October,  1820, 
he  was  married  to  Miss  Katherine  Lowther, 
dauohter  of   Robert,  the   eldest  son  of  Col. 
William  ;  and  shortly  after  this  event,  took 
up  his  residence  on  this  river,  near  its  con- 
fluence  with   the   South   fork,   on   the   farm    that   is   now   the 
property  of  his  son,  G.  M.  Ireland;  and  here  the  remainder  of 
his  life  was  spent. 


Thomas  and  Sarah  Lowther  Ireland. 


As  is  well  known,  the  forest  at  this  time  was  full  of  wild 
animals  of  various  species,  and  not  long  after  his  arrival  here, 
lie  killed  a  large  panther,  which  had  come  close  to  the  house 


226  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUSTY 

and  raised  a  disturbance  with  the  hogs.  At  another  time,  he 
shot  a  young  panther,  and  fearing  an  attack  from  the  mother 
beast,  lost  no  time  until  he  had  reached  home  in  safety.  He 
also  killed  two  huge  bears  at  difit'erent  times  with  his  "trusty 
rifie." 

He  was  a  man  of  unalloyed  integrit3^  and  of  strong  re- 
ligious convictions,  and  w^as  one  of  the  .corner-stones  of  the 
White  Oak  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  he  and  his  wife  being 
among  the  charter  members.  And  beneath  the  shadow  of 
this  church,  side  by  side,  they  lie  in  their  last  sleep. 

Their  children  w^ere  twelve  in  number:  .  Robert,  Alex- 
ander, John  C,  Albert,  Alortimer,  George  M.,  Thomas  W., 
J.  Franklin,  Elizabeth,  Cathrine,  Susan  and  Sarah. 

Robert  went  to  Kansas,  where  he  died  in  1870,  and  where 
his  family  still  live. 

Alexander  resides  in  Ohio.  John  C.  passed  away  in 
Dodridge  county.  Albert  died  in  childhood  (in  1849),  and 
Elizabeth,  at  a  ripe  old  age. 

Mortimer  is  now  a  superannuated  minister  of  the  Method- 
ist Protestant  church,  and  his  home  is  at  W^orthington,  Marion 
county. 

George  AI.,  the  only  one  that  remains  here,  has  long  been 
a  prominent  figure  in  Sunday  school  and  Farmers'  Institute 
circles,  as  w^ell  as  in  business  affairs.  He  served  as  a  soldier 
of  the  Union  in  the  Civil  w^ar  and  rose  to  the  rank  of  Captain. 

Thomas  W.,  who  was  identified  among  the  teachers  of 
this  county  in  former  years  and  served  one  term  as  County 
Superintendent,  is  now  a  prominent  minister  of  the  ^Methodist 
Protestant  church,  and  Morgantown  is  his  home. 

J.  Franklin  went  to  Colorado  many  years  ago,  where  he 
still  lives. 

Cathrine  and  Susan  make  their  home  with  their  brother. 
G.  AI.,  at  Pullman :  and  Sarah  is  Mrs.  Maulsby,  of  West  Union. 

This  family,  like  many  of  the  other  pioneer  families,  has 
produced  a  host  of  prominent  young  people.  Among  them 
are  the  Rev.  A.  L.  Ireland,  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  : 
A.  D.  Ireland,  of  Parkersburg:  Miss  Addie  Ireland,  teacher 
of  art  in  the  Fairmont  schools  ;  and  many  others  that  might 
be  mentioned. 


MIDDLE  FORK  SETTLED  227 

Archibald  Lowther  was  the  second  pioneer  on  the  Mid- 
dle fork  of  Hughes  river.  Harrison  county  was  the  place  of 
his  nativity,  and  near  the  little  town  of  West  Milford,  on 
May  17,  1811,  he  first  saw  "the  light  of  day."  On  September  'I'd, 
1834,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Charlotte  Williard,  who  was 
born  of  German  parentage  in  Greene  county,  Pennsylvania, 
on  January  29,  1813  ;  and  in  1836,  they  came  to  Holbrook,  and 
settled  on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  by  William  Adams, 
and  Mr.  Townsend — the  site  of  the  original  cabin  Ijeing  near 
the  Townsend  residence.  Here,  for  more  than  forty  years, 
the  family  resided  (until  1876,  when  they  sold  the  farm  to 
the  late  John  Coburn)  ;  here,  Mr.  Lowther  suddenly  fell 
asleep,  on  October  29,  1874 ;  and  here,  on  tlie  old  homestead, 
surrounded  by  the  silent  dust  of  five  generations  of  the  family, 
beside  his  wife,  he  lies  at  rest. 

When  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lowther  arrived,  their  nearest  neigh- 
bors were  at  Oxford,  and  at  the  mouth  of  the  river:  and 
though  they  did  not  keep  a  house  of  public  entertainment, 
their  home  was  known  far  and  wide  for  its  hospitality  to 
strangers,  and  it  was  a  general  stopping  place  for  travelers. 

After  the  old  homestead  had  passed  into  other  hands, 
Mrs.  Lowther  lived  with  her  children,  until  Iter  death,  on 
April  6,  1895.  She  was  a  woman  of  strong  physique,  and  of 
no  ordinary  degree  of  intellect,  and  her  whole  life  was  char- 
acterized by  kind  and  helpful  deeds. 

The  children  of  this  family  were  seven  in  number;  viz., 
Elizabeth  Jane,  the  first  born,  died  at  the  age  of  seventeen 
years ;  Robert,  the  third  son,  in  childhood  ;  and  Margaret  C., 
who  was  the  late  Mrs.  T.  E.  Nutter,  of  Holbrook,  in  1905. 

William  George,  the  eldest  son,  resides  at  Fonsoville ; 
Alexander  S.,  at  Peabody,  Kansas  ;  John  Marshall,  near  Au- 
burn ;  and  Sarah  Ann  is  Mrs.  C.  W.  Leggett,  of  Pullman. 

W.  G.  and  Alexander  were  soldiers  of  the  Union  army 
during  the  late  Civil  war. 

The  next  arrivals  were  Mr.  Lowther's  parents,  William 
and  Margaret  Morrison  Lowther,^  and  his  widowed  sister, 
Mrs.    Sudna   Willard,   and    her    three    daughters.      Mlie    elder 


ipor    history    of    WiUiarn    Lrowther   see  first  chapter. 


228         .  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Lowther  and  his  wife  remained  as  snembers  of  tlie  household 
of  their  son  until  they  passed  from  earth ;  and  Mrs.  Willard 
took  up  her  residence  on  the  Lowther  homestead,  where  she 
reared  her  little  family. 

Mrs.  Sudna  Lowther  Willard,  was  the  only  daughter  of 
'\\'illiam  and  Alargarct  Morrison  Lowther  that  married  and 
reared  a  family.  She  was  born  near  West  Milford,  on  April 
10,  lvD2,  and  in  her  early  womanhood,  she  was  married  to 
George  Willard,  brother  of  I\Irs.  Archibald  Lowther ;  and, 
w^hile  on  a  visit  with  her  brother,  Alexander  Lowther,  at  Ox- 
ford, a  short  time  before  the  family  removed  to  this  county, 
]\Jr.  AMllard  died,  and  w-as  laid  at  rest  on  the  Flannagan  farm, 
above  Berea. 

She  died  full  of  years  at  the  home  of  her  daughter,  Mrs. 
M.  A.  Neal,  and,  at  Pullman,  she  slumbers. 

Her  daughters  were  Margaret,  Rebecca,  and  Charlotte 
Willard.. 

Margaret  married  \\'ilson  Watson,  of  Otterslide,  and  w^as 
the  mother  of  three  children:  John,  the  only  son,  died  in  in- 
fancy ;  Sudna  Jane  was  the  first  w'ife  of  the  late  A.  M.  Wade ; 
and  Charlotte  is  Mrs.  Ai  Kelley,  of  Otterslide. 

Rebecca  \A"illard  married  William  R.  Brown,  and  was 
the  mother  of  William  R.  Brown,  ex-Prosecuting  Attorney  of 
Doddridge  county;  and  of  Hon.  T.  A.  Browai,  of  Parkersburg; 
and  of  the  late  Mrs.  Ozenia  Lipscomb,  and  the  late  ^Irs.  ]\Iary 
Hodge. 

Charlotte,  the  youngest  and  only  surviving  daughter,  is 
Mrs.  AL  A.  Neal,  of  Pullman.  Her  children  are,  Llomer  and 
the  late  Clarke  Neal.  of  Colorado:  l\Irs.  Alice  Hawkins  Cor- 
bin.  and  the  late  Mrs.  Louella  Peirpoint,  Mrs.  Jane  Alusgrave. 
the  late  Olive  Neal,  and  Miss  Isa  Neal,  who  holds  a  position 
as  teacher  in  the  Fairmont  schools. 

The  Willards  are  of  German  origin.  George  ^^'i^lard 
came  from  the  Fatherland  late  in  the  eighteenth  century,  and 
settled  in  Greene  county,  Pennsylvania.  He  married  Mrs. 
Elizabeth  Hume  Ghanz,  the  w^idow^  of  a  Frenchman,  but  a 
native  of  Germany,  before  leaving  the  land  of  his  birth,  and 
they  were  the  parents  of  four  sons  and  three  daughters :  viz., 


MIDDLE  FORK  SETTLED  229 

Elias  was  the  father  of  Porter  E.  Willard,  of  Cameron;  Jacob 
settled  in  Kanawha  county,  but  went  from  there  to  California 
during"  the  gold  excitement,  and  was  never  heard  of  again ; 
Isaac  rests  at  "Brown's  mill,"  in  Monongalia  county;  George, 
the  progenitor  of  the  Ritchie  county  family,  in  this  county ; 
Elizabeth  became  Mrs.  Schenk  and  went  to  Illinois,  where 
she  spent  her  last  hours,  and  where  her  descendants  live ; 
Dorothea  was  another  daughter ;  Mrs.  Hannah  Ghantz  Jen- 
kins, of  Illinois,  was  the  half-s'ister ;  and  Mrs.  Charlotte  Low- 
ther  was  the  youngest,  and  the  only  member  of  the  family 
that  was  not  taught  to  read  and  to  speak  the  German  lan- 
guage. When  she  was  but  a  small  child,  her  father  removed 
to  the  Monongalia  side — his  farm  lying  across  the  Virginia 
and  Pennsylvania  line.  Here  Mrs.  Lowther  grew  to  woman- 
hood ;  here  she  was  married  ;  and  here  her  parents  sleep. 

Though  the  connection  cannot  be  made  clear  owing  to 
the  burning  of  the  Willard  records  in  Colonial  days  in  Mass- 
achusetts, there  is  but  little  doubt  that  this  family  and  that 
of  the  late  Frances  E.  Willard  are  descended  from  the  same 
race.  Her  ancestors,  who  were  of  German  lineage,  came  from 
England  to  the  Massachusetts  colon}^  during  the  seventeenth 
century,  and  became  prominently  identified  with  colonial 
affairs.  (A  letter  dictated  by  her  in  person  not  long  before 
her  death  is  before  us.) 

The  love  that  bound  her  (Miss  Frances  Willard)  to  the 
land  that  gave  her  fore-fathers  birth,  she  so  beautifully  ex- 
pressed in  the  following  language,  on  one  occasion,  when  the 
pride  of  nationality  was  being  discussed : 

"First,  I  am  a  Christian,  then,  I  am  a  Saxon  ;  then  I  am 
an  American  ;  and  when  I  get  home  to  Heaven,  I  expect  to 
register  from  Evanston." 

The  Zinns. — After  the  Lowthers  and  the  Willards  came 
the  Zinns.  This  family  trace  their  ancestry  to  the  Fatherland. 
George  Zinn  and  his  wife,  Mary  Saylor  Zinn,  with  licr  brother. 
William  Saylor,  emigrated  from  Germany  to  America  in  the 
year  1776.  It  is  not  positively  known  where  they  first  estab- 
lished their  home,  but  they  removed  from  Hagerstown.  ^larv- 
land,  to  Preston  county   (^^^est)   Virginia  and  from  there   to 


230  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Harrison  county,  where  they  spent  the  remnant  of  their  days. 
These  venerable  pioneers  were  the  parents  of  eleven  children ; 
namely,  Jacob,  Elizabeth,  John,  George,  Michael,  Henry, 
Alexander,  AVilliam,  Samuel,  Peter,  and  Mary  Zinn. 

Elizabeth,  the  eldest  daughter,  married  Henry  Grimm 
and  removed  to  Indiana ;  and  Mary  became  Mrs.  Bland  and 
remained  in  Harrison  county ;  Henry  and  George  lived  in 
Ohio,  and  the  rest  probablv  remained  in  this  state. 

John  Zinn,  the  second  son,  whose  history  concerns  us 
most,  married  ]\Iiss  Ruth  Gandy,  and  they,  with  their  family, 
and  their  married  son,  J.  W.  Zinn,  came  from  Preston  count^^ 
late  in  the  thirties,  and  settled  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the 
home  of  H.  C.  Zinn — the  son  of  J.  A\\  Zinn.  Here  the  re- 
mainder of  their  lives  were  spent,  and  in  the  Baptist  church- 
yard, at  Oxford,  they  sleep. 

The  elder  Zinn  was  a  tanner  by  trade,  and  he  opened  the 
first  tannery  in  this  part  of  the  county;  and  his  son  run  a 
horse-mill  for  the  convenience  of  the  public. 

John  and  Ruth  Gandy  Zinn  were  the  parents  of  thirteen 
children,  twelve  of  whom  married  and  reared  families  of  their 
own  ;  and  not  a  few  of  the  substantial  citizens  of  this,  and 
sister  counties,  are  descended  from  this  worthy  couple. 
Their  children  were  as  follows: 

Samuel,  George  O.,  Alanley,  J.  V\.,  Granville,  Preston, 
Rachel,  Narcissus.  Fernandez,  Amelia,  Delila,  Elizabeth,  and 
Thomas,  who  died  at  the  age  of  fourteen  years. 

J.  Wesley  Zinn,  who,  with  his  father,  settled  the  H.  C. 
Zinn  farm,  was  born  on  August  14,  1814,  and  died  in  1853, 
and  was  laid  in  the  Oxford  churchyard.  He  married  Miss 
Eliza  Hoskins,  of  Preston  county,  and  they  were  the  parents 
of — W.  B.  Zinn,  Mrs.  Mary  E.  (Taylor)  Cox,  of  Wirt  county; 
Mrs.  Sebra  (Thomas)  Law,  Edward  D.,  and  C.  X.  Zinn.  of 
the  West;  and  H^.  C.  Zinn,  of  Holbrook. 

Q,  Manley  Zinn,  some  time  after  the  arrival  of  the  fam- 
ily, married  Miss  Lucy  Ann  Wilson,  sister  of  Isaac  AX'ilson. 
and  settled  at  the  mouth  of  Bear  run.  on  the  farm  that  is  now 
the  property  of  his  son.  ]\I.  B.  Zinn.  Here  he  passed  away  ia 
1868,  at  the  age  of  fifty-four  years,  and  in  the  Baptist  church- 


MIDDLE  FORK  SETTLED  231 

yard  at  Oxford  he  sleeps  by  the  side  of  his  wife,  who  survived 
him  by  many  years.  (Manly  and  J.  Wesley  Zinn  were  twins.) 
He  was  the  father  of  C.  L.  Zinn,  of  Auburn,  who  is  prom- 
inently known  in  political  circles,  and  who  has  twice  repre- 
sented his  native  county  in  the  Legislature,  at  Charleston. 
His  other  children  are:  Newton  Zinn,  of  Glenville  ;  M.  B., 
of  Holbrook ;  Worthington,  of  Oxford ;  Noah;  of  Clarksburg ; 
Grant,  of  Parkersburg;  Victoria,  wife  of  the  late  Granville 
Hall,  Colorado ;  Mrs.  Palestine  Wilson,  Toledo,  Ohio ;  Mrs. 
Alice  Childers,  and  Mrs.  Magdalena  Nutter  (mother  of  At- 
torney Bruce  Nutter),  both  of  Buckhannon  ;  and  Martha,  who 
died  in  the  "beauty  of  her  youth." 

George  Zinn  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Sarah  Gray  Zinn,  came 
with  the  rest  of  the  family,  from  Preston  county,  and  settled 
just  across  the  Doddridge  county  line;  but.  a  little  later,  they 
removed  to  the  Oxford  vicinity  to  the  farm  that  is  now  the 
home  of  their  son.  Granville  Zinn.  Here  their  last  hours  were 
spent,  and,  with  the  other  pioneers  of  their  name,  they  rest  in 
the  Baptist  churchyard  at  Oxford. 

Their  children  were  the  late  James,  of  Oxford;  John,  of 
Lewis  county;  Thomas,  of  Harrisville ;  Granville,  above  men- 
tioned ;  Milroy,  and  O.  M.  Zinn,  who  resides  with  his  sister, 
Mrs.  E.  A.  Leggett,  at  Oxford ;  Mrs.  Mary  J.  Marsli,  Lewis 
count}'  ;  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Douglass,  of  the  West ;  Ruth,  who 
first  married  Mr.  Bumgarnt,  is  now  Mrs.  James  Carter,  of 
West  Union  ;  and  Delia,  wlio  died  in  youth. 

Samuel  Zinn,  the  eldest  son  of  John  and  Ruth  Gaudy 
Zinn,  was  first  married  to  Miss  Miranda  Weaver,  who  died 
ere  long,  leaving  five  children ;  viz.,  Elizabeth,  Columbus, 
Minerva,  Rachel  (who  is  now  Mrs.  E.  M.  Brown,  of  Auburn), 
and  Worthington.  Ilis  second  wife  was  Miss  Ann  Dawson, 
and  the  twelve  children  of. this  union,  which  are  scattered  in 
different  parts  of  the  West,  were  as  follows:  Elizabeth,, 
William,  Elijah,  Sarah,  Preston,  Eliza,  Martha,  David  B.„ 
Mary,  Laura,  Jerusha,  and  Ella  Zinn.  (Married  names  un- 
known to  us.) 

Rachel  Zinn  (daughter  of  John  and  Ruth  Gandy  Zinn) 
married    Thomas    Gray,    and    they    settled    just    across    the 


232  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUXTY 

Doddridge  county  line,  near  one-half  mile  from  the  Oxford 
post-office,  on  the  farm  that  is  still  in  the  hands  of  their  de- 
scendants— the  children  of  their  late  son.  Charter,  being"  the 
heirs.  Here  they  lived  and  died,  and  in  the  Baptist  church 
cemetery  at  Oxford  they  lie  at  rest. 

Their  children  were  eleven  in  number ;  viz..  Jane,  the 
first  born,  married  John  Stiriespring,  and  I\Irs.  J.  E.  Day,  of 
Doddridge  countv.  is  her  onlv  child.  Thomas  died  in  child- 
hood;  William,  in  3'oung  manhood:  Amelia  and  Erminia,  in 
early  womanhood;  James  was  a  soldier  of  the  Union  army, 
and  not  long  after  his  return  home  (late  in  the  '60's)  he 
passed  on :  Elizabeth  is  Mrs.  John  M.  Gribble,  of  West  Union  : 
Sarah  was  the  late  Mrs.  F.  A.  Nutter,  of  Oxford  ;  Narcissus  is 
is  Mrs.  Charles  B.  Cleavenger,  of  Oxford;  Lucia,  who  first 
married  the  late  \\  ilson  B.  Lowther,  of  Oxford,  is  now  Airs. 
L.  C.  Alorris ;  and  Charter,  the  only  son  that  left  a  family, 
married  Miss  Hannah  Bee. 

Narcissus  Zinn  (daughter  of  John  and  Ruth  Gandy  Zinnj 
married  Samuel  Rogers,  but  she  died  early  in  life,  and  ]\Ir. 
Rogers  married  again.  The  family  resided  in  the  Oxford 
vicinity  for  a  time  in  pioneer  days,  but  returned  to  Preston 
county.  Two  of  her  children  were  Thomas  and  Preston,  but 
here  our  authentic  information  ends. 

Delila  Zinn  (daughter  of  John  and  Ruth  Gandy  Zinn) 
married  David  Fortney,  and  remained  in  Preston  county.  Her 
children's  first  names  only  are  at  hand :  Eugene,  Fernandez, 
L3'-curgus,  Charlotte,  Ashford,  Caroline,  Silas,  and  Orpha  Fort- 
ney.   Mr.  Fortney,  of  Leatherbarke,  is  descended  from  her. 

Elizabeth  Zinn  (daughter  of  John  and  Ruth  Gandy  Zinn") 
married  Thomas  Brown,  and  remained  in  Preston  county. 
And  her  children  were,  Adaline.  Buckner.  A\'illiam.  Charles. 
Virgil  and  Cloa  Brown. 

Preston  Zinn  (son  of  John  and  Ruth  Gandy  Zinn)  mar- 
ried ]^Iiss  Nanc}'  Rogers.  (See  Berea  settlers.)  And  the 
family  of  Amelia  Zinn,  who  first  married  Thomas  E.  Davis, 
senior,  and  later  Eli  Heaton,  will  be  found  in  a  subsequent 
chapter. 


MIDDLE  FORK  SETTLED  233 

BEAR  RUN  SETTLED. 

Granville  Zinn,  the  remaining  son  of  John  and  Ruth 
Gandy  Zinn,  married  ]\Iiss  Rosetta  Lowther,  and  settled  on 
Bear  run,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  Delaine  Tharpe, 
in  1843. 

This  stream,  whicli  is  a  small  tributary  of  the  Middle 
fork,  took  its  name  from  a  huge  black  bear  that  came  to  its 
death  here  at  the  hands  of  Mrs.  Zinn's  father  and  brother, 
\\m.  B.,  and  \\n\.  R.  Lowther,  and  Wm.  K.  f^owther,  while 
Hi  this  section  on  a  hunting  expedition  years  before  the  date 
of  this  settlement. 

Mr.  Zinn  lived  and  died  where  he  settled,  and  some  time, 
after  he  was  laid  in  the  Oxford  Baptist  churchyard,  his  widow 
and  son,  Samuel,  removed  to  Harrisville,  where  they  still  re- 
side. Airs.  Zinn  celebrated  her  ninetieth  birthday  in  February, 
1910. 

Besides  the  son  mentioned,  their  children  were  as  fol- 
lows: The  late  W^illiam,  the  Rev.  Lemuel,  and  the  late 
George,  of  Salem  ;  Mrs.  Margaret  Harbert,  Harrison  county  ; 
Albert  Zinn,  Tollgate ;  arid  Ellen  and  Sophia,  who  died  in 
childhood. 

George  Griffin  was  the  second  settler  on  Bear  run.  He 
was  born  in  Harrison  county,  on  February  IG,  1828 ;  and  on 
February  22,  1849,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Juan  Fernandez 
Zinn  (daughter  of  John  and  Ruth  Gandy  Zinn),  who  was  born 
on  November  30,  1828  ;  and  in  1852,  they  settled  on  what  is 
known  as  the  Roger's  farm,  on  the  Ritchie  and  Doddridge 
county  line,  and  in  18T3,  they  removed  to  Holbrook  to  the  old 
homestead,  where  their  remaining  years  were  spent.  Here,  in 
January,  1909,  Death,  for  the  first  time,  invaded  this  family 
circle  and  claimed  Airs.  Grififin,  who  was  a  noble  type  of 
womanhood.  Mr.  Griffin  then  went  to  the  home  of  his  son. 
Charles  G.  Griffin,  in  Ohio,  and  there,  near  two  months  later. 
Death  overtook  him.  His  remains  were  brought  back  and 
laid  in  the  South  fork  Baptist  churchyard,  b}'  the  side  of  the 
companion  that  had  traveled  with  him  so  far  down  the  "decliv- 
ity of  time." 

These  pioneers  were  the  parents  of  ten  children,  who  are 


234  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUXTY 

all  living  and  who  are  all  the  heads  of  respected  families ;  viz., 
A.  Virginia  is  Mrs.  James  K.  Wilson,  of  West  Union ;  M. 
Caroline  is  Mrs.  W.  B.  Hayden,  of  Centreville,  Washington  ; 
J.  Franklin,  is  of  Wood  county ;  Thomas  J.,  of  Holbrook ; 
John  Woofter,  of  California;  Charles  G.,  of  Ohio;  ]\Irs.  Laura 
Crofton,  of  Idaho;  Mrs.  Lucetta  J.  (S.  L.)  McClain,  of  West 
Union ;  Ella  is  Mrs.  Gilbert  Hayden,  of  Auburn  ;  and  Homer 
Griffin  is  of  Wirt  county. 

Several  members  of  this  family  w^ere  at  different  times 
identified  in  the  profession  of  teaching  here  and  elsewhere. 

The  Griffins  are  of  Welsh  descent.  John  Griffin  crossed 
from  Wales  some  time  during  the  latter  part  of  the  eighteenth 
century,  and  settled  in  Maryland.  His  son,  Samuel,  married 
Miss  Sarah  Scarf,  of  Hartford  county  (Maryland),  and  set- 
tled in  Talbott  county ;  and  from  there,  near  the  year  1804, 
they  migrated  to  Harrison  county,  (W.)  Virginia,  where  they 
spent  the  remaining  years  of  their  lives. 

They  were  the  parents  of  eleven  children  ;  viz.,  Xancy, 
John,  Henry  S.,  Susana,  Edward,  William  S..  Joshua  H.,  James 
S.,  Benjamin  S.,  George  G.,  and  Martha  Griffin.  Several  of 
these  sons  were  soldiers  of  the  war  of  1812. 

James  S.  Griffin,  the  progenitor  of  the  Ritchie  county 
faniil}',  married  ^Nliss  Martha  Harbert.  and  settled  at  Lumber- 
port,  in  Harrison  county.  He  was  one  of  the  pioneer  minis- 
ters of  the  Baptist  church  in  wdiat  is  now  West  Virginia,  his 
field  of  labor  being  in  Harrison,  Ritchie  and  the  adjoining 
counties,  reaching  as  far  as  Kanawha  county.  He  was  the 
first  Moderator  of  the  Mt.  Pisgah  Baptist  church,  in  Gilmer 
county,  being  elected  to  this  office  at  its  organization,  on  Octo- 
ber 27,  1854.     He  rests  in  Harrison  county. 

His  children  were — Joshua,  John,  Allison,  Benjamin. 
Luther  C,  Charlotte  (Mrs.  Jeremiah  Robey"),  Jane  (}\Ir;-i. 
Christian  Davis),  Permilla  (who  married  Anthony  Winter- 
mine,  and  went  to  Oregon),  and  George  G.  Griffin.  All  the 
rest  of  the  family  remained  in  Harrison  county  except  the  last 
two  mentioned.  Benjamin  and  Luther  were  soldiers  of  the 
Civil  war. 

H.  B.  Tharpe,  shortly  after  his  marriage  to  Miss  Eliza- 
beth Wass,  sister  of  Harrison  Wass,  in  1847,  made  the  first 


MIDDLE  FORK  SETTLED  235 

settlement  on  the  old  homestead,  where  he  and  his  aged  com- 
panion are  quietly  spending  the  eventide  of  their  lives.  Per- 
haps, this  remarkable  instance  can  hardly  be  duplicated  in  the 
county.  One  by  one  they  have  followed  their  five  children 
to  the  grave,  and  only  three  of  their  grandchildren  survive ; 
viz.,  Mrs.  Dora  Pritchard  Cox,  who  resides  with  ^hem  ;  Por- 
ter Tharpe,  of  Clarksburg;  and  Mrs.  Ora  Bush,  of  Troy — the 
latter  being  the  children  of  the  late  Harrison  Tharpe. 

Their  only  daughter,  Eliza  Ellen,  was  the  late  Mrs.  Ar;- 
drew  Pritchard.  John  died  in  childhood,  and  Irvin  and  George 
Tharpe,  in  their  young  manhood. 

The  Nutters. — The  year  1849  was  marked  by  the  coming 
of  Christopher  N.  Nutter  to  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of 
his  son,  C.  W.  Nutter ;  and  two  years  later,  his  father,  Thomas 
Nutter,  made  the  first  improvement,  on  the  farm  that  was 
until  recently  the  home  of  his  grandson,  T.  E.  Nutter — now 
owned  by  M.  B.  Zinn. 

The  elder  Nutter  (Thomas),  Avho  was  a  native  of  the 
Clarksburg  vicinity,  married  Miss  Lois  Parks,  and  was  the 
father  of— AV.  EI.  H.  Nutter,  of  Iowa;  G.  Hamilton,  of  Ohio; 
Daniel,  of  Barbour  county;  Mrs.  Thomas  Scoonover,  of  Ran- 
dolph ;  Sarah,  who  became  the  wife  of  the  Rev.  Thomas  Hat- 
field, of  Ohio;  Airs.  Mary  (Wm.)  Douglass,  and  Mrs.  Belinda 
(Levi)  Douglass,  both  of  Barbour  county;  and  Lois,  who 
went  to  California,  and  there  married. 

Mrs.  Nutter  died  and  was  laid  to  rest  in  Harrison  county, 
before  he  came  to  Ritchie  county.  Here  on  the  Middle  fork, 
he  passed  from  earth,  and  in  the  Lowther  cemetery,  he  sleeps. 

Christopher  N.  Nutter  married  Miss  Sarah  Swisher, 
daughter  of  Isaac  Swisher — a  pioneer  of  Lost  creek,  Harrison 
county,  and  from  the  time  of  their  arrival  until  they  were  laid 
in  the  Lowther  cemetery  (in  1883  and  '94,  respectively)  they 
were  among  the  substantial  citizens  of  this  community. 

Their  children  were  John  A.  Nutter,  who  lost  his  life  in 
the  Confederate  cause;  the  late  Mrs.  Erances  (G.  W.)  BroAvn, 
who  sleeps  at  Holbrook ;  Mrs.  Mary  A.  (A.  S.)  Lowther,  of 
Peabody,  Kansas;  the  late  T.  E.,  of  Parkersburg ;  and  C.  W., 
of  Holbrook.  who  is  now  a  member  of  the  honorable  County 
court. 


336  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

AI.  Bruce  Nutter,  who  is  a  prominent  attorney  at  Buck- 
hannon,  belongs  to  this  family,  he  bein^-  the  s-rand^on  i^f  Ham- 
ilton, and  the  son  of  Thomas. 

Andrew  Nutter,  an  early  pioneer  of  the  Oxford  vicinity, 
whose  descendants  in  this  county  are  not  a  few  in  number, 
also,  belon»'ed  to  this  family,  he  being  a  first  cousin  of  Thomas 
Nutter. 

He  was  a  native  of  Harrison  county  and  a  veteran  of  the 
war  of  1812  ;  he  having  enlisted  at  the  age  of  seventeen  years, 
and  was  in  the  engagement  of  Ft.  Defiance  on  the  Alaumee 
river.  He  married  Aliss  Malinda  ^Villis  (sister  of  Robert 
Willis,  of  Oxford ;  of  Mrs.  Peter  Pritchard,  of  White  Oak ; 
and  of  Mrs.  William  Elder),  and  they  were  the  parents  of 
Willis,  John,  Andrew,  junior,  and  Mrs.  Julia  A\'arren,  of  Ox- 
ford :  Mrs.  Nancy  Hart,  Mrs.  Alalinda  Hart,  and  Mrs.  Eliza- 
beth Hart,  of  Pleasants  county ;  and  Airs.  Sallie  Watson,  of 
Roane  county ;  all  of  whom  have  passed  on,  except  Mrs.  War- 
ren, who  is  now  a  nonegenarian,  and  possibly  another  one  or 
two. 

Willis  Nutter  married  Aliss  Julia  Richards,  of  Harrison 
county,  and  his  son,  Thomas,  married  Aliss  Sarah  A.  Allender, 
daughter  of  the  late  Jacob  Allender,  of  Oxford,  and  they  were 
the  parents  of  ex-Sheriff  Oke}^  E.  Nutter;  of  Emma,  the  wife 
of  Lee  Prunty,  of  Oxford;  of  Mrs.  Lola  (Ben)  AA'ilson,  of  Toll- 
gate;  Mrs.  Bessie  (Fred)  Ross,  of  Pennsboro ;  and  of  Mrs. 
Eva  Tharpe,  of  Oklahoma  city. 

W.  M.  Nutter,  of  Eva;  AL  B.,  of  Oxford;  and  W.  J.,  of 
Pennsboro,  are  the  other  descendants  of  Andrew,  senior,  they 
being  the  sons  of  Andrew  (HI),  of  Oxford. 

John  Nutter,  brother  of  Andrew,  senior,  and  his  wife,  ^Trs. 
Emily  Vincient  Nutter,  were  early  settlers  just  across  the 
Doddridge  county  line :  but  they  removed  from  there  to 
Leatherbrake,  in  the  early  fifties,  imCv  there  spent  their  last 
days;  and  on  the  old  homestead,  near  Iris,  they  sleep.  They 
were  the  parents  of  several  children  :  Jacob  and  Andrew,  Mrs. 
Julia  (Lewis)  Rogers,  ]\Irs.  Alary  (Henry)  Smith,  and  Cassie, 
who  married  and  lived  in  Ohio,  have  all  passed  on.  Nels6n 
lives  in  California;  Thomas,  in  Kansas;  Airs.   Ellen   (Wm.) 


MIDDLE  FORK  SETTLED  237 

Connolly,  in  Virginia;  and  Dorinda,  Avho  never  married,  on 
Leatherbarke. 

The  Nutters  are  of  Scotch-English  descent.  Four  brothers 
came  from  England  and  settled  in  Harrison  county,  where 
they  figured  quite  prominently  as  pioneers  and  as  Indian 
fighters ;  and  from  them  the  far-famed  Indian  fort  took  its 
name ;  and  from  them  all  the  Nutters  of  this,  and  adjoining 
counties,  are  descended.  Thomas,  one  of  these  brothers,  with 
a  company  of  other  men,  followed  the  savages  from  Harrison 
county,  to  what  is  now  the  vicinity  of  Washburn,  where  the}^ 
overtook  and  killed  one  of  the  leaders  of  the  band,  Avho  man- 
aged to  crawl  under  a  clilT  of  rocks,  where  his  skeleton  was 
found  a  number  of  years  afterwards.  He  (Thomas)  was  the 
progenitor  of  the  Elolbrook,  Oxford,  and  Leatherbarke  fami- 
lies, his  son,  Christopher,  being  the  father  of  Thomas,  of  Hol- 
brook ;  and  his  son,  John,  of  Andrew,  senior,  of  Oxford,  and  of 
John,  of  Leatherbarke. 

The  Watsons, — Other  early  settlers  in  this  part  were 
Otho,  George,  and  John  Watson— three  brothers,  from  Bar- 
bour county,  who  all  made  their  improvements  on  Brush  run — 
a  small  tributary  of  the  Middle  fork. 

They  were  the  sons  of  Jacob  Watson,  who  removed  from 
Marion  to  Barbour  county  near  1812.  He  married  a  Miss 
Gandy — sister  of  Mrs.  John  Zinn,  and  one  son,  Otho,  was 
born  of  this  un.ion.  After  her  death,  he  married  Miss  Sarah 
Pritchard,  sister  of  Peter  Pritchard,  and  they  were  the  parents 
of — George  and  John,  and  of  Mrs.  John  (Mary)  Jett  (mother 
of  Wm.  Jett,  of  Otterslide)  ;  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Westfall,  Mrs. 
Castor,  Mrs.  Nancy  Divers,  Mrs.  Amanda  Divers,  all  of  Bar- 
bour county;  Mrs.  Jane  Rowe,  and  the  late  William,  Roane 
county;  the  late  Mrs.  Angeline  (Lair)  Simons,  of  Auburn; 
and  Emily,  who  died  unmarried. 

Otho  Watson  married  Miss  Louise  Jett,  and  made  the 
first  settlement  on  Brush  run,  in  18-15  ;  from  here  he  removed 
to  Roane  county,  where  his  widov/  still  survives  (1908)  at  the 
age  of  more  than  one  hundred  years.  This  pioneer  and  two 
of  his  sons,  Jacob,  of  Roane  county,  and  George,  who  died 
during  the  Civil  war,  served  as  Union  soldiers  ;  Irvin,  Mrs. 
Elias  (xA-melia)  Pritchard,  and  the  late  Mrs.  Matilda  Boise,  of 


238  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUXTY 

Roane  county;  and  Airs.  Henry  Collins  are  the  other  children. 

George  Watson  married  Miss  Susan  Divers,  and  remained 
here  until  death  ;  and  in  the  Auburn  cemetery,  beside  his  wife, 
he  rests. 

His  children  are — ]M.  B.,  and  Wilson,  of  Auburn ;  An- 
drew, of  Salem:  George,  of  Parkersburg;  Mrs.  Mary  Bee.  of 
Berea ;  the  late  Mrs.  ]\Iartha  (J.  B.)  Gribble,  of  Auburn;  Mrs. 
Jennie  Summers,  and  Mrs.  Alice  Adams,  Roane  county;  Mrs. 
Elien  Smith,  Doddridge  county;  and  ]\Irs.  Adaline  (Marshall) 
Hall.  Colorado. 

John  Watson  married  Aiiss  Kathrine  Thrash,  of  Barbour 
county,  and  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life  on  Brush  run, 
where  he  settled  ;  and  in  the  Lowther  burying-ground,  beside 
his  wife,  he  found  a  resting  place.  His  children  are:  Nealy, 
and  Jacob  M.,  of  Aiiburn ;  the  late  Thomas,  and  David,  of 
Elizabeth:  Scott,  of  Parkersburg;  Grant,  of  Cincinnati;  and 
John  ("Jack"),  of  Fenwick. 

After  the  death  of  his  first  wife,  he  w'as  married  to  Miss 
Sarah  Maxwell,  daughter  of  Lamar  3.1axwell,  of  Doddridge 
county,  and  was  the  father  of  several  more  children  ;  Mrs. 
Charles  Sinnett,  of  Auburn  ;  of  Dora,  Sarah,  ]\Iary.  Joe,  and 
Morgan,  junior. 

William  Adams  w^as  another  early  settler  on  the  waters 
of  the  Middle  fork.  Though  his  domain  was  just  across  what 
is  now  the  Ritchie  and  Doddridge  county  line,  his  interests 
"were  identical  w-ith  those  of  the  other  pioneers  of  this  vicinity. 
He  was  a  native  of  Plarrison  county — the  son  of  Jonathan 
Adams,  a  Revolutionary  soldier,  who  fought  under  General 
Washington.  He  married  Miss  Lucinda  Wright,  of  Harrison 
county  (who  was  a  member  of  the  A\^right  family,  of  Spruce 
creek),  and  in  1840,  took  up  his  residence  in  the  forest  where 
his  son,  William  Adams,  now  lives.  Here  he  passed  from 
sight  in  1861 ;  and  in  the  Auburn  cemetery,  beside  his  wife,  he 
sleeps.  After  the  death  of  the  wife  of  his  youth,  he  married 
Miss  Louisa  Summers,  sister  of  Joseph  and^Elijah  Snmmeis; 
and  they  were  the  parents  of  five  children:  Elijah,  and  Alex- 
ander Adams,  J\lrs.  Susana  Pierce,  IMrs.  Margaret  Husk,  -and 
Mrs.  Flora  Edgell,  of  Doddridge  county. 


MIDDLE  FORK  SETTLED  239 

The  children  of  the  first  union  were;  viz., 

William,  who  lives  at  the  old  homestead;  Joshua  Adams, 
of  Summers — the  father  of  the  well  known  lawyer,  Homer 
Adams,  of  Harrisville ;  the  late  Jackson  Adams,  of  Summers  ; 
Mrs.  Mary  (Thos.)  Hickman,  of  Grove;  and  the  late  Mrs. 
Harriet  (Elias)  Snodgrass,  Ritchie  county  ;  the  late  Mrs.  Mary 
Ann  Leeson,  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Lipscomb,  and  the  late 
Mrs.  Sarah  Gray,  who  was  the  mother  of  the  Gray  Brothers, 
of  Elizabeth,  \\  irt  county. 


CHAPTER  XVI 


Bone  Creek  Settled 


ROBERT  SOMMERVILLE  was  the  first  pio- 
neer to  break  the  forest  on  Bone  creek.     He 
came  from  Harrison  county  in  1834,  and  set- 
tled a  short  distance  below  Auburn,  on  .the 
farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of  his  late  son. 
William.     Here  he  continued  to  reside  until 
he  was  laid  in  the  Auburn  cemetery. 
Mr.  Sommerville  was  born  near  Cumberland,  Maryland, 
on  May  1,  1800.     He  was  the  son  of  James  Simmeral,^  who, 
with  his  wife,  and  tAvo  children,  came  fiom  Cork,  Ireland,  near 

1788,  and  settled  on  the  coast  of  Dela- 
ware, for  a  time,  before  removing  to 
Maryland.  When  the  family  came  to 
America,  two  sons,  John  and  Andrew, 
remained  in  Ireland,  but  Andrew  after- 
wards came  to  the  United  States.  The 
other  members  of  the  family  were : 
James,  Mrs.  Nancy  Lynch,  Mrs.  A\'m. 
(Peggy)  Burnside,  all  of  Harrison 
county  ;  and  Robert,  above  mentioned. 
In  1825,  Robert  married  Miss  Mary 
Ward,  daughter  of  William  Ward,  of 
Harrison  county,  a  soldier  of  the  war 
of  1812 ;  and  for  long  years  after  his  death,  "Aunt  Polly,"  as 
she  was  familiarly  known,  continued  to  reside  at  the  old  home 
below  Auburn,  where  she  fell  asleep  in  1894,  at  the  great  age 
of  ninety-one  or  two  years. 

Their    children    are:    the    late    William,    Martin,    George, 
Franklin.   John,   Hiram,   Mrs.   Sarah    (Charles)    Brown,   Mrs. 


Robert  Sommerville. 


•The   name  was   originally   Simmeral,   but   through    some   error   of   pro- 
nunciation it  finally  became   Sommerville. 


BONE  CREEK  SETTLED  241 

Drusilla  Fisher.  Mrs.  Margaret  (A.  N.)  Watson,  Mrs.  Ruhama 
(Wilson)  Watson. 

All  the  sons  have  passed  away,  except  John.  Franklin 
met  a  tragic  death  by  falling  from  a  building,  and  Hiram  died 
in  childhood,  and  his  remains  filled  the  first  grave  that  "was 
hollowed  out"  in  the  Auburn  cemetery.  The  others  all  left 
families :  a  noteworthy  feature  is  that  the  dead  of  this  family 
all  rest  at  Auburn,  and  here  the  living  all  reside. 

Timothy  Tharpe. — The  settlement  of  Mr.  Sommerville 
was  closely  followed  by  that  of  Timothy  Tharpe,  who  came 
from  his  native  county — Harrison,  and  took  up  his  residence 
on  the  late  A.  P.  Knisely  homestead.,  above  Auburn.  He  later 
moved  to  the  Israel  Cookman  farm,  and  finally,  to  the  Earnest 
Fry  mire  property,  where  he  died,  in  1881. 

Mr.  Tharpe  was  of  Irish  Hneage.  He  was  born  on  July 
35,  1802;  was  the  son  of  II.  Benjamin  Tharpe,  a  ship-builder 
and  carpenter.  When  he  was  but  a  small  boy  his  parents 
died,  and- he  was  bound  out  to  strangers,  and  thus  the  days 
of  his  childhood  and  youth  were  sadly  spent.  Fle  was  a 
brother  of  the  late  H.  B.  Tharpe  ,of  Iowa ;  of  Mrs.  Susan 
Hall — mother  of  the  late  Lemuel  Hall — of  Auburn  ;  the  late 
Mrs.  Hannah  Davis,  of  Pai-kersburg ;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Wm. 
Davis,  of  West  Union.  Fie  was  a  man  of  very  strict  religious 
principles,  and  was  one  of  the  corner-stones  of  the  Auburn 
M.  E.  church,  as  was  Mr.  Sommerville. 

On  Christmas  day,  1823,  he  was  married  to  ]\liss  Sarah 
Cox,  sister  of  Col.  Daniel  V.  Cox,  of  Slab  creek,  who  was 
born  on  December  18,  1805  ;  and  thirteen  children  were  the 
fruits  of  this  union.  Mrs.  Tharpe  followed  him  to  the  grave 
in  1884,  and  both  rest  at  Auburn. 

Their  children:  Matilda  (Mrs.  Henry  Hayden),  Mrs. 
Christiana  AVagner,  W.  D.,  and  Mrs.  Mahala  Mitchell,  sleep 
in  Iowa ;  Mrs.  Luvina  Collins,  on  Spruce  creek ;  Mrs.  Caroline 
Brown  and  E.  H.  Tharpe,  at  Auburn ;  two  daughters  died  in 
childhood,  and  one  son,  Sedwick  S.,  in  the  Andersonville 
prison  during  the  Civil  war.  The  surviving  ones  are  H.  B. 
Tharpe,  of  Hoibrook ;  P.  R.,  of  Harrisville  ;  and  Mrs.  Eliza- 
beth (Isaac)  Hayden,  Auburn. 


242  HISTORY   or   RITCHIE   COUXTV 

Andrew  Law  was  tlie  third  settler  on  Bone  creek.  He 
came  from  Lewis  county,  in  1834,  and  made  his  improvement 
on  the  farm  that  is  best  known  as  the  "Thomas  Kniseley 
homestead" — now  the  home  of  W.  H.  Hall. 

He  was  quite  a  young  man  at  this  time,  not  having  yet 
deserted  single  life ;  but  two  years  later,  he  was  married  to 
Miss  Margaret  Vvaldeck,  daughter  of  Henry  Waldeck,  a  Ger- 
man, who  came  to  America  in  1T7G,  as  a  Hessian  soldier  in 
the  Revolution  ;  and  who,  refusing  to  return  to  his  native  land 
at  the  close  of  the  war,  though  a  fortune  awaited  him,  entered 
land  on  the  river  below  Weston,  where  he  and  his  wife,  ^Irs. 
Mary  Sleeth  Waldeck — sister  of  David  Sleeth,  of  Smithville — 
established  their  home. 

A  few  years  after  Mr.  Law's  marriage,  on  the  occasion 
of  a  husking  bee,  while  his  ''good  wife"  was  preparing  the  pot 
for  dinner,  her  attention  was  attracted  by  an  unusual  dis- 
turbance among  the  hogs  ;  and,  stepping  to  the  door,  she  dis- 
covered an  old  bear  and  two  cubs  making  an  attack  on  them. 
Calling  the  family  dog  to  her  assistance,  she  managed  to  tree 
the  mother,  and  one  of  the  cubs,  and  to  hold  them  at  bay 
until  the  "tooting"  of  the  horn  brought  the  men  from  the  field. 
Air.  Law,  seizing  his  gun  as  he  passed  the  house,  soon  brought 
both  offenders  to  the  ground.  The  other  cub,  returning  in 
quest  of  its  mother,  shared  a  like  fate. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Law  went  to  Colorado  in  the  early  seven- 
ties, and  there,  fell  asleep. 

They  were  the  parents  of  nine  children :  Dr.  Galehria 
Law,  Mrs.  Jeniza  (J.  F.)  Ireland,  John  E.,  and  Lorenzo  D. 
Law,  all  of  Colorado;  the  Rev.  H.  M.,  of  the  West  Virginia 
M.  E.  conference;  Leondias  F.,  of  Spencer;  Mrs.  (W.  M.) 
Agnes  Rymer,  Harrisville ;  Mrs.  Mary  E.  (G.  M.)  Ireland, 
White  Oak;  and  Henry  T.,  v/ho  died  in  the  Andersonville 
prison  during  the  Civil  war.  Leonidas  and  Galelma  were  also 
L^nion  soldiers ;  and  Mrs.  Ireland,  and  Dr.  Law  were  once 
identified  among  the  teachers  of  the  county. 

The  Laws  have  an  interesting  ancestral  history.  They, 
being  in  sympathy  with  the  A\'esleyans,  were  dri\en  from 
Belfast,  Ireland,  the  place  of  their  nativity,  by  religious  perse- 
cution.     So    bitter    were    their    persecutors — the    Catholics — 


^1 


BONE  CREEK  SETTLED  243 

that  they  were  obliged  to  leave  by  stealth,  a  friendly  Catholic 
girl,  having  warned  them  of  their  peril.  And  in  the  wilds  of 
America,  "They  sought  a  faith's  pure  shrine" — "Freedom  to 
worship  God."  And  though  man}^  generations  have  come 
and  gone  since  that  time,  the  different  families  of  this  name 
still  adhere  to  the  religious  faith  (Methodist  Episcopal)  that 
brought  their  fore-fathers  to  this  land. 

In  1794,  four  brothers,  Thomas,  William,  Frank,  and 
John  Law,  with  their  parents,  set  sail  for  America.  The 
mother  died  on  board  the  ship,  while  crossing,  and  was  buried 
beneath  the  briny  waves,  and  the  rest  landed  in  Philadelphia. 

Frank  died  leaving  no  issue.  John,  who  was  an  Irish 
peddler,  went  West  and  married  and  his  descendants  are 
scattered  over  Ohio  and  Indiana. 

Thomas  and  William  remained  in  Philadelphia  for  a  time, 
but  finally  emigrated  to  West  Virginia.  William  settled  at 
Gooseman's  mill,  in  Harrison  county,  and  was  the  ancestor 
of  the  Lawford  branch  of  the  family ;  and  Thomas,  near  Jane 
Lew,  in  Lewis  county. 

Thomas  Law  married  Miss  Martha  Fisher  in  "Old  Erin," 
and  four  months  after  their  arrival  in  the  "City  of  Brotherly 
Love,"  twins  were  born  of  them  (on  April  4,  1795) — the  first 
of  the  name  to  be  born  in  America.  Shortly  after  their  birth, 
the  mother  and  the  infant  daughter  passed  on,  and  the  son, 
who  was  known  as  Billy  F.  Law,  grew  to  manhood  and  mar- 
ried a  Miss  Thornhill,  and  from  him  the  Otterslide  branch  of 
the  family  are  descended,  he  being  the  father  of  the  late 
Thomas  T.  Law,  of  Otterslide,  and  the  grandfather  of  the 
late  Mrs.  John  Ehret,  Mrs.  Azariah  Bee,  and  Mrs.  Elisha 
Maxin. 

When  Billy  F.  Law  was  a  lad  of  fourteen  years,  he  made 
a  pair  of  red  cedar  gate  posts,  and  placed  them  on  his  father's 
farm,  near  Jane  Lew,  and  though  a  century  has  past,  one  of 
these  posts,  still  stands,  as  a  "lone  sentinel,"  keeping  its  silent 
vigil. 

Some  years  after  the  death  of  his  first  wife  (Mrs.  Martha 
Fisher  Law),  Thomas  Law,  senior,  married  Miss  Nancy 
Dixon,  w^ho  came  from  Ireland  at  the  same  time  that  he  did ; 
and   three   sons   and   three  daughters   were   the  fruits  of  this 


244  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

union :  Andrew,  the  Bone  creek  pioneer ;  the  late  James,  of 
Cove  creek;  and  the  late  Asa,  of  Jane  Lew;  Mrs.  Eliza  Collins, 
Mrs.  Margaret  Armstrong,  and  Eleanor,  who  married  a  Mr. 
Jackson,  of  Jane  Lew. 

Asa  Law  married  Miss  Mary  Fell,  of  Westmoreland  coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania,  and  lived  and  died  near  Jane  Lew — on 
October  29,  1908,  at  the  age  of  ninety-six  years.  He  was  the 
father  of  ten  children,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death,  his  poster- 
ity numbered  forty-five  grandchildren,  fifty-four  great-grand- 
children, and  two  great-great-grandchildren,  some  of  whom 
had  passed  on.  His  progeny  are  said  to  be  scattered  from 
the  Atlantic  to  the  Pacific,  and  one  granddaughter  is  a  mis- 
sionary in  China. 

James  D.  Law  w^as  born  in  Lewis  county,  in  September, 
1817,  and  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Bowen,  in  1852,  and 
resided  in  his  native  county  until  1876,  when  he  removed  to 
Gilmer  county,  where  he  died  three  years  later.  He  was  the 
father  of  A.  F.  Law,  C.  F.,  Nancy,  Josephine,  W.  S.,  W.  J., 
Ida  v..  Missouri  K.,  and  Cree  L  Law. 

The  Rev.  George  Collins — a  minister  of  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  church,  also  found  a  home  on  the  Thomas  Kniseley 
(now  the  Hall)  farm,  at  an  early  day. 

He  was  the  first  minister  in  this  section,  and  was  a  man 
of  no  mean  ability.  He  first  married  Miss  Mary  Ann  Law, 
of  Gooseman's  mill,  Harrison  county — half-sister  of  the  late 
Asby  Law,  of  Lawford,  and  when  she  was  about  to  leave  this 
world,  she  requested  him  to  marry  her  cousin.  Miss  Eliza 
Law,  sister  of  Andrew  Law — a  request  which  was  complied 
with  some  time  later. 

Sylvester,  Edwin.  Albert,  and  Mary  B.  were  the  fruits  of 
the  first  union  ;  and  Eliza  Catharine,  and  another  child  that 
died  in  infancy,  of  the  last.  The  family  went  to  Illinois ;  and 
when  Miss  Eliza  C.  grew  to  womanhood,  she  returned  to  this 
county  on  a  visit,  and  while  here,  listened  to  the  wooing  voice 
of  John  M.  Brown,  of  Hannahdale,  and  became  his  bride;  and 
at  Riddel's  chapel,  she  sleeps.  She  was  the  mother  of  Deputy 
Sheriff  C.  Floyd  Brown,  of  Mrs.  lona  Wagner,  of  Hannah- 
dale  :  and  of  Mrs.  Mae  (John)  Harris,  Weston. 

Alexander  Armstrong  is  said  to  have  preceded  Mr.  Col- 


BONE  CREEK  SETTLED  245 

lins  to  the  Thomas  Kniseiy  farm,  he  having  erected  the  cabin 
that  Mr.  Collins  afterwards  occupied.  He  was  a  brother-in- 
law  of  Andrew  Law,  and  Mr.  Collins,  his  wife  being  Miss 
Margaret  Law.  From  here  he  went  to  near  Troy,  in  Gilmer 
county ;  and  finally,  to  Ohio. 

Samuel  Mann  is  said  tO'  have  been  another  early  settler  in 
this  section,  but  of  him  we  know  nothing. 

Henry  Hayden  made  the  first  improvement  on  the  farm 
that  is  designated  as  the  Frymire  homestead.  He  was  born 
in  Pennsylvania  in  1819  ;  and  from  there,  came  to  Harrison 
county,  in  1840,  and  two  years  later,  to  Bone  creek ;  here  he 
married  Miss  Matilda  Tharpe,  daughter  of  Timothy  Tharpe ; 
and  from  here  they  removed  to  Davis  county,  Iowa,  in  1859, 
where  they  both  sleep — she  having  passed  from  earth  in  1900, 
and  he,  in  1906. 

Isaac  Hayden — brother  of  Henry,  was  the  first  settler  on 
the  Hayden  farm,  in  this  vicinity.  He,  too,  was  a  native  of 
the  "Keystone  state,"  having  been  born  in  Westmoreland 
county,  on  August  1,  1821.  He  came  to  this  county  in  1849, 
and  two  years  later,  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Ann  Tharpe.  who 
was,  also,  a  daughter  of  Timothy  Tharpe,  and  took  up  his 
residence  on  the  farm  that  remained  his  home  until  his  death, 
on  February  6,  1894.  He  rests  in  the  Auburn  cemetery,  and 
his  widow  lives  with  her  son,  at  Auburn. 

Their  children  are  as  follows :  Wm.  Bennett  Hayden, 
Washington;  the  late  Mrs.  Mary  M.  (Samuel  N.)  Haddox, 
Pleasant  Hill;  Mrs.  Huldah  J.  (L  N.)  Czigan,  Doddridge 
county;  Mrs.  Amanda  C.  Qohn  \¥.)  Haddox,  Calhoun  coun- 
ty; Irvin  M.  Hayden,  and  Gilbert,  and  Mrs.  Abby  L.  (J.  P.) 
Smith,  Auburn;  Mrs.  Sarah  E.  (Wilson)  Rymer,  Gilmer 
county;  Nathaniel  riayden,  Doddridge  county;  and  Mrs.  Ida 
(John)  W^ass,  Huntington.  The  eldest  son,  W.  B.,  taught 
school  in  this  county  for  near  a  score  of  years,  and  served  one 
term  as  County  surveyor  before  going  West.  Gilbert  also 
held  the  office  of  County  surveyor  for  ten  years. 

The  Haydens  are  of  English  descent.  They  came  from 
"The  Motherland,"  and  were  among  the  earliest  settlers  of 
the  New  Jersey  colony.  They  figured  in  Colonial  history 
both  as  Revolutionary  soldiers,  and  as  Indian  fighters. 


2i6  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Nathaniel  Hayden — grandfather  of  Henry  and  Isaac — 
was  one  of  the  first  settlers  in  the  vicinity  of  Pittsburg,  he 
having  gone  there  from  New  Jersey,  when  but  a  lad.  Twice 
the  emigrant  party  to  which  he  belonged,  was  driven  back  to 
New  Jersey  by  the  hostility  of  the  Indians.  On  one  occasion, 
he,  and  a  few  other  men,  made  an  average  of  seventy-five 
miles  a  day  on  horse-back,  when  compelled  to  flee  from  the 
dusky  foe.  Air.  Hayden,  at  one  time,  owned  four  hundred 
acres  of  land  in  what  is  now  the  City  of  Pittsburg.  His 
earthly  pilgrimage  began  on  November  28,  1755,  and  closed, 
on  September  15,  1845.  His  wife,  Abigail,  lived  from  June 
17,  1762,  to  April  20.  1836. 

Thomas  Hayden,  his  son.  married  Aliss  Mary  Hayden, 
and  from  him  the  Ritchie  county  family  are  descended.  He 
Avas  born  in  Pennsylvania — in  Westmoreland  county — near 
the  year  1788,  and  his  wife  was  born  in  1790:  both  died  there, 
in  1874. 

They  were  the  parents  of  thirteen  children  :  Henry  and 
Isaac,  of  Ritchie  county;  James  and  Thomas,  of  AIcKeesport, 
Pennsylvania;  Nathaniel,  who  lost  his  life  in  the  Union  cause; 
Samuel,  of  Idaho ;  the  late  Wm.,  the  late  Alexander,  and 
Abijah,  all  of  Pennsylvania;  Mrs.  Christina  Marshall,  Mrs. 
Abigail  Fell,  and  Mary  M.,  and  Elsie,  who  both  died  unmar- 
ried. 

Lemuel  Hall. — In  1841,  Lemuel  Hall  came  to  the  home- 
stead that  remained  in  his  hands  until  he  passed  to  his  reward 
in  1897.  (Mr.  Sheets  now  owns  this  farm.)  He  was  of 
English  descent,  and  came  upon  the  stage  of  action  in  Lewis 
county,  on  August  9,  1820;  was  the  son  of  Elisha  and  Mrs. 
Susan  Tharpe  Hall.  On  December  15,  1840,  he  was  married 
to  Miss  Susana  Woofter,  v/ho  was  born  in  Lewis  county,  on 
January  17,  1823.  Mrs.  Hall  survived  him  by  two  years ;  and 
both  sleep  at  Auburn.  Mr.  Hall  was  a  magistrate  for  several 
years,  and  was  long  a  deacon  in  the -Baptist  church. 

Their  children:     Mrs.   George  Brake    (Mary  Jane),   Gil- 
mer  county;   Mrs.   Wm.    G.   Davis    (Martha   A.),   Doddridge 
county;  Cyrus  J.,  Ohio;  Marshall  D.,  Francis  M.,  and  Mrs 
George   Emmerson    (Louella   B.),   Kentucky;  the   late   Gran- 
ville, and  George  W.,  Colorado;  the  late  Mrs.  L.  D.  Bartletl 


BONE  CREEK  SETTLED  247 

(Matilda),  Auburn;  Edward  M.,  Calhoun  county;  Charles, 
Emory  T.,  Roane  county ;  and  Alfred  N.,  who  died  in  child- 
hood. 

Elisha  M.  Hall.— On  October  1,  1849,  the  Rev.  Elisha  Al 
Hall — brother  of  Lemuel — married  Miss  Tacy  Jane,  daughtei  ■ 
of  Joseph  Jeft'reys,  of  Doddridge  county,  and  the  followini^ 
year  came  to  Bone  creek,  where  he  opened  a  store,  near  the 
year  1857.  He  made  the  first  settlment  on  the  farm  that  is 
now  the  estate  of  the  late  George  Somerville,  below  Auburn. 
Mr.  Sommerville  owned  the  farm  that  is  now  the  Town  Hall 
homestead,  and  he,  and  Mr.  Hall,  traded  farms.  Here  Mr. 
Hall  continued  to  live  until  he  was  laid  in  the  Auburn  ceme- 
tery in  1886.  He  put  two  hundred  acres  of  land  under  cultiva- 
tion on  this  creek.  He  was  a  prominent  minister  of  the 
Baptist  church;  a  native  of  Allen  county,  Ohio,  and  his  natal 
da}^  was  September  1,  1829. 

Mrs.  Hall  died  at  Auburn,  on  May  4,  1908,  and  sleeps  by 
his  side. 

They  were  the  parents  of  twelve  children :  John  T., 
Auburn;  Wm.  F.,  and  Joseph  S.,  Colorado;  and  Mrs.  Tacy  J. 
Brake,  Gilmer  county ;  all  the  rest  have  joined  the  throng  on 
the  other  side;  viz.,  Mrs.  Rosa  K.  (Gilbert)  Hayden ;  Dr.  J. 
Monroe,  Preston  R.,  Ava  A.,  Iva  O.,  David  A.,  and  two  died 
in  infancy. 

Lawson  Hall,  brother  of  Lemuel  and  Elisha  above  men- 
tioned, has  been  a  familiar  figure  in  the  Auburn  vicinity,  for 
sixty-seven  years,  he  having  come  here  with  his  brother, 
Lemuel,  when  he  was  a  lad  of  ten  summers.  He  taught 
school  before  the  Civil  war,  as  did  his  brother,  and  for  several 
years  afterwards,  and  like  his  brothers,  has  long  been  a  cor- 
ner-stone of  the  Auburn  Baptist  church.  On  September  2, 
1852,  he  claimed  Miss  Sarah  J.  Sinnett,  daughter  of  Abel  and 
Elizabeth  Stuart  Sinnett,  as  his  bride,  and  shortly  after  his 
marriage  took  up  his  residence  where  he  still  lives,  and  where 
he  has  cleared  and  put  under  cultivation  one  hundred  fifty 
acres  of  land.    His  wife  also  survives. 

They  are  the  parents  of  ten  children :  Mrs.  Martin  L. 
Cunningham  (Euphamy),  Abel,  John  A.,  Mrs.  S.  A.  Weirs 
(Sarah  E.),  Mrs.  C.  A.  Ward   (Catharine),  Mrs.  Van  Riddel 


248  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

(Columbia),  all  of  Auburn;  the  other  four  have  passed  on: 
viz.,  Mrs.  C.  F.  Beall  (Sofronia),  and  William,  who  were 
twins;  Franklin  was  a  twin  of  Mrs.  Riddel,  and  George  A. 
died  in  childhood. 

Martin  Sommerville- — son  of  Robert — and  his  wife,  Mrs. 
Susan  Gaston  Sommerville,  were  the  pioneers  on  the  Town 
Hall  homestead.  They  were  succeeded  here  by  his  brother, 
George,  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Nancy  Thomas  Sommerville,  who 
later  exchanged  farms  with  the  late  Rev.  Elisha  Hall,  as 
above  stated.  Martin  Sommerville  went  from  here  to  Otter- 
slide,  and  there  passed  from  earth,  where  his  son,  Robert  O. 
Sommerville,  now  lives. 

His  other  children  are :     Mrs.  Mary  Elizabeth  Nets,  and 

Mrs.  Caroline ,  of  Ohio;  Mrs.  Martha  Barrackman, 

of  Roane  county  Mrs.  Fillmore  Kelly  (Olive),  of  Berea ; 
Floyd,  of  Holbrook ;  and  the  late  John  A.,  and  Charles  E. 
Sommerville. 

The  children  of  George  and  Nancy  Thomas  Sommerv'ille 
are  Charles  and  Henry  Sommerville,  and  Mrs.  Louisa  Garner, 
of  Auburn  ;  and  Madeline  and  Hattie,  who  died  in  youth. 

Franklin  Sommerville  made  the  first  improvement  on  the 
Hoff  farm,  below  Auburn,  but  while  erecting  a  stable  here  he 
met  his  death  by  a  fall,  and  this  improvement  passed  into  the 
hands  of  the  Rev.  John  Miller,"  and  afterwards  became  the 
property  of  the  late  John  Hofif. 

Mr.  Sommerville's  widow,  Mrs.  Caroline  Chevront  Som- 
merville, and  her  only  child,  Newton,  went  to  Nebraska,  where 
they  still  survive. 

John  Miller  was  a  lay  minister  of  the  Methodist  Episco- 
pal church,  and  a  blacksmith  by  trade.  Fie  had  been  reared 
b}^  the  late  Waitman  T.  Willey,  of  Morgantown.  He  married 
for  his  first  wife  a  Miss  Robinson,  of  Monongalia  county,  and 
while  residing  on  the  Hofif  farm,  she  passed  on.  Diphtheria 
invaded  the  home  here,  and  stilled  the  voices  of  all  the  chil- 
dren, but  two  sons.  Some  time  after  the  death  of  his  wife. 
Mr.  Miller  married  Mrs.  Mary  Cox  Alexander,  niece  of  Philip 
Cox,  and  mother  of  Calvin  Alexander,  of  Auburn,  and  they 
finally  went  West. 

Martin  Ward  was  the  pioneer  of  the  "Ward  homestead." 


BONE  CREEK  SETTLED  249 

Vi^hich  is  still  in  the  hands  of  his  heirs — his  late  son's  (Smith 
Ward's)  wife,  who  is  now  Mrs.  Laban  Bush,  being  the  owner. 

Mr.  Ward  was  the  son  of  William  Ward,  an  Englishman, 
and  of  Mrs.  Sarah  Shobe  Ward,  a  Dutch  maiden,  who  crossed 
the  sea,  and  came  to  Harrison  county,  before  her  marriage. 
Here  she  and  her  husband,  who  were  identified  among  the 
early  pioneers  of  the  county,  lived  and  died,  and  here,  in  the 
Bethel  cemetery,  near  their  old  home,  they  are  sleeping,  side 
by  side.  Five  of  their  ten  children  sleep  in  Ritchie  county ; 
viz.,  George  W.,  who  settled  just  across  the  line  in  Gilmer 
county ;  Mrs.  Robert  Sommerville,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Bailey, 
who  died  at  the  home  of  Martin  Ward,  with  their  brother, 
Martin,  all  rest  at  Auburn ;  and  Mrs.  Daniel  Cox,  on  Slab 
creek. 

Martin  Carr  Ward's  nativity  was  Harrison  county,  on 
August  1,  1821.  There  on  December  17,  1840,  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Mary  Jane  Gaston,  daughter  of  John  Gaston,  who 
was  born  in  the  same  county,  on  June  22,  1823  ;  and  tvv'o  years 
afterward  (1842),  they  came  to  Bone  creek,  and  settled  at  the 
"Ward  homestead,"  where  he  passed  from  earth,  on  March 
8,  1897,  and  she,  on  December  18,  1908. 

When  they  came  to  this  couiity,  Mrs.  Ward  made  tlie 
trip  on  horse-back,  through  the  wilderness,  carrying  her  babe 
in  her  arms,  and  her  sister — a  giri  of  ten  years,  behind  her. 
Marvelous  were  the  changes,  they  lived  to  see.  None  of  the 
other  pioneers  were  longer  identified  with  the  interests  of  the 
community  than  they,  and  none  were  held  in  higher  esteem. 

They  were  the  parents  of  twelve  children:  Sarah  Eliza- 
beth died  in  childhood ;  John  J.,  who  was  a  Union  soldier, 
resides  in  Colorado;  Mrs.  W.  B.  Zinn  (Anna),  at  Holbrook; 
Thomas  F.,  and  Albert  M.,  Berea;  Mrs.  J.  T.  Hall  (Amanda), 
and  C.  A.  Ward,  Auburn  ;  Calvin  B.,  North  Dakota ;  Mrs.  J. 
E.  Amos  (Eliza  J.),  near  Harrisville ;  Lewis  M.,  died  in  child- 
hood ;  Wm.  W.,  in  his  youth  ;  and  Smith,  a  few  years  since, 
leaving  a  family. 

John  HofT  was  another  early  settler  on  this  creek,  just 
below  the  "Ward  homestead."  He  was,  also,  a  Harrison 
county  product,  being  born  on  October  9,  1825  ;  and  near  the 
year   1846,   he  was   married  to   A4iss    Elizabeth   Ann   Gaston, 


250  HISTORY    OF   RITCHIE    COUXTV 

daughter  of  James  and  Charlotte  Swisher  Gaston.  The  Gas- 
tons  being  of  Irish  descent,  and  the  Swishers  (or  Svveitzers 
as  the  name  was  originally  spelled  in  the  native  land),  of  Ger- 
man. Mrs.  Gaston  was  able  to  speak  both  German  and 
English,  fluently. 

Mr.  Hoff  came  to  Bone  creek  near  the  year  1850,  and 
remained  until  his  death,  on  August  3,  1903.  He  was  an 
honest,  industrious  citizen,  and  became  a  large  land-owner. 
Mrs.  Hofif,  who  was  a  most  estimable  woman,  survived  him 
but  a  short  time,  and  both  lie  at  rest  in  the  Auburn  cemetery. 
The  simplicity  of  the  inscription  upon  the  marble  shaft  that 
marks  the  resting  place  of  Mr.  Hoff — "Honesty  is  the  best 
policy" — leaves  its  impress  upori  the  visitor  to  this  cemetery. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hofif  were  the  parents  of  eleven  children 
that  reached  the  years  of  maturity — seven  sons  and  four 
daughters.  These  sons  are  nearly  all  prominently  known  in 
the  various  walks  of  life :  Eri  B.  is  a  minister  of  the  West 
Virginia  Methodist  Episcopal  conference;  Weldon  A.  L.  Hoff 
was  graduated  from  the  Commercial  college  at  Delaware. 
Ohio,  after  spending  some  time  in  teaching  in  his  native  coun- 
ty, and  is  now  a  professor  in  a  commercial  college  in  Okla- 
homa. 

I.  Samuel  (unmarried),  and  Lloyd,  who  was  also  a 
teacher,  are  prosperous  farmers,  of  near  Cairo. 

Lewis  Ross,  who  began  his  career  as  a  rural  pedagogue 
in  his  native  state,  was  graduated  from  a  college  at  AVinfield, 
Kansas,  in  the  Bachelor  of  Science  degree,  and  later  took  a 
theological  course  at  Drew  seminary,  and  is  now  a  distingu- 
ished pulpit  orator  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  of  Lib- 
eral, Kansas. 

Silas  Marion  is  at  this  time  one  of  the  prominent  ofificial 
figures  of  his  native  count}^     (See  Younger  Men's  Calendar.) 

George  S.  and  Miss  Rosa  Byrd,  who  were  both  known 
among  the  teachers  of  this  county,  are  lying  in  their  narrow 
beds  in  the  Auburn  cemetery. 

Rebecca  J.,  is  Mrs.  E.  L.  Bee,  of  Berea :  Charlotte  C,  is 
Mrs.  W.  J.  Butcher,  of  Hacker's  Valley ;  and  Caroline  is  the 
wife  of  Alva  Fitz  Randolph,  of  Alfred,  New  York.  She  was, 
also,  a  teacher. 


BONE  CREEK  SETTLED  251 

The  Hoff  family  is  said  to  have  originated  in  Germany 
near  the  fourteenth  century.  John  HofT  was  called  from  his 
native  land  to  a  professor's  chair  in  the  Oxford  University, 
in  England ;  and  members  of  this  family  migrated  to  America 
in  Colonial  days,  and  settled  at  York,  Pennsylvania,  and  in 
Meigs  county,  Ohio.  But  shortly  before  the  American  Revo- 
lution, one  John  Hofit  came  across  to  visit  his  kinsmen  in 
Pennsylvania  and  Ohio,  and  he  settled  in  Virginia,  where  he 
took  up  arms  in  behalf  of  his  adopted  country  in  her  struggle 
for  liberty;  and  from  him  the  Ritchie  county  family  come.  lie 
was  a  slave-holder  and  a  large  land-owner,  and  one  of  his 
slaves  died  at  A\"est  Milford,  in  Harrison  county,  only  a  few 
years  since,  in  a  little  home  that  he  had  thoughtfully  provided 
for  her  by  his  last  will  and  testament. 

Samuel  Hoff,  his  son,  was  born  at  the  old  homestead,  in 
Harrison  county,  in  1802,  and  there  spent  his  enin-e  life,  dying 
on  January  8,  1887.  Samuel  Hofr  was  married  to  Miss  Cath- 
arine Paris,  who  was  born  of  Scotch  parentage,  and  they  had 
eight  children ;  John  Hoff,  of  this  county,  being  the  eldest 
son.  The  other  children  were,  Silas,  Lewis,  Rose,  Humphre}-, 
James,  Melissa,  Rebecca,  Amy,  and  Margaret. 

Daniel  Luzader,  though  not  so  early  as  the  others,  was 
the  first  settler  on  his  old  homestead  on  this  creek. 

He  was  born  near  Grafton,  in  Taylor  county,  on  July  5, 
1823,  and  his  wife,  Martha  A.  Newlon,  was  born  near  Prunty- 
town,  in  the  sanie  county,  on  December  17,  1828.  They  were 
married  in  1850,  and  at  the  close  of  the  Civil  war,  came  to 
this  county,  and  settled  on  Spruce  creek,  before  coming  to 
P)One  creek,  where  they  reared  their  family,  and  where  Mr. 
Luzader  passed  away,  on  July  20,  1902.  His  wife  followed 
him  to  the  grave,  on  July  6,  1906,  she  having  spent  her  last 
hours  with  her  son  at  Pennsboro.  Both  rest  in  the  Spruce 
creek  Baptist  churchyard. 

Their  children  were  nine  in  number,  and  some  of  them 
are  quite  prominently  known. 

Winfield  Scott,  the  eldest  son.  who  was  long  identified 
in  the  teaching  profession,  is  the  father  of  Everett,  Mae  and 
]\Irs.  Flossie  Brown,  who  are  among  the  present  teachers. 

Grant,   who   was,   also,    a    teacher   of   former   vears,    was 


252  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

graduated  from  the  Parsons  Horolog-ical  Institute,  at  Laporte, 
Indiana,  and  is  now  meeting  with  success  in  his  trade  at 
Pennsboro. 

Sherman,  who  was  Hkewise  a  teacher  of  Ritchie  and  Gil- 
mer counties,  is  a  well-to-do  farmer  of  Wayne  town,  Indiana, 
where  he  found  his  life  companion. 

M.  M.  is  of  Harrisville.  Mollie  B.  is  Mrs.  Randolph 
Weaver,  and  Harriett  is  Mrs.  George  Weaver,  both  of  Law- 
ford  ;  Martha  C.  married  Alva  V.  Oldaker  and  went  to  Indiana, 
but  they  now  reside  on  a  fine  old  plantation  in  Virginia. 

Malcolm  M.  Luzader  is  the  one  Ritchian  whose  reputa- 
tion as  a  vocalist  is  more  than  "state  wide." 

He  first  opened  his  eyes  on  this  mundane  sphere  in  Tay- 
lor county,  on  November  37,  1858.  but  came  to  this  county 
with  his  parents  when  but  a  lad  of  eleven  summers.  A  nat- 
ural born  student,  he  early  entered  the  profession  of  teaching 
and  Avas  for  a  number  of  years  known  among  the  pedagogues 
of  Ritchie,  Gilmer,  Lewis,  and  Preston  counties,  he  having  at 
one  time  held  a  position  in  the  Academy  at  Kingwood. 

His  love  for  music  developed  at  an  early  age,  and  he  im- 
proved his  talent  about  the  fireside,  as  circumstances  would 
permit,  attended  a  few  local  singing  schools,  and  then  took  a 
course  of  five  terms  in  the  West  Virginia  Normal  Music 
school:  and  in  1883,  he  was  made  the  secretary  of  the  West 
Virginia  Music  Teachers'  Association.  He  later  attended  the 
Indiana  State  Normal  Music  school,  where  he  studied 
thorough  base,  harmony,  composition,  form  and  voice  under 
instructors  of  national  reputation.  For  more  than  thirty  years 
he  has  been  a  successful  teacher  of  vocal  music,  having  in 
that  time  instructed  more  than  twenty  thousand  pupils  of  all 
ages.  Perhaps  no  other  teacher  in  the  State  has  instructed  a 
greater  number  or  covered  a  wider  range  of  territor^^  he  haA- 
ing  taught  in  West  Virginia,  Ohio,  Indiana,  Illinois,  Pennsyl- 
vania, and  Missouri. 

He  has  taken  an  active  interest  in  politics  ever  since  he 
reached  his  majority,  and  was  one  of  the  representatives  from 
this  county  in  the  State  Legislature  in  1901 ;  and  having  led 
to  a  "decisive  victory  for  righteousness"  in  the  defeat  of  the 
Salem    (Harrison  county)   charter  bill,  he  became  the  recog- 


BONE  CREEK  SETTLED  253 

nized  leader  of  the  Temperance  forces  of  the  House.  He  is  a 
Baptist  in  religion  and  has  twice  served  as  Moderator  of  the 
Harrisville  Baptist  church. 

On  August  16,  1893,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  E. 
Truax,  of  Alamo,  Indiana,  and  after  a  five  years'  residence 
there,  with  his  wife,  he  returned  to  this  county  and  established 
his  home  at  Harrisville,  where  he  still  lives.  The  one  child 
born  of  this  union  died  in  infancy.  (Since  this  was  written, 
Mr.  Luzader  has  sold  his  Harrisville  home,  and  has  gone  to 
the  "Old  Dominion"  to  live.) 

David  E.  Brown  made  his  settlement  on  the  "Hardesty"' 
— now  the  Thomas  Mason  farm.  He  was  of  Dutch  descent. 
His  ancestors  came  to  America  as  British  soldiers  during  the 
Revolution;  and  being  so  delighted  with  the  country,  they 
took  up  their  residence  on  the  South  branch  of  the  Potomac 
when  the  conflict  was  ended ;  and  from  there  John  Brown 
emigrated  to  Lewis  county,  near  the  close  of  the  eighteenth 
century,  and  settled  on  the  waters  of  the  West  fork  of  the 
Monongahela  river,  near  the  Broad  run  Baptist  church.  There 
David  E.  Brown,  the  head  of  the  Ritchie  count}'-  family,  was 
born,  on  September  9,  1801 ;  there  he  grew  to  manhood ;  there 
he  was  married  to  Miss  Deborah  Stalnaker.  on  February  15, 
1827;  and  from  there  came  to  Bone  creek  in  18o3. 

In  18G1,  Mrs.  Brown  passed  from  sight,  and  at  Auburn, 
she  rests.  Mr.  Brown,  who  survived  her  by  a  number  of  years, 
died  at  the  home  of  his  son,  John,  at  Hannahdale. 

They  were  the  parents  of  nine  children.  Five  of  their 
seven  sons  served  as  Union  soldiers,  and  all  returned  home  in 
safety. 

The  eldest  son,  Joseph  C,  went  to  California,  during  the 
gold  excitement,  in  1849.  There  he  married  and  had  a  family, 
and  there  he  sleeps.  W.  R.  (the  late  father  of  \V.  R.  Brown, 
of  West  Union,  and  T.  A.,  of  Elizabeth),  has  been  sleeping  in 
the  Auburn  cemetery,  for  many  years ;  George  W.  married 
Miss  Frances  Nutter,  sister  of  C.  W.  Nutter,  and  after  her 
early  death,  he  went  West,  and,  near  Buft'alo.  Wyoming,  in 
1902,  he  fell  asleep;  Andrew  S.  never  married.     He  went  to 


'The  Hardesty  farm,  which  was  owned  by  Asa  Law,  of  .Jane  Lew, 
was  tenanted  by  Otho  Law,  before  the  coming  of  Mr.  Brown,  who  pur- 
chased it. 


254  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUXTV 

Wyoming  near  1875,  and  there  he  was  murdered,  in  1901.  He 
lived  alone  in  a  secluded  spot,  and  being  known  to  have  con- 
siderable means,  robbery  is  supposed  to  have  been  the  moti\e. 
Some  of  his  property  in  the  hands  of  suspicious  looking  in- 
dividuals, led  to  an  investigation,  which  brought  to  light  the 
heinous  crime,  and  the  attempt  to  conceal  it  by  the  cremation 
of  the  body.  Samuel  V.  resides  at  Morgantown ;  E.  M.,  nt 
Auburn;  John  M.,  at  Hannahdale ;  Mrs.  P.  P.  Brown  (Mary 
Jane),  at  Jane  Lew;  and  Mrs.  Elijah  W.  Summers  fCaroline 
v.),  at  Summers. 

George  G.  Brown — the  well  known  timberman — formerly 
of  Smithville,  but  now  of  Huntington,  belongs  to  this  family. 
He  is  the  son  of  the  late  Lemuel  Brown,  of  Doddridge  county ; 
and  grandson  of  Thomas  and  Alary  Stalnaker  Brown — brother 
of  David — of  Lewis  county. 

The  Woofters. — Andrew  Woofter,  in  1851,  made  the  first 
improvement,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  by  Albert  Smith, 
and  he  continued  to  reside  here  until  he  was  borne  to  the 
tomb.  He  was  of  German  lineage.  His  ancestors  came  to 
America  near  1GG5,  and  settled  in  the  New  Jerse}^  colony. 
John  Woofter  married  a  Scotch  maiden  by  the  name  of  Petit, 
and  emigrated  from  New  Jersey  to  Loudin  county,  Virginia; 
and  from  thence  to  Lewis  county,  (\V.)  Virginia,  wdiere  he 
rests  in  the  old  churchyard  at  Broad  run.  His  son,  Jonathan 
Woofter,  married  Miss  Jeannette  Winans,  and  they  were  the 
parents  of — the  Rev.  John  Woofter,  of  the  Baptist  church. 
Andrew,  William,  Perry,  Enos,  and  Jonathan,  who  resides  at 
Washington,  in  Wood  countv.  and  who  is  the  only  survivor 
of  the  family ;  the  daughters  were :  Mrs.  Lydia  Simmons, 
Mrs.  Sarah  Ferrell,  Mrs.  Mary  Bailey.  Mrs.  Alcinda  Crowcer, 
and  Jane. 

Andrew  Woofter  was  born  in  Lewis  county,  on  Septem- 
ber 17,  1833;  and  on  May  29,  1815,  he  was  married  to  Miss 
Jane  Simpson,  who  was  born  in  Ohio,  but  was  reared  in 
Lewis  county.  Her  father,  John  .Simpson,  having  removed 
from  that  county  to  the  "Buckeye  state,"  where  he  was  killed 
by  lightning;  and  after  his  death  the  family  returned  to  their 
former  home. 

Mr.   Woofter   was   one   of   the   early   pedagogues   of   this 


BONE  CREEK  SETTLED  255 

vicinity,  and  several  members  of  his  family  were  identified  in 
this  profession  in  after  years.  He  died  in  February,  1902,  and 
his  wife  followed  him  to  the  grave  four  months  later.  Both 
rest  in  the  Auburn  cemetery. 

Their  children  are  as  follows:  Thomas  J.,  Wood  county; 
the  Rev.  George  A.,  of  the  Baptist  church,  Shinnston;  Francis 
A.  Woofter,  DeKalb ;  John  S.,  Houston,  Texas;  Clarke,  Au- 
burn; Ellet,  Charleston;  Mrs.  Sarah  E.  Adams,  Oxford;  and 
Mrs.  Columbia  J.  Bush  (M.  F.),  Burnt  House.  Homer 
Adam's,  the  well  known  Flarrisville  lawyer,  is_  a  grandson  of 
this  pioneer ;  and  the  Rev.  Emery  Woofter,  of  the  Baptist 
cliurch,  is  a  grandson  of  the  late  Rev.  John  Woofter,  of  the 
Baptist  church — brother  of  Andrew. 

Ebenezer  Tharpe — son  of  Timothy — was  the  first  to  find 
a  home  on  the  farm  that  is  still  in  the  hands  of  his  widow, 
Mrs.  Amanda  Wass  Tharpe.  Here  he  died,  and  at  Auburn, 
he  sleeps.  They  were  the  parents  of  eleven  children  :  Alvin 
and  John  have  passed  on  ;  S.  S.,  Milton,  Mrs.  Rosa  B.  Wright, 
Mrs.  Lillie  Nestor,  Mrs.  Laura  Woofter,  and  Mrs.  Ida  Rohey, 
are  all  of  Auburn;  ]\Irs.  Grace  Brake,  of  ^Veston ;  Mrs.  Bar- 
bara Aiken,  of  Greenwood,  and  E.   F.  Tharp  \  of  Burnt  House. 


CHAPTER  XVII 


Otterslide  Settled 


HIS  stream  derived  its  name  from  the  mini- 
.erous  slides  made  by  otters  along  its  banks. 
William  Gribble  was  the  first  settler. 
His  ancestors  came  from  Holland  in  Col- 
onial times  and  settled  in  Pennsylvania, 
where  he  was  born,  but  his  family  later  re- 
moved to  Preston  county,  (West)  Virginia : 
and  there  he  (William)  was  married  to  Miss  Lydia  Rogers, 
who  was  of  Scotch-Irish  and  Welsh  lineage,  and  was  the 
daughter  of  John  and  Elizabeth  Wilson  Rogers,  of  Preston 
county.  Her  mother  belonged  to  one  of  the  pioneer  families 
of  Monongalia  county,  who  forted  on  the  present  site  of  Alor- 
gantown  in  Indian  times. 

The  first  years  of  their  married  life  were  spent  in  Pres- 
ton coinity,  but  they  came  to  Otterslide  in  1840,  and  reared 
their  humble  cabin  on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  by  Jack- 
son Hudkins,  and  here  they  remained  until  death  claimed 
them. 

They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  named  children, 
some  of  whom  have  been  prominently  known :  William  A. 
Gribble  (lost  his  life  in  the  Union  army),  the  late  Ezekiel,  J. 
B.,  and  Thomas  N.,  Berea;  Cornelius  A.,  Harrison  county; 
and  John  M.  Gribble,  of  West  Union,  all  of  whom  served  as 
Union  soldiers,  are  the  sons.  John  M.  has  been  a  leading 
figure  in  public  affairs  in  Doddridge  county  for  a  number  of 
years,  he  having  served  as  assessor,  sheriff,  and  has  been  the 
president  of  the  West  Union  bank  throughout  its  history. 

The  daughters  of  this  famih-  are:  Sarah  J.,  wife  of  the 
late  R.  H.  Wilson,  who  died  in  the  Andersonville  prison  dur- 
ing the  Civil  war ;  Perces,  the  late  Mrs.  A.  J.  Nutter,  of  Ox- 


OTTERS LIDE  SETTLED  257 

ford ;   Airs.   Hattie   Skank,  who  resides   in  the   East ;  and  the 
late  Mrs.  Annie  (Alex)  Stout,  of  West  Union. 

William  Wall  was  the  next  settler.  He  married  Miss 
Flnliarty,  a  sister  of  the  late  Adam  Fluharty,  of  Leatherbarke, 
and  came  here  from  Marion  county  and  erected  his  cabin  on 
the  head  of  the  stream,  on  what  is  now  the  Campbell  farm. 
But  he  was  only  a  squatter,  and  was  supplanted  by  John  Jett. 
in  1849. 

John  Jett  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Alary  Watson  Jett,  came 
from  their  native  county — Barbour — and  remained  until  1875, 
when  they  removed  to  Roane  county,  where  they  found  a  iinal 
resting  place  in  the  Spring-  Creek  cemetery. 

They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  named  children: 

George,  Elizabeth  and  Sarah  died  in  childhood;  Wilson 
and  Jacob,  of  Roane  county,  and  Alden,  of  Charleston,  have, 
also,  passed  on;  John,  junior,  resides  in  Kanawha  county; 
Mrs.  Mary  Abbott,  m  Roane;  Sylvester,  at  Holbrook ;  and 
William  Jett,  on  Otterslide. 

William  Jett  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Safronia  Lowther  Jett, 
have  had  a  longer  connection  with  this  creek  than  any  other 
citizens  in  its  history.  He  having  been  here  since  1849,  when 
he  came  with  his  parents,  and  she,  since  the  day  of  her  birth 
in  1845. 

Wesley  Jett,  brother  of  John,  senior,  married  Miss  Nancy 
Lipscomb,  and  came  to  this  county  in  1845,  and  settled  on 
Brushy  fork  of  Bone  creek,  where  they  both  died,  and  at  Au- 
burn they  sleep. 

Their  only  son,  Wesley,  junior,  died  as  a  prisoner  of  war, 
at  Camp  Chase,  the  Union  prison  at  Columbus,  Ohio,  during 
the  sixties. 

The  Jetts  are  of  Welsh  ancestry.  William  Jett,  senior, 
came  from  Wales  with  his  wife,  shortly  before  the  American 
Revolution,  and  settled  on  the  Potomac  river  below  Washing- 
ton city.  -He  served  his  adopted  country  as  a  soldier  in  the 
Continental  army,  being  under  the  direct  command  of  General 
Washington.  His  son,  John  Jett,  senior,  was  born  and  reared 
in  Franklin  county,  Virginia,  and  there  he  was  married  to 
Miss  Sarah  Smith;  and  from  there  they  removed  to  Barbour 
county,  near  the  year  1820,  where  Air.  Jett  died  in   1863,  and 


258  HISTORY   or   RITCHIE   COUNTY       ■ 

where  his  son,  John  Jett,  junior,  tlie  Otterslide  pioneer,  was 
born. 

Jonathan  C.  Lowther  was  another  pioneer  on  this  stream. 
And  though  he  is  now  a  nonegenarian,  he  is  still  a  familiar 
figure  here.  He  is  the  son  of  Elias  Lowther  and  the  only  sur- 
viving grandson  of  Col.  William  Lowther.  He  married  Miss 
Emza  Xeal.  sister  of  '\l.  A.  Neal,  of  Pullman,  and  since  her 
death  in  1906,  he  has  made  his  home  with  his  daughter,  Mrs. 
William  Jett.  He  is  the  father  of  one  other  daughter,  Airs. 
Rebecca  Bee,  of  Rutherford  ;  and  William  Lowther,  of  Cali- 
fornia, is  an  adopted  son. 

Ezekiel  Kelley  was  another  early  settler  on  this  stream. 
He  Avas  the  son  of  John  Kelley,  and  in  Doddridge  county  he 
was  born  and  reared.  Near  the  year  1849,  he  was  married  to 
Miss  Estella  Davis,  and  came  to  this  county  and  established 
his  home  on  what  is  now  known  as  the  L.  M.  Jett  farm.  j\Irs. 
Kelley  died  in  18T5,  and  his  second  wife  was  Miss  Mary 
Stinespring,  who  survived  him.     He  died  ni  1891. 

He  and  his  first  wife  were  the  parents  of  nine  children: 
Ai,  Fillmore,  and  Festus  Kelley,  Mrs.  Verna  Ehret,  and  Mrs. 
Lulu  Zinn,  all  of  this  county ;  INIrs.  Darlie  Bond,  Roanoke ; 
Horace  Kelley,  Webster  county ;  and  two  wdio  are  numbered 
with  the  dead. 

Lemuel  Davis  was  another  arrival  of  the  year  1849.  He, 
too,  was  a  Doddridge  county  product.  He  married  Miss 
Rhoda  Bee,  daughter  of  Asa  Bee,  and  they  spent  the  remainder 
of  their  lives  here. 

They  were  the  parents  of  six  children;  viz.,  the  late 
Phineas,  of  Alice,  Gilmer  county,  Ephraim,  Alonzo,  Gideon, 
and  Daniel,  and  one  daughter,  Virginia. 

Stephen  Davis  and  his  wife,  Jemima  Kelley  Davis  (sister 
of  Ezekiel  Kelley)  came  from  their  native  county — Doddridge 
— in  1858,  and  from  here  they  went  to  Clay  county,  where 
they  rest.  Their  children:  Arzander  and  Leander  (twins). 
Isaiah,  Grant  and  Gordon,  and  the  daughter,  Emza,  are  all 
living  in  Roane  county  ;  and  Elizabeth  is  dead. 

Zibbie  Davis,  a  native  of  Greenbrier  county,  married 
Miss  Dorinda  Lowther,  sister  of  Jonathan,  and  came  here 
from   Doddridge  county  in   1850,  wdiere  they   remained   until 


OTTERSLIDE  SETTLED  359 

death;  he  was  laid  in  the  Pine  Grove  cemetery,  in  1898.  His 
only  child,  Talitha,  married  Thomas  Gribble,  and  she  was 
laid  in  the  Pine  Grove  cemetery,  on  the  same  day  that  her 
father  was  laid  away.  Mrs.  Davis  had  passed  on  two  years 
before. 

Jacob  Fronseman  married  Katharine  Kelley,  sister  of 
Ezekiel,  and  came  here  from  Doddridge  county,  but  did  not 
remain  until  death,  so  but  little  of  his  history  is  available.  Buc 
he  had  one  son,  Nelson,  who  died  in  Wood  county,  near  Park- 
ersburg. 

David  Randolph,  son  of  Jonathan  Randolph,  and  his  wife. 
Caroline  Cornell,  both  natives  of  Harrison  county,  were 
known  among  the  early  people  here,  but  their  stay  was  brief ; 
and  they  returned  to  their  native  county,  where  they  died. 
.She,  in  1904;  and  he.  in  1908. 

FitzRandolph  has  been  one  of  the  prominent  names  in 
this  part  of  the  county  for  almost  sixty  years. 

This  family  are  of  English  origin  and  of  Revolutionary 
stock.  Their  ancestor,  Edward  FitzRandolph,  came  from 
Nottinghamshire,  England,  in  1630,  and  settled  in  the  Mass- 
achusetts colony;  and  from  there  the  family  emigrated  to 
New  Jersey,  and  thence  to  West  Virginia.  The  Randolphs, 
also,  trace  their  ancestry  to  Thomas  Blossom,  a  prominent 
deacon  in  the  Pilgrim  church  at  Plymouth. 

Edward  FitzRandolph  had  a  son,  John,  and  this  son 
(John)  was  the  father  of  Samuel  FitzRandolph,  who  was  a 
member  of  the  Continental  army  during  the  Revolution.  And 
from  Samuel's  son,  Jesse,  the  Randolphs  of  this  county  come. 

Jesse  F.  Randolph  migrated  from  New  Jersey  to  what  is 
now  Salem,  West  Virginia,  when  this  section  of  country  was 
in  its  primitive  wilderness,  and  the  red  man  roamed  the  forest 
at  will.  Here  his  son,  John  F.  Randolph,  grew  to  manhood 
and  married  Miss  Experience  Brown;  and  on  February  1, 
1832,  Asa  F.  Randolph,  the  progenitor  of  the  Ritchie  county 
family  was  born,  of  this  union. 

Asa  FitzRandolph  married  Miss  Marvel  Maxin,  daughter 
of  John  i\Iaxin  (her  mother  being  a  sister  of  Ezekiel  Bee), 
who  was  descended  from  a  well-known  Rhode  Island  famih' 


200  HISTORY   or   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

that  emigrated  from  New  Jersey  to  Salem  with  the  Fitz Ran- 
dolphs and  the  Bees. 

The  marriage  took  place  on  October  1,  1S51,  and,  shortly 
afterwards,  they  came  to  this  county  and  settled  on  the  divide 
between  Otterslide  and  Bone  creek ;  but  after  a  two  years' 
residence  here,  they  removed  to  Doddridge  county,  where 
Mr.  Randolph  opened  a  tannery,  at  New  Milton  ;  but  in  L85G, 
they  returned  to  this  vicinity  and  established  a  permanent 
home  on  the  river  below  Berea,  where  he  operated  a  tannery 
for  a  number  of  years  :  and  where  they  reared  their  family. 

He  and  his  wife  were  both  strong  advocates  of  education, 
and  despite  the  many  disadvantages  that  surrounded  them, 
their  children  nearly  all  obtained  good  educations.  They 
were  both  faithful  communicants  of  the  Seventh  Day  Baptist 
church,  and  he  was  a  deacon  in  this  church.  Mrs.  Randolph 
died  on  December  3,  1883 ;  and  seven  years  afterwards,  he 
married  Miss  Mary  H.  vSaunders,  of  Alfred,  New  York,  dr  J 
removed  to  that  state,  where  he  claimed  his  residence  to  the 
end  of  his  earthly  race.  He  died  while  on  a  visit  to  his  old 
home  at  Berea,  on  September  3,  1903,  and  was  laid  at  rest  by 
the  wife  of  his  youth  in  the  Pine  Grove  cemetery,  at  Berea. 

He  and  his  first  wife  were  the  parents  of  eleven  children, 
two  of  whom  died  in  infancy,  and  nine  grew  to  the  years  of 
maturity.  Their  early  training  developed  in  them  a  love  for 
education,  and  all  of  them  joined  the  ranks  of  the  teacher, 
seven  of  them  having  taught  in  this  county. 

Five  were  graduated  from  the  Alfred  University  in  New 
York;  viz.,  Experience,  Califurnia,  who  is  now  Mrs.  Meathrell, 
of  Berea;  Virgil,  and  Alva,  of  New  York,  and  Delvenus.  of 
California.  Experience,  who  was  the  late  Mrs.  Leon  Burdick, 
of  New  York,  was  also  graduated  from  the  Alfred  Theological 
Seminary.  The  other  members  of  the  family  are*  Mrs.  Clev 
Jordan,  and  the  late  Mrs.  Emza  Coon,  New  York ;  the  late 
Ellsworth,  and  Preston,  of  Berea.  (See  chapter  LI  for  more 
exteiided  account  of  Experience  Randolph.) 


CHAPTER  XVIII 


Spruce  Creek  Settled 


PRUCE  CREEK  derived  its  name  from   the 
numerous  pines  that  adorn  its  banks. 

John  Shores. — It  was  first  settled  near 
1815,  by  John  Shores,  who  came  from  Salem, 
liarrisoa  county,  and  reared  his  cabin  near 
the  present  site  of  the  E.  C.  Snodgrass  resi- 
dence. He  was  a  native  of  the  "Old  Domin- 
ion." Kis  parents  came  from  Devonshire,  England,  in  1740, 
and  settled  in  the  Virginia  colony,  where  he  was  born  in  17Cyi ; 
and  from  there  he  came  to  Harrison  county,  at  the  age  of 
twenty-one  years.  He  three  times  took  the  marriage  vow. 
Miss  A^latilda  Howard  was  the  first  wife,  and  of  this  union 
one  daughter,  Amanda  (who  became  A^Irs.  William  Parks), 
was  born  ;  and  one  son,  Thomas,  who  died  in  his  early  man- 
hood, was  the  fruit  of  the  second  union  ;  his  third  wife  was 
Miss  Sarah  Mitchell,  of  Barbour  county,  and  their  children 
were :  Mrs.  Rachel  Smith,  of  Slab  creek ;  the  late  Mrs.  Sarah 
Jane  Watson,  of  Cherry  Point,  Illinois;  the  late  James  Shores, 
of  Cairo,  who  died  at  Parkersburg,  in  1900;  and  Mrs.  Mary 
Ann  McDonald,  of  Spruce  creek,  an  octogenarian,  who  is  the 
only  survivor  of  the  family. 

Mr.  Shores  went  from  Spruce  creek  to  the  mouth  of  Slab 
creek,  and  made  the  first  settlement  there  on  the  farm  that 
is  now  designated  as  the  "Westfall  farm."  There  he  died  in 
1849,  and  in  the  old  Pleasant  Hill  cemetery,  he  sleeps.  His 
wife  was  laid  by  his  side  in  1875. 

William  Parks — son-in-law  of  John  Shores — who  located 
his  cabin  on  the  Minor  Bartl'ett  (now  the  H.  C.  Buzzard) 
farm,  was  the  second  settler  on  this  creek.  After  a  short  resi- 
dence here,  Mr.  Parks  and  his  family  went  to  Texas,  and  one 
letter    reached    their    friends    after    their    departure;    but    the 


262  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

silence  was  never  again  broken,  and  the  supposition  was,  that 
they  met  a  tragic  fate  at  the  hands  of  the  red  man,  or  in  some 
other  manner. 

Cornelius  Wyer. — Near  the  year  1827,  Cornelius  Wyer 
became  the  owner  of  the  Parks'  improvement.  He  was  the 
son  of  George  Wyer,  an  Irishman,  who  married  an  English 
lady  and  settled  on  Bingamon  creek,  in  Harrison  county, 
where  he  (Cornelius)  was  born  near  1798.  Near  1825,  he 
married  Miss  Elizabeth  Malone,  sister  of  James  Malone, 
junior,  and  the  following  year,  his  connection  with  this  coun- 
ty's history  began,  when  he  made  the  first  improvement  on 
the  Harrison  Wass  homestead,  above  Goff 's ;  and  the  next 
year  he  went  to  Spruce  creek.  Being  driven  from  his  home, 
on  the  Bartlett  farm,  by  a  high  tide  in  the  creek,  he  went 
farther  up  the  stream,  and  reared  a  cabin  on  what  is  now  the 
J.  W.  Gofif  homestead,  and  here  he  passed  away  in  1842. 
(This  farm  has  been  continuously  occupied  ever  since  the 
date  of  his  settlement.)  His  wife,  who  was  born  in  1802,  died 
on  the  waters  of  Tanner's  creek,  in  Gilmer  county,  in  1877. 

They  were  the  parents  of  four  sons  and  two  daughters  ; 
all  of  whom  have  passed  on,  except  Archibald,  of  Alfred,  Gil- 
mer county.  The  other  sons  were  John,  Mattison,  and  Benja- 
min ;  and  the  daughters  were  Elizabeth,  who  married  Phillip 
B.  Gofi* — son  of  John  A.  Gofif,  of  this  county;  and  Sarah,  who 
married  the  late  Daniel  Valentine,  of  this  county. 

Among  the  grandsons  and  the  granddaughters  of  this  pio- 
neer, who  are  well-known  citizens  of  this,  and  adjoining  coun- 
ties, are  C.  J.  Valentine,  of  Fonsoville ;  Emery,  of  Nevvberne : 
J.  M.  and  John  B.,  Macfarlan  ;  S.  A.  Wyer,  of  Auburn  ;  Mrs. 
Katharine  Beckner,  Parkersburg;  and  George  Wyer,  and  a 
host  of  others,  of  Gilmer  county. 

Levi  Smith  was  the  first  denizen  of  Upper  Spruce  creek. 
He  was  the  son  of  Aaron,  t!ie  pioneer  on  the  Hatfield  farm, 
at  Gold's.  He  married  his  cousin.  Katharine  Smith,  daughter 
of  Barnes,  senior,  and  made  the  first  settlement  where  E.  C. 
GoiT  now  lives,  before  coming  to  Spruce  creek,  in  1831,  where 
he  found  a  permanent  home  on  the  farm  that  is  now  his  estate ; 
the  old  "mansion  house"  being  occupied  by  his  youngest  son, 
Elisha.     Here  he  resided  until  death  claimed  him,  near  1894; 


SPRUCE  CREEK  SETTLED  2G3 

and  on  his  old  homestead,  he  sleeps.  The  first  grave  that 
was  hollowed  out  on  this  creek  was  on  this  homestead,  and  it 
was  filled  by  one  of  his  children.  After  the  death  of  his  first 
wife,  he  married  Miss  Ruhama  Morehead,  who  survived  until 
June,  1910. 

The  children  of  the  first  marriage  have  all  passed  on. 
They  were,  Silas,  who  died  in  childhood,  Lemuel,  Barnes, 
and  Nathaniel,  of  Spruce  creek;  Mrs.  Wm.  (Drusilla)  Som- 
merville,  Auburn;  Mrs.  Christopher  (Charlotte)  Morehead, 
Berea ;  Mrs.  Sarah  Ann  (James)  Smith,  Spruce  creek ;  and 
Hannah,  who  died  in  childhood.  Mrs.  Morehead,  and  Barnes, 
both  passed  away  in  February,  1909. 

The  children  of  the  last  marriage  were  the  son  above 
mentioned;  Allison  B.  Smith,  of  Richwood ;  Mrs..  Columbia 
(Cash)  Freed,  and  the  late  Mrs.  Rebecca  Tucker,  of  Spruce 
creek. 

Isaac  Smith. — Scarcely  had  Levi  Smith  settled  dowii  in 
his  new  home,  Avhen  Isaac  Smith — his  cousin,  and  Samuel 
Davidson  arrived,  the  former  reared  his  cabin  one  day,  and 
the  latter  the  next.  The  site  of  Mr.  Smith's  cabin  is  now 
marked  by  the  dwelling  of  the  late  Harrison  Bartlett.  He 
was  the  son  of  Barnes  Smith,  senior,  and  his  wife,  Hannali 
Collins,  was  the  daughter  of  Isaac  Collins,  and  granddaughter 
of  Thomas  and  Phebe  Cunningham.  He  moved  from  here  to 
Smithvilie,  where  he  and  his  wife  rest 

His  children  were,  Martin  Smith,  A.  W.,  Mrs.  Alfred 
(Cynthia)  Barr,  Mrs.  M.  A.  Ayres  (Mary),  Smithvilie;  S. 
Allen  wSmith,  and  Sylvanus  Smith,  and  Mrs.  Sabra  J.  White 
(John),  all  of  Iowa;  the  late  Mrs.  Rachel  (Nutter)  Webb,  of 
Smithvilie;  and  Lear,  and  Jefl:'erson,  who  both  died  in  child- 
hood. 

Samuel  Davidson's  cabin  stood  on  the  farm  that  after- 
wards became  the  homestead  of  the  late  Dr.  Harrison  Wright. 
Mr.  Davidson  was  the  son  of  Alexander  Davidson,  of  Smith- 
vilie, and  he  married  .Sarah,  the  daughter  of  Barnes  Smith. 
He  moved  from  here  to  Gilmer  county,  and  settled  on  Road 
run,  near  Tannersville.  Here  his  wife  died,  and  at  Tanners- 
ville  she  sleeps.  He  rests  in  Braxton  county,  where  he  passed 
away  at  the  home  of  his  son. 


2fi4  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

He  was  the  father  of  three  sons  and  six  daughters :  Mrs. 
Elizabeth  (J.  A.  C.)  Davis,  and  Mrs.  Mary  (Wesley)  Byrd, 
Hazelgreen;  Mrs.  Benjamin  Goff  (Elzara),  Burnt  House;  and 
Warren  Davidson,  of  Braxton  county,  are  the  surviving  ones ; 
and  the  deceased  are,  Mrs.  Jane  Earle,  Hazelgreen ;  Mrs. 
Alex.  McDonald,  Racket;  Mrs.  Adaline  Willis  Hamilton, 
second  wife  of  Eli  Hamilton,  and  John  and  Israel,  of  Tan- 
nersville.  From  Israel,  junior,  the  late  teachers,  Joy  and 
Samuel  Davidson,  were  descended. 

Joshua  Smith,  brother  of  Isaac,  made  the  first  improve- 
ment on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  M.  L.  Law,  in  iSiO. 
He  married  Miss  Emily  Beall,  and  went  from  here  to  the 
Kanawha  river,  below  Grantsville,  where  he  and  his  wife  sleep, 
and  where  no  small  number  of  his  descendants  live. 

His  children:  Henry,  Solomon,  Jerome,  Levi,  and  Mat- 
thew Smith,  and  Mrs.  Mary  Harris,  are  all  of  Calhoun  coun- 
ty ;  Newton,  is  of  Braxton  county ;  Mrs.  Sarah  J.  Hickembot- 
tom,  of  Clarksburg;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Sarah  Newlon,  oi 
Grantsville. 

Asby  Law. — During  the  spring  of  1S48,  the  late  Asby 
Poole  Law  became  the  successor  of  Joshua  Smith  on  the 
Law  farm,  where  he  continued  to  reside  until  he  fell  asleep, 
on  February  20,  1868,  at  the  age  of  forty-four  years.  His 
sons,  F.  M..  David  G.,  M.  L.,  and  Willie,  and  his  daughters, 
Mrs.  Hannah  (Wm.)  Huff,  and  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Singleton., 
who  all  have  interesting  families,  are  still  prominently  identi- 
fied with  the  affairs  of  the  community  in  both  chvuxh  and 
state ;  and  his  venerable  widow,  Mrs.  Deborah  Gaston  Law 
Bartlett,  is  spending  a  pleasant  eventide  here  with  her  chil- 
dren. Her  posterity  numbers  eight  children,  forty-two  grand- 
children, and  nineteen  great-grandchildren,  who  have  risen 
up  "to  call  her  blessed."  Two  of  her  children  have  passed  on 
— the  youngest  son.  in  infancy,  and  the  eldest,  John  W.  Law, 
father  of  Steele  Law,  of  Clarksburg,  later  in  life,  Morris  La^v 
is  of  Newberne,  and  Newton,  of  Cairo. 

The  ancestral  history  of  this  family  is  .one  and  the  same 
as  that  of  the  Bone  creek  branch.  The  two  brothers  having 
come  from  Ireland  at  the  same  time  (see  Bone  creek  chapter), 
and  from  them  all  the  Laws  in  \^'est  Virginia  arc  descended. 


SPRUCE  CREEK  SETTLED  265 

William  Law,  the  progenitor  of  the  Lawforcl  branch,  mar- 
ried a  Miss  Burnside,  and  settled  near  Gooseman's  mill,  in 
Harrison  county;  and  of  this  union  six  children  were  born: 
William,  junior,  Thomas,  John,  and  Isaac,  all  of  Lewis  and 
Harrison  counties;  Frank,  of  Wirt  county;  and  Mary  B.,  wife 
of  the  Rev.  George  Collins.  After  the  birth  of  these  children. 
Miss  Hannah  Sill  became  the  wife  of  William  Law,  and  seven 
more  children  v^ere  the  fruits  of  this  union  ;  viz.,  David,  and 
Asby  Poole,  Asa,  Jesse,  Elizabeth,  who  became  Mrs.  Morris 
Gaston,  of  Doddridge  county  ;  Ruhama,  who  married  Jeffer- 
son Law,  and  Ellen,  James  Hutson,  both  of  Harrison  county. 

Eleven  Riddel  made  the  first  settlement  on  the  A.  J.  Reed 
farm,  in  1841.  He  was  a  native  of  Gilmer  county,  the  son  of 
Jeremiah  and  Margaret  Hardman  Riddel,^  but  being  left  an 
orphan  at  an  early  age,  he  was  reared  b}^  the  late  Rev.  James 
Hardman,  of  Hardman  chapel.  He  married  Miss  Susan 
Davidson,  sister  of  the  venerable  Israel  Davidson,  of  Lawford, 
and  made  a  settlement  on  Leatherbarke.  which  antedated  the 
one  on  Spruce  creek. 

He  died  in  June,  1893,  at  the  home  of  his  son,  George,  on 
the  Ritchie  and  Gilmer  county  line,  and.  beside  his  wife,  he 
sleeps  in  the  Wright  graveyard,  on  Spruce  creek.  He  v;as 
the  father  of  nine  children;  viz.,  Katharine  Elizabeth,  the 
only  daughter,  married  Hanson  Bumgardner,  and  went  to 
Iowa,  where  she  rests.  James  and  Samuel  sacrificed  their 
lives  for  the  LInion  cause ;  and  Jeremiah  died  shortly  after  his 
return  from  the  L'^nion  army ;  Davidson  C.,  and  George,  reside 
near  Lawford  ;  Hiram,  on  Devil  Hole  ;  Loman,  in  Gilmer  coun- 
ty ;  and  Granville,  in  Webster. 

The  Wright  Brothers. — The  next  settlers  in  this  section 
were  James  and  Harrison  Wright,  two  brothers,  who  came 
from  Barbour  county,  in  1843,  and  found  permanent  homes, 
and  final  resting  places  here. 

James  Wright  took  up  his  residence  near  one  mile  below 
the  little  hamlet  of  Lawford,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned 
by  his  sons,  Joshua  and  James,  and  Robert  Pride — the  latter 
being  the  occupant  of  the  old  home.  Here  he  passed  away  in 
1884,  and  in  the  old  Spruce  creek  burying-ground  on  the  M. 


'See  other  chapters  for  ancestral  history  of  Riddels  and  Hardmans. 


i66  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

L.  Law  farm  he  is  sleeping.  He  first  married  Aliss  Mary 
Wiant,  and  Joshua  was  the  son  of  this  union ;  three  others 
having'  died  in  childhood.     His  second  wife  was  Miss  Eliza- 


'fe 


beth  Calhoun,  daughter  of  Allen  Calhoun,  and  she  was  the 
mother  of  the  Rev.  Allen  Wright,  of  Parkersburg;  James,  of 
Spruce  creek ;  and  Columbus,  who  died  in  the  asylum  at  Wes- 
ton. His  last  wife  was  Ruth,  the  daughter  of  Daniel  Mitchell. 
He  was  a  blacksmith  by  trade  and  one  of  the  earliest  in  this 
section.  He  had  wielded  the  hammer  on  the  Doddridge  coun- 
ty side,  for  a  short  time,  before  coming  to  Spruce  creek. 

Dr.  Harrison  Wright  made  his  settlement,  near  one  mile 
above  Lawford,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  by  his  grand- 
son, Addison  Wright.  He  also  owned  the  Samuel  Davidson 
farm — now  the  property  of  M.  L.  Lav.^ 

He  was  born  on  Simpson's  creek,  in  what  is  now  Barbour 
county,  on  June  14,  1815,  and  died  on  January  17,  1889,  and 
in  the  Mt.  Olive  churchyard — the  Progressive  Brethren — on 
Spruce  creek,  he  lies  buried.  He  married  Miss  Elizabeth 
Cleavenger,  daughter  of  Edman  Cleavenger,  of  Barbour  coun- 
ty, who  was  born  in  1820,  and  was  laid  by  his  side  in  1902. 
She  was  of  Dutch  descent  and  was  a  distant  relative  of  George 
Washington. 

Their  children:  Zachariah,  Lloyd,  Alexander,  ^Ivs.  ]\Iary 
Ann  Rollins,  Harrison  AVright,  junior,  Mrs.  Adaline  Weaver, 
Mrs.  Clarinda  Weaver,  all  reside  on  the  waters  of  Spruce 
creek ;  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Bright  lives  in  Greenbrier  covinty ; 
David  died  in  the  Rock  Island  prison  during  the  late  Civil 
^var:  Ai,  near  Lawford;  Mrs.  Moriah  Gragg.  in  Gilmer  coun- 
ty; and  Edgar,  in  childhood. 

The  Wrights  are  of  Scotch-L'ish  descent.  The  grand- 
father of  James  and  Harrison  W^right  crossed  the  sea,  near 
1745,  and  married  a  Virginia  girl  by  the  name  of  Porter,  ami 
settled  in  this  colony.  He  served  as  a  Revolutionary  soldier : 
and  from  his  son  Joshua,  who  was  born  in  the  "Old  Domin- 
ion," in  1770,  the  Ritchie  county  families  come. 

Besides  James  and  Harrison — of  this  county — Joshua 
Wright's  other  children  were,  the  late  Mrs.  W^m.  Adams 
(Lucinda),  of  Doddridge  county — grandmother  of  Lawyer 
Homer  Adams,  of  Harrisville ;  the  late  Mrs.  David  Cleavenger 


SPRUCE  CREEK  SETTLED  267 

(Jemima),  of  Gilmer  county;  Mrs.  Sylvester  Monroe  (Eliza- 
beth), sleeps  in  Harrison  county;  Willis,  and  Thompson,  in 
Barbour  county:  and  Joshua  Wright  was  a  citizen  of  Seattle. 
Washington,  the  last  account,  he  being  the  only  survivor  of 
the  family. 

Israel  Davidson. — The  autumn  of  1839  was  marked  by 
the  coming  of  Israel  Davidson,  who  made  the  first  improve- 
ment on  the  homestead  where  he  is  cpiietly  spending  the  even- 
tide of  his  serene  old  age.  He  is  not  only  the  oldest  citizen 
of  Spruce  creek,  but  he  enjoys  the  distinction  of  being  the 
oldest  surviving  son  of  Ritchie  county.  He  is  perhaps,  too, 
the  only  citizen  of  the  courity  that  still  occupies  the  home 
that  he  obtained  from  the  Commonwealth  of  Virginia,  arid 
one  that  has  never  changed  hands. 

He  is  the  son  of  Alexander  Davidson,  and  in  May,  1818, 
he  first  saw  the  light  of  day  at  the  family  home,  one  mile 
north  of  Harrisville.  When  he  was  but  two  years  of  age, 
his  father  moved  to  Smithville,  and  there  he  grew  to  man- 
hood ;  and  from  there,  after  the  death  of  his  father,  the  family 
emigrated  to  Illinois  in  a  wagon,  and  he  went  with  them — 
walking  much  of  the  distance;  but' only  staid  a  short  time. 
The  following  year  he  came  to  Spruce  creek,  where  he  has 
ever  since  remained.  He  was  unmarried  at  the  time  of  his 
settlement,  but  three  years  later,  he  claimed  Miss  Tabitha 
Cunningham,  daughter  of  Joseph  Cunningham,  who  then  re- 
sided on  the  E.  C.  Snodgrass  farm,  as  his  wife,  and  for  more 
than  fifty-six  years  she  crowned  his  life  with  happiness,  and 
then  passed  from  sight.  Two  of  their  five  children,  Benjamin 
and  James,  died  in  childhood ;  and  Silas,  in  his  young  man- 
hood ;  and  Mrs.  Samuel  Cleavenger,  and  Albert  Davidson, 
reside  at  Lawford. 

Mr.  Davidson  was,  at  one  time,  numbered  among  the  late 
General  Harris'  pupils.  He  was  an  early  pedagogue,  and  a 
noted  hunter,  he  having  slain  near  one  hundred  fifty  deer  in 
his  time — an  almost  snow-white  one  being  among  the  num- 
ber. Being  a  gentleman  of  high  character,  he  is  esteemed  by 
all  who  know  him  ;  and  though  he  has  no  church  ties,  he  has 
great   reverence  for  religion.     His   mind   is   a   store-house   of 


268  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

pioneer  lore,  and  to  him  we  are  indebted  for  no  small  amount 
of  valuable  information. 

The  Doughertys. — In  1840,  John  Dougherty  came  to  the 
farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  T.  T.  Goff,  below  Hazelgreen. 
A  man  by  the  name  of  Holbert  had  made  a  slight  improve- 
ment here,  which  he  purchased.  Remaining  on  the  GofT  farm 
but  a  short  time,  he  went  to  Dry  run  and  settled  on  the  farm 
that  is  now  the  home  of  the  Wright  Brothers,  below  J  una; 
and  here  his  life  was  principally  spent  until  he  was  laid  in 
the  Reeves  cemetery,  near  the  year  1864.  He  w^as  of  Irish 
descent,  his  grandfather,  George  Dougherty,  having  come 
from,  the  "Emerald  Isle,"  near  the  middle  of  the  eighteenth 
century,  and  settled  in  Pennsylvania.  He  (George  Doughert3^ 
senior)  served  in  the  French  and  Indian  war,  and  was  with 
General  Washington's  army  at  Braddock's  defeat.  He,  also, 
served  as  a  Revolutionary  soldier ;  and  at  the  close  of  this 
struggle,  he  Avas  married  to  Miss  Mary  Sharrow,  an  English 
maiden,  who  lived  in  Pennsylvania;  and  their  son,  George, 
was  the  father  of  John,  of  this  county.  He  (George,  junior; 
was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812. 

John  Dougherty  was  born  in  the  ancestral  home  in  the 
Keystone  state,  and  there  he  was  married  to  Miss  Katharine 
Bolinger — sister  of  the  late  Rev.  John  Bolinger — a  German 
maiden ;  and  in  1833,  they  removed  to  Monongalia  county, 
and  from  there  they  came  to  Spruce  creek,  at  the  time  above 
stated.  Their  son,  the  late  Jacob,  of  Lamb's  run,  served  as 
a  Confederate  soldier  in  the  Civil  war,  and  George  and  Wes- 
iey,  in  defense  of  the  Union.  The  latter  met  his  death  shortly 
after  his  return  home  by  an  accidental  bullet  wound  m  his 
forehead,  which  he  only  survived  a  very  brief  time.  George 
now  lives  in  Ohio;  William,  in  Mississippi;  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
Weinrich,  on  Lamb's  run  :  and  Mrs.  Sarah  Feathers  Scott,  of 
Indian  creek,  and  Mrs.  Mary  (Eugene)  Tibbs,  of  Missouri, 
have  joined  the  throng  on  the  other  side.  (Few  families  have 
a  more  continuous  military  record.) 

Benjamin  Goff  made  his  settlement  on  th.e  T.  T.  Goti 
homestead,  near  Hazelgreen,  about  the  year  1845,  but  in  1853, 
he  sold  his  interests  here  to  his  brother.  xA.lexander  Goff,  and 
removed  to  the  Frederick's  mill  vicinitv,  and  later,  to  Goli's, 


SPRUCE  CREEK  SETTLED  269 

where  his  son,  E.  C.  Goff,  now  hvcs,  and  where  his  last  hours 
were  spent.  Here  his  aged  widow,  who  was  ^liss  Eda  Sinith, 
daughter  of  Aaron  Smith — tlie  pioneer  at  Goff's — also  passed 
away  a  few  years  ago;  and  side  by  side  they  sleep  in  the 
Reeves  cemetery. 

Their  children  were  ten  in  number:  Strother — father  of 
the  late  Levi,  of  Goff's,  sleeps  near  Hazelgreen ;  Alexander 
died  in  Libby  prison  during  the  Civil  war ;  and  Core  and 
Sarah,  in  childhood;  E.  C,  who  was  a  Union  soldier,  and  a 
recent  member  of  the  House  of  Delegates,  is  merchant  and 
post-master  at  Goff's;  and  Mrs.  Roanna  Byrd  (Davis)  is,  also, 
of  Goff's;  B.  P.  Goff"  is  of  Macfarlan ;  Mrs.  Rebecca  Bee 
(Obidiah),  of  Belpre,  Ohio;  Mrs.  Dorcas  Beall  (J.  S.),  of 
Burnt  House;  and  Mrs.  Mary  Gainer  (Perry),  of  Bone  creek. 

Alexander  Goff,  born  November  29,  1818,  mafried  Miss 
Apiary  Bush,  daughter  of  George  Bush,  an  early  settler  of  Gil- 
mer county,  on  January  28,  1840,  and  his  family  are  still 
prominently  identified  with  the  Hazelgreen  community. 
Here,  at  the  old  homestead,  his  venerable  widow,  who  has 
been  numbered  among  the  octogenarians  for  several  years, 
still  survives.  But  Mr.  Goff"  has  been  a  silent  sleeper  in  the 
Buzzard  cemetery  for  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century. 

This  family's  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  M.  E.  church, 
South,  and  politically,  they  are  strongly  Democratic ;  while 
Benjamin's  family  are  members  of  the  M.  E.  church,  and  are 
ardent  Republicans. 

Their  children  were  seven  in  number:  Lafayette  died  in 
childhood;  Marcellus — father  of  L.  C,  of  Juna ;  Marshall — 
father  of  Guy,  of  ^Burnt  House;  Dr.  Lee,  and  Ira  S.  have,  also, 
passed  on ;  T.  T.,  and  R.  W.  are  of  Hazelgreen ;  and  Mrs. 
Martha  EUen  Wass,  of  Huntington. 

Thomas  Goff — another  brother  of  Benjamin  and  Alex- 
ander— was  the  pioneer  on  the  Prather  farm.  Lie  married 
Elizabeth,  the  daughter  of  Barnes  Smith,  senior,  and  came 
from  Gilmer  county,  neai-  1850;  he  afterwards  removed  to  the 
E.  C.  Goff  homestead,  and  from  there,  to  Iowa;  perhaps,  late 
in  the  sixties,  and  there,  near  Decatur,  he  and  his  wife  rest. 

They  were  the  parents  of  sixteen  children,  several  of 
whom  died  in  childhood :     T.  M.  Goff,  of  Harrisville  ;  the  late 


270  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Simeon — father  of  Dr.  J.  M.  Goff,  of  Hazelgreen  ,  and  the  late 
Airs.  A.  P.  Hardman  (Thankful  Ann),  of  Fonsoville  ;  were  the 
ones  that  remained  in  their  native  county — the  rest  all  went 
West:  Barnes,  Jethro,  and  Francis;  Sarah  became  Mrs. 
Daniel  Osbourne,  and  they  live  at  Knoxville,  Iowa ;  Mrs. 
Elzaria  Hendricks,  Mrs.  Rachel  Hendricks,  Mrs.  Cynthia 
Rambo,  and  Eli,  who  sleeps  in  the  West,  are  the  other  mem- 
bers of  the  family. 

Aaron  Schoolcraft. — The  year  1853,  brought  Aaron 
Schoolcraft  from  Gilmer  county  to  the  Schoolcraft  farm,  on 
Lower  Spruce  creek.  About  the  ancestry  of  this  typical 
pioneer  hangs  a  mantle  of  unusual,  historic  interest: 

John,  Jacob,  and  Leonard  Schoolcraft — three  brothers, 
were  captured  by  the  Indians  in  their  boyhood,  and  were  held 
as  captives  until  they  had  almost  reached  the  years  of  matur- 
ity. In  fact,  Leonard  always  remained  with  the  red  men. 
But  John  and  Jacob,  when  nearly  grown,  were  given  guns, 
and  an  allowance  of  ammunition,  and  each  day  upon  their 
return  from  hunting,  they  were  required  to  give  a  strict  ac- 
count of  their  success  as  marksmen.  They  were  expected  to 
kill  something  with  each  shot,  but  they  managed,  however, 
to  hide  away  a  shot  or  two  each  day  until  a  supply  had  ac- 
cumulated, and  one  fine  morning,  they  set  out  for  their  home, 
which  was  on  the  South  branch  of  the  Potomac.  They  pro- 
ceeded without  incident  until  nearing  a  frontier  settlement,, 
when  they  discovered  that  the  Indians  were  in  pursuit.  Tak- 
ing refuge  under  a  creek  bank,  they  lay  in  hiding  until  their 
pursuers  had  passed  on  ;  but  discovering  that  they  were  near- 
ing a  fort,  the  Indians  hastily  retreated,  and  when  they  had 
disappeared  in  the  distance,  the  boys  resumed  their  journey 
and  soon  came  within  sight  of  the  fort.  "The  Whites,"  seeing 
tliem  approaching,  and  mistaking  them  for  savages — so  like 
them  was  their  dress  and  manner — marched  forth  to  meet 
them  prepared  for  battle ;  but  the  lads,  holding  up  their 
guns  as  a  token  of  surrender,  were  permitted  to  reach  the 
fort  in  safety.-  AMien  once  inside,  they  told  the  story  of  their 
captivity  as  best  they  could  in  their  broken,  Indian  tongue, 
and  when  they  had  finished,  an  aged  inmate  of  the  fort,  who 


SPRUCE  CREEK  SETTLED  271 

had  listened  in  rapt  silence,  joyfully  claimed  them  as  his  long- 
lost  sons,  whom  he  had  mourned  as  dead. 

Jacob,  who  married  a  Aliss  Parsons,  was  the  father  of 
Aaron — the  Spruce  creek  pioneer. 

Aaron  Schoolcraft  married  Miss  Sarah  Collins,  sister 
of  the  iate  Chainey  Collins,  of  Smithville,  and  was  the  father 
of  Mrs.  Granville  (Mahala)  Tingier,  of  Juna  ;  and  of  Mrs.  Re- 
becca RadclifFe.  of  Lewis  county.  He  and  his  wife  sleep  on 
the  old  homestead,  where  he  settled. 

The  Bartletts. — The  history  of  Upper  Spruce  creek  would 
hardly  be  complete,  without  a  word  concerning  the  Bartletts, 
who,  though  not  so  early  as  the  settlers  before  mentioned, 
were  as  truly  pioneers ;  as  they  came  here  in  the  ante-bellum, 
days,  when  but  little  improvement  had  been  made,  and  have 
helped  to  transform  this  section  of  the  wilderness  into  one 
of  the  best  agricultural  districts  in  the  county. 

This  family  are  direct  descendants  of  Josiah  Bartlett, 
one  of  the  signers  of  the  Declaration  of  Independence,  uho 
was  born  at  Amesbury,  Massachusetts,  in  1?29,  and  died  in 
1795.  He  Avas  a  member  of  the  Continental  Congress  :  Chief 
Justice  of  New  Hampshire ;  and  the  first  governor  of  the 
"Granite  State"  under  the  new  Cojistitution.  Three  brothers 
crossed  the  sea,  doubtless,  from  England,  as  this  is  a  prom- 
inent name  in  that  country,  and  settled  in  the  New  England 
states,  where  not  a  few  of  their  descendants  have  distinguished 
themselves,  as  men  of  letters,  and  of  military  prowess. 

Josiah  Bartlett  was  the  father  of  AA'illiam  Bartlett,  whose 
two  sons,  Robert  and  Thomas,  have  innumerable  descendants 
in  this  and  diiterent  other  counties  of  the  state. 

Robert  was  the  father  of  Harrison  Bartlett,  who  came  to 
Spruce  creek  in  1858,  and  remained  until  1907,  when  he  was 
laid  in  the  Baptist  churchyard. 

Harrison  Bartlett  was  born  in  Taylor  county,  on  Simp- 
son's creek,  on  April  28.  1829.  and  there  he  was  married  to 
Miss  Hannah  Rhyne.  who  was  the  mother  of  seven  of  his 
children:  John  R.,  Phineas,  Nathan.  Jeddeiah,  Mrs.  Lydia 
Ellen  (Robert)  Sommerville,  of  Auburn :  and  Arminda.  and 
Sarah  Jane,  who  died  in  childhood. 

After  her  death,  he  married  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Reed  Smith, 


272  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

who  was  the  mother  of  Ira  C.  Bartlett,  of  Xewberne ;  Mrs. 
Dora  (George)  Simmons,  Auburn,  and  Mrs.  Myrtal  (Hayes) 
Coburn,  Clarksburg. 

John  R.  and  Phineas.  reside  in  Gihiier  county,  and  Jed- 
deiah,  in  Calhoun. 

Elijah  Bartlett,  who  came  to  Spruce  creek  from  the  place 
of  his  nativity,  Simpson's  creek,  Taylor  county,  in  1859,  was 
the  son  of  Thomas  Bartlett,  brother  of  Robert.  He  married 
his  cousin,  Aliss  Rebecca  Bartlett,  daughter  of.  Robert,  and 
sister  of  Harrison,  and  Avas  the  father  of  three  sons  and  two 
daughters :  Sylvester,  and  the  late  Starling,  and  Lair  D., 
Mrs.  Lydia  (T.  D.)  Phillips,  Spruce  creek;  and  ]\lrs.  ^Melissa 
(Moses)  Law,  Harrison  county. 

James  F.  Bartlett,  who  was  long  a  citizen  of  this 
creek,  was  the  son  of  Samuel  and  Mary  Flemming  Bart- 
lett, and  the  grandson  of  Thomas.  He  married  Miss  Zelda 
Newlon,  of  Barbour  county,  and  joined  bis  kinsmen  here  at 
the  close  of  the  Civil  war,  and  remained  until  he,  too,  was  laid 
in  the  Baptist  churchyard,  on  Spruce  creek. 

He  was  the  father  of  the  late  L.  D.  Bartlett,  Patrick  F., 
]\Irs.  Martha  (Chas.)  Hickman,  Mrs.  Celia  (D.  G.)  Law.  all 
of  the  Auburn  vicinity ;  and  Henrietta,  and  Loverna,  who  died 
in  infancy. 

He  and  his  son,  L.  D.,  were  both  soldiers  of  the  Civil  war. 
The  Bartletts  were  the  corner  stones  of  the  Spruce  creek 
Baptist  church,  and  their  descendants  are  among  its  present 
pillars.  James  and  Oaf  Hickman,  who  are  prominently 
known  among  the  teachers  of  the  county,  are  grandsons  of 
James  F.  Bartlett,  and  P.  S.  Strother,  another  successful  peda- 
gogue is  descended  from  this  family,  he  being  the  grandson 
of  Phineas  Bartlett,  a  brother  of  Harrison. 

Sanford  B.  Flemming  merits  a  little  place  in  this  chapter, 
as  he  redeemed  from  its  primitive  wilderness  one  of  the  finest 
blue  grass  farms  of  five  hundred  fifty  acres,  in  this  part  of  the 
county,  though  he  did  not  come  here  until  the  spring -of  1868. 

Mr.  Flemming  was  born  in  the  ancestral  home  at  Flem- 
mington,  in  Taylor  county,  in  1837,  and  there  grew  to  man- 
hood and  married  Miss  Lydia  Ellen  Gather,  daughter  of  the 
Rev.  Jasper  Gather,  in  1861 ;  and  seven  years  later  they  came 


SFRdCE  CREEK  SETTLED  273 

to  Spruce  creek,  where  she  passed  away  in  1900,  and  wliere 
Mr.  Flemming  died  in  1910.  They  were  the  parents  of  two 
sons:  Floyd  died  in  inianc}^  and  Harvey,  who  was  graduated 
from  the  State  University  at  Morg'anto\\'n  in  the  class  of  1885, 
is  now  a  prominent  journalist  of  Kansas  City,  ^Missouri. 

The  Flemmings  are  of  Scotch-Irish  stock.  Their  ante- 
cessors crossed  the  sea  early  in  the  eighteenth  century,  and 
settled  in  the  \'irginia  colony,  and  from  there,  scattered  to 
other  colonies. 

James  Flemming,  who  was  descended  from  this  Virginia 
family,  came  from  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  near  1799,  and 
settled  at  Flemmington,  in  what  is  now  Taylor  county  ;  and 
from  him  this  town  took  its  name,  he  having  given  the  right- 
of-way  for  the  railroad  and  the  ground  for  the  station,  at  the 
coming  of  the  railroad.  He  married  the  daughter  of  Judson 
Ala'cDonald,  of  Taylor  count}-,  and  in  1800  a  son  was  born  of 
this  union,  which  was  named  Patrick  Flemming.  This  son 
married  Miss  Margaret  MacDonald,  daughter  of  James  Mac- 
Donald,  of  Taylor  county,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  San- 
ford  B.  Flemming,  of  Spruce  creek. 

Patrick  Flemming  spent  his  entire  life  at  Flemmington, 
where  he  sleeps. 

Alary,  or  Polly  Flemming,  as  she  was  called,  sister  of 
Patrick,  married  Samuel  Bartlett,  of  Barbour  county,  and  was 
the  mother  of  the  late  James  F.  Bartlett,  of  Spruce  creek,  and 
grandmother  of  Airs.  D.  G.  Law,  of  Lawford ;  and  of  Mrs. 
Charles  Hickman,  of  Auburn. 

Farther  Development. — The  Methodist  Episcopal  church 
was  the  pioneer  church  on  this  creek.  This  organization  was 
perfected  in  1850,  and  among  its  original  members  w"ere  Mr. 
and  Airs.  Asby  Law,  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Benjamin  Goff. 

The  first  church  house  was  erected  in  1853,  near  the 
jM-esent  site  of  the  residence  of  J.  \V.  Gotx,  above  Hazelgieen, 
and  was  known  as  the  "Old  Spruce  Valley  church."  From 
this  organization,  the  present  Spruce  creek  churches  date 
their  history,  as  does  the  Bethany  church,  at  Goil's. 

The  Spruce  Creek  Baptist  church  was  organized  through 
the  efforts  of  Harrison  and  Elijah  Bartlett,  in  1859,  w^ith  thir- 
teen charter  members,  and  it  is  now  a  strong  and  influential 


274  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUXTV 

church.    Airs.  Barnes  Smith  is  the  only  survivor  of  the  original 
thirteen  members. 

The  first  church  was  erected  in  1866,  and  the  present  one, 
in  1890. 

The  Methodist  Episcopal  Church  South  once  had  an 
organization  here,  but  it  has  now  become  the  Methodist  Pro- 
testant church. 

The  United  Brethren  and  the  Progressive  Brethren,  or 
Dunkards,  also,  have  influential  organizations.  The  late  John 
Byrd  was  long  a  pillar  in  the  former,  and  it  was  called  by  his 
name.  "Byrd  chapel." 

The  late  Wilson  B.  Cunningham,  whose  history  belongs 
to  Leatherbarke,  was  the  pioneer  school-teacher  on  this  creek. 
The  house  in  which  this  school  was  taught,  stood  near  the 
present  site  of  the  Wright  school  house. 

Gofif's  was  the  first  post-office.  It  was  moved  during  "the 
sixties  to  this  creek,  but  after  a  few  3-ears  was  changed  back 
to  its  present  location  at  Gofif's. 

In  1871  or  '2,  an  ofifice  was  established  at  the  residence  of 
Alexander  Wright  under  the  name  of  "Spruce  Creek,"  but  it 
was  discontinued  after  a  few  years. 

Then  near  1885,  came  the  Ira  S.  Gofif  store,  and  a  little 
later,  the  Hazelgreen  post-ofifice,  with  Mr.  GofT  as  first  post- 
master. 

In  1890  the  Lawford  post-office  was  established  at  the 
home  of  M.  L.  Law,  with  Air.  Law  as  post-master :  and  this 
same  year  E.  C.  Gofif  launched  the  mercantile  business  at  Law- 
ford  and  erected  the  first  store. 

Then  in  1906  came  the  Juna  office  with  L.  C.  Gofif  post- 
master. 

Buzzard's  Mill. — Near  the  year  1860,  Buzzard's  mill  came 
upon  the  stage.  The  late  Thomas  Hardman,  of  Tannersville, 
son  of  Benjamin  Hardman,  was  the  pioneer  of  this  enterprise, 
and  he  sold  the  property  to  James  Holbert.  It  was  then  in 
turn  owned  by  the  late  Simeon,  R.  W.,  and  William  Gofif,  and 
in  the  early  seventies  it  passed  into  the  hands  of  the  late 
Plenry  Buzzard,  and  thus  continued  until  sw^ept  away  by  a 
flood  in  1896,  and  it  has  never  been  rebuilt. 

Thomas  Hardman  married  Aliss  Alary  Fling,  sister  of  F. 


SPRUCE  CREEK  SETTLED  275 

G.  Fling,  of  Burnt  House,  and  went  to  Tannersville,  where 
he  Hes  in  his  last  sleep.  After  the  death  of  his  first  wife,  he 
married  Miss  Drusilla  Kelly,  and  eight  children  were  the 
fruits  of  this  union :  the  late  Thomas,  principal  of  the  Glen- 
ville  Normal  school,  and  later  clerk  of  the  County  court ;  1.  N. 
Hardman,  the  present  County  clerk,  Asa,  Wm.  L.,  French, 
the  late  Creed,  Virgil,  and  Mrs.  Gae  (T.  E.)  Waggie,  all  of 
Gilmer  county. 

The  children  of  the  first  marriage  are :  Lewis  S.,  Francis 
G.,  Henry  G.,  and  John  J.,  and  Rebecca  and  Mary,  who  both 
died  in  youth. 


CHAPTER  XIX 


Grass  Run  Settled 

RASS  RUN  derived  its  name  from  a  bit  of 
grass  that  grew  in  a  swampy  place  near  its 
mouth,  and  though  it  is  a  small  stream,  it 
has  quite  an  interesting  history. 

John  Riddel,  its  first  citizen,  was  born 
in  Virginia,  not  far  from  the  present  site  of 
Georgetown,  in  the  District  of  Columbia,  on 
June  30,  1778 — at  a  time  when  the  forests  were  resonant  with 
the  din  of  the  American  Revolution  ;  and  with  his  parents  re- 
moved to  what  is  now  Tucker  county,  where  he  was  married, 
on  September  23,  1802,  to  Miss  Tamar  Goff,  half-sister  of 
Alexander  Goff,  senior,  who  was  born  in  the  "Old  Dominion," 
in  September,  1782,  and  died  at  her  home  in  Gilmer  county, 
on  September  15,  1823.  This  was  one  of  the  romantic  run- 
away marriages  of  early  days,  and  on  the  banks  of  the  Cheat 
river,  it  was  solemnized ;  the  young  people  having  been  com- 
pelled to  ford  this  river  in  order  to  carry  out  their  nuptial 
plans. 

The  date  of  the  removal  of  Mr.  Riddel  from  Randolph 
to  Gilmer  county  is  wanting,  but  it  was  probably  shortly 
after  the  war  of  1812.  There  death  robbed  him  of  the  com- 
panion of  his  youth ;  and  there  he  was  again  married,  on  May 
16,  1824,  to  IVfiss  Elizabeth  Holbert ;  and  in  1831,  they  came 
to  this  county  and  settled  on  what  is  now  the  J.  C.  Rexroad 
homestead — this  old  pioneer  cabin  having  stood  just  across 
the  road  from  the  present  Rexroad  residence,  and  only  a  few 
rods  from  the  Fonzo  post-office,  and  Hatfield  store.  Here, 
death  again  robbed  him  of  his  companion,  and  some  time 
afterwards,  he  was  married  to  Mrs.  Hannah  Drake  Smith. 
Avidow  of  Aaron  Smith ;  and  from  here  he  removed  to  the 
Obadiah  Bee  farm,  on  Spruce  creek,  near  the  year  1838.     He 


GRASS  RUN  SETTLED  277 

later  went  to  Lewis  county,  and  finally,  to  Roane,  where  he 
died  in  1843,  and  where  he  and  his  last  wife  sleep. 

He  was  the  father  of  fourteen  children ;  viz.,  the  late 
James,  of  Roane  county ;  the  late  Rev.  Eli  Riddel,  of  Riddel's 
chapel;  Mrs.  Hannah  (Benjamin)  Cunningham,  Mrs.  Nancy 
(Strother)  Goff,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (N.  H.)  Frederick,  of  Burnt 
Elouse ;  Eleven  and  George,  who  died  in  childhood,  were  the 
children  of  the  first  marriage ;  and  Tamar,  who  was  the  late 
Mrs.  Emmett  Norman,  of  Auburn;  Dorcas,  who  married 
Rufus  Holbert,  of  Roane  county ;  William  and  Harrison  (wlio 
were  twins),  Thomas,  Joseph  and  John,  who  passed  on  in 
childhood  were  the  fruits  of  the  second  union. 

Though  his  children  have  all  joined  the  throng  on  the 
other  side,  his  descendants  in  this  and  adjoining  counties  are 
a  multitude.  Among  the  grandchildren  that  are  Avell-known 
citizens,  are  Mrs.  Clara  Gofif,  Mrs.  J.  R.  Stalnaker,  James,  the 
late  John  Frederick,  all  of  Burnt  House;  John  R.  Cunningham, 
of  Tani]ers;  the  Normans,  of  Auburn,  and  numerous  others 
that  we  might  mention. 

Riddel  Ancestry. — Though  not  a  few  of  the  Riddels  claim 
to  be  of  French  extraction,  investigation  proves  that  their 
ancestor,  James  Riddel,  came  from  Germany  along  with  John 
and  Salathiel  Goft,  and  Joseph  Hardman ;  and  that  after  a 
brief  sojourn  in  England,  they  all  came  to  America,  and  set- 
tled at  Georgetown,  which  is  now  in  the  District  of  Columbia, 
after  a  twelve  month's  residence  in  Baltimore,  where  they 
first  landed — in  the  year  1773  or  '4.  From  here  they  went  to 
Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  and  later  to  what  is  now  Tucker 
county,  West  Virginia,  where  he  probably  sleeps.  His  death 
occurred  on  February  26,  1816.  He  married  a  Miss  Welsh,  of 
Scotland,  before  leaving  the  Fatherland,  and  was  the  father 
of  the  following  named  sons  and  daughters:  John,  James, 
junior,  Benjamin,  Jeremiah,  Dorcas,  who  married  Joseph 
Hardman,  and  Elizabeth,  the  wife  of  Alexander  Gofif,  senior. 
And  from  these  sons  and  daughters  sprang  the  innumerable 
families  of  Riddels,  and  Hardmans — and  not  a  few  of  the 
Goft's  in  this  and  adjoining  counties — in  fact,  these  descend- 
ants are  scattered  throughout  the  Union. 

John  Riddel,  as  above  stated,  settled  in  Ritchie  county ; 


278  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COL'XTY 

James,  junior,  in  Lewis  county.     He  was  twice  married  but 
left  no  heirs. 

Benjamin  I^iddel  married  Miss  Nancy  Anne  Goff,  daugh- 
ter of  Salathiel  Goff,  and  settled  at  Hollow  Meadows,  on  the 
Cheat  river,  in  Randolph  (now  Tucker)  county ;  but  near  the 
close  of  the  w^ar  of  1812,  he  sold  his  possessions  there,  and 
removed  to  Gilmer  county,  and  became  one  of  the  pioneers, 
at  the  mouth  of  Leading  creek.  Here  he  passed  from  earth, 
and  here  his  ashes  lie.  He  was  the  father  of  ten  sons  and 
one  daughter;  viz.,  Salathiel,  died  in  Roane  county,  in  1907, 
at  the  age  of  ninety  years;  Silas  T.,  the  youngest  son  and  the 
only  survivor  of  the  family,  resides  near  Washburn,  in  this 
county;  and  the  others  were,  Hiram,  Richard  Welsh,  John 
Goff,  Benjamin,  junior,  George  Washington,  William  (died 
in  infancy),  and  the  next  brother  was  called  William  Slavens, 
James  S.,  and  Dorcas,  who  married  William  Holbert,  of  Gil- 
mer county. 

Jeremiah  Riddel,  or  "Jerry,"  as  he  was  familiarly  known, 
married  Miss  Margaret  Hardman,  sister  of  Joseph  Hardman, 
who  came  from  Germany  with  the  rest  of  the  party,  and  fol- 
lowed them  in  their  wanderings  until  they  found  a  home  (and 
she,  a  final  resting  place),  in  Gilmer  county. 

It  is  not  known  where  or  when  they  were  married,  but 
circumstances  point  strongly  to  the  fact  that  they  were  mar- 
ried in  the  Fatherland,  before  they  set  sail  for  America,  but 
this  cannot  be  verified  at  this  late  day.  However,  he  died  at 
Norfolk,  Virginia,  while  serving  his  country  in  the  war  of 
1812,  and  there  he  reposes.  He  was  the  father  of  six  children  ; 
viz.,  Eleven,  the  Spruce  creek  pioneer;  James,  junior,  John  E., 
George  M.,  and  Mrs.  John  Short. 

George  M,  Riddel  married  Miss  Mary  Norman,  and  was 
the  father  of  Mrs.  Nancy  Bush,  of  Auburn;  Mrs.  Etta  Russell, 
of  Parkersburg;  and  grandfather  of  Mrs.  W.  H.  Amos,  of 
Auburn,  and  the  well-known  traveling  salesman,  A.  W.  W'est- 
fall. 

(The  family  of  Dorcas  Riddel  Hardman  appears  in  an 
earlier  chapter,  and  that  of  Elizabeth  Riddel  Goff"  follows  in 
this  chaptei'.) 

James  Harvey  Cooper  was  the  second  citizen  of  the  Rex- 


GRASS  RUN  SETTLED  2T9 

road  homestead.  He  was  born  in  Pocahontas  county,  in 
1810,  and  married  Miss  Julia  Ann  Whitman,  a  native  of  Green- 
brier county;. and  in  1830,  came  to  Gilmer  county  and  settled 
near  Troy;  and  two  years  later  (1838),  removed  to  the  Rex- 
rcad  farm.  After  a  brief  sojourn  here,  he  went  to  Leather- 
barke,  and  made  an  improvement  on  the  Dr.  A.  M.  Ed.^ell 
farm  ;  and  near  1840,  returned  to  the  Frederick's  mill  vicinity, 
and  reared  the  first  dwelling  on  the  land  that  is  now  owned 
by  his  grandson.  F.  M.  Cooper;  and  from  here  he  removed 
to  Gilmer  county,  and  took  up  his  residence  on  what  is  now 
designated  as  the  S.  L.  Bush  homestead,  where  he  passea 
from  earth  in  1881,  and  on  an  adjoining  farm,  he  rests.  He 
was  a  school-teacher,  and  in  this  profession  forty  years  of  his 
life  were  spent.  He  was  also  a  surve3^or,  and  was  at  one  time 
County  surveyor  of  Gilmer. 

He  was  the  father  of  three  daughters  and  eight  sons : 
Agnes  died  in  youth  ;  Julia  is  Mrs.  Francis  Hardman,  of  Tan- 
nersville ;  and  Rebecca,  Mrs.  Jesse  Hardman,  of  Nebraska. 
Five  of  the  sons  were  Confederate  soldiers  ;  Robert  S.  died  in 
prison ;  George  was  slain  in  the  Battle  of  Fisher's  hill,  in  1861 ; 
the  late  James  T.,  lost  an  arm  in  the  cause;  John  M..  who 
resides  in  Gilmer  county,  was  severely  wounded  ;  and  Charles, 
of  Auburn,  narrowly  escaped  injury ;  Andrew  Holly  also  re- 
sides in  Gilmer  county ;  and  Leonidas,  and  Henry  J.,  have 
passed  on. 

While  the  greater  number  of  his  descendants  live  in  Gil- 
mer county,  not  a  few  of  them  are  known  in  this  coimty ;  the 
family  of  Charles  Cooper,  of  Auburn,  being  prominently 
known  among  the  teachers,  and  in  other  professions :  H.  E. 
Cooper  was  the  principal  of  the  Harrisville  school  for  two 
years  ;  Victor,  who  was  formerly  County  Superintendent  of 
Gilmer,  is  now  identified  among  the  Harrisville  lawyers  ;  Mrs. 
Flomer  Adams,  of  Harrisville ;  Miss  Cora,  Everett,  Grover, 
the  late  Price,  w-ho  was  graduated  from  the  State  University, 
at  ^Morgantown,  and  died  of  smallpox  in  tlte  Philippines,  where 
he  went  as  a  teacher;  and  the  late  lamented  Okey  Cooper,  of 
Xewd:)erne,  w"ere  all  members  of  this  family,  and  have  all  i^een 
identified  in  the  profession  of  teaching.  F.  M.  and  Joseph 
Cooper,  of  Fonzo,  are  also  grandsons  of  this  pioneer,  they 
being  the  sons  of  John  Cooper. 


280  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

The  Coopers^  are  descended  from  an  old  Virginia  family. 
James  Cooper,  father  of  James  Harvey,  being  a  native  of 
Augusta  county,  and  a  t3^pical  pioneer  of  West  Virginia.  He 
married  Miss  Nancy  Agnes  Wooddell,  who  was  also  a  native 
of  the  "Old  Dominion,"  and  came  to  Pocahontas  county,  early 
in  the  nineteenth  century  and  settled  near  Piney  woods,  now 
known  as  Greenbanks,  where  the  remainder  of  his  life  was 
spent.  He  was  a  prominent  figure  in  the  early  affairs  of  Poca- 
hontas county,  being  one  of  its  organizers,  and  having  after- 
wards served  as  constable,  magistrate,  assessor,  and  peda- 
gogue. He  was  also  one  of  the  pillars  of  the  "Liberty"  church, 
in  its  early  history. 

His  children  were  ten  in  number :  Elizabeth,  became 
Mrs.  Woods,  of  Highland  county ;  Margaret  was  the  late  Mrs. 
Enoch  Hill,  of  Hardman  chapel,  this  county ;  Jane  married 
Andrew  Kerr,  and  lived  at  Dunmore ;  Lucinda  became  ]\Irs. 
John  A.  Gillispie,  of  Greenbanks  ;  Nancy,  and  Malinda  were 
the  other  two,  all  were  of  Pocahontas  county;  Thomas  died  in 
youth  ,  John  T.  became  a  prominent  physician.  He  resided 
at  Parkersburg  for  a  ntmiber  of  years,  but  finally  went  to 
Cla3^sville,  Avhere  he  died  in  1878.  His  son,  Arthur,  is  now  a 
renov/ned  pulpit  orator  of  the  Presbyterian  church  of  Illinois: 
and  James  and  other  members  of  his  family  still  live  at  Park- 
ersburg". 

James  Harvey,  the  Ritchie  county  pioneer,  and  Joseph 
W.,  of  Pocahontas,  were  the  other  sons. 

Isaac  Collins  made  the  second  settlement  on  Grass  run. 
on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of  the  late  Nicholas  H. 
Frederick,  near  the  vear  1832.  He  was  of  Irish  lineage ;  and 
was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812,  having  been  drafted  into 
service.  He  married  Miss  Rachel  Cunningham,  daughter  of 
Thomas  and  Phebe.  and  they  resided  at  Smithville,  and  at  dif- 
ferent other  points  in  this  county,  before  going  to  Calhoun 
county,  where  they  spent  the  remnant  of  their  days,  near 
Freed,  and  where,  on  their  old  homestead,  side  by  side,  they 
sleep.  At  their  home  Phebe  Cunningham  died,  and  there  she 
rests. 


'The  facts  concerning-  tlie  ancestral  history  of  this  family  are  .srleaned 
in  part  from  the  "History  of  Pocahontas  County,"  the  author  of  that 
boolv  being  indebted  to  George  C.  Cooper,  son  of  Joseph,  for  his  informa- 
tion. 


GRASS  RUN  SETTLED  281 

Their  children  were  as  follows : 

Felix,  the  eldest  son,  served  as  a  soldier  of  the  war  of 
1812,  and  shortly  after  its  close,  went  to  Texas ;  Thomas,  also, 
went  to  Texas  ;  Isaac,  to  Iowa ;  John  D.  resided  at  Chestnut 
Grove,  in  Calhoun  county ;  Phebe,  became  Mrs.  Anthony 
Smith,  of  Portsmouth,  Ohio;  Hannah  married  Isaac  Smith, 
and  lived  and  died  at  Smithville;  Leah  was  Mrs.  Henderson 
Beall,  and  Barbara,  Mrs.  John  Beall,  both  of  Calhoun  county; 
Nancy,  Mrs.  James  Wilson,  of  Wirt  county;  and  Rachel,  is 
Mrs.  Jesse  McGee,  of  Harrisville. 

Among-  the  grandsons  and  granddaughters  are,  Martin 
and  A.  W.  Smith,  Mrs.  M.  A.  Ayres,  and  Mrs.  Alfred  Barr,  all 
of  Smithville ;  and  Isaac  and  Wilford  Collins,  of  the  Lawford 
vicinity. 

Philip  Frederick  was  the  successor  of  Mr.  Collins  on  the 
Frederick  homestead,  as  early  as  1835.  He  was  of  German 
origin,  and  of  Pennsylvania  nativity,  he  having  been  born  at 
Lancaster,  in  1775.  P'rom  his  native  state,  in  his  young  man- 
hood, he  went  to  Rockingham  county,  Virginia,  where  he  met 
and  married  a  young  lady  of  French  descent  by  the  name  of 


"V> 


Bougher." 

He  was  a  miller  by  trade  and  for  a  time  after  their  mar- 
riage, they  resided  in  Louisa  county,  Virginia,  and  from  there, 
removed  to  this  county  in  1833,  and  settled  on  Indian  creek, 
near  the  County  Infirmary,  for  a  brief  time  before  coming  to 
Grass  run.  They  afterwards  emigrated  to  Athens,  Ohio,  but 
soon  returned  to  their  old  home  on  this  creek,  where  they 
spent  their  last  hours.  Mr.  Frederick  died  in  1861,  and  both 
lie  at  rest  on  their  old  homestead,  which  is  still  in  the  hanrls 
of  their  heirs. 

Their  sons  were  David,  Nicholas  H.,  Samuel  B.  and 
Philip  Frederick. 

David  Frederick  left  home  in  his  youth  and  was  never 
heard  from  afterwards. 

Nicholas  H.  Frederick,  who  was  born  on  October  6,  1815, 
married  Miss  Elizabeth  Riddel,  daughter  of  John  and  Tarn? 
Goff  Riddel,  who  was  born  on  March  7,  1815,  while  her  father 
was  serving  as  a  soldier  in  the  war  of  '12.    The  marriage  was 
solemnized,  in  1837,  at  what  is  now  the  W.  G.  Lowther  home- 


•?s-  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUNTY 

stead,  and  they  at  once  took  up  their  residence  at  the  eld 
home  on  Grass  rvm,  where  they  Kved  and  died,  and  where 
they  lie  at  rest. 

Their  children  are  James  Frederick,  the  late  John,  Airs. 
Louisa  (J.  R.)  Stalnaker,  Mrs.  Clara  Goff,  Mrs.  William  Stal - 
naker,  who  are  all  the  heads  of  families;  and  Joseph,  Samu( ' 
Mary  E.,  Tamar,  Martha  J.,  and  Nancy,  who  died  in  youth. 

Samuel  B.  Frederick  married  Aliss  Elizabeth  Petty,  of 
Wirt  county,  and  principally  spent  his  life  in  the  Burnt  House 
vicinity.  He  was  the  father  of  Samuel,  Ulysses  G..  the  late 
Victor,  and  Roll,  Cathrine  Snodgrass,  Josephine  Pritchard, 
and  Amanda. 

Philip  Frederick  married  Aliss  Phebe  Hardman,  daughtc/ 
of  Benjamin,  and  lived  and  died  on  Grass  run.  They  were 
the  parents  of  Charles,  Franklin,  Williami.  David.  Edward. 
James,  Samuel,  Elizabeth,  who  died  young,  Leah,  who  mir- 
ried  James  Cain,  and  Safronia,  the  late  wife  of  George  W. 
Hardman. 

Benjamin  Cunningham,  son  of  Thomas  and  Phebe,  made 
the  first  improvement  on  the  Dr.  J.  F.  Hartman  farm  in  183fi : 
but  in  1845,  he  sold  this  improvement  to  David  W.  Sleeth. 
and  moved  his  family  to  Iowa  in  a  wagon.  Not  being  satis- 
fied there,  he  returned  to  this  county,  the  following  spring, 
and  became  the  first  settler  of  the  Charles  Drake  homestead, 
near  Hardman  chapel.  Here  the  remainder  of  his  life  w?h 
spent,  and  here  he  fell  asleep,  on  April  24,  1853,  at  the  age  of 
fifty-three  years  ;  and  on  the  Joseph  Fredeiick  homestead,  he- 
side  his  father,  he  lies  asleep. 

lie  married  Miss  Plannah  Riddel,  daughter  of  John  Rid- 
del, whose  earthly  pilgrimage  began  in  Randolph  county,  on 
August  18,  1803,  and  closed  on  Leatherbarke,  on  December 
13,  1881.    She  rests  at  Flardman  chapel. 

Their  children  were  as  follows:  Phebe  died  m  childhood 
and  James,  in  infancy;  John  R.  is  of  Tannersville ;  Wm.  C. 
of  Calhoun ;  the  late  Mrs.  Hannah  E.  (John)  Modisette,  of 
Walker;  Mrs.  Leah  C.  (Wm.)  Vannoy,  Gilmer  county:  and 
the  late  Mrs.  Nancy  PL  (Wilson  B.)  Cunningham,  of  Eva: 
Mrs.  Rachel  Norman,  of  Doddridge  county ;  Mrs.  Tamar  J. 
(James  T.)  Smith,  of  Smithville ;  Eli  R.,  of  Iris;  and  Thomas. 
of  Calhoun  county,  have  all  passed  on. 


GRASS  RUN  SETTLED  28:5 

The  Dr.  Hartman  homestead  is  still  in  the  hands  of  the 
heirs  of  David  Sleeth.  Mrs.  Hartman  being  his  only  surviving- 
granddaughter. 

John  Harris  built  the  first  dwelling  on  the  F.  G.  Fling 
farm  at  Burnt  House  as  early  as  1836.  He  came  from  Xew 
York  and  kept  a  stage  coach  and  a  house  of  public  entertain- 
ment. While  thus  engaged  a  tragical  drama  is  said  to  have 
been  enacted  within  the  walls  of  this  home,  which  hung  a 
shadow  about  the  good  name  of  the  family,  and  furnished 
material  for  all  sorts  of  weird  tales  and  ghost  stories. 

A  stranger,  who  had  stopped  for  the  night,  mysteriously 
disappeared,  and  nothing  ever  being  heard  of  him  again,  sus- 
picion pointed  strongly  to  Flarris  or  his  son,  William  (This 
is  variously  stated),  as  having  been  the  perpetrator  of  a 
crime.  A  child,  belonging  to  the  famdly,  is  said  to  have  told 
the  following  story : 

That  while  the  stranger  sat  at  supper,  the  father  (or 
brother)  decapitated  him  with  a  drawing-knife,  and  concealed 
his  remains  up  a  run,  which  has  ever  since  borne  the  name  of 
"Dead  Man's  Hollow."  For  many  years  this  region  was  su])- 
posed  to  have  been  visited  by  supernatural  beings — appari- 
tions in  varied  forms  appeared  to  the  consternation  of  the 
fanciful.  But  these  old  superstitious  traditions  have  long 
since  lost  their  terror — they  are  now  naught  but  a  memory. 
To  those  of  us  who  are  familiar  with  the  pleasant  scenes  of 
this  section,  they  are  but  little  more  than  interesting  legends, 
or  fairy  tales. 

Shortly  after  this  tragic  occurrence,  in  the  early  fifties, 
Flarris  sold  his  possessions  here,  to  Mrs.  Susan  Groves — a 
widow — and  her  son,  John,  and  went  West,  and  here  his  his- 
tory ends.    He  has  no  known  relatives  in  this  county. 

While  the  Groves  family  resided  here,  an  incident  oc- 
curred, which  gave  rise  to  the  name  "Burnt  House." 

Mr.  Groves  being  a  slave  holder  in  the  "antebellum  days," 
is  said  to  have  sold  a  little  negress,  and  she  being  so  enraged 
at  her  master  for  this  act  of  cruelty,  set  fire  to  some  clothing 
up  stairs,  before  taking  her  departure,  which  resulted  in  tlie 
destruction  of  the  house — the  first  dwelling  where  the  village 
now  stands,  the  site  being  marked  by  the  Ferrell  hotel. 


284  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

This  interesting"  little  legend,  however,  is  set  aside  by 
facts  which  somewhat  modify  it.  The  other  story  being  that 
the  little  black  girl  had  been  lent  to  ]\Irs.  John  Groves,  by 
her  father,  ]\Ir.  Rogers,  of  \\'aynesboro,  Virginia,  and  that 
while  iMr.  Groves  was  absent — taking  the  little  wench  back 
to  his  father-in-law,  the  house  caught  fire,  and  was  burned  to 
the  ground — hence  the  origin  of  the  name. 

The  Groveses  came  from  Augusta  county,  Virginia,  and 
Mrs.  Susan  Groves  went  back  there  and  died.  John  went  to 
California,  and  Thomas  lived  in  AA'irt  county,  but  moved  to 
Cairo,  where  he  died  some  years  ago,  and  where  one  of  his 
daughters  still  lives. 

Henry  Fling. — In  1859,  the  Grove's  farm  became  the  prop- 
erty of  the  late  Henry  Fling,  and  has  ever  since  been  in  the 
hands  of  the  Fling  family,  he  having  been  the  first  to  rebuild 
where  the  Grove's  residence  was  burned. 

In  1849,  John  Fling  purchased  cjuite  a  tract  of  land  in  this 
section,  which  he  divided  between  his  two  sons,  Henry  and 
Levi. 

Henry  built  his  cabin  on  the  land  that  is  now  owned  b}- 
J\Irs.  Ona  Fling,  and  having  married  ]\Iiss  Eunice  Fisher,  o^' 
Gilmer  county,  two  years  before,  took  up  his  residence  here 
this  same  3-ear  (1849).  And  in  1859,  as  before  stated,  he 
moved  to  the  Groves'  farm,  where  he  continued  to  reside  until 
1883,  when  he  was  succeeded  by  his  brother,  F.  G.  Fling, 
who  is  still  the  owner.  Henrv  Fling  was  born  in  1821,  and 
died  in  Calhoun  county,  in  1906,  and  sleeps  beside  his  Avife  in 
the  Baptist  chuchyard,  at  Tannersville. 

His  first  wife  died  in  1872,  and,  two  years  later,  he  mar- 
ried Miss  Rebecca  Holbert,  who,  with  her  four  daughters. 
Gay,  Martha,  Mary,  and  Jennie,  resides  at  Brooksville. 

The  children  of  the  first  union  have  all  passed  awa\  but 
three;  viz.,  Mrs.  Minerva  Kelley,  Tannersville;  ]\Irs.  Maggie 
Heller,  Nebraska;  and  Fisher, .of  Pittsburg;  Henry  and  his 
family  met  tragic  deatlis  at  their  home  in  Calhoun  counts,  a 
few  3-ears  ago  by  a  gas  explosion — the  charred  remains  of  the 
wife  and  two  children  being  laid  in  the  same  grave  at  Tan- 
nersville.    \\'illiam  died  at  Big  Springs,  in  Calhoun  county; 


GRASS  RUN  SETTLED  285 

George  A.,  at  his  home  near  Hardman  chapel ;  Floyd,  and 
Levi  J.,  in  Nebraska;  Mary  S.,  and  John,  at  Burnt  House. 

Levi  Fling  built  his  dwelling-  near  the  present  residence 
of  his  only  son,  P.  J.  Fling,  about  the  same  time  that  his 
brother  Henry,  made  his  settlement;  but  he  put  a  tenant  ori 
his  farm  until  his  marriage  to  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Bush  Heckart — 
ari  event  which  took  place  on  August  9,  1869,  and  commemo- 
rated the  forty-sixth  anniversary  of  his  birth.  From  that  time 
until  his  death,  in  1905,  he  was  a  respected  citizen  of  this  com- 
munity. He  sleeps  at  Mt.  Liberty,  and  his  venerable  widow 
still  occupies  the  old  home. 

She  first  married  Jacob  Heckart,  and  is  the  mother  of  S. 
P.  Heckart,  of  Cairo;  Mrs.  Margaret  Harden,  and  the  late  W. 
H.  Heckart,  Burnt  House;  the  late  H.  A.,  of  Tannersville ;  J. 
M.,  of  Knoxville,  Tennessee;  Mrs.  Sarah  (Jerome)  Prunty, 
California;  and  Mrs.  Louie  S.  Beckner,  Tannersville. 

F.  Gainer  Fling  married  Miss  Elsie  Bush,  daughter  of 
George  and  ]\Irs.  ]\Iary  McOuain  Bush,  of  Gilmer  county,  and 
is  the  father  of  the  late  General  Fling  and  Mrs.  Mollie  E.  (J. 
E.)  Ferrell. 

The  Flings  are  of  Irish  lineage.  John  Fling  was  born  in 
America,  shortly  after  his  parents  crossed  the  sea ;  and  when 
he  w^as  still  in  his  cradle,  his  parents  both  died,  and  he  was 
reared  by  a  family  by  the  name  of  "Polen,"  near  Baltimore, 
Maryland.  After  he  had  grown  to  manhood,  and  served  as  a 
soldier  in  the  war  of  1812,  he  came  to  Barbour  county,  (\V.) 
Virginia,  and  there  he  met  and  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Gainer, 
in  1816;  and  from  there,  they  removed  to  Gilmer  county,  in 
1831.  Here  at  his  old  homestead,  near  Tannersville,  he  closed 
his  eyes  to  earth,  in  186  L  Eight  children  were  the  fruits  of 
this  union.  Besides  the  three  sons  already  mentioned  were  : 
the  late  Mrs.  Jane  (\Vm.)  Wilson,  Mrs.  Sarah  (ThoiTias") 
Flardman,  the  late  George  and  Sanford,  all  of  Tannersville ; 
and  Mrs.  Mary  (David)  Ayres,  of  Calhoun  county. 

George  Fling  married  Miss  Hannah  Bush,  and  was  the 
father  of  the  late  H.  H.  Fling,  of  Roseville,  who  figured  as 
an  early  miller  in  the  history  of  .the  towns  of  Smithville,  Au- 
burn, and  perhaps,  others,  in  this  county. 

H.  H.  Fling  married  Miss  Mary  Talbott,  of  Philippi,  Bar- 


286  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

bour  county,  and  was  the  father  of  twelve  children ;  viz.,  G. 
W.  D.  Pling,  Mrs.  Rose  Bush,  Mrs.  Guy  Younge,  and  Miss 
Eva,  are  all  of  Gilmer  county ;  Laura  B.  is  Mrs.  P.  J.  Fling,  of 
Burnt  House,  and  Dr.  I.  C.  W.  Fling  is  of  the  same  place ;  P. 
E.  A.  Fling  is  of  Arkansas ;  H.  H.  J.,  of  Texas  :  Mrs.  Bertha 
House,  of  Clarksburg ;  Gertie  L.,  J.  K.  W.  and  ]\I.  E.  have  all 
passed  on. 

.Joseph  Cunningham  made  the  first  improvement  on  lhe 
head  of  the  stream,  on  the  T.  J-  Hartman  farm.  We  learn 
that  he  never  owned  this  land,  that  it  belonged  to  tlie  J\lax- 
wells  at  this  time. 

He  was  a  nephew  of  Thomas  Cunningham,  being  the  son 
of  his  brother,  Benjamin.  He  married  Miss  Jane  ]\Ialone,  sis- 
ter of  John  and  James  Malone,  and  was  the  father  of  the  iate 
Mrs.  Tabitha  (Israel)  Davidson,  of  Spruce  creek;  Benjamin, 
of  Missouri ;  Findlay,  of  Ohio ;  Mrs.  Sarah  Quinn,  and  Airs. 
Elizabeth  Quinn,  both  of  Iowa;  Mrs.  Priscilla  Kenney.  of 
Missouri,  who  later  became  Mrs.  John  Miller,  of  Ohio ;  Airs. 
Amanda ,  of  Missouri ;  and  Robert,  of  Ohio. 

After  residing  at  a  number  of  other  points  in  this  county, 
Mr.  Cunningham  went  West,  but  finally  returned  to  the 
home  of  Israel  Davidson,  of  Spruce  creek,  where  he  found  a 
final  resting  place,  beside  his  wife. 

Jonathan  Bessie,  of  Virginia,  was  another  early  settler 
on  the  T.  J.  Hartman  farm  ;  it  being  claimed  by  some  that 
he  preceded  Cimningham  here,  but  we  are  unable  to  verify 
this  statement,  however. 

Strother  Goff  was  the  pioneer  on  the  old  homestead  that 
is  still  in  the  hands  of  his  heirs.  He  was  born  in  Randolpli 
(now  Tucker)  county,  in  1809,  and  Avith  his  parents  came  to 
Gilmer  county  shortly  after  the  vv^ar  of  1812,  where  he  grew 
to  manliood,  and  married  his  cousin.  Miss  Nancy  Riddel, 
daughter  of  John  and  Tamar  Gofif  Riddel,  who  was  also  born 
in  Randolph  (now  Tucker)  county,  on  October  17,  1807.  He 
served  as  deputy  sherifif  of  Gilmer  county  under  Peregrine 
Hays,  before  coming  to  this  county,  in  1850,  where 
he  spent  the  remnant  of  his  days.  He  was  one  of  the  corner- 
stones of  the  old  AI.  E.  church  South,  at  Burnt  House,  and  re- 
mained a  pillar  in  this  church  to  the  close  of  his  earthlv  pil- 


GRASS  RUN  SETTLED  287 

grimage.  Side  by  side  on  the  old  homestead,  he  and  his  wife 
sleep.  Their  children  were :  James  R.,  Mrs.  Tamar  (James) 
Frederick,  Mrs.  Rtihama  (Archibald)  Wyer,  W.  H.  Goff. 
Benjamin,  Granville,  Mrs.  Mary  Riddel  Valentine,  and 
George,  of  Gilmer  county.    The  last  two  only  survive. 

The  Goff  Ancestry. — The  Goffs,  like  many  of  the  other 
pioneers,  have  an  interesting  ancestral  history,  though  two 
claims  as  to  their  origin  in  the  "New  World"  are  in  our  pos- 
session. 

The  first  one  is  that  the  progenitors  of  the  mrmerous 
families,  of  the  name,  scattered  throughout  West  Virginia, 
are  lineal  descendants  of  Colonel  William  Goffe,  the  English 
parliamentarian  and  soldier,  who  was  a  member  of  that  dis- 
tinguished Judicial  body  that  signed  the  death  warrant  of 
Charles  the  I ;  and  who,  being  compelled  to  flee  from  the 
vengance  of  Charles  the  II,  sought  refuge  in  the  wilds  of 
America,  where  he  wandered  about  and  lay  in  hiding  in  old 
mills,  cliffs  of  rocks,  and  in  caves,  near  New  Haven,  Connecti- 
cut, from  1660-64,  when  he  went  to  Hadley,  Massachusetts, 
and  found  a  friendly  asylum  with  the  minister  of  the  parish 
uritil  his  death  in  1679. 

Almost  every  school-boy  or  girl  is  familiar  with  the  story 
of  the  ''strange,  old  man  with  long,  white  beard  in  ancient 
garb,"  that  suddenly  appeared  upon  the  scene  at  the  little 
chapel  at  Hadley,  on  that  quiet  Sunday  morning  when  a  band 
of  devout  worshipers  were  surprised  by  the  Indians,  and  led 
them  to  victory — then  disappeared  as  mysteriously  as  he  had 
come,  leaving  the  astonished  villagers  to  think  that  God  had 
sent  an  Angel  to  deliver  them  from  the  dusky  foe. 

This  "strange  old  man"  was  no  other  than  Colonel 
William  Gofife,  the  regicide,  who  had  seen  the  approaching 
enemy  from  the  window  of  the  minister's  house,  and  the  same 
individual  that  is  claimed  by  some  to  have  been  the  antecessor 
of  the  Goffs  of  this  county.  But  if  Colonel  Goffe  had  a  family 
(and  doubtless  he  had,  as  history  tells  us  that  his  father-in- 
law,  Edward  Wlialley,  was  the  companion  of  his  flight)  he 
must  have  left  them  behind  in  England,  as  circumstances  will 
not  permit  us  to  draw  any  other  conclusion.  But,  while  he 
could  hardlv  have  been  the  antecessor  of  the  fore-fathers  of 


288  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUXTY 

the  AVest  Virginia  families,  it  is  not  at  all  unlikely  that  they 
all  belonged  to  the  same  race — the  German :  for  people  of  this 
name  are  said  to  be  scattered  through  various  countries  of 
Europe  to-day,  and  it  is  not  difficult  to  believe  that  they  all 
may  have  sprung  from  the  same  parent-stem,  when  we  re- 
member that  in  olden-times  the  spirit  of  migration  was  evc" 
in  evidence — sometimes  from  natural  inclinations,  but  more 
often  from  more  imperative  reasons — religious  or  political 
persecutions,  which  drove  thousands  from  their  native  lands. 
But  be  this  as  it  may,  John  T.  and  Salathiel  Goff,  the  tvvo 
brothers  who  were  the  progenitors  of  the  families  that  belong 
to  this  history,  were  natives  of  Germany,  and  of  Teutonic 
birth ;  but,  owing  to  the  tyrannous  hand  of  oppression  in  tlie 
Fatherland,  they  (with  the  Riddels,  and  the  Hardmans,  iud, 
perhaps,  the  Springstons)  migrated  to  England,  and  after  a 
brief  sojourn  there,  embarked  to  America,  landing  in  Balti- 
more, shortly  before  the  Revolution,  where  they  remained 
twelve  months  before  going  to  v;hat  is  now  Georgetown,  in 
the  District  of  Columbia. 

John  T,  Goff  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Welsh,  of  Scotland, 
sister  of  Mrs.  James  Riddel,  before  leaving  the  Fatherland, 
and  when  they  removed  from  Baltimore,  they  established 
their  home  on  the  Marjdand  side,  not  far  from  Georgetown, 
W'here  it  is  probable  that  Mrs.  Goff  died,  not  many  years  later: 
for  he  Avas  married  to  his  second  wife,  Monacah  Cerrico,  as 
early  as  1781.  From  there,  after  the  Revolution,  he  removed 
to  near  Fredericksburg.  Virginia,  and  later,  to  wdiat  is  now 
Tucker  county.  West  Virginia,  where  he,  doubtless,  sleeps 
on  the  banks  of  the  Cheat  river.  From  an  old  time-worn 
record,  we  learn  that  he  bade  his  final  adieu  to  earth,  on 
March  9,  1803  ;  and  that  his  wife,  Monacah,  died  on  December 
27,  1815. 

It  will  be  noted  in  the  beginning  of  this  chapter,  that  his 
daughter,  Tamar,  figured  in  a  runaway-marriage  six  months 
before  his  death,  and  that  the  scene  of  this  little  romance  was 
on  the  Cheat'  river,  in  what  is  now  Tucker  county ;  hence  this 
is  conclusive  evidence  that  his  last  hours  were  spent  here. 


^From   the  "Border  "Warfare"   we   learn  that  John   T.   Goff  was   one  of 
tlie  first  settlers  at  "Horse  Shoe  Bottom,"  on  this  river. 


GRASS  RUN  SETTLED  289 

A  complete  and  authentic  record  of  the  children  of  his 
first  union  is  wanting,  but  he  and  his  wife,  Elizabeth,  were 
the  parents  of  five  or  more  children;  viz.,  William,  John, 
James,  Alexander,  au-d  Hannah  ;  and  he  and  his  wife,  Monacah, 
had  three  daughters;  Joanna,  Tamar,  and  Luda  GolT  (the 
first  two,  Joanna  and  Tamar,  evidently  being  twins,  as  the 
record  shows  that  both  were  born  in  1782,  though  the  name 
of  the  month  in  one  instance  is  missing). 

James  Goff. — Of  the  subsequent  history  of  William  and 
John,  we  know  nothing,  hut  James  was  twice  married.  The 
name  of  his  first  wife  is  unknown,  but  the  second  was  a  Miss 
Barnhouse.  He  came  from  the  Cheat  river  with  the  other 
Gofits,  and  settled  near  the  Big  Bend  in  Calhoun  county  ;  and 
from  there  went  to  Athens,  Ohio,  where  he  died  at  the  home 
of  his  eldest  son,  John  B.  Goli',  who  was  a  soldier  of  the  war 
of  1812. 

The  children  of  James  Goff  were,  John  B.,  Robert,  George 
L.,  William,  Alary,  Rebecca,  and  Libbie.  Libbie  married  a 
man  by  the  nam.e  of  Lisson,  and  went  to  Ohio.  George  L. 
married  Cathrine  Phy,  and  was  the  father  of  Phillip  Goff,  of 
Juna,-wlio  is  the  only  survivor  of  the  family;  James,  V.'illiam, 
and  Susan,  the  other  children,  having  passed  on. 

Hannah  Goff  (daughter  of  John  T.  Gofi)  married  John 
Smith,  and  lived  and  died  on  Leading  creek,  in  Gilmer  county. 
Pier  children  were  seven  in  number;  viz.,  George,  John, 
Nathan,  Jacob,  Phebe  (Mrs.  John  Davis),  Luvina  (remained 
single),  and  Mary  (Mrs.  William  Patton). 

Joanna  Goff^  (daughter  of  John  T.  Goff)  was  born  on 
August  4,  1782,  and  on  October  8,  1803,  she  was  married  to 
her  first  cousin,  George  G.  Goff,  son  of  Salathiel  Goff',  and  six 
children  were  the  result  of  this  union ;  viz., 

John  L.  (born  in  1804  and  died  1805),  George  W.,  Hiram 
A.,   Elizabeth    (Airs.   Thomas   Brannon),  Rachel    (Airs.   Abra- 


'The  record  of  this  marriage,  which  was  recently  brouglit  from  its 
dust-covered  hiding  place,  with  its  accompanying  explanation  tliat 
"Joanna  Gnft".  daughter  of  John  T.  Goff,  married  her  cousin,  George  G. 
Goff,  son  of  Salathiel  Goff,"  sets  at  rest  the  dispute  concerning  the  rela- 
tionship of  John  T.  and  Salathiel  Goff,  and  establishes  the  fact  beyond 
cavil  that  they  must  have  been  brothers  or  half-brothers;  for  the  younger 
generations  remember  liaving  heard  their  grandsires  say,  repeatedly,  tliat 
Joanna  married  lier  first  cousin.  These  little  tilings  seem  insignificant  to 
the  casual  observer,  but  througli  them  alone  we  establish  facts,  and  settle 
controversies. 


290  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUNTY 

ham  Bush,  of  Gihiier  county),  and  Nancy  (Mrs.  John  Riddel, 
of  Calhoun  county).    Joanna  died  in  1861. 

Tamar  Goff  (daughter  of  John  T.  Goff)  married  John 
Riddel,  and  her  family  occupy  the  first  place  in  this  chapter. 

Luda  Goff  married  Jacob  Springston,  junior,  and  left  a 
large  line  of  descendants.     (See  later  chapter.) 

Alexander  Goff  (son  of  John  T.),  who  was  familiarly 
known  as  "Sauny."  was  the  founder  of  the  Ritchie  county 
family.  He  was  born,  on  October  16,  1773,  during  the  sojourn 
of  the  family  in  England,  and  near  the  year  1799.  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Elizabeth  Riddel,  sister  of  John  Riddel,  who 
was  born  in  1779.  The  marriage  doubtless  took  place  in  what 
is  now  Tucker  county  (then  Randolph),  where  they  first 
established  their  home,  and  where  they  remained  until  after 
the  close  of  the  war  of  1812,  when  they  removed  to  Leading 
creek,  in  Gilmer  county.  Here  they  reared  their  large  family, 
and  here  they  resided  until  some  tmie  in  the  early  fifties, 
when  they  came  to  this  county  and  spent  the  remnant  of  their 
old  age  with  their  son,  Strother,  near  Burnt  House.  Mr.  Gott 
died  in  1857,  and,  side  by  side,  they  lie  at  rest  on  the  Strother 
Goff  homestead. 

Their  family  record  is  as  follows : 

John  A.— born  in  1800  ;  Thomas,  in  1806  ;  Strother,  1809  : 
Benjamin,  1811;  Dorcas,  1812;  George,  1814;  Elizabeth,  1815; 
Alexander,  3  816;  Joseph  H.,  1822;  and  James,  who  died  in 
youth.     Elizabeth,  also,  died  in  youth. 

John  A.  Goff  was  a  minister  of  the  Alethodist  Episcopal 
Church  South.  He  married  Miss  Julia  House,  and  came  from 
Gilmer  county,  and  settled  on  Long  run,  near  Goff's  post- 
office,  where  he  died.  He  was  the  father  of — Phillip,  of  Cal- 
houn county  ;  the  late  John  W..  of  Gilmer  county ;  the  late 
Alex.,  of  Braxton  ;  Lafayette  and  Thomas,  who  lost  their  lives 
in  the  Southern  cause  during  the  Civil  war;  and  Mrs.  W.  O. 
Barnhouse. 

S.  L.  Gofl^,  of  Lawford,  is  the  son  of  Lafayette. 

Dorcas  Goif,  the  daughter  of  Alexander,  senior,  married 
Samuel  Flemming,  and  shortly  after  their  marriage  they  came 
to  this  county,  and  settled  on  Dry  run  of  Spruce  creek,  where 
their  son,  John   Fleming,  now  lives;  and  there  they  saw  the 


GRASS  RUN  SETTLED  291 

last  of  earth.  Their  other  children  besides  John,  were  as  fol- 
lows :  Benjamin,  of  Pennsylvania  ;  Alfred,  who  died  in  youth  ; 
Mrs.  Joanna  (George)  Stansbury,  of  Clarksburg;  the  larc 
Mrs.  Mary  (Jacob)  Scott,  of  Mahone ;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Jane 
Connolly,  of  Gilmer  county. 

George  GofT  married  Miss  Mary  Smith,  daughter  of 
Barnes  Smith,  senior,  and  sister  of  his  brother,  Thomas'  wife, 
and  settled  in  Wood  county ;  and  from  there  removed  to  Mis- 
souri, where  he  died.  His  children  were — John,  Flenry, 
George,  Barnes,  Elzaria,  who  all  resided  in  the  West  and 
South ;  and  Hila  Ann,  late  wife  of  James  S.  Hardman,  of 
Hardman  chapel. 

Henry  lost  his  wife  in  the  Confederate  cause,  and  John 
is  supposed  to  have  been  killed  by  the  Indians,  some  place  in 
the  West. 

Joseph  H.  Goff,  who  was  also  a  minister  of  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  Church  South,  married  Miss  Angeline  Davis,  and 
resided  in  Braxton  county  for  a  time.  Here  Mrs.  Goff  died, 
after  giving  birth  to  five  children ;  viz.,  Henry,  of  Spruce 
creek ;  Charles  and  Theodore,  who  both  died  in  youth ;  Mrs. 
Joanna  Davidson  (widow  of  Israel  Davidson,  junior,  of  Tan- 
ners), of  near  Grafton;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Mary  McGill.  of 
Spruce  creek. 

In  1865,  Mr.  Goff  was  married  again  to  Miss  Virginia 
Buzzard,  sister  of  the  late  Henr}^  Buzzard,  and  came  to 
Spruce  creek,  from  Pocahontas  county  (where  the  marriage 
took  place),  shortly  after  the  Civil  war;  and  here  his  life  came 
to  a  close  on  March  8,  1893.  The  children  of  this  union  are 
three  in  numl)er ;  viz.,  Floyd  P.,  J.  Warren  Goff,  and  Mrs. 
Alice  (Elmore)  Summers,  all  of  Hazelgreen.  His  wife  still 
survives. 

Thomas  Goff  married  Elizabeth  Smith,  daughter  of 
Barnes  Smith,  senior. 

Benjamin  Goff  married  Miss  Eda  Smith,  daughter  of 
pioneer  Aaron  Smith. 

Alexander  Goff,  junior,  married  Miss  Mary  Bush,  daugh- 
ter of  George  Bush. 

Strother  Goff  married  his  cousin.  Miss  Nancy  Riddel, 
daughter  of  John  and  Tamar  Goff  Riddel,  but  the  record  of 


292  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUXTY 

their  families   wiil  all   be  found  in  other  parts  of  this   work. 
(See  Spruce  creek  for  all,  but  Strother.) 

Salathiel  Goff's  Line. — Salathiel  Gofif  married  Miss  Eliza- 
beth L.  Gray  in  the  Fatherland  and,  as  above  mentioned, 
crossed  to  America  with  his  brother,  John  T.  Goff,  after  a 
brief  sojourn  in  England  ;  and  his  wanderings  in  the  Occident 
dilTer  but  little  from  those  of  his  brother,  and  of  the  other 
families  that  crossed  with  them. 

After  leaving  Baltimore,  where  they  first  stepped  on 
American  soil,  Salathiel  Goff  w^ent  to  Georgetown  (with  the 
rest 'of  the  immigrant  party)  and  settled  on  the  bank  of  the 
Potomac  river,  on  the  Virginia  side.  He  is  said  to  have  re- 
moved to  the  vicinity  of  Fredericksburg,  a  little  later,  but 
however  this  may  have  been,  he  was  a  resident  of  Harrison 
county,  (W.)  Virginia,  in  1784;  for  on  July  tw^entieth  of  this 
3^ear  (IvS-i),  when  \A'illiam  Raymond,  the  first  principal  sur- 
veyor of  Harrison  count}',  was  qualified  for  this  office, 
Salathiel  Golf,  Col.  Benjamin  Wilson,  senior,  Col.  William 
Lowther,  and  Jacob  Westfall  were  the  Justices  of  the  Peace 
of  this  new  County  of  Harrison.  (This  comes  from  an  old 
and  authentic  record.)  But  old  papers  found  among  the  pos- 
sessions of  his  son,  George  G.  Gofif,  which  are  now  in  the 
hands  of  AV.  S.  Goft,  of  Glenville,  show  that  his  last  will  and 
testament  was  made  in  what  is  now  Tucker  county,  so  doubt- 
less here  his  ashes  lie.    He  is  said  to  have  died  of  cancer. 

His  children  were  Hiram,  John,  George  G.,  Nancy  Anne, 
Elizabeth,  and  ]^Iary. 

Hiram  Goff,  the  eldest  son,  married  ]\Iiss  Margaret  Rush, 
of  Tucker  county,  and  removed  to  Leading  creek,  in  Gilmer 
county,  shortly  after  the  w^ar  of  1812.  He  was  a  thrifty 
farmer,  and  an  extensive  stock-raiser  and  cattle-merchant ; 
and  it  was  his  custom  to  drive  his  large  herds  of  cattle  to 
Baltimore  for  market.  And  on  one  of  these  long  trips  across 
the  mountains,  after  marketing  a  large  drove,  and  being  paid 
in  gold,  he  was  attacked  by  a  band  of  robbers,  only  a  few- 
miles  distant  from  Baltimore,  and  brutally  beaten  over  the 
head  wuth  a  club  and  robbed  of  his  gold.  From  this  cruel 
wound  he  became  violently  insane,  and  wandered  aimlessly 
about  over  the  surrounding  country  (in  the  vicinity  of  Balti- 


GRASS  RUN  SETTLED  .  293 

more)  in  a  starving  and  deplorable  condition,  for  several 
months  before  his  family  conld  locate  him  ;  but  at  length  his 
identity  became  known,  and  his  sons  went  and  brought  him 
back  to  his  home,  but  he  was  never  rational  again:  and.  at 
times,  he  had  to  be  confined  in  a  strong  room  in  his  home, 
which  had  been  constructed  for  this  purpose.  Some  very 
pathetic  stories  have  come  down  to  his  descendants  concern- 
ing his  irrational  acts. 

He  was  the  father  of  John  R.  Gofi,  of  Tucker  count}^;  of 
William,  who  married  a  Miss  Bush,  and  settled  where  Spencer 
now  stands ;  of  Dawson,  who  married  Miss  Rachel  Brannon, 
of  Gilmer  county,  and  settled  in  Roane  county;  of  (jieorge,  of 
Pomeroy,  Ohio;  Rachel,  who  was  the  late  wife  of  George  \\". 
Hardman,  senior,  of  Hardman  Bend,  in  Calhoun  county; 
Effie.  wife  of  Jacob  Springston ;  Elizabeth,  who  married 
Hiram  Riddel,  and  went  to  Texas;  and  of  Eda  and  Cyrus,  who 
died  unmarried.  .    ' 

Roane  county  is  full  of  his  descendants,  Frank,  Lee. 
Charles,  Louis  and  Ira  Goff,  of  Spencer,  are  his  grandsons, 
they  being  the  sons  of  Dawson  Goii';  and  Mrs.  T.  'M.  Goff,  of 
Harrisville,  is  a  granddaughter. 

(For  the  families  of  Rachel  Hardman.  and  Effie  Spring- 
ston, see  Hardman  and  .Springston  families.) 

John  Goff,  the  second  son  of  Salathiel,  was  the  first  set- 
tler where  Glenville  now  stands.  Here  his  first  wife,  whose 
name  is  missing,  died,  and  he  married  a  Miss  Richards  for 
his  second.  He  went  to  Kanawha  country,  in  his  old  age, 
where  he  died.  The  children  of  his  first  union  Vv^ere  as  fol- 
lows: Salathiel.  Drusa  (Mrs.  Parson,  of  Roane  county),  and 
Rebecca  (Mrs.  Thomas  Hardman,  of  Roane  county).  The 
children  of  his  last  marriage  w^ere  three  in  number,  one  daugh- 
ter and  two  sons. 

George  G.  Goff,  son  of  Salathiel.  who  w^as  born  on  August 
25,  1782,  and  died  in  July.  1867,  married  his  cousin.  Joanna 
Gofif,  daughter  of  John  T.  Gofl".  (See  Family  of  John  T.  GofT 
for  farther  history.) 

Nancy  Anne  Goff  (daughter  of  Salathiel)  married  ]'>en- 
jamin  Riddel.     (See  Riddel  family.) 

Elizabeth  Goff    (daughter  of  Salathiel)    married   William 


204  ,  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

Stalnaker,  and  came  from  Tucker  county  shortly  after  the 
war  of  1812,  and  settled  on  DeKalb,  in  Gilmer  county.  Their 
two  children  were  Salathiel  and  Xathaniel  Stalnaker,  who 
both  married  and  reared  families  in  Gilmer  county. 

Mary  GofF  (daughter  of  Salathiel)  married  a  man  by  the 
name  of  Mongold,  and  had  one  daughter,  ]\Iary.  She  is  said 
to  have  died  young. 


CHAPTER  XX 


Leatherbarke 

HIS  stream,  which  flows  into  the  South  fork 
of  Hughes  river,  below  Smithville,  took  its 
name  from  the  numerous  growth  of  leather- 
barke upon  its  banks. 

John  Hill. — As  so  many  dates  are  miss- 
ing, we  have  been  unable  to  determine  vvhich 
was  the  first  settler  on  this  creek,  but  this 
distinction  probably  belongs  to  John  Hill,  who  built  his  cabin 
on  the  Alfred  Barr  farm,  at  a  very  early  day. 

Mr.  Hill  was  a  native  of  Harrison  county,  having  been 
born  on  February  8,  17!)() ;  and  on  April  25,  1816,  he  v/as  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Keturah  Cunningham,  daughter  of  Edward,  and 
niece  of  Thomas  Cunningham,  who  was  also  a  native  of  Har- 
rison  county ;  and  from  this  vicinity,  they  went  to  Gilmer 
county,  where  Air.  Hill  fell  asleep,  on  [March  17,  1885,  and 
there  on  the  George  S.  Bush  homestead  (now  the  John  Elli- 
son farm),  beside  his  wife,  he  sleeps. 
Their  children  were  as  follows : 

Celia,  who  became  Mrs.  Wm.  Holbert ;  Anna,  Mrs.  Johii 
S.  Holbert;  Mary,  Mrs.  Hannibal  B.  Wilson;  Daniel,  who 
died  in  his  youth,  all  of  Gilmer  county  ;  and  the  late  Enoch  R. 
Hill,  of  near  Burnt  House,  this  county.  The  family  have  all 
passed  on,  but  among  the  grandsons  and  granddaughters  of 
this  pioneer  are,  Floyd  Hill,  and  Mrs.  Harriet  Fling,  Burnt 
House ;  Moses  Holbert,  Mrs.  Phillip  Engle,  Mrs.  William 
Reeser,  and  quite  a  number  of  others,  of  Gilmer  county. 

Mr.  and  [\Irs.  Flill  were  members  of  the  first  M.  E. 
church  organization  in  this  county,  and  their  descendants  still 
cling  to  this  faith. 

John  Earle  was  the  first  denizen  on  the  late  Eber  Wilson 
homestead — now  the  home  of  Hugh  Ayres.     Fie  was  a  brother 


296  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE    COUXTY 

of  ]\Irs.  Barnes  Smith,  senior,  and  was  of  Harrison  county. 
He  married  Miss  Jemima  Drake,  daughter  of  the  Rev.  John 
Drake,  and  after  she  was  laid  in  the  Alurphy  graveyard,  he 
went  to  Ohio,  but  finally  returned  here  and  died. 

]\Irs.  Susana  Stuart  Bush,  of  Iris,  is  a  descendant  of  his. 

Benjamin  Horner  was  the  second  settler  on  the  ^^'ilson 
farm.  He  was  an  Irishman,  having  been  born  in  "Old  Erin." 
He  married  Aliss  [Mary  ]\Iurphy.  sister  of  the  four  ]\Ivirphy 
Brothers,  and  w^ent  from  here  to  Roane  county,  where  they 
both  fell  asleep.  He  had  a  son,  Benjamin,  by  a  form.er  mar- 
riage, who  went  \\  est  with  A'alentine  Bozarth. 

John  B.  Rogers. —  .\s  these  first  settlers  did  not  remain 
long,  John  B.  Rogers  came  into  possession  of  the  Wilson 
farm  at  an  early  day.  Here  he  remained  for  many  years  :  and 
here  his  wife,  Sarah  Webb  Rogers,  daughter  of  Benjamin 
AA  ebb,  passed  away ;  after  her  death  he  removed  to  the  Dr. 
A.  ]\I.  Edgell  property,  at  Smithville,  where  his  last  moments 
were  spent.    At  Smithville,  beside  his  wife,  he  sleeps. 

His  descendants  in  the  county  are  still  quite  numerous. 
His  children  were  as  follov^'s :  Robert  H.,  the  late  A.  I.  (father 
of  B.  F..  of  Harrisville),  both  of  Calhoun  county;  the  late 
Mrs.  Edraonia  Hardman  (mother  of  Sherman  Hardman,  of 
Hardman  chapel),  the  late  Mrs.  Taylor  Glover  (Drusilla.) 
mother  of  A.  R.  Glover,  of  Mt.  Zion  ;  the  late  Airs.  Elizabeth 
(John)  Elliott,  the  late  Airs.  Aiartha  (Frank)  Elliott,  James, 
who  went  West,  and  John,  who  met  a  tragic  death  at  Webb's 
mill,  while  serving  as  a  Home-guard  during  the  late  Civil  war. 

This  family  are  descended  from  the  pioneer  Rogers'  fam- 
ily of  Harrisville. 

The  Rev.  John  Drake,  whose  interesting  history  will  be 
found  in  a  preceding  chapter,  was  the  pioneer  at  the  mouth 
of  this  stream,  on  land  now  owned  by  W .  A.  Flesher. 

William  Stuart,  junior,  was  the  first  settler  at  Iris,  on  tlic 
farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  his  son,  Robert  Stuart.  He 
married  Aliss  Rachel  Webb,  sister  of  Benjamin  AA'ebb,  and 
came  here  from  the  Glover  farm  at  Smithville,  near  the  year 
1837 :  and  here  they  both  passed  away  in  1850,  and  in  th.e 
Webb's  cemetery,  they  lie  at  rest. 

Air.   Stuart  was  the  son  of  AMlliam   Stuart,  who  settled 


LEATHERBARKE  297 

the  Byrd  farm,  above  Goff's.  and  he  was  a  native  of  the  "Key- 
stone state."  He  was  the  father  of  eleven  children,  all  of 
whom  have  passed  on.  except  Robert  of  Iris.  Xntter  and 
Joseph  died  in  youth,  William  A\'ebb,  and  Anna,  later  in  life: 
John  went  A\'est :  James,  Benjamin,  Mrs.  Martha  (Elisha) 
Smith  (mother  of  Janies  T.  Smith,  of  Burnt  House),  and 
Mrs.  Elizabeth  W'estfall  Hardin,  remained  citizens  of  this 
part  of  the  county;  and  Mrs.  Lydia  (John)  Cain,  lived  on  the 
North  fork  of  Hughes  river. 

Robert  Stuart  is  now  tiie  Iris  post-master  and  merchant. 

John  Solomon  Holbert,  son-in-law  of  John  Hill,  was 
another  early  settler  in  the  Iris  vicinity.  He  went  from  here 
to  Revel,  Gilmer  comity,  where  he  and  his  wife  (nee  Anna 
Hill)  sleep:  and  where  his  descendants  live.  ]\Ioses,  Monroe, 
the  late  James,  Mrs.  Phillip  Engle,  and  Mrs.  William  Reeser, 
all  of  Gilmer  county,  are  his  children.     He  died  in  1901. 

Wilson  Benjamin  Cunningham  was  the  first  denizen  of 
the  forest  in  the  vicinity  of  Eva.  He  was  the  son  of  William 
and  Rebecca  Johnston  Cunningham,  his  mother  being  a 
native  of  New  Jersey,  and  the  grandson  of  Thomas  and 
Phoebe  Cunningham.  His  father  went  from  this  county  to 
Ohio,  near  the  year  1811,  and  later  became  a  prominent  min- 
ister of  the  Ohio  M.  E.  conference :  and  there,  at  Cadiz,  on 
May  12,  l^'l'l,  Wilson  B.  was  born.  He  was  one  of  the  early 
school-teachers  of  the  county,  and  was  an  exhorter  of  the 
Methodist  Episcopal  church. 

On  April  10,  ISIG,  at  Keokuk,  Iowa,  he  was  married  to 
his  cousin,  Miss  Nancy  Hila  Cunningham,  daughter  of  Ben- 
jamin and  Hannah  Riddel  Cunningham ;  and  two  months  later 
they  returned  to  this  county,  and  settled  on  the  James  Fred- 
erick farm,  on  Grass  run  :  and  from  there  removed  to  Eva,  to 
the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  their  son,  John  C,  in  1861, 
where  both  passed  from  earth — he,  on  June  23,  1887  ;  and  she, 
on  June  25,  1908.     Both  rest  at  Hardman  chapel. 

Their  children:  Columbus  died  in  infancy:  Wade  M.. 
in  1875:  Benjamin  E.,  in  '78;  James  AV.,  in  19(»1 ;  John  C.  re- 
sides at  the  old  home:  and  Theodore,  near  by;  Mrs.  Rebecca 
J.  Elder,  is  of  Iris:  and  Airs.  Clara  R.  Wiseman,  of  Richwood. 

William   Cunningham — son  of  Benjamin — who  is   now   a 


298  HISTORY   OF   RITCHIE   COUXTY 

resident  of  Calhoun  county,  was  another  early  settler  at  Eva. 
He  married  Miss  Cathrine  Cross,  daughter  of  Nimrod,  and 
was  the  father  of  four  children:  Sanford  and  Sheridan,  Vic- 
toria, and  ]\Irs.  IMinnie  (George)  Lowther,  of  Calhoun  county. 

John  R.  Cunningham — brother  of  William,  who  is  now 
spending  the  eventide  of  his  life  with  his  daughter,  Mrs.  A. 
H.  Cooper,  in  Gilmer  county,  was  the  first  settler  on  the 
Hildreth  farm,  near  the  site  of  the  "Old  Pleasant  Valley 
church."  He  gave  the  grounds  for  this  church,  which  was 
built  in  1870,  and  which  was  replaced  by  a  frame  structure  in 
190l — the  site  being  moved  farther  up  the  creek. 

]Mr.  Cunningham  resided  here  until  1882,  when  he  pur- 
chased the  homestead  that  he  continued  to  occupy  until  1907, 
when  it  passed  into  the  hands  of  AV.  M.  Nutter.  On  May  20, 
1906,  death  entered  his  home  and  carried  away  his  beloved 
companion,  Mrs.  Frances  J.  Modisette  Cunningham,  who  was 
the  daughter  of  Augustus  and  Dorcas  Modisette,  of  Iris.  She 
sleeps  at  Hardman  chapel. 

His  children :  Asa  L.  resides  at  Columbus,  and  Mrs. 
Lillie  B.  Yates,  at  Center-Belpre,  in  Ohio;  ]\Irs.  Adaline  V. 
(A.  H.)  Cooper,  in  Gilmer  county;  A.  C,  at  Parkersburg ;  and 
Simpson  J.,  at  Eva;  one  daughter  died  in  infancy;  William  S., 
Harrison  G.,  and  Archie  D.,  in  childhood — the  last  two  men- 
tioned sleep  in  the  same  grave  at  Hardman  chapel ;  Julia  and 
Guy  died  in  their  young  man  and  womanhood. 

These  brothers  are  natives  of  this  county,  and  are  the 
grandsons  of  Thomas  and  Phebe  Cunningham. 

George  Washington  Hardman  was  the  first  to  settle  the 
John  R.  Cunningham — now  the  W.  M.  Nutter — farm.  He 
married  Miss  Mary  Ann  Lowther,  daughter  of  Jesse,  of  Corn- 
wallis,  and  took  up  his  residence  here  in  the  early  fifties.  He 
lived  at  various  other  points  in  the  county,  and  finally  died 
at  his  home  below  Burnt  House,  in  1890,  and  ^vas  laid  at  rest 
at  Hardman  chapel  by  the  side  of  his  wife,  who  preceded 
him  to  the  grave  by  a  number  of  years. 

Their  children:  the  late  Mrs.  Marietta  i\\ .  E.  Hill). 
Harrisville ;  Mrs.  Olive  (James)  Rexroad,  Den  run  ;  the  late 
Mrs.  Maggie  (Wm.)  Collins,  of  Cairo;  Mrs.  Emma  Lee, 
Cairo ;  Mrs.  Victoria  Stanley,  Clay  county ;  the  late  Mrs.  Lillie 


LEATHERBARKE  299 

(F.  S.)  Moyer,  Fonsoville;  the  late  Mrs.  Pliebe  Cunningham 
Holstein,  of  Iris ;  the  late  Mrs.  Thomas  Johnson,  and  James 
Hardman,  of  Cantwell. 

.After  the  death  of  his  first  wife,  he  married  Miss  Safronia 
Frederick,  daughter  of  Phillip  Frederick,  and  four  children 
were  born  of  this  union  ;  viz.,  Lloyd,  Frank,  George,  and  Belle. 
The  second  Mrs.  Hardman  has  also  passed  on.  This  pioneer 
belongs  to  the  Hardman  family,  whose  ancestral  history  oc- 
cupies an  earlier  chapter. 

Augustus  Modisette. — Near  the  year  1849,  Augustus 
Modisette  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Dorcas  ^^'ilson  Modisette  (sister 
of  Archibald  A\'ilson),  with  their  family,  came  from  Barbour 
county,  and  took  up  their  residence  near  one  mile  from  the 
present  site  of  the  Iris  post-office.  He  was  of  Irish  descent, 
and  was  an  old  time  school-teacher.  He  died  near  the  year 
187-i,  and  sleeps  at  Hardman  chapel  beside  his  wife,  who  was 
descended  from  the  Wilson  family,  whose  history  appears 
with  the  South  fork  settlers. 

They  were  the  parents  of  four  sons  and  four  daughters : 

AVilliam  lost  his  life  in  battle  in  behalf  of  the  Union 
cause,  in  his  young  manhood.  James  went  to  Ohio,  where  he 
died  at  a  ripe  old  age,  a  few  years  ago,  and  where  his  descend- 
arits  live;  and  Wilson  sleeps  in  Wood  county;  John  resided 
in  Murphy  district  until  a  few  months  since,  vvlien  he  went 
to  AValker  station  ;  Garrison  died  single ;  Frances  was  the  late 
wife  of  John  R.  Gunningham,  of  Eva  ;  the  late  Mrs.  Harriet 
Gooper,  of  Gilmer  county ;  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (John) 
Gollins,  and  the  late  ^Irs.  Mary  Knight — -mother  of  Phillip 
Knight,  of  Galhoun  county,  were  the  other  daughters. 

James  Alexander  Yates  was  another  worthy  pioneer  of 
the  Eva  vicinity.  He  was  born  near  Grafton,  in  1836,  and 
there  grew  to  manhood  and  married  Miss  Sarah  Jane  Rob- 
inson, on  March  10,  184:7 ;  and  ten  years  later  (1857)  they 
came  to  this  county  and  made  the  first  improvement  on  the 
farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  Wilson  B.  Gunningham,  junior; 
and  here  he  passed  from  earth  on  January  3,  1897. 

Airs.  Yates  followed  him  to  the  grave  on  November  82nd, 
of  the  same  year.  Both  had  long  been  pillars  in  the  church 
at  Hardman  chapel,  and  there  they  rest. 


300  HISTORY   OF  RITCHIE   COUNTY 

]\Irs.  Yates  was  born  in  Maryland,  in  1825,  and  witli  her 
parents  removed  to  Taylor  county,  in  1843.  She  was  the 
daughter  of  Owen  Robinson,  who  came  from  England  to  Old 
Town,  V^irginia,  with  his  parents  when  he  was  a  boy,  and 
there  married  Miss  Eleanor  ^Mitchell.  She  was  one  of  a 
family  of  ten  children,  who  have  all  passed  to  the  other  side, 
except  I\Iiss  Helen  Robinson,  of  Parkersburg.  ^Irs.  Ellen 
Ison,  wife  of  the  late  Rev.  Benjamin  Ison,  of  the  West  Vir- 
ginia IMethodist  Episcopal  conference,  was  another  sister. 

]\Ir.  and  Mrs.  Yates  Avere  the  parents  of  eight  children, 
four  of  whom  died  in  infancy.  Philander  Ovren  Yates  died, 
in  1909.  at  his  home  in  Oklahoma,  where  his  family  reside : 
and  the  other  three  survive:  ]\Irs.  Fannie  Cunningham  Kel- 
ley  lives  at  Rhodesdale,  Ohio:  ]\Irs.  Mary  Ellen  (T.  A.)  Hard- 
man,  at  Fonsovilie :  and  Mrs.  Emma  Y.  AVamsley.  at  i'air- 
mont. 

The  Yateses  are  of  German  lineage.  Two  brothers  came 
from  Hesse,  Darmstadt,  in  the  Fatherland,  some  time  before 
the  Revolution,  and  settled  in  the  ^Massachusetts  colon^^ 
One  of  these  brothers.  John  Yates,  took  up  arms  in  defense 
of  his  adopted  country,  and  after  the  struggle  for  Independ- 
ence v>'as  at  an  end.  he  emigrated  to  Virginia,  where  he  re- 
mained until  after  our  second  Avar  with  Great  Britain,  when 
he  removed  to  Taylor  county,  and  purchased  land  for  his 
four  sons,  Lawson,  John,  junior,  Elijah,  and  \Yilliam,  near 
Pruntvtown. 

William  Yates  married  ^vliss  Hilary  Simpson,  and  was  the 
father  of  thirteen  children,  among  whom  was  Alexander 
Yates,  of  Leatherbarke.  The  other  members  of  the  family 
were,  Henry,  who  went  to  Indiana;  Harrison,  the  father  of 
H.  M.  Yates,  of  Center-Belpre,  Ohio ;  Thomas,  Abner.  ]Mrs. 
Elizabeth  Sinsel,  Airs.  Xancy  Derham,  and  I\Irs.  Fannie  Rec- 
tor, who  spent  their  lives  in  their  native  county,  Taylor :  and 
Mary,  who  died  in  youth  :  the  rest  died  in  childhood. 

The  Bealls. — Another  family  Avhose  interests  have  been 
identified  with  this  creek  since  1847,  is  that  of  the  late  John 
Beall.  who  made  his  settlement  where  his  son,  Charles  F. 
Beall,  now  resides,  and  here  he  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life. 


LEA  THERBARKE  [\0 1 

The  homestead  of  his  son  James  S.,  and  the  estate  of  his  late 
son,  Wilson,  also  belong  to  the  original  tract  here. 

yir.  Beall  was  of  Scotch-Irish  descent.  He  was  born  in 
Tucker  county,  (AV.)  Virginia,  in  1817 ;  and  when  he  was 
still  in  his  cradle,  his  parents,  John  and  Patricia  Holbert  Beall, 
came  to  Gilmer  coitnty  (1818),  and  settled  at  the  mouth  of 
Cedar  creek.  Here  Mr.  Beall  sleeps,  and  his  venerable  vAie 
found  a  resting-place  on  the  Joseph  Frederick  homestead,  in 
this  county,  beside  her  son,  AVilson,  and  her  daughter,  Xancy. 
The  other  daughter  was  Maria,  who  married  John  Holbert, 
and  Avent  West,  where  she  lies  at  rest. 

John  Beall,  junior — the  Leatherbarke  pioneer — married 
Miss  Leah  Hardman,  daughter  of  the  late  Rev.  James  Hard- 
man,  in  1840,  and  first  settled  on  the  E.  R.  Tibbs  farm,  at 
Gofif's.  He  later  removed  to  the  Frederick's  mill  vicinity,  and 
from  there  (the  AA\  G.  Lowther  farm),  to  Leatherbarke,  where 
he  passed  from  earth  on  January  20,  1880. 

His  wife  survived  until  September  10,  1902,  when  she 
was  laid  by  his  side,  on  the  old  homestead. 

Their  children  were  fourteen  in  number :  Thomas  and 
Henry  died  in  infancy;  Dorcas,  at  the  age  of  eleven  years. 
The  rest  all  lived  to  rear  families:  Wilson  A.,  Mrs.  Abigail 
C.  Cooper,  and  ]\Irs.  Phebe  (Jacob)  Alinear,  S.  M.,  and  M.  T., 
have  all  passed  on;  James  S.,  C.  F.,  and  ]\Irs.  J.  L.  Gill,  are 
all  of  Leatherbarke,  M.  A.,  of  Clay  county,  and  J.  X.,  of  Lin- 
coln, Xebraska. 

The  Bealls  are  quite  numerous  in  different  parts  of  the 
State.  Those  in  Gilmer,  Braxton,  Lewis,  and  Clay  counties 
are  of  this  family,  John  Beall,  senior,  having  four  brothers, 
from  whom  they  are  descended. 

Eva  Founded. — John  L.  Gill  was  the  first  merchant  and 
post-master  at  Eva.  His  store  came  into  existence  in  Janu- 
ary, 1894,  and  the  post-office  v/as  established  the  same  year. 

Mr.  Gill  was  born  in  Marshall  county,  on  March  33,  1861, 
and  with  his  parents  came  to  Leatherbarke  in  X'ovember,  1879. 
On  August  5,  1883,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Florence  L.  Beall, 
and  six  children  are  the  result  of  this  union  :  Eva  AL  is  the 
wife  of  C.  A.  Daily,  of  Hardman  chapel ;  Leslie  A.  is  married, 
also ;  Miss  Lulu  lies  in  the  churchyard  at  Hardman  chapel ; 


302  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

and  John  A.,  Bernie  A\'.,  and  Irene  E.  are  at  home.  Ylr.  Gill 
was  a  soldier  of  the  Spanish-American  war. 

The  Gills  have  been  leading  citizens  of  this  community 
for  more  than  thirty  years,  they  having  come  here  from  j\Iar- 
shall  county.  The  late  Andrew  and  ]\Irs.  Anna  Birch  Gill 
were  the  heads  of  this  family  which  consisted  of  the  foliov/- 
ing  named  members,  besides  John  L.  Gill :  Bruce.  William, 
the  late  James  and  George,  the  late  Airs.  Irene  (Frankj  Bush. 
Mrs.  C.  F.  Zickafoose,  j\Irs.  Josephine  (M.  R. )  Osbourne.  are 
all  of  this  part  county ;  Airs.  George  Hildreth,  of  Cairo ;  Mrs. 
Agnes  Rule,  of  Ohio;  JNIrs.  Susana  Furguson,  Gilmer  county; 
Airs.  Lizzie  Dobbins,  Alarshall  county,  and  Aliss  Cora,  avIio 
lies  in  the  quiet  churchyard,  with  her  parents. 

The  Iris  post-office  is  perhaps  eight  or  ten  years  younger 
than  the  one  at  Eva,  and  Robert  Stuart  was  the  first  post- 
maste-r  here.  Leatherbarke  is  famous  for  its  numerous  stores, 
and  oil  developments  are  in  progress  on  its  head  waters. 


CHAPTER  XXI 


Indian  Creek  Settled 


LI  WATKINS,  John  AyreS,  and  Thomas 
Stanley  were  the  first  pioneers  on  this  creek, 
they  having  found  homes  near  the  mouth,  as 
early  as  ISIO  ;  and  John  Starr,  (before  men- 
tioned.) was  the  first  settler  on  its  head 
waters,  near  this  same  time. 

Of  \A'atkins'  history,  we  know  nothing, 
except  that  he  was  the  son-in-law  of  Thomas  Stanley  and  the 
brother-in-law  of  John  Ayres. 

Mr.  Ayres  came  from  Rockbridge  county,  Virginia,  in 
1810.  and  built  his  cabin  near  the  present  site  of  the  Phillips' 
school  house,  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  S.  C.  Phil- 
lips. He  enjoyed  the  distinction  of  being  the  first  school 
teacher  in  the  Hughes  river  valley,  aiid  his  history  will  appear 
more  at  length  with  the  schools. 

•^Thomas  Stanley  made  his  settlement  on  the  D.  M.  V. 
Phillips'  homestead — adjoining  Mr.  Ayres.  He  was  a  native 
of  "Old  Erin,"  but  came  here  from  Virginia — the  time  of  his 
coming  being  variously  stated,  from  1810  to  1830 — and  re- 
mained until  he  was  laid  on  the  hillside,  in  tSfiO. 

He  was  the  father  of  John  Stanley,  who  married  Ellen 
Ayres,  daughter  of  John  x^yres,  and  resided  on  the  old  home- 
stead until  he,  too,  found  a  resting  place  upon  the  hillside ; 
then  his  brother.'  James  resided  here  until  the  farm  became 
the  propert}-  of  D.  AI.  V.  Phillips,  late  in  the  sixties  or  early 
in  the  seventies.  The  other  sons  were:  AA'illiam.  who  was 
killed  at  Beverly  on  July  4,  1863.  while  serving  as  a  Union 
soldier;  Adam  and  Thomas,  died  in  Wood  county;  and  Mrs. 
Margaret  Taylor,  and  Mrs.  Bridget  Parks,  in  Roane  county ; 
and  Mrs.   Marv    (Eli)    W'atkins,  in   this  county.     These  chil- 


304  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

dren  have  all  passed  on,  but  among  the  grandchildren  are, 
Joseph  Stanley,  Petroleum,  the  oldest  living  descendant; 
Daniel,  and  William  Stanley,  Mrs.  Phebe  Lewis,  and  Mrs. 
Mary  Jenkins,  of  ^Mellin.  John  and  Flavins  Stanley,  of  Slab 
and  Indian  creek,  respectively,  are  great-grand  sons. 

The  Stanleys  were  Indian  fighters  and  were  honest,  in- 
dustrious pioneers. 

Daniel  Ayres,  son  of  John  and  father  of  "Dick"  Ayres, 
of  Island  run,  made  the  first  improvement  on  the  farm  that  is 
now  the  property  of  the  late  Asa  Flesher's  heirs,  near  Mahone. 
He  first  married  a  Aliss  Brown,  of  Virginia,  and  had  one 
daughter,  Lizzie,  who  became  the  ^vife  of  Charles  Ayres,  and 
went  lo  Indiana  ;  and  two  sons,  Charles  and  Jeremiah,  who 
also  went  AVest. 

His  second  wife  was  Aliss  Tabitha  Tingler,  daughter  of 
Henry  Tingler,  and  their  children  were,  "Dick,"  Jackson,  and 
Mack  Ayres,  Mrs.  Sarah  (Daniel)  Stanley,  Mrs.  India  Pollock, 
and  jNIrs.  i\Iary  Rinehart  Wiant  Kennedy  of  Smithville. 

Air.  Ayres  died  on  his  home  farm  and  there  his  ashes  lie. 

Jacob  Wolfe  was  the  first  to  find  a  home  on  Plum  run,  in 
this  section,  which  is  now  a  noted  oil  center.  He  was  born  in 
Northern  Germany,  on  January  10,  1816,  and  there  learned 
the  blacksmith's  trade  ;  and  when  he  was  still  but  a  lad,  he 
crossed  to  America,  and  followed  this  trade.  In  1855,  he  was 
married  to  Miss  IMargaret  Weinreich,  daughter  of  Christopher 
Weinreich,  and  sister  of  the  late  Lewis,  of  Mahone,  who  Avas 
also  born  in  the  Fatherland,  but  who,  with  her  father  and 
brothers  came  to  Eaton,  in  Wood  county,  in  her  early  woman- 
hood, where  her  father  soon  passed  away,  and  where  he 
sleeps.     Her  mother  sleeps  across  the  sea  in  the  homeland. 

The  marriage  took  place  at  AVheeling,  and  in  Barbour 
county  they  resided  imtil  1857,  when  they  came  to  this  county, 
and  settled  on  the  homestead  that  is  now  occupied  by  their 
son,  L.  P.  Wolfe  ;  and  in  this  vicinity  they  still  survive,  though 
the  weight  of  ninety-three  years  is  upon  Mr.  AVolfe. 

Their  children  are  as  follows :  L.  P.,  Charles,  and  John 
Wolfe,  and  Mrs.  A.  A.  Scott,  all  of  Mahone ;  Mary  married  L. 
B.  Scott,  who  recently  removed  from  Mahone  to  Clarksburg, 
and  after  her  death,  her  sister,  Amelia,  became  the  wife  of  L. 


INDIAN  CREEK  SETTLED  305 

B.  Scott ;  Lena  was  the  late  Mrs.  N.  D.  Bailey,  of  Harclman 
chapel ;  JMargaret  first  married  Silas  Smith,  and  after  his  death, 
L.  H.  Carder,  of  Iris;  Miss  Addie  is  now  a  physician,  of  Pitts- 
burg-. 

Jacob  Sinnett  made  the  first  improvement  where  his 
grandson,  Dr.  C.  W.  Rexroad,  now  lives,  and  from  here  he 
passed  to  his  eternal  home.  He  was  the  son  of  Patrick,  and 
his  wife  was  Miss  Elizabeth  Rexroad,  daughter  of  the  late 
Heniy  Rexroad,  of  Harrisville.  Side  by  side  they  slumber  on 
the  Charles  Mo3"er  farm,  on  Den  run. 

Their  children  Vv'ere  :  Henry  R.  Sinnett,  of  Missouri ;  Mrs. 
Phebe  (Zebulon)  Rexroad,  and  the  late  Mrs.  Cambyses 
(Sarah)  Lowther. 

James  Drake  was  the  pioneer  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the 
home  of  the  County  infirm,  he  having  come  here  some  time 
between  ISIO,  and  '20.  Pie  was  the  son  of  the  Rev.  John 
Drake,  and  the  son-in-law  of  Patrick  Sinnett,  his  wife  being 
Miss  Elizabeth  Sinnett.  He  was  a  veteran  of  the  war  of  1812, 
and  his  widow  drew  a  pension  of  twelve  dollars  a  month  until 
her  death  in  1884,  at  the  age  of  eighty-six  years. 

Near  1825  or  '30,  James  Drake  built  the  first  saw-mill  on 
Indian  creek — the  site  of  this  mill  being  near  the  Isaac  Wil- 
son residence. 

He  and  his  wife  were  the  parents  of  twelve  children,  five 
of  whom  reached  the  years  of  maturity:  Mrs.  Phebe  (\'\''m.) 
Moats,  Mrs.  Katharine  (Otha)  Zickafoose,  the  late  Mrs. 
Agnes  (Jacob)  Layfield ;  Wm.  Drake,  who  married  the  daugh- 
ter of  Barcus  Ayres,  and  went  West;  and  Patrick,  who  mar- 
ried a  Miss  Keener,  and  was  the  father  of  the  late  3ilrs.  Ella 
Prey,  of  Harrisville  ;  and  of  Charles  Drake,  of  Hardman  chapel. 
The  "County  farm"  was  Mrs.  Drake's  third  of  her  husband's 
estate  and  she  sold  it  to  the  county  for  this  purpose. 

John  Sinnett  was  the  first  to  mark  the  forest  in  the  vichi- 
ity  of  Jackson's  store.  He  erected  his  dwelling  on  the  farm 
that  is  now  the  Dr.  J.  H.  Snyder  estate,  at  the  foot  of  King- 
Knob  hill,  near  the  year  1824. 

He  was  a  son  of  Patrick  Sinnett,  and  a  native  of  Pendle- 
ton county,  having  been  born  on  November  12,  1787.  He  mar- 
ried Miss  Elizaljeth  R.  Propst,  of  the  same  county,  and  they 


306  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

settled  on  the  Black  Thorn  creek  for  a  few  3'ears  after  their 
marriage,  before  coming  to  Ritchie  county.  He  erected  the 
first  and  only  powder-mill  that  was  ever  in  this  section,  and 
engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  powder  for  a  few  years — until 
the  mill  was  carried  away  by  a  flood,  and  was  never  rebuilt. 

He  went  from  here  to  Roane  county,  where  he  and  his 
wife  rest  side  by  side.  She  having  passed  on  in  1843,  and  he, 
in  1869. 

Their  children  were:  Harmon,  of  Chevauxdefrise ;  Abel 
P..  of  Kanawha  countv ;  Henrv,  of  this  countv :  and  Samuel, 
and  Joseph  (twins),  of  Roane  county. 

Abel  Sinnett  succeeded  his  brother,  John,  on  the  Snyder 
farm,  at  the  foot  of  King  Knob  hill,  and  there  he  continued 
to  reside  until  he  was  laid  in  the  Indian  creek  Baptist  church- 
yard, in  July,  1873. 

He  was  the  owner  of  the  first  saw-mill  in  this  section, 
the  site  of  which  is  now  marked  by  the  Plammer  hotel.  He 
married  Miss  Elizabeth  Stuart,  and  was  the  father  of — Mrs. 
Belinda  (Thomas)  Hill,  of  AA'ashburn  :  ]\Irs.  Sarah  J.  (Law- 
son)  Hall,  of  Auburn  ;  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (W.  T.)  ]\Ioats, 
of  Indian  creek:  Mrs.  Margaret  (Lewis)  Hammer,  Wash- 
burn ;  the  late  Mrs.  Kathrine  (James)  Moats,  Indian  creek : 
and  George  AV.  Sinnett,  Jackson  county. 

John  Webb. — Xear  the  year  1841,  John  Webb  came  from 
Rockbridge  county,  Virginia,  and  became  the  pioneer  of  Den 
run,  making  his  settlement  on  the  farm  that  he  occupied  until 
his  death,  on  July  13,  1875  ;  and  the  one  wdiich  is  now  the  home 
of  his  granddaughter,  Mrs.  Sarah  L.  Simmons. 

Mr.  Webb  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Isenhour,  and  was  the 
father  of  eight  children,  who  were  all  born  in  the  "Old  Domin- 
ion :"  Henry,  Phebe,  and  Michael  married  and  remained  there, 
and  the  other  five  came  to  this  county  with  their  parents — 
William.  James,  and  Addison,  remained  here;  i\Iary  became 
the  wife  oi  Xoah  Boston,  and  went  to  Illinois  ;  Lucinda.  mar- 
ried Henry  Fulwider,  and  went  to  Indiana. 

The  older  generation  have  now  all  passed  on,  but  among 
the-  grandchildren  that  are  still  here  are:  ]\Irs.  A\*ashington 
Isner,  Mrs.  Mary  Snyder,  and  Airs.  Simmons  above  men- 
tioned, and  Isaiah  Webb,  all  of  the  Washburn  \  icinity. 


INDIAN  CREEK  SETTLED  307 

The  Webbs  were  the  donors  of  the  ground,  and  were 
among  the  chief  buihJers,  of  the  Den  run  M.  P.  church,  which 
bears  their  name,  "Webb's  chapeL"  And  here  they  sleep,  on 
the  old  homestead. 

Silas  Pettit  made  the  first  improvement  in  the  extreme 
head  of  the  creek,  where  J.  O.  Nay  now  lives,  near  the  year 
1843.  The  place  of  his  nativity  was  near  Fairmont,  in  Marion 
county,  and  the  date  of  his  birth  was  January  27,  1821.  His 
wife  was  Miss  fviziah  Weaver,  daughter  of  Joseph  Weas'er, 
and  their  family  consisted  of  fourteen  children.  They  re- 
moved from  the  Nay  farm  to  the  Big  Bend,  in  Calhoun  coun- 
ty, in  1850,  and  there  remained  until  death  claimed  Mrs.  Pettit 
some  time  in  the  nineties.  Then  in  1897,  he  was  married  to 
Mrs.  Jane  Williams,  and  with  her  spent  his  closing  hours  in 
Wirt  county,  in  1899,  but  he  rests  beside  the  wife  of  his  youth 
at  the  Big  Bend. 

His  children  were : 

The  late  Mrs.  Arzana  (D.  M.  V.)  Phillips,  and  the  late 
Mrs.  Clarissa  (Albert)  Johnson,  both  of  Smithville ;  Mrs.  In- 
diana (B.  F.)  Prince;  Mellin ;  Mrs.  Martha  (A.  I.)  Rogers, 
Harrisville;  Mrs.  Amanda  (Henry)  Devees,  Mingo,  Ohio; 
Frances  married  Ephraim  Bee,  and  after  her  death  at  Cam- 
bridge, Nebraska,  her  sister,  Huldah,  became  the  wife  of  Mr. 
Bee;  Joseph  Pettit  is  of  Ohio;  A.  J.,  of  Mellin:  Aaron,  and 
Benjamin,  of  Calhoun  county;  and  Henrietta,  Willie  and  Mary 
died  in  youth. 

Thomas  Hoover  was  an  early  settler  on  Dog  run,  a  small 
tributary  of  Indian  creek.  He  came  here  from  Pendleton 
county  near  1844,  and  established  his  home  on  the  head  of  the 
stream,  where  Peter  Jones  now  lives,  he  having  purchased 
this  tract  of  woodland  of  Henry  Rexroad.  He  later  purchased 
adjoining  tracts,  until  his  territory  numbered  four  hundred 
forty-five  acres.  He  sold  the  original  tract  to  Peter  Simmons, 
early  in  the  fifties,  and  the  other  tracts,  to  later  settlers  from 
Pendleton  county. 

He  gave  the  grounds  for  the  Spruce  Grove  M.  E.  church, 
deeding  it  to  the  trustees  and  their  successors  (William  and 
Conrad  Mullenax  and  A\'illiam  and  Isaac  Cokeley  being  the 
original  trustees). 


308  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Pie  afterwards  patented  two  tracts  of  land  on  the  waters 
ofDevii  Hole,  Indian  and  Elm  runs  (696  acres  in  all),  which 
is  now  Owned  by  the  John  Simmon's  heirs,  and  the  Layfields. 
lie  went  from  this  county  to  Wood,  and  later  to  ^Missouri, 
wdiere  he  died. 

He  married  Miss  Frances  Rexroad,  sister  of  Zachariah 
Rexroad,  and  was  the  father  of  ten  children:  AA'illiam, 
^lichael,  Daniel,  Washington,  Charles,  Henry,  Jacob,  Jane, 
and  ]\Iary,  who  became  ]\Irs.  Samuel  Sinnett,  of  Indian  creek; 
]\Iichael,  Xoah,  Washinoton,  and  Henrv  were  Union  soldier*^ 
of  the  Civil  war.  Part  of  the  family  went  AA'est,  and  John, 
and  Jefferson,  of  near  Cokeley's,  are  the  only  families  of  this 
name  in  the  county,  that  are  descended  from  Thomas.  They 
are  the  sons  of  William  and  Emily  Cunningham  Hoover. 
Grant  and  Herbert  Hoover,  who  are  well-known  among  the 
young  teachers  of  the  county,  are  the  sons  of  JefTerson. 

Later  Settlers. — In  the  forties  and  the  early  fifties  quite 
a  colony  of  substantial  citizens  came  from  Pendleton  county 
and  found  homes  on  the  waters  of  Indian  creek,  w^here  their 
descendants  still  reside.  This  colony  were  all  of  German  de- 
scent, and  all  spent  the  remainder  of  their  lives  here. 

Jacob  Hammer. — Among  the  first  of  these  to  arrive  was 
Jacob  Hammer,  who  settled  where  Miller  I.  Hill  now  lives, 
some  time  in  the  forties.  He  married  ]\Iiss  Phebe  ]\Ioyer,  sis- 
ter of  James  ]\Ioyer,  and  on  their  old  homestead,  they  sleep. 
Their  children  are  as  follows :  Samuel,  who  died  in  the  An- 
dersonville  prison  during  the  war ;  and  LcAvis  and  George,  of 
'Washburn,  who  w^ere  also  Union  soldiers ;  Jacob  died  in 
childhood,  and  Leonard,  in  his  young  manhood  ;  ]\Iary  mar- 
ried Peter  Zickafoose,  and  went  to  Kansas ;  Sarah  is  the  widow 
of  T.  Benton  Rexroad,  of  AA^ashburn ;  ^Irs.  Louisa  Laird 
Friedle}',  and  Airs.  Phebe  (AI.  I.)  Hill,  are  of  Spruce  Grove. 

James  Meyer  and  his  wife,  ]\Irs.  Abigail  Rexroad  Moyer 
— daughter  of  Zachariah  Rexroad — w^ere  the  next  arrivals  in 
1849.  They  settled  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of 
their  late  son,  Charles,  and  here  they  sleep.  'Sirs.  Kathrine 
( !'.  R.)  Tharpe,  of  Harrisville,  is  the  only  survivor  of  the 
family  ;  the  sons,  Charles,  Edmond,  and  James,  who  died  in 
cliildhood,  having  all  passed  on. 


INDIAN  CREEK  SETTLED  :300 

/' 
Peter  Moyer  and  his  wife,  ]\Irs.  Louisia  Rexroad  Mover, 

found  a  permanent  home  on  Den  run,  where  Mr.  Moyer  still 

survives,   though   Mrs.   Moyer  has  been   sleeping-  on  the  old 

homestead  for  a  number  of  years.     He  is  a  brother  of  the  late 

James  Moyer,  and  his  family  are:     Lewis,  Frank,  Ellsworth, 

Graiit,  Charles,  and  JMrs.  Mary  (Samuel)  Moats. 

Amos  Jones  was  another  member  of  the  Pendleton  colony. 
He  married  Miss  Phebe  Simmons,  daughter  of  Peter,  and  set- 
tled where  his  son,  Samuel,  now  lives,  in  1854.  Here  he  and 
his  wife  passed  from  earth,  and  on  the  Peter  Moyer  homestead, 
they  He  at  rest. 

Their  children:     Peter  M.,  and  Samuel,  Harrisville;  Mrs. 

Katharine  (Lee)  Parker,  Wood  county;  and  Mrs.  Delia , 

Ohio. 

Peter  Simmons  and  Jacob  Crun.imett,  with  their  families, 
arrived  in  185L 

Mr.  Simmons  bought  an  improvement  of  Thomas  Ploover. 
and  settled  where  Peter  M.  Jones  now  lives.  He  married 
Miss  Sarah  Moyer — sister  of  James  and  Peter,  and  side  by 
side  they'  sleep  on  the  Peter  Moyer's  homestead.  Their  chil- 
dren were — Mrs.  Amos  (Phebe)  Jones;  Mrs.  Jacob  Crummett, 
and  Aaron  Simmons,  Den  run;  Mrs.  Sydney  Jordan,  Macfar- 
lan  ;  the  late  Mrs.  A.  A\'.  (Mary)  Zickafoose,  Harrisville  ;  and 
the  late  Mrs.  Sarah  (A.  W.)  Zickafoose,  and  Abigail,  who  was 
drowned  in  childhood. 

Jacob  Crummett  purchased  two  hundred  one  acres  of  land 
at  three  dollars  twenty-five  cents  an  acre,  and  established  his 
heme  on  the  farm  that  is  now  his  estate,  though  unoccupied. 

His  father,  Jacob  Crummett,  senior,  and  his  mother.  Al>i- 
gail  Rexroad,  were  both  of  German  lineage;  and,  in  Pendle- 
ton county,  he  was  born  on  March  19,  1826. 

He  united  with  the  Lutheran  church  in  his  boyhood,  but 
was  an  adherent  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  faith  for 
the  last  forty-five  years  of  his  life,  and  was  an  exhorter  in  the 
church. 

On  May  15,  1855,  he  was  united  in  marriage  with  Miss 
Mahala  Simmons,  daughter  of  Peter  Simmons,  and  three  sons 
and  one  daughter  were  the  result  of  this  union  :  George  F. 
Crummett  and  Mrs.   Margaret  (Levi)    Moreton  live  near  the 


310  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

old  home ;   Alartin  J.,  is  of  Huntington,  and   the   Rev.   S.   P. 
Crummett,  of  Parkersburg. 

i\Ir.  Crummett  died  on  P'ebruary  4,  1907J  and  was  laid  in 
the  Fairview  churchyard,  on  Devil  Hole,  and  Airs.  Crummett 
lives  with  her  daughter. 

Simon  P.  Crummett. — The  careei'  of  the  Rev.  Simon  P. 
Crummett  merits  more  than  a  passing  notice,  as  he  is  now  a 
distinguished  pulpit  orator  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church. 

The  Rev.  Air.  Crummett  was  born  on  the  old  homestead, 
not  far  from  Harrisville,  on  March  5,  1857,  and  began  life  for 
himself  as  a  school-teacher  in  the  rural  districts  of  his  native 
county,  and  continued  in  this  profession  for  twelve  years.  A 
part  of  this  time  he  filled  the  office  of  assessor — holding  this 
office  for  eight  years. 

In  188(3,  he  entered  the  ministry,  taking  work  as  a  sup- 
ply; and  joined  the  West  Virginia  conference,  the  following 
year.  He  served  as  pastor  of  the  Volcano,  Elizabeth,  West 
Union,  Belleville,  Guyandotte,  and  Kingwood  charges,  and  the 
Wesley  chapel,  at  Wheeling,  before  being  appointed  as  Pre- 
siding Elder  of  the  Buckhannon  district  in  1899 — a  position 
which  he  filled  for  five  years.  He  was  then  transferred  to  the 
Presiding-eldership  of  the  Parkersburg  district,  and  has  just 
completed  his  term  of  six  years  in  this  capacity  under  the 
changed  name  of  "District  Superintendent."     (1910.) 

On  October  5,  1882,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Laura  J. 
Douglass,  daughter  of  the  late  John,  and  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Marsh 
Douglass,  who  was  born  near  Cairo  on  August  3,  1861,  and 
two  sons,  Aubrey  and  Paul,  are  the  fruits  of  this  union. 

Sampson  Zickafoose  was  also  identified  among  the  set- 
tlers from  Pendleton  county,  he  having  arrived  here  some  time 
during  the  forties,  and  located  just  above  the  present  site  of 
the  Den  run  church,  where  he  died  on  March  20,  1885,  at  the 
age  of  ninety-three  years. 

His  last  resting  place  is  marked  in  the  Alt.  Zion  church- 
yard. 

He  married  a  Aliss  Wade,  and  they  were  the  parents  of 
the  following  named  children  : 

Otho,  Peter,  and  Asbury  Zickafoose,  Airs.  Nimrod  Kuy- 


INDIAN  CREEK  SETTLED  3il 

cleiulall,  who  went  West;  Airs.  Wm.  T.  Mitchell.  Airs.  James 
Westfali,  and  Mrs.  Phebe  White. 

Dr.  S.  H.  Zickafoose,  of  Harrisvilie,  is  a  granclsoti  of  Mr. 
Zickafoose,  and  all  the  other  families  of  the  name  in  the  coitntv 
are  his  descendants. 

An  Interesting  Reminiscence. — A  thrilling  reminiscence 
of  the  "ante-bellum  days,"  whicli  comes  into  our  possession 
through  a  gentleman  who  was  known  to  the  facts  herein 
recorded,  will  doubtless  add  interest  to  the  conclusion  of  this 
chapter : 

In  the  year  1856,  on  the  left  bank  of  this  stream  near  one- 
half  mile  below  the  Phillips  school-house,  stood  an  old  grist- 
mill of  the  pioneer  order,  which  was  designed  solely  for  the 
purpose  of  manufacturing  corn  meal  for  the  convenience  of 
the  citizens  of  the  neighborhood  ;  and  under  this  same  roof 
was  an  "up-and-down  saw,"  which  turned  the  timber  into 
lumber  for  flooring  purposes,  etc.,  for  the  log  houses. 

This  old  mill  was  probably  built  by  Barcus  Ayres,  whose 
name  has  already  found  a  place  in  this  history,  but.  however, 
this  may  have  been,  while  it  was  playing  its  part  well  in  the 
affairs  of  the  community,  a  man  by  the  name  -of  Sylvester 
Rush,  of  Pennsylvania,  appeared  upon  the  scene,  and  pur- 
chased this  mill. 

He,  being  a  man  of  considerable  shrewdness  and  enter- 
prise, soon  decided  that,  from  a  financial  standpoint,  the  manu- 
facture of  corn  into  liquid  form  would  be  far  more  profitable 
than  that  of  meal,  so  he  turned  this  peaceful  old  mill  into  a 
distillery,  and  it  now  became  the  favorite  resort  of  "swine," 
both  quadruped  and  "biped." 

The  former  growing  fat  upon  the  grain  that  remained 
after  the  alcohol  had  been  extracted,  and  the  latter,  "guzzling 
the  swill  that  was  distilled  through  the  'worm,'  all  the  while 
growing  poorer  and  more  like  his  four-footed  companions." 

The  price  was  low,  and  the  proprietor  of  the  establish- 
ment would  gladly  exchange  his  liquor  for  corn,  wheat,  or 
any  of  the  commodities  of  the  day,  so  that  it  w^as  no  difficult 
task  for  any  one  to  obtain  the  desired  quantity ;  and  it  was 
no  uncommon  sight  to  see  a  weary,  way-worn  traveler  with  a 
sack  of  corn  on  his  back,  going  toward  the  mill,  and  to  see 


312  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

him  returning  laden  with  jugs,  bottles,  coffee-pots  or  tin- 
buckets  of  the  "stuff." 

It  did  not  seem  to  be  an  illicit  business,  either,  as  it  was 
carried  on  openly  without  interference  from  the  law,  and  it 
seemed  to  grow  and  to  prosper  until  it  was  suddenly  wiped 
out  of  existence  by  the  power  of  an  unseen  "Hand." 

Dnring  the  spring  of  1858  or  '59,  Mr.  Rush  was  joined  by 
his  iirother,  Samuel,  who  had  recently  returned  from  the 
"gold-fields"  of  California,  and  together,  they  were  laying 
their  plans  for  a  more  extensive  manufacture  of  the  "soul  de- 
stroying stuff,"  when  these  plans  were  suddenly  foiled,  and 
their  unholy  work  came  to  an  ignominious  end. 

It  was  during  the  month  of  April  in  one  of  these  years, 
amidst  a  flood-tide  in  the  creek,  that  Sylvester  Rush,,  being 
interested  in  some  rafted  timber  that  he  wished  to  market  at 
a  certain  point  down  the  river,  secured  the  services  of  Asa  G. 
Dilworth  as  pilot,  and  with  his  brother.  Samuel,  set  out  with 
his  raft. 

The}'  proceeded  without  incident  until  tliey  had  reached 
the  Little  Kanawha  river,  when  the  raft  became  unmanage- 
able, and  though  the  three  men  worked  frantically  to  bring 
it  to  shore  for  the  night,  their  efforts  were  all  in  vain — the}'- 
were  carried  into  the  Ohio  river.  A  cold  north  wind  was 
blowing  and  soon  one  of  the  brothers  dropped  down  exhausted, 
an.d  became  so  benumbed  that  he  was  unable  to  rise.  The 
other  brother  went  to  his  assistance,  and  not  returning  to  his 
post  of  duty,  Mr.  Dilworth  groped  about  in  the  darkness  until 
he  found  them  lying  apparently  asleep,  but  kneeling  down  so 
that  he  could  examine  them  more  closely,  he  found  to  his 
horror  that  both  were  dead. 

By  this  time,  he,  too,  was  so  benumbed  with  the  cold 
that  he  was  unable  to  rise  from  his  knees,  and  there  bending 
over  the  lifeless  forms  of  his  unfortunate  companions,  he 
fought  with  all  his  might  against  the  stupor  that  threatened 
to  render  his  bod}'  as  pulseless  as  theirs,  until  the  coming 
light,  when  he  was  just  able  to  signal  some  one  on  shore,  who 
came  to  his  rescue  at  a  timely  moment. 

Dihvorth,  however,  recovered  sufficiently  to  accompany 
the  remains  of  the  Rushes  back  to  their  home,  but  he  long 


INDIA.\   CREEK  SETTLED  313 

remembered  the  horror  of  that  awful  experience — perhaps,  to 
life's  last  hour. 

These  unfortunate  brothers  were  laid  at  rest  in  the 
Haught  burying-ground,  on  this  creek,  but  a  few  days  after 
their  interment,  their  father  arrived  from  Pennsylvania,  and 
carried  their  remains,  with  those  of  one  of  Sylvester  Rush's 
children,  back  to  their  old  home,  and  the  bereaved  family  of 
Sylvester  went  along,  and  thus  the  Rushes,  both  dead  and  liv- 
ing, passed  out  of  the  history  of  tliis  county. 

This  was  the  death  blow  to  the  distillery  business  on  tliir, 
creek,  an  attempt  was  made  a  little  later  to  revive  the  v/ork. 
but  without  success,  and  the  fixtures  were  hauled  away,  and 
our  informant  says  that  so  far  as  he  knows  no  other  such  an 
attempt  has  since  been  made  within  the  bounds  of  the  county. 
As  this  county  has  ever  stood  firm  against  licensing  such 
"dens  of  iniquity." 

in  incidents  like  this  one  can  hardly  fail  to  recognize  the 
over-ruling  power  of  an  Omnipotent  Hand.  And  how  grate- 
ful we  should  be  that  a  protecting  power  has  frowned  upon 
the  licensing  of  this  greatest  curse  of  the  Iranian  race  in  our 
midst  through  all  these  years ;  and  let  us  hope  that  the  his- 
torian of  the  next  century  can  still  hand  this  record  down  to 
generations  yet  unborn. 

We  had  scarcely  been  able  to  realize  tlie  blessing  of  the 
anti-license  policy  tmtil,  a  short  time  since  when  beyond  its 
influence,  we  were  compelled  to  listen  to  the  riotous  voice  of 
this  evil  under  the  sanction  of  law. 


314  fflSTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

"Let  us  hold  fast  our  iategrity" 

One   says: 
"It's  nothing  to  me! 

I  have  no  fear  my  boy  will  tread 
The    downward    road    of   sin  and  shame, 

And  crush  my  heart  and  darken  his  name; 

But— 

"Is  it  nothing  to  us  to  idly  sleep, 

While  the  cohorts   of  death  their  vigils  keep; 
To  gather  the  young  and  thoughtless  in, 

And  grind  in  our  midst  a  grist  of  sin?" 
"Yet,  it  is  something  for  us  to  stand. 

And  clasp  by  faith  our  Father's  hand 
To   learn  to   labor  live  and  fight 

On  the  side  of  God  and  changeless  right." 


M  ti)\B  IGtltlr  (Earner  3  J^lant 


to 


of 


iig  Angd  iMntl|0r 


Mrs.   Jennie   Kendall   Lowther. 


"She  died  in  the  beauty  of   her   youth,    and    in    my 
memory   she   will   always   be    young   and    beautiful." 


CHAPTER  XXII 


Chevauxdefrise  Settled 


wo    traditions    are    in    existence    as    to    the 

origin  of  the  name  of  this  stream.     The  first 

is  that  a  piece  of  wood  filled  with  iron  spikes 

called  chevauxdefrise — having  once  belonged 

to  the  Indians,  was  found  upon  its  banks — 

givintr  rise  to  the  name ;  and  the  other  is,  that 

two  hunters,  being  compelled  to  lie  out  in  the 

cold  throughout  the  night,  shivered  and  froze,  and  e\-er  after 

in  referring  to  the  stream  they  called  it  "shi\'erdy,"  hence  the 

name.  , 

Harmon  Sinnett  was  the  first  settler.  He  was  a  nati\-e  of 
Pendleton  county,  being  a  son  of  John  Sinnett,  and  a  grand- 
son of  Patrick.  Tn  1S35,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Frances 
Moats,  daughter  of  George  Moats,  and  during  the  following 
autumn,  took  up  his  residence  at  the  mouth  of  the  creek,  on 


Harmon  and  Frances  Moats  Sinnett. 


CHErAUXDEFRlSE  SETTLED  317 

the  land  now  owned  by  the  heirs  of  his  late  son,  John  P.  Sin- 
nett,  and  the  Hall  Brothers — the  latter  being  in  possession  of 
the  old  home,  which  is  still  standing,  though  unoccupied. 

His  services  to  this  community  were  of  a  high  order.  He 
erected  the  first  grist-mill  in  this  section,  near  1850 — the  well- 
known  Sinnett's  mill,  which  stood  a  little  above  the  mouth  of 
Chevauxdefrise,  on  Indian  creek;  and  which  was  twice  washed 
away  by  a  flood,  and  was  not  rebuilt  the  last  time. 

Mr.  Sinnett  was  truly  the  corner-stone  of  the  Indian  creek 
Baptist  church  ;  he  having  given  the  grounds  and  played  an 
important  part  in  the  erection  of  the  old  log  church,  in  1855, 
which  was  replaced  by  the  present  frame  structure  in  1890. 
Until  the  close  of  his  life,  which  came  on  March  9,  1904,  at 
the  home  of  his  daughter,  Mrs.  Alfred  Simmons,  on  Gillispie's 
run,  he  was  a  familiar  figure  in  this  community.  His  beloved 
companion  had  fallen  asleep  just  twenty-seven  hours  before 
(on  the  evening  of  March  8,  1904).  When  he  was  told  that 
•'she  was  no  more,"  he  expressed  a  hope  that  he  might  be  pet- 
mitted  to  go  with  her ;  and  on  the  following  morning,  though 
he  seemed  in  his  usual  health,  he  remarked  that  he  might  ''yet 
be  ready  to  be  buried  with  her,"  and  that  night  he  closed  his 
eyes,  and  quietly  joined  her  on  the  other  shore.  The  family, 
hearing  him  making  a  slight  noise,  went  to  his  bedside  just  in 
time  to  see  him  breathe  his  last.  Both  were  ninety-one  years 
of  age,  and  both  were  laid  in  one  grave,  in  the  Heck  cemetery, 
on  Gillispie's  run.  Thus  this  venerable  couple,  who  had 
traveled  hand  in  hand  so  far  down  "the  declivity  of  time," 
were  re-united  after  but  a  few  hours  of  separation. 

They  were  the  parents  of  the  Rev.  James  T.  Sinnett ;  the 
late  Mrs.  Susan  (\Vm.)  Heck,  Mrs.  Mary  (Alfred)  Simmons, 
Rutherford ;  Mrs.  Martha  (Cyrus)  Washburn,  the  late  Mrs. 
Florinda  (Harmon)  Nottingham,  and  the  late  John  P.  Sin- 
nett, Washburn;  Mrs.  Harriet  (George)  Washburn,  Harrison 
county;  the  late  Mrs.  Frances  (B.  F.)  Cunningham,  Cantwell ; 
the  late  Mrs.  Serepta  (A.  O.)  Wilson,  Harrisville ;  and  the  late 
Elizabeth  Sinnett,  of  Cairo. 

The  Rev.  James  T.  Sinnett  was  the  first  merchant  in  this 
section.  He  built  the  store  that  is  now  owned  by  the  Hall 
Brothers,  in  1870;  and  was  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business 


31S  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

here  until  1881,  when  he  removed  to  Smithville,  where  he  still 
clciims  his  residence. 

On  May  12,  1864,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Nancy  Jane, 
daughter  of  Samuel  Clevenger,  and  in  1893,  she  passed  from 
sight;  and,  on  April  28,  1904,  their  only  son.  Dr.  J.  H.  ^I.  Sin- 
nett,  of  Smithville,  followed  her  to  the  grave.  Airs.  Addie  B. 
(John)  Stanley,  of  Slab  creek ;  and  Mrs.  Grace  Suttle.  wife  of 
Dr.  Bruce  Suttle,  of  Tennessee,  are  their  two  daughters. 

The  Sinnett's  Mill  post-office,  with  Harmon  Sinnett  post- 
master, came  into  existence  in  I860,  and  went  out  in  1890. 

Owing  to  a  change  in  the  administration,  and  an  effort  to 
carry  into  effect  the  Andrew  Jackson  doctrine,  "To  the  victor 
belongs  the  spoils,"  this  office  was  moved  to  wdiat  was  con- 
sidered an  inconvenient  point ;  and  this  change  brought  about 
a  fight,  which  terminated  in  the  establishment  of  a  new^  office 
under  the  name  of  "\\'ashburn,"  in  1889,  and  in  the  dis-con- 
tinuance  of  Sinnett's  jNIill,  the  following  year. 

Joseph  Weaver  was  the  second  settler  on  Chevauxdefrise. 
lie  built  his  cabin  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  Isaac 
Riggs — formerly  the  "\\'hite  homestead."  He  Avas  of  German 
descent,  and  he  married  ]\Iiss  Martha  Read,  who  was  born  on 
the  sea,  while  her  parents  were  bound  for  America,  and  seven 
children  were  the  result  of  this  union.  After  her  death,  !Mr. 
Weaver  married  Miss  Malinda  Tucker,  and  was  the  father  of 
seven  more  children.  He  met  a  tragic  death  at  the  hands  of 
one  Nelson  Koone  during  the  Civil  war  (1861),  while  residing 
on  the  West  Fork  river,  in  Calhoun  county — the  tragedy  oc- 
curring at  Annamoriah  flats,  near  three  miles  from  his  home — 
and  was  due,  doubtless,  to  their  difference  of  opinion  in  re- 
gard to  the  struggle  that  was  then  engaging  the  attention  of 
the  North  and  the  South. 

The  children  of  the  first  union  were:  the  late  'Wis.  Silas 
Pettit,  Big  Bend :  Mrs.  Katharine  Stuart,  3,Irs.  Eugene 
Weaver,  both  of  Elizabeth ;  Mrs.  Alark  wSears,  John  Weaver, 
Burning  Springs;  Joseph,  of  Ohio:  and  Clarinda,  who  died  in 
childhood.    All  have  joined  the  throng  on  che  other  side. 

The  children  of  the  second  union  :  Cora  died  in  childhood, 
Charley  Avas  murdered  at  Elizabeth  ;  Rufus  died  at  Burning 
Springs;  and  George,  at  Standing  Stone;  Floyd  is  a  traveling 


OiEl'AUXDEFRISE  SETTLED  319 

salesman,  and  resides  in  Ohio;  j\Irs.  Joseph  L.  Pettit  resides  at 
Parkersburg.  and  Airs.  Alary  Morgan,  at  Ravenswood. 

Isaac  Clarke  followed  Air.  Weaver  on  the  Riggs  farm. 
He  came  from  Pennsylvania  with  his  family,  and  returned 
there  after  selling  this  farm  to  the  late  distinguished  "Alud- 
wall"  Jackson,  who,  shortly  after  the  Civil  war,  sold  it  to  Ben- 
jamin Starkey,  whose  family  are  still  identified  with  the  com- 
munity. 

Adam  Harris  (son  of  Thomas,  after  whom  Harrisville 
was  named)  w^as  the  pioneer  on  the  Amos  farm.  He  married 
A'liss  Alargaret  Webb,  sister  of  Benjamin,  and  from  Chevaux- 
defrise,  they  went  to  the  Kennedy  farm,  at  the  mouth  of 
Lamb's  run,  where  they  remained  for  a  number  of  years,  be- 
fore going  to  the  Lemuel  Wilson  farm,  above  Smithville, 
where  they  passed  from  earth  ;  and  in  the  Smithville  burymg- 
ground  they  lie  at  rest. 

Their  children  were  six  in  number;  viz.,  Thomas  lost  his 
life  in  the  Civil  war;  Benjamin,  Robert,  Airs.  Jane  (Robert) 
Lucas,  Airs.  Alartha  (Thomas)  Alartin,  Smithville  ;  and  Airs. 
Rebecca  (Joe)  Silman,  Gilmer  county. 

John  Harris,  brother  of  Adam,  familiarly  known  as  "Sum- 
mer John."  was  another  early  settler  on  this  creek.  He  first 
built  a  cabin  in  the  \icinity  of  Alt.  Zion,  and  later  removed  to 
the  Amos  farm,  and  afterwards  resided  at  different  places  in 
the  Washburn  vicinitv,  and  on  Husher's  run,  before  going  to 
Illinois,  where  he  passed  to  the  "confines  of  the  tomb."  His 
wife  was  Aliss  Alargaret  Calhoun,  niece  of  Samuel  Calhoun, 
and  his  chief  occupation  was  hunting. 

Ephraim  Gulp  and  his  wife.  Airs.  Julia  Aloats  Culp,  were 
the  first  to  establish  a  home  on  the  J.  O.  Kelley — no\v  the  X. 
E.  Conaway — farm.  They  came  here  some  time  during  the 
forties,  and  remained  in  the  immediate  vicinity  for  several 
years,  before  removing  to  the  North  fork  of  Hughes'  river — 
on  the  Cornwallis  road — to  the  farm  that  was  long  designated 
as  the  "Culp  homestead" — later  the  Plorner.  Air.  Culp  disap- 
peared while  on  a  business  trip  down  the  river,  and  his  fate 
was  never  known,  as  nothing  was  ever  heard  of  him  again. 

Airs.  Culp  and  her  sons,  Henry  and  James,  rest  at  Har- 
risville ;  John   died   while  serving  as  a  soldier  in   the   L^nion 


S20  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

army.  The  other  two  abo\e  mentioned  were  also  soldiers; 
and  the  daughter,  ^Martha,  became  ]\Irs.  Husher. 

Owen  Watson  and  his  wife,  ■Mrs.  Martha  Clarke  Watson, 
were  the  second  settlers  on  the  Kdlc}-  farm,  l^ut  they  went  to 
Illinois,  where  they  founded  a  permanent  home  near  Cherry 
Point.  He  was  an  uncle  of  Dr.  J.  W.  Watson,  and  a  farther 
account  of  the  family  will  be  found  in  the  Harrisville  chapter. 

Noah  Boston  was  the  first  citizen  of  the  George  Xangle 
farm.  He  came  from  Rockbridge  county,  Virginia,  and  finally 
went  West.  His  wife  was  ]\Iiss  Ivathrine  AA'ebb,  daughter  of 
John  AA'ebb,  senior,  of  Washburn. 

James  Braden,  of  Pennsylvania,  and  Charles  Ay  res,  son 
of  Jeremiah  Ayrcs,  were  other  early  settlers  on  this  creek. 
yiv.  Braden  was  the  father  of  Thomas  and  James  Braden,  and 
other  children,  and  he  died  on  the  Anthony  W^agner  farm,  and 
sleeps  in  the  Indian  creek  Baptist  churchyard.  Air.  Ayres 
settled  the  Thomas  Hardbarger  farm  and  finally  went  West. 

Henry  H.  Amos. — The  }'ear  1849  was  marked  by  the  com- 
ing of  Henry  H.  Amos  and  his  family,  from  [Marion  count}^ 
to  the  farm  now  owned  b}^  his  son,  J.  E.  Amos.  ]Mr.  Amos 
was  born  on  July  31,  ISIT;  and  on  April  4,  1841,  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Malinda  Rex,  the  marriage  taking  place  at  her 
home  near  Fairmont ;  and  in  1848,  they  came  to  this  county 
and  resided  on  the  Nay  farm,  for  a  brief  time,  before  coming 
to  Chevauxdefrise,  where  they  both  fell  asleep — he,  in  18S9. 
after  a  long  invalidism,  and  she,  in  1891.  Both  rest  in  the 
graveyard  at  the  Chevauxdefrise  church.  Both  having  long 
been  faithful  members  of  that  church.  Their  children  were  as 
follows : 

John  W.  Amos,  who  now  resides  at  Vandalia,  Missouri, 
v.as  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war,  serving  under  General  Sheridan 
in  the  Valley  of  Virginia,  in  Co.  K,  of  the  Tenth  West  V^ir- 
ginia  Infantry  Volunteers ;  the  late  George  W.  Amos,  of  Har- 
risville, who  served  as  County  clerk  for  twent3'-six  3^ears  in 
succession.  (He  married  jMiss  Laura  Hall,  and  died  en 
December  5,  1898,  without  issue)  ;  Eli  R.  Amos,  fell  asleep 
two  weeks  later  at  his  home  in  Southern  Missouri ;  Airs.  Jacob 
Hardbarger,  of  W^ashburn ;  and  jMrs.  Lydia  K.  (].  M  )  Lovv- 
ther,  of  Auburn,  have  also,  passed  on.     Mrs.  Alargaret  (E.  E.) 


CHEVAUXDEFRISE  SETTLED  :V21 

Cokeley,  and  ]\Irs.  Eliza  (P.  M.)  Jones,  reside  near  Harris- 
ville ;  J.  E.  and  Aliss  Lizzie,  at  the  old  homestead;  Mrs.  HatUe 
(S.  C.)  Foster,  at  Vandalia,  Alissouri ;  and  W.  H.  has  a  furni- 
Lure  and  undertaking  establishment  at  Auburn. 

The  Ameses  are  of  German  origin.  Their  ancestors  came 
from  the  Fatherland,  near  the  middle  of  the  seventeenth  cen- 
tury ;  but  the  authentic  and  connected  history  of  this  famih' 
begins  prior  to  the  Revolutionary  war,  when  Henry  Amos, 
senior — grandfather  of  Henry,  of  Ritchie  county,  came  to 
Monongalia  county,  where,  in  1790.  he  was  married  to  Miss 
Dorcas  Flail,  of  Pennsylvania,  wdiose  parents  came  from  Dela- 
ware. 

In  181(5,  their  second  son,  George,  married  Miss  Idna 
HaAvkins,^  a  descendant  of  an  old  English  family ;  her  grand- 
father having  come  from  England  to  the  Virginia  colony  as 
early  as  1750;  and  from  him  the  Ritchie  county  families  are 
descended.  He  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1813,  and  was  the 
father  of  thirteen  children ;  viz.,  Henry,  of  Ritchie  county, 
was  the  eldest  son  ;  the  late  Asel,  of  Pennsboro ;  George,  of 
White  Oak ;  Bennett,  Tracy,  Edgar,  Stephen,  and  Jehu,  who 
died  in  early  manhood,  were  the  other  sons;  Mrs.  George 
Smith  of  Weston — mother  of  the  Rev.  G.  D.  Smith,  of  the  W^est 
Virginia  M.  E.  conference;  Mrs.  Zana  Saterfield,  of  Bellaire, 
Ohio;  Mrs.  I\F  Shumley,  of  Marion  county;  Mrs.  Rhoda  Snbd- 
grass,  Illinois;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Wm.)  Bell,  of 
Marion  county,  were  the  daughters. 

Thomas  Smailwood  W'ilson  was  the  first  denizen  of  the 
lames  farm.  He  was  born  in  Monongalia  county,  in  1784, 
and  there  he  was  married  to  Miss  Hannah  Camp,  daughter  oi 
Adam  Camp,  and  in  1843,  he  came  to  this  county,  and  settled 
on  the  Michaels'  farm,  near  Oxford,  for  a  brief  time,  before 
coming  to  the  lames  homestead.  He  was  of  Scotch-Irish 
descent,  his  father.  Thomas,  senior,  being  a  native  of  Scotland 
(he  liaving  crossed  the  ocean  after  his  eldest  son,  Joseph,  was 
born). 

This  pioneer  was  a  lum.ber  merchant,  and  while  on  a  trip 
to  Cincinnati,  in  1848,  he  contracted  cholera,  and  by  the  time 
he  had  reached   Parkersburg,  on  his  return,  he  was  stricken 


'The  other  Hawkins  of  the  covinty  belong  to  this  family. 


322  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

with  the  fatal  malady,  and  died  there ;  and  was  laid  at  rest 
near  the  present  site  of  the  B.  &  O.  depot,  at  that  place.  I\Irs. 
Vv'ilson  died  at  the  P.  R.  Tharp  homestead,  on  Indian  run,  in 
1856,  and  in  the  Drake  burying-ground,  on  the  County  farm, 
she  sleeps. 

Their  children  were  ten  in  number:  the  late  John  M., 
Freeport,  Wirt  county;  Mrs.  Aliranda  (Elias)  Summers,  Slab 
creek;  W'm.  L.  AA'ilson,  [Monongalia  county,  who  died  at  the 
home  of  his  daughter,  near  Grantsville :  Mrs.  JNIary  Ann 
(John)  Lough,  Illinois;  Joseph,  of  Doddridge  county;  Mrs. 
Lucy  Ann  (Alanly)  Zinn,  Holbrook :  ]\Irs.  Melissa  Simmons, 
Auburn ;  Isaac  Van  Buren,  Indian  creek — the  oniy  survivor 
of  the  family ;  Thomas  Peter,  also  of  Indian  creek,  and  Israel, 
who  died  in  youth. 

All  of  the  family  were  born  in  r^^Ionongalia  county. 

John  M,  Wilson,  son  of  Thomas  ^l.,  above  mentioend, 
was  the  first  to  make  an  improvement  on  the  farm  that  passed 
into  the  hands  of  Ransom  Kendall,  in  18J:9.  Pie  married  Miss 
Sarah  Reed,  of  Alonongalia  countv,  and  from  here  thev  went 
to  Marion  county,  and  finally  to  Freeport.  A\'irt  county,  where 
he  rests.  He  was  a  minister  of  the  Isl.  P.  church,  having 
served  various  charges  in  "\\'est  Virginia  and  Ohio;  was  pas- 
tor of  the  Freeport  circuit  at  the  time  of  his  death. 

He  had  seven  children :  Thomas,  ]\Iary,  Alelissa,  Caro- 
line, and  Jackson  have  all  joined  the  hosts  on  the  other  side : 
Nathaniel  and  I\Irs.  Ellen  Barker,  live  in  Ohio  ;  and  [Mrs.  Leone 
Hammond,  in  AA'irt  county. 

Ransom  Kendall. — In  1849,  Ransom  Kendall  purchased 
the  improvement  that  had  been  made  by  J.  M.  \\'ilson.  and 
took  up  his  residence  here,  where  he  remained  until  he  "'passed 
through  the  Gates,"  on  October  1?.  1887.  And  near  two  years 
later  this  old  homestead  became  the  property  of  J.  [M.  Leggett. 
who  sold  it  to  Mr.  Davisson.  the  present  ov^^ner. 

[Mr.  Kendall  was  born  in  [Marion  county,  on  [March  "28, 
1816  ;  and  there,  on  August  27,  1838,  he  was  married  to  [Miss 
Lydia  Rex,  daughter  of  Eli  and.  Sarah  Hall  Rex,  who  vv-as 
born  in  Penns3-lvania.  on  August  25,  1820,  but  with  her 
parents  removed  to  [Marion  county,  when  she  was  but  a  child 
of  two  summers.     He  and  his  Avife  were  both  loval  members 


CHEJ'AUXDEFRISE  SETTLED  :^23 

of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  for  ahnost  a  half-century 
^were  pillars  in  the  church  at  Chevauxdefrise  from  the  time 
of  its  institution  until  the  close  of  their  lives.  They  gave  the 
grounds  for  the  church  and  cemetery  and  were  important 
factors  in  the  erection  of  the  first  church,  near  1S67.  And 
their  son,  John,  who  died  in  childhood,  filled  the  first  grave 
that  was  made  in  this  cemetery,  in  October,  1857. 

Mrs.  Kendall  died  on  September  25,  1888.  Her  last  mo- 
ments were  full' of  triumph,  her  last  words  were  an  expression 
of  praise. 

AV'eli  does  the  writer  remember  that  impressive  hour,  as 
one  by  one  she  bade  us  adieu,  and  admonished  us  to  meet  her 
beyond  the  "Gate  fjeautiful."  which  she  was  just  then  enter- 
ing. 

On  the  old  homestead,  beside  her  husband,  she  is  sleeping. 

The  children  of  this  household  were  fourteen  in  number, 
seven  boys  and  seven  girls  : 

The  late  Dr.  James  Emery  Ivendall,  who  was  for  a  num- 
ber of  years  a  prominent  physician  of  Parkersburg,  was  the 
eldest  son.  He  served  as  assistant  surgeon  of  the  Eleventh 
West  Virginia  Infantry  Volunteers  during  the  Civil  war,  and 
at  one  time,  later  in  life,  represented  the  West  Virginia  Med- 
ical Fraternity  at  the  International  Association  at  London, 
and  while  there  was  presented  with  a  medal  by  the  late 
Queen  Victoria,  which  is  now  a  valued  possession  of  his 
family. 

The  late  Amos  Kendall,  of  Tonganoxie.  Kansas,  was,  also, 
a  soldier  of  the  Civil  war :  and  Eli  Rex  lost  his  life  in  defense 
of  the  Union,  at  Beverly,  on  July  3,  1863,  and  in  the  National 
cemetery,  at  Grafton,  he  reposes. 

Jasper  Newton,  who  was  at  one  time  superintendent  of 
the  schools  of  this  county,  has  for  a  number  of  years  been 
prominently  identified  among  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church 
ministers  of  the  South  and  West;  he  having  been  a  member 
of  the  Tennessee,  Texas.  Oklahoma,  Colorado,  and  Idaho  con- 
ferences. William  Alpheus  is  a  physician  of  Crescent  City, 
Oklahoma.  John,  as  above  mentioned,  has  been  sleeping  in 
the  churchyard,  since  his  childhood;  and  Marcellus  Allen,  the 
youngest  son,  who  is  of  Parkersburg,  served  one  term  as  State 


324  HISTORY  OF  RirCHIE  COUNTY 

Treasurer,  and  is  now  doing  service  as  United  States  Bank 
Examiner/ 

The  daughters  are :  I\Irs.  Anarie  ( D.  S.)  Cox,  who  re- 
sides on  part  of  the  old  homestead  on  this  creek  ;  ]\Irs.  Sarah 
Kathrine  Alitchell  Mason,  PuUman ;  Mrs.  ^lary  L.  Lowther 
(wife  of  the  late  Dr.  J.  G.  Lowther),  Parkersburg ;  ]\Irs. 
Martha  L.  ( L.  C. )  Jones,  Clarendon,  Texas;  Mrs.  Bertha 
Blanche  Kelley  (wife  of  Dr.  \\\  C.  Kelley),  ]\Iorgantown  ;  the 
late  IMrs.  Alaria  Louisa  Davis  (wife  of  the  Rev.  D.  H.  Davis, 
of  the  AL  P.  church)  ;  and  Jennie,  the  late  wife  of  W.  G.  Low- 
ther, of  Fonsoville. 

The  Kendalls  are  of  English  origin.  In  Westmoreland 
county.  England,  is  a  river  named  "Kent,"  whose  valley  is 
known  as  the  "Kentdale."  Here  in  the  town  of  Kirby-Ken- 
dal,  or  Kendale,  as  it  was  formerly  spelled,  lived  one  of  the 
"big  families  of  Westmoreland,"  who  became  generally  known 
as  the  Kendal,  Kendall,  or  Kendale  family."  Hence  the  origin 
of  the  name." 

Ln  County  Cornwall  to-day  there  is  a  family  of  the  same 
name  who  came  from  Treworgy  centuries  ago,  and  while  their 
ancestry  is  not  traceable  to  Kirby-in-Kendall,  it  is  quite  prob- 
able that  they  hailed  from  the  same  stock. 

Eleanor  Lexington,  in  her  "Colonial  Families,"  says : 

"The  Kendall  family  bears  the  proud  distinction  of  hav- 
ing sent  more  men.ibers,  perhaps,  than  any  other  fam.ily  to 
the  British  parliament.    At  all  events  it  has  sent  as  many." 

The  first  record  we  have  of  the  name  in  America  begins 
with  George  Kendall,  a  member  of  the  first  Jamestown  Coun- 
cil, who  crossed  the  water  with  this  little  colony  in  1607;  but 
the  Ritchie  family,  and  the  numerous  others  scattered 
throughout  the  L'nion  to-day,  trace  their  origin  to  members 
of  the  famih"  who  crossed  a  little  later. 

According  to  Miss  Lexington  two  brothers,  Francis  and 
Thomas  Kendall,  who  were  born  in  England,  came  to  the 
Western  world  before  the  year  1640,  and  settled  in  the  I\Iass- 
achusetts  Bay  Colony. 

Francis  went  to  AA'oburn,  Massachusetts,  then  known  as 
Charlestown,   where   he  was   married   to   Alarv   Tidd,  but   he 


^See  Young-er   Men's   Calendar. 


CHEJ'AUXDEFRISE  SETTLED  o25 

later  removed  to  Reading.  He  had  four  sons  and  five  daugh- 
ters, and  thus  gave  the  family  name  quite  a  start  in  the  New 
World.  By  the  year  1S58,  eight  of  his  line  had  been  gradu- 
ated from  Harvard,  three  from  the  College  of  Xew  England, 
and  one  brave  member  had  been  killed  as  a  witch.  Amos 
Kendall,  the  statesman,  who  served  as  Postmaster-General 
under  President  Andrew  Jackson's  administration,  and  George 
Wilkins  Kendall,  the  journalist,  who  died  at  Oak  Springs, 
Texas,  in  1867,  belonged  to  the  family  of  Francis. 

Thomas   settled   at    Lynn,   Massachusetts,   where   he    was 

married  to  Rebecca ,  and  about  the  year  1653.  he  also 

removed  to  Reading,  where  he  died  in  1681,  leaving  behind 
him  a  reputation  for  manliness,  and  for  a  highly  religious 
character. 

He  had  no  son  that  reached  the  3^ears  of  maturity,  but  lie 
left  eight  daughters.  \\ho  lamented  the  fact  that  "so  good  a 
surname  as  theirs  could  not  be  preserved,"  so  they  met  in 
council  and  decided  that  the  first  born  son  of  each  should 
bear  the  name  of  "Kendall,"  and  as  a  result  there  Avas  Ken- 
dall Pearson,  Kendall  Eaton,  etc. 

One  of  the  biographers  of  these  families  says  ■ 

"The  descendants  of  these  pious  Puritans  have  spread 
themselves  over  the  length  and  the  breadth  of  this  countr}^ 
as  pioneers  and  settlers — waking  the  forests  and  plains  from 
their  long  sleep.  Some  were  eminent  divines,  some  were  dis- 
tinguished lawyers  and  jurists,  and  others  were  journalists, 
statesmen,  authors  and  travelers." 

The  tradition  of  our  own  branch  of  the  family,  as  well  as 
that  of  the  Ohio  branch,  says  thai  three  brothers  crossed  at 
the  same  time,  and  that  the  third  one  settled  in  Virginia ;  and 
from  him  the  Kendalls  of  Ohio  and  both  Virginias  are  de- 
scended. But  as  Virginia  has  been  visited  by  fires  which 
have  swept  away  some  of  her  records,  the  given  name  of  the 
founder  of  this  family  is  missing.  However,  our  record  begins 
v.ith  William  Kendall,  senior,  whose  son,  William  Kendall, 
junior,  was  married  to  Miss  Jemima  Kirk,  on  May  10,  1738, 
in  Stafford  county,  Virginia. 

This  couple  (\\'illiam  and  Jemima)  were  the  parents  of 
ten  children  :     Jesse,  Thomas,  George,  Anne.  John,  \\'illiani, 


320  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Samuel,  Mary  Anne,  Elizabeth,  and  Jeremiah.  And  one  of 
these  sons,  which  one  cannot  be  determined,  crossed  the 
mountains  from  the  "Old  Dominion"  and  settled  in  Marion 
county,  not  far  from  the  time  of  the  birth  of  his  youngest  son, 
James  Kendall,  in  1784.  His  family  consisted  of  six  other 
sons,  besides  James,  who  scattered  to  Ohio,  Indiana  and  Ken- 
tucky (with  perhaps  an  exception  or  two),  but  James  re- 
mained at  the  old  homestead  in  ]\rarion  county,  where  he  died 
in  1S6S,  and  where  he  lies  buried. 

James  Kendall  was  married  to  ^Nliss  Kathrine  Shuman, 
who  was  born  in  the  Fatherland,  and,  with  her  parents,  came 
to  Pennsylvania  at  the  age  of  tAvelve  years.  The  family  were 
six  months  in  crossing  and  several  of  the  children  died  on 
board  the  ship  and  were  buried  beneath  the  waves  in  order  to 
avoid  the  danger  from  the  sharks. 

Kathrine  died  at  her  home  in  3Jarion  county,  in  1848,  and 
sleeps  beside  her  husband  on  the  old  homestead. 

This  family  consisted  of  two  sons  and  seven  daughters; 
viz..  Ransom,  the  head  of  the  Ritchie  county  family;  Jere- 
miah, of  Tyler  county ;  Rachel,  and  Orpha,  who  died  in  youth  ; 
Zilpah  (Mrs.  Aaron  Kearns),  Xancy  (Mrs.  James  Kearns), 
Sarah  (Mrs.  Levi  Shuman),  Kathrine  (Mrs.  William  Hayes), 
and  Anarie,  who  married  Asel  Amos.  All  left  families,  ex- 
cept ]^Irs.  Amos. 

Jeremiah  Kendall,  the  younger  son  of  William,  junior, 
and  Jemima  Kirk,  served  as  a  member  of  the  Continental 
forces  for  five  years  du.ring  the  Anierican  Revolution,  and  was 
with  General  Anthony  Wayne  in  his  campaign  against  the 
Indians  for  two  years,  being  at  the  battle  of  Maumee,  and  at 
the  treaty  of  Greenville.  He  carried  to  his  grave  nine  scars 
from  musket-ball  wounds  which  he  sustained  in  battle.  After 
the  Revolution,  he  sold  his  interests  in  Virginia;  and  with  his 
wife  and  two  children  and  their  sole  belongings,  emigrated  to 
Pennsylvania  on  horseback,  and  settled  on  the  old  "National 
Road,"  in  Fayette  county,  between  Brownsville  and  Union- 
town,  where  he  died  in  1843,  and  where  some  of  his  descend- 
ants now  live. 

He  was  the  father  of  the  late  General  William  Kendall, 
of  Ohio,  who  served  under  General  Harrison  at  Tippecanoe, 


CHErAUXDEfRISE  SETTLED  327 

and  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812 ;  was  the  grand-uncle  of 
Ransom  Kendall ;  and  Ransom's  only  brother  was  named  for 
him. 

The  family  are  in  some  way  related  to  General  Wayne, 
and  Jeremiah  Kendall  fell  heir  to  the  spurs,  watch-chain  and 
boot-hooks  of  this  distinguished  warrior,  who  is  better  known 
as  "Mad  Anthony,"  and  these  invaluable  relics  are  still  cher- 
ished in  his  family,  they  having  been  handed  down  from  father 
to  eldest  son  for  five  generations,  until  they  have  now  reached 
Kendall  Overturf,  of  Columbus,  Ohio. 

Thomas  Kendall,  who  came  from  Settle,  Yorkshire,  Eng- 
land, in  17<)n.  is  said  to  have  been  the  founder  of  the  Penn- 
sylvania branch  of  the  family. 

Old  Record. — As  these  old  records  are  rare  and  of  inestim  ■ 
able  value,  we  insert  this  one: 

^Marriages  of  the  sons  of  William  Kendall,  senior,  of  Vir- 
ginia : 

1 — William  Kendall,  junior,  married  Jemima  Kirk  on  May 
10,  n38. 

2— James  Iventiall  married  Mary  Coitey  on  February  35, 
1745. 

3 — George  Kendall  married  Cathrine  Kelley,  June  5,  1748. 

4 — Joshua  Kendall  married  Cathrine  Smith,  April  4,  1749. 

5 — John  Kendall  married  Margaret  Keys,  January  9,  1752. 

Family  of  William,  junior,  and  Jemima  Kirk  Kendall: 

1 — Jesse  Kendall  born  October  4,  1740. 

2— Thomas  Kendall  born  May  27,  1742. 

3 — George  Kendall  born  January  13,  1744. 

4 — Anne  Kendall  born  December  6,  1745. 

5 — John  Kendall  born  March  21,  1748. 

6  and  7 — William  and  Samuel  (twins),  August  30,  1749. 

8 — Mary  Anne,  April  9,  1752. 

9— Elizabeth.  April  1.  1754. 
10 — -Jeremiah  (of  Penn.),  February  6,  1758. 

(One  of  these  brothers  was  the  grandfather  of  Ransoni 
Kendall.) 

Children  of  Joshua  and  Cathrine  Smith  Kendall :  Jesse, 
born  August  21,  1751;  Joshua,  born  May  27,  1753;  Nancy, 
born  December  19,  1755  ;  and  Betty,  born  February  22,  1758. 


328  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Children  of  James  and  Alary  Coffey  Kendall :  John,  born 
February  26,  1749;  Jesse,  born  June  ID,  1750;  Bailey,  born 
October  S,  1755  ;  Moses  and  Aaron  are  also  said  to  have  be- 
longed to  this  family. 

Children  of  John  and  Cathrine  Keys  Kendall:  Samuel 
B.,  January  1,  1753;  Charles,  born  September  17,  1754;  anl 
Elizabetli,  born  February  11,  1758. 

A\'e  have  no  record  of  the  children  of  Joshua  and  Cathrine 
Smith  Kendall. 

Note. — The  tradition  handed  down  to  us  concerning  the 
coming  of  the  Kendalls  to  America  is  that  three  brothers 
crossed  in  Colonial  times;  One  settled  in  the  Pine  forests  of 
Maine;  one  in  the  "City  of  Brotherly  Love,"  and  the  other,  in 
Virginia,  but  as  Miss  Lexington's  information  seemed  more 
definite  than  ours  concerning  the  i)lace  of  settlement  in  Xew 
England,  we  have  given  hers  the  first  place,  but  we  still  credit 
the  coming  of  the  third  one  to  the  "Old  Domin.ion."  We  are 
also  indebted  to  her  for  the  origin  of  the  name. 

The  information  of  the  Kendalls  of  Ohio  comes  to  us 
from  the  great-granddaughter  of  Jeremiah  Kendall,  Mrs.  Ella 
Kendall  Overturf,  of  Columbus,  Ohio,  she  havino-  sent  us  a 
copy  of  an  old  manuscript  written  by  her  grandfather,  the  late 
General  William  Kendall,  and  to  her  we-  owe  our  thanks  fcjr 
this  old  record. 

The  Rexes. — As  quite  a  nturiber  of  the  people  of  this 
county  are  descended  from  the  •  Rex  family,  a  brief  mention 
of  their  origin  in  America  will  perhaps  add  interest  m  this 
connection. 

This  family  are  of  Welsh  descent;  and  from  Mapleton, 
Pennsylvania,  their  original  home  on  this  side  of  the  water, 
they  migrated  to  Marion  county.  The  father  lost  his  life  in 
the  struggle  for  Independence,  as  he  was  never  heard  of  after 
the  close  of  the  war.  but  he  left  a  family  of  four  sons  and 
three  daughters  ;  \iz..  Eli  Rex,  who  married  Sarah  Hall,  and 
was  the  father  of  Mrs.  Kendall  and  Mrs.  Amos;  Jonathan, 
John,  and  Jesse  were  the  other  sons.  One  of  the  daughters, 
Elizabeth,  became  Mrs.  Fast,  and  she  was  the  grandmother 
of  J.  E.  Ferrell,  of  Burnt  House ;  Rebecca  first  married  a 
Price,  and  was  the  mother  of  the  late  Mrs.  John  Leggett,  of 


CHEl'AUXDEFRISE  SETTLED  329 

Pullman  ;  the  late  Mrs.  J eremiah  Snodgrass,  of  Harrisville ; 
and  the  late  Mrs.  Rachel  Troy,  and  her  second  married  name 
was  Ice.     Mary  Rex  died  in  youth. 

William  Cokeley. — Shortly  after  the  coming  of  Har- 
mon Sinnett.  William  Cokeley  made  the  first  settlement  at 
Mt.  Zion,  where  his  only  daughter,  Mrs.  Salem  Duckworth, 
now  lives.  He  was  a  native  of  Ilampshire  county,  and  soon 
after  h.is  arrival  in  tliis  count}^  with  his  parents,  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Hannah  Starr,  sister  of  James  Starr,  and  at  Mt. 
Zion  they  founded  their  home,  and  remained  until  death 
closed  their  eyes.  He  died  on  February  12,  1888,  at  the  age 
of  seventy-four  years,  one  month,  twelve  days.  His  wife 
was  born  on  Indian  creek,  on  September  5,  1816,  and  died  on 
May  12,  1895. 

They  were  Christians  of  the  United  Brethren  churcli 
faith,  and  Mr.  Cokeley  might  be  styled  -the  "Father"  of  the 
Mt.  Zion  church :  for  he  gave  the  grounds  and  played  no 
small  part  in.  tlie  erection  of  the  first  church  home  here  in 
1859,  and  beneath  the  shadow  of  the  present  building,  which 
was  erected  in  ISDJ:,  he  lies  in  his  last  sleep  beside  his  com- 
panion. 

Nimrod  Kuykendall  was  the  first  citizen  of  the  farm 
formerly  owned  by  J.  N.  Kendall  and  C.  W.  Leggett,  but  now 
the  property  of  A\"illiam  A\'ilson.  Mr.  Kuykendall  and  his 
wife.  Kathrine  Zickafoose,  sister  of  the  late  Asbury  Zicka- 
foose,  came  from  Pocahontas  county  in  the  early  fifties,  and 
after  the  Civil  war,  removed  to  the  West.  He  and  his  son, 
Jacob,  were  soldiers  of  the  Civil  war;  and  Jacob,  who  v^^as 
Captain  of  Company  K  of  the  Tenth  West  Virginia  Infantry. 
lost  his  life  at  the  battle  of  Cedar  creek,  on  October  19,  1864, 
and  his  father  was  commissioned  to  take  his  place.  His  last 
resting-place  is  marked  by  a  marble  slab  in  the  Mt.  Zion 
churchvard.    The  other  son,  Samuel,  went  West. 


CHAPTER  XXIII 


Slab  Creek  Settled 

^gj^,^  HIS  creek  derived  its  name  from  a  hunter'^* 
camp,  which  was  constructed  of  slabs,  and 
stood  upon  its  banks. 

John  Cain^  was  the  first  citizen  to  pen- 
etrate  its   forest.      He   came   from    Harrison 
county,    as    early    as    1S18,    and    reared    his 
lowly   dwelling   on   the   farm    that   for   long 
years   was    designated    as    the   "Lewis    Maxwell    homestead," 
now  the  property  of  W  .  E.  Hall,  at  Pullman. 

We  know  but  little  of  his  early  history,  except  that  he 
was  an  inmate  of  the  old  "Xutter  fort'"  at  C'arksburg.  during 
his  bo3diood  days,  A\hen  the  citizens  of  that  vicinity  were 
compelled  to  take  refuge  from  the  savage  foe.  within  its  pro- 
tecting walls. 

We  have  been  unable  to  secure  a  record  of  his  family, 
but  he  was  the  grand-uncle  of  J.  R.  Lowther.  of  Pullman  :  and 
the  father  of  the  late  Harrison,  and  RpcL;e,  Edith,  Xancy,  and 
Dorinda  Cain.  His  descendants  in  this  county  are  quite 
numerous,  however. 

John  Shores,  w'hose  history  will  be  found  in  the  Spruce 
creek  chapter,  vvas  the  first  settler  at  the  mouth  of  this  creek : 
but  we  have  no  account  of  any  other  contemporary  settlers 
with  Cain,  whose  coming  antedates  that  of  Shores  by  a  num- 
ber of  years.  But  not  a  few,  however,  whose  names  belong 
to  this  chapter,  and  whose  descendants  are  still  identified 
with  the  citizenship  of  the  vicinity,  came  here  in  the  thirties 
and  in  the  forties,  and  redeemed  their  homes  from  their  primi- 
tive wilderness. 


^John  Cain   i*  said  to  have  been   a  brother  of  David   Cain,   whose  his- 
tory appears  with  the  South  Fork  settlers. 


SLAB  CREEK  SETTLED  331 

Daniel  V.  Cox  was  the  first  settler  at  the  forks  of  Slab 
creek,  where  his  son,  Floyd  Cox,  now  lives.  He  was  born  iii 
Harrison  county,  on  Alarch  10,  1809 ;  and  was  the  son  of 
Phillip  and  Christiana  Stille  Cox. 

He  married  ]\Iiss  Mahala  Ward,  of  Harrison  county,  sis- 
ter of  the  late  [Martin  Ward,  who  was  born  in  1812;  and  in 
1835,  they  came  to  the  mouth  of  Bone  creek,  where  they  re- 
mained until  1845,  when  they  removed  to  Slab  creek. 

]\Ir.  Cox  was  the  first  merchant  at  the  mouth  of  Bone 
creek,  he  and  his  brother,  Phillip,  being  partners  in  this  busi- 
ness. They  also  opened  a  tailor-shop  here  with  John  Shores,^ 
a  Dutchman,  wdio  died  at  the  home  of  Col.  Cox  in  the  early 
sixties,  as  tailor.  This  was,  doubtless,  the  first  tailor-shop 
in  the  countv. 

Col.  Cox,  as  he  n^as  generally  known,  was  Colonel  of  the 
^lilitia  from  the  time  of  the  organization  of  the  county,  until 
a  short  time  before  his  death  in  the  sixties.  He  recruited  a 
company, of  volunteers,  early  in  the  Civil  war,  but  owing  to 
his  failing  health  did  not  go  into  active  service.  But  three  of 
his  sons  took  up  arms  in  defense  of  the  Union :  (John,  Taylor, 
and  J.  E.) 

Col.  Cox,  like  many  of  the  otlier  pioneers,  was  a  man  of 
indomitable  courage,  and  of  great  daring.  His  daring  being 
scarcely  second  to  that  of  Israel  Putnam,  when  he  descended 
the  wolfe's  den  and  shot  the  animal  by  the  glaring  light  of 
its  own  eye,  as  the  following  incident  will  illustrate : 

When  Robert  Sommerville  reared  his  cabin  on  Bone 
creek,  he  had  to  get  his  help  from  Harrison  and  Lewis  coun- 
ties ;  and  during  the  night,  after  the  cabin  had  been  erected, 
there  fell  a  tracking  snow ;  and  on  the  following  morning, 
when  the  little  party  started  for  their  homes,  they  discovered 
three  panthers'  tracks  in  the  snow%  near  a  mile  beyond  the 
Gilmer  county  line;  and  following  the  tracks  the}^  were  led 
to  a  ledge  of  rocks  where  the  animais  were  securely  housed. 
They  tried  for  several  houjrs  to  smoke  them  out,  but  all  in 
vain,  and  all  but  Col.  Cox  decided  to  give  it  up  and  to  go  on 
home;  but  he  said,  "No,  gentlemen,  those  panthers  must  come 

•Shores   had   no  family,   and   i.s   not   known   to  be   connected   to   the  pio- 
neer of  the  same  name. 


332  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUXTY 

out  of  there."  And  despite  their  remonstrances,  with  a  pine 
torch  in  one  hand,  and  a  huge  kni^e  in  the  other,  he  started 
in  after  them,  telling  his  companions  to  be  ready  with  their 
guns  to  fire  should  they  come  out :  but  after  some  delay  to 
their  intense  relief,  they  heard  him  coming,  and  he  soon  ap- 
peared dragging  his  prey  after  him,  the  animals  having  per- 
ished from  the  efifects  of  the  smoke. 

He  sleeps  on  his  old  homestead  on  Slab  creek,  beside  his 
wife,  who  died  in  1899. 

He  was  the  father  of  ten  children: 

W.  Floyd,  and  Airs.  Louisa  (W'm.)  Bane,  the  late  H.  C. 
and  j.  E.,  all  of  Slab  creek;  the  late  John  AL,  of  Burnt 
House ;  D.  S.,  Chevauxdefrise ;  A\'.  Taylor,  Calhoun  county ; 
\\".  E.,  Alvin  A^'..  and  Phillip,  all  died  in  3-oath. 

Phillip  Cox,  brother  of  Col.  Cox,  was  also  identified  with 
the  county's  earl}^  history,  he  being  a  surveyor  in  this  and  ad- 
joining counties  as  early  as  1820  ;  and,  as  already  mentioned, 
he  was  a  partner  in  the  mercantile  business  with  hjs  brother 
at  the  mouih  of  Bone  creek,  in  1835  ;  though  he  did  not  take 
up  his  residence  here  until  1847,  when  he  removed  to  Blarris- 
vilie,  and  took  charge  of  the  "Franklin  hotel,"  where  he  re- 
mained until  18.j-^.  He  finally  went  lo  Cox's  mill,  in  Gilmer 
county,  where  he  died  on  December  19,  1876.  at  the  age  of 
seventy-six  years,  he  having  been  born,  on  July  20,  1800.  He 
at  one  time  represented  Braxton  and  Lewis  counties  in  the 
General  Assembly  at  Richmond. 

He  married  Aliss  Susan  Kniseley,  daughter  of  George, 
and  sister  of  the  late  John  Kniseley,  of  Auburn,  and  in  the 
Auburn  cemetery,  beside  his  wife,  he  sleeps. 

He  was  the  father  of  D.  W.  Cox,  of  A\'ashburn,  and  of 
the  following  other  sons  and  daughters :  Oliver  P.  Cox,  of 
Cox's  mill ;  George  Kniseley  Cox :  Isaac,  of  Clay  county ; 
John,  of  Kansas  Cit}^ ;  Airs.  Josephine  (Hamilton)  Xorman, 
Spokane.  AA'ashington ;  Airs.  Elizabeth  (Anthony)  Wagner, 
of  Washburn — mother  of  "Al"  A\'agner,  Berea ;  Airs.  Alary 
Snodgrass,  wife  of  the  late  Rev.  Elisha  L.  Snodgrass,  of  Au- 
burn :  Airs.  Rodenia  (Thomas)  Williams,  Kansas  City,  all  of 
whom  have  passed  on,  save  D.  \\'..  O.  P.,  and  Airs.  Norman. 

The    Coxes    have    a    distinguished    ancestral    line,    which 


SLAB  CREEK  SETTLED  333 

the}^  trace  back  to  Dr.  Daniel  Cox,  of  London,  who  was  the 
Royal  family's  physician  when  Queen  Anne  was  on  the  throne 
(from  1T02-1T1J:),  he  being  a  cousin  of  the  Queen. 

Dr.  Daniel  Cox  had  three  sons,  Isaac,  John,  and  Daniel, 
junior,  who  came  to  the  New  Jersey  colony  at  a  very  earl}' 
day,  and  from  these  three  brothers,  nearly  all  of  the  Coxes  in 
the  United  States  are  said  to  be  descended.  From  Isaac  the 
Ritchie  county  line  comes  ;  but  the  generations  from  him  to 
the  Isaac  that  came  to  Harrison  county,  are  about  six  or 
seven,  and  the  heads  of  the  line  down  are  alternately  "Isaac" 
and  "Phillip,"  and  it  is  quite  difiicult  to  niake  the  matter 
clear.  However,  Isaac  Cox,  the  Harrison  county  pioneer, 
was  born  in  Xew  Jersey  in  1731.  He  was  the  son  of  Phillip 
and  Hannah  Trembly  Cox — the  youngest  and  only  son  that 
lived  to  rear  a  family. 

Isaac  Cox,  the  first,  iu-  making  a  disposition  of  his  prop- 
erty, had  willed  all  his  immense  fortune  to  his  eldest  son. 
Phillip,  thus  setting  a  precedent  that  was  adhered  to  for 
seven  generations.  But  Isaac  Cox.  the  Harrison  county  pio- 
neer (being  the  youngest  of  the  family  as  above  stated),  be- 
came the  legatee  of  the  property,  owing  to  the  fact  that  he 
was  the  only  survivor  of  the  family.  His  brothers,  having 
gone  some  distance  from  home  to  make  an  improvement,  in 
advance  of  the  settlement,  and  raise  a  crop,  pitched  their  tent 
near  a  fine  spring  from  wdiich  they  got  water  for  constant 
use,  and  in  a  short  time  they  all  sickened  and  died;  and  upon 
investigation,  it  was  found  that  the  water  came  from  a  cop- 
per-mine, and  thus  was  poisonous.  Isaac  being  but  a  lad,  and 
drinking  here  and  there  where  he  chanced  to  be  herding  the 
stock,  escaped  death. 

Isaac  Cox  married  Miss  Sarah  Sutton,  of  New  Jersey, 
and  after  the  Revolution,  perhaps,  near  1790,  came  to  Harri- 
son county,  and  settled  at  the  mouth  of  Kincheloe's  creek. 
He  died  in  1838,  at  the  age  of  one  hundred  seven  years,  and 
in  the  "Broad  Run  cemetery,"  in  Lewis  county,  beside  his 
wife,  he  lies  at  rest.  His  father  died  in  New  Jersey,  in  1797, 
at  the  age  of  one  hundred  twelve  vears. 

They  (Isaac  and  Sarah  Sutton)  were  the  parents  of  five 
children :      Phillip,  Avho   sleeps   in   Ritchie   county ;  John   and 


334  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Mrs.  Sarah  (John)  Tingle}',  Ohio ;  Mrs.  Hannah  (Joseph) 
Smith,  Harrison  county ;  and  Isaac,  of  Chestnut  Grove,  Cal- 
houn county. 

Phillip  Cox  married  Miss  Christiana  Stille,  and  was  the 
father  of  Col.  Daniel,  the  Ritchie  county  pioneer,  and  of  nine 
other  children;  viz.,  Isaac  P.;  John,  of  Ohio;  David  S.,  Han- 
nah, Phillip,  Pluldah,  who  became  Mrs.  Hezekiah  D.  Tharpe, 
and  went  to  Iowa  ;  Sarah,  who  was  Mrs.  Timothy  Tharpe,  of 
Auburn  ;  James  S.,  and  Levi,  who  sleeps  in  Doddridge  coun- 
ty. All  the  Coxes  in  this  and  adjoining  counties  came  from 
this  family. 

Phillip  and  his  wife  Ciiristiana  died  at  the  home  of  their 
son.  Col.  Daniel  V.  Cox,  on  Slab  creek,  and  here  they  sleep. 
He  was  born  in  1760,  and  died  in  185i.  She  died  in  1856,  at 
the  age  of  ninety-two  years. 

Enoch, B.  Leggett. — Thomas  Stevens  built  the  first  dwell- 
ing on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  by  Mrs.  Cynthia  Lowther, 
at  Pullman.  He  came  from  JNIonongalia  county  and  went  to 
Alarion,  where  he  died.  But  Enoch  B.  Leggett  purchased 
this  slight  improvement  in  1845,  and  moved  into  the  rude 
cabin  until  a  better  one  could  be  constructed. 

jJr.  Leggett  was  born  in  Monongalia  county,  in  1811, 
and  near  the  3'\ear  1835,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  Athey, 
of  Marion  count}-,  and  in  her  native  county,  they  remained 
until  they  came  to  Slab  creek,  where  he  played  an  important 
part  in  the  early  afl:airs  of  the  community.  He  was  one  of 
the  charter  members  of  the  first  church  organization  here ; 
was  the  donor  of  the  grounds  for  the  church  and  the  ceme- 
tery, known  as  "Bethel,"  or  "Old  Slab,"  and  was  one  of  the 
principal  factors  in  its  erection. 

From  here  he  removed  to  the  Harrisville  vicinity,  near 
one  mile  north-east,  where  he  was  engaged  in  the  milling 
business  until  his  property  was  destroyed  by  fire,  in  1871; 
and  in  a  few  years  after  this,  he  went  to  Holbrook.  where  he 
was  again  engaged  as  miller  for  a  time.  Here  death  en- 
tered his  home  and  carried  away  his  beloved  wife,  and  he 
then  made  his  home  with  his  children  until  his  death,  at  the 
home  of  his  son,  E.  A.  Leggett,  near  Oxford,  in  1886.  His 
last  moments  were  full  of  triumph,  he  having  been  permitted 


SLAB  CREEK  SETTLED  335 

to  catch  a  glimpse  of  the  glorious  over  there,  before  he  closed 
his  eyes  to  earth.  Side  by  side  lie  and  his  wife  slumber  in 
the  Pullman  churchyard.  Here,  too,  rests  his  daughters 
Harriet,  Martha,  and  his  son,  Nelson,  who  died  in  childhood." 
The  other  members  of  the  family  are  as  follows:  Afrs.  Anna 
(T.  E.)  Davis,  Mrs.  Jennie  Amos  Tarleton,  Harnsville : 
Marion  Leggett,  Ravenswood ;  E.  A.,  Oxford ;  and  the  late 
Mrs.  Nancy  (James)  Davis,  Harrisville ;  the  late  Mrs.  Alarv 
(A.  K.)  Athey,  Marion  county;  and  the  late  Mrs.  Kathrine 
(Smith)   Gaston,  Doddridge  county. 

Airs.  Tarleton  and  Marion  Leggett  have  both  passed  on 
since  the  above  was  written. 

John  Leggett,  brother  of  Enoch,  made  the  first  improve- 
ment on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  and  occupied  by  his 
son,  C.  W.  Leggett.  He  was  born  in  Marion  county,  on 
September  3,  LS-?5,  and  there  on  April  1(3,  1846,  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Mary  Price,  daughtei  of  Charles  Price,  and  in 
September,  1848,  they  removed  to  Slab  creek,  where  their 
lives  came  to  a  close.  Mrs.  Leggett  was  born  on  August  15, 
1828,  and  died  in  1896  ;  and  he  survived  until  September  28, 
1906.  Both -lie  in  the  AMiite  Oak  churchyard,  as  do  their 
sons,  James  N.,  and  Francis  M.  Leggett. 

Their  other  children  are:  C.  W.,  Pullman;  AI.  Jackson, 
and  V.  Elbert,  Harrisville ;  and  Airs.  Kathrine  Rebecca  (T. 
A.)  Prunty,  Chrisman,  Illinois. 

The  Leggetts  are  of  English  origin.  James  Leggett  came 
from  England  before  the  American  Revolution  and  settled  in 
Rockingham  county,  Virginia,  and  from  there  removed  to 
what  is  now  Alonongalia  county.  West  Virginia.  It  is  not 
known  whether  he  was  a  soldier  of  the  Continental  army  or 
not,  but  he  was  a  noted  Indian  fighter,  and  not  lono-  after  his 
removal  to  the  "Little  Alountain  State,"  he  started  eastward 
on  a  journey,  and  nothing  was  ever  heard  of  him  again,  and 
thus  his  history  ends.  But  he  had  several  sons :  John, 
James,  Thomas,  George,  and  Isaac,  and  perhaps,  others,  and 
one  daughter  at  least.  This  daughter,  Elizabeth,  became 
Airs.  Arnett,  of  Arnettsville,  Alarion  county,  and  she  lived 
to  reach  the  century  mark;  and  her  daughter,  Airs.  Alary 
Glasscock,  reached  the  age  of  one  hundred  five  years.     She  is 


336  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

said  to  have  been  the  ancestor  of  Governor  Glasscock,  but  we 
cannot  verify  this,  however. 

James  went  to  Cohmii)us,  Ohio,  near  the  year  18"35,  and 
there,  and,  perhaps,  in  other  parts  of  the  West  his  descend- 
ants Hve. 

Thomas  and  George  (  ?)  Leggett  crossed  the  Allegheny 
mountains  into  Western  Virginia  in  Indian  times,  and  all 
trace  of  them  was  lost,  but  during  the  Civil  war,  James  Leg- 
gett,  the  brother  of  Enoch,  met  with  Thomas'  son,  James, 
who  was  serving  as  a  soldier  from  a  Western  state ;  and 
"Border  Warfare"  relates  the  story  of  a  party  of  drovers 
from  Dunkard  and  Fish  creeks  who  were  overtaken  by  the 
Indians  in  September,  1791,  while  on  their  way  to  Marietta 
to  market  their  cattle;  and  Jesse  Hughes  alone  escaped  to 
tell  the  tragic  tale.  "George  Leggett"  was  a  member  of  this 
party,  and  as  he  was  never  heard  of  again,  he  is  supposed  to 
have  shared  the  fate  of  the  rest.  It  is  not  positively  known 
that  he  was  a  member  of  this  family,  but  there  can  scarcely 
be  a  reasonable  doubt  of  it. 

Isaac  Leggett  was  but  a  half-brother  of  the  others,  and 
he  is  the  ancestor  of  the  Doddridge  county  branch;  and  John, 
of  the  Ritchie  county  family. 

John  Leggett,  senior,  whose  history  is  of  more  moment 
to  us,  was  twice  married.  His  first  wife,  whose  name  is 
wanting,  met  a  tragic  death  b}^  a  fall  early  in  their  wedded 
life,  and  he  then  married  Miss  Kathrine  Barrick,  who  was 
born  in  Germany,  and  with  her  parents  crossed  the  water  to 
Rockingham  county,  Virginia,  at  the  age  of  nine  years.  Plere 
she  grew  to  young  womanhood;  and  here  on  September  11, 
ISO?,  she  took  the  marriage  vovv.  She  w-as  a  sister  of  Adam 
Barrick,  who  was  at  one  time  a  resident  of  Harrisville,  and 
her  death  occurred  in  ^Marion  county,  at  the  age  of  sixty-one 
years.  Her  old  German  Bible  is  now  the  treasured  heirloom 
of  her  granddaughter,  ^Irs.  T.  E.  Davis,  of  Harrisville. 

Some  time  after  her  death,  perhaps,  in  the  early  fifties, 
Mr.  Leggett  came  to  this  county  and  resided  on  the  Flan- 
nagan  farm,  above  Berea,  for  several  years.  He  died  on 
February  14,  18fi'?,  at  the  age  of  eighty-four  years,  and  rests 
at  Duckworth  summit. 


SLAB  CREEK  SETTLED  '627 

He  was  the  father  of  a  large  family  of  sons  and  daugh- 
ters, who  nearly  all  have  descendants  in  this  county : 

]\Irs.  Mary  (C.  W.)  Batson,  of  Marion  county  (mother 
of  tlie  late  W.  H.  Batson,  of  Berca)  ;  Mrs.  Sarah  (Thomas) 
Bane,  Farmington  (mother  of  the  late  Wm.  Bane,  Pullman)  ; 
jMrs.  Elizabeth  (Zubulon)  Bee,  Berea ;  Mrs.  IMargaret  (Dick- 
erson)  Wood,  Marion  county;  Mrs.  Casandra  (Henry)  Good- 
win, Berea ;  Elethean,  who  first  married  William  Dixon,  of 
Pennsboro,  and  after  his  death,  Powell  Calhoun,  formerly  of 
this  county,  but  later  of  Tyler;  Enoch  B.,  and  John,  the  pio- 
neers of  this  county ;  James,  V\^ho  resided  here  but  removed 
to  Alissouri  shortly  after  his  service  as  a  soldier  in  the  Union 
army,  where  he  died  in  1903;  Thomas,  who  resided  at  Toll- 
gate,  also,  went  to  Missouri  shortly  after  the  Civil  war ;  and 
Jacob  died  in  youth. 

Note. — Some  conflicting  statements  have  confronted  us 
in  this  data,  but  we  iiave  given  it  according  to  what  we  con- 
sidered the  best  authority.  One  is  that  the  original  Leggett's 
name  was  Isaac,  or  John,  instead  of  James. 

Jonathan  McKinley  was  another  worthy  pioneer  here. 
He  came  from  Harrison  county,  in  1850,  and  redeemed  the 
"McKinley  homestead"  from  its  primitive  wilderness ;  and 
for  almost  sixty  years  his  family  have  been  identified  with 
this  community.  Pie  Avas  a  native  of  Monongalia  county ;  the 
son  of  Thomas  and  Sarah  Stuart  McKinley.  who  later  re- 
moved to  Harrison  county,  where  they  sleep.  He  was  of 
Highland  Scotch  stock.  His  grandfather,  John  McKinley, 
came  from  Scotland  to  the  Virginia  colony,  perhaps,  near  the 
middle  of  the  eighteenth  century ;  and,  doubtless,  served  as 
a  Revolutionary  soldier,  as  he  was  an  officer  in  one  of  the 
Virginia  regiments.  He  was  a  noted  Indian  fighter,  and 
while  on  an  expedition  against  the  Delawares  (with  near 
two  hundred  other  men  from  the  Monongalia  settlements), 
in  17S2,  he  was  captured  and  beheaded,  by  the  savages.  Ir. 
was  on  this  expedition,  and  near  the  same  time  that  Col. 
Crawford  met  his  cruel,  tragic,  death  at  the  hands  of  the  in- 
human monsters.  As  he  (Col.  Crawford)  passed  along  in 
captivity,  he  witnessed  the  death  of  John  McKinley  and  his 
four  companions. 


338  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Jonathan  McKinley  married  IsVxzs  Elizabeth  Rector,  i" 
Pruntytovvn,  wlio  was  of  Dutch  descent,  and  the;,  were  the 
parents  of  nine  children:  William,  of  Pullman;  Eli,  of  H.-'i- 
ri.•^vilie ;  Thomas,  of  Roane  county ;  John,  of  Pennsboro : 
Marion,  of  Harrison  county;  Mrs.  Rebecca  .\.  (Saul)  Som- 
merville,  Plarrison  county;  Mrs.  Juliet  (David ^  Owens.  \Vood 
county;  Mrs.  Harriet  (James  R. )  Lowther,  Pullman;  and 
Mrs.  Jane  Lowther.  Pennsboro.  The  last  two  mentioned 
alone  survive.  Jane,  first  married  Robert  Lowther  and  after 
his  death,  she  married  his  Ijrother,  William  L  Lowther. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  McKinley  rest  at  Pullman. 

The  late  Homer  JJ.  ^dcKinley,  of  Salem,  wlio  was  so 
prominently  knoAvn  in  different  parts  of  the  state,  was  a 
member  of  this  famil}-,  he  being  the  son  of  E!i,  and  ]\Irs.. 
Dorinda  Lowther  McKinley,  and  the  grandson  of  Jonathan. 
He  attended  the  McKinley  reunion  at  the  Kansas  State  build- 
ing, at  the  W'orld's  Fair  at  Chicago,  on  September  13,  1893. 
in  which  the  late  President  [McKinley,  wdio  was  then  Gover- 
nor of  Ohio,  and  other  distinguished  gentlemen  of  the  name 
from  the  United  States,  Canada,  and  Scotland,  participated 
(giving  interesting  reminiscences  of  the  origin  and  historv 
of  the  family),  and  thus  he  learned  that  his  ancestors  sprang 
from  the  same  Scottish  stock,  as  did  those  of  the  late  Presi- 
dent McKinley. 

Joseph  Wilson  was  another  early  settler  on  this  creek, 
beiow  Pullman.  He  was  of  Scotch-Irish  descent,  and  was  a 
native  of  Ireland,  haA-ing  been  i3orne  in  1804;  and  with  hi:-^- 
parents  removed  to  Kentucky  in  his  youth.  At  the  age  of 
twenty-one  years,  he  came  to  this  county,  where  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  [\Iary  Cain,  daughter  of  David  Cain,  who  resided 
on  the  Prunty  farm  at  that  tim*:- ;  there  the  marriage  was 
solemnized,  and  there  they  resided  for  several  years,  before 
going  to  Ohio,  where  they  remained  until  1847.  when  they 
returned  and  took  up  their  residence  on  the  Joseph  Summer'^ 
homestead,  where  \\.r.  Wilson  passed  away  in  1878.  Mrs. 
Wilson  died  at  the  home  of  her  son,  Lemuel,  at  Smithville.  a 
number  of  years  later,  and  both  sleep  at  Pleasant  Hill. 

They  were  the  parents  of  six  sons ; 

David   M.  and    James  died  in  vouth,   the  late  Robert,  of 


SLAB  CREEK  SETTLED  b3'.) 

Slab  creek,  died  several  years  ago,  leaving  one  son,  Alortimer; 
Napoleon,  who  is  a  twin  of  Lemuel,  of  Smithville,  resides  at 
Burnsviile,  with  his  only  son,  Carl ;  Hiram  resides  at  Salem. 
He  is  the  father  of  several  children,  JDUt  the  other  three 
brothers  had  but  one  son  each.  C.  A.  Wilson,  of  Burnt 
House,  is  the  son  of  Lemuel. 

Elias  Summers  was  the  first  settler  on  the  farm  now 
owned  by  his  son,  E.  X.  Summers.  He  was  born  in  Alonon- 
galia  county,  and  there  he  was  married  to  Miss  Miranda  Wil- 
son, sister  of  Isaac  Wilson,  of  Indian  creek,  and  came  to  this 
county  in  1838,  and  settled  near  Oxford,  on  the  farm  that  is 
now  owned  by  the  Michael  heirs.  He  removed  from  here  to 
the  Thomas  McKinley  farm,  on  White  Oak,  and  from  there, 
to  the  E.  X.  Summers  homestead,  in  1854,  where  he  passed 
from  earth  rich  in  the  esteem  of  all  who  knew  him.  He  was 
buried  in  the  Cox  graveyard,  and,  in  1901,  his  wife  v;as  laid 
by  his  side. 

Their  children:  Mrs.  Hannah  (James)  Prather,  \lvs. 
Margaret  (J.  M.)  Cox,  ]\Irs.  Jemima  (Robert)  Mitchell, 
James  K.,  who  lost  his  life  in  the  I'nion  cause,  Mrs.  Mary  A. 
I, John  O.)  Kelley,  Harrisville;  and  Thomas,  and  Delia,  who 
died  in  infancy,  have  ail  joined  the  throng  on  the  other  side. 
The  surviving  ones  are:  Mrs.  Lucy  E.  (T.  T.)  Pritchard, 
Wyoming;  Joseph  M.  Summers,  Ohio;  J.  T.,  Kansas;  and  E. 
X'.  Summers,  of  Pullman. 

Elijah  Summers,  brother  of  Elias,  and  his  wife,  Mrs. 
Susan  Barnett  Summers,  were  very  early  settlers  across  the 
Doddridge  county  line,  near  Summers;  here  they  passed  from 
earth  and  here  they  lie  buried. 

They  were  the  parents  of  the  late  Joseph  Summers,  and 
Elijah  W.  Summers,  of  Summers;  of  Mrs.  Louisa  Adams,  of 
Mrs.  Sarah  McClain,  and  of  Francis  Summers,  all  of  Roane 
county. 

Grant  Summers,  the  County  clerk  of  Doddridge  ;  M.  B. 
Summers,  of  West  Union,  who  is  prominently  known  in 
Democratic  circles  ;  Mrs.  George  \\' oofter,  wife  of  the  well- 
known  Baptist  minister;  and  the  Rev.  M.  A.  Summers,  of  the 
Baptist  church,  are  grandchildren  of  Elijah. 

Elijah  and  Elisha  Summers  were  the  sons  of  Alexander 


340  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Summers,  an  early  settler  of  ^Monongalia  county,  and  they 
were  two  of  a  family  of  ten  brothers  and  sisters.  The  other 
eight  members  being  as  follows :  Joseph  Summers,  Preston 
count}- :  David,  James,  Jonathan,  and  Mrs.  Rebecca  Barker, 
all  of  ^Monongalia  county ;  Elisha,  ]Mrs.  Elizabeth  Snyder,  and 
Airs.  !Mary  Swisher,  •Marion  county. 

Elisha  was  the  father  of  T.  M.  Summers,  of  Hazelgreen, 
and  here,  at  the  home  of  his  son,  he  spent  his  last  hours. 

William  T.  Mitchell  was  long  identified  with  this  creek. 
He  was  born  in  Barbour  county,  on  September  13,  1823, 
and  was  married  to  Miss  Matilda  Zickafoose,  daughter 
of  Sampson  Zickafoose,  who  was  born  in  Pendleton  county, 
on  June  24,  1831:,  and  died  on  March  24,  1895.  They  \vere 
the  parents  of  eight  children:  O.  G.  Mitchell,  Mrs.  Sarah  L. 
Prunty,  Airs.  Fannie  V.  Hardbarger,  who  reside  on  the  old 
homestead;  Thomas  L.,  Kansas;  William  T.,  junior,  George, 
and  Sampson,  of  Oklahoma,  and  Sanford  E.,  who  sleeps  in 
the  Alt.  Zion  churchyard,  beside  his  parents. 

Mr.  Mitchell  was  a  brother  of  John,  Daniel,  and  Josiah 
Mitchell,  who  went  West,  and  from  the  first  three  nearly  all 
of  this  name  in  the  county  are  descended.  Alartin.  of  Iris ; 
Robert,  of  Tanners  ;  and  the  late  Mrs.  F.  Al.  Law,  of  Lawford, 
are  the  children  of  Daniel. 

Hiram  Cain,  another  early  settler  on  this  creek,  was  born, 
lived,  and  died  in  this  county,  and  his  widow,  who  was  Aliss 
Eveline  Collins,  now  resides  with  her  daughter  at  Parkers- 
burg. 

Isaac  Trem.ble  and  his  wife.  Airs.  Alatilda  Neal  Tremble, 
were  the  first  settlers  of  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of 
Winfield  Chapman. 

He  came  from  Harrison  county  (?j,  and  here  passed 
from  earth,  on  August  17,  1878,  at  the  age  of  fift3^-two  years, 
five  months,  twenty-eight  days. 

Airs.  Tremble  died  on  Alarch  27,  1871,  at  the  age  of 
forty-four  3'ears.  Both  rest  at  Pullman.  They  were  the 
parents  of  several  children,  all  of  whom  died  in  youth,  and 
in  childhood,  except  Ellen,  who  was  the  late  wj,fe  of  Winfield 
Chapman.  Her  son,  Lester  Chapman,  is  the  only  living  de- 
scendant of  this  couple. 


SLAB  CREEK  SETTLED  341 

Henry  S,  Morris  was  another  arrival  of  the  early  fifties. 
He  was  born  in  Marion  county,  on  April  26,  1834;  was  the 
son  of  Richard  and  Susan  Morris.  He  married  Miss  Jane 
Wilson,  daughter  of  H.  B.  Wilson,  on  November  16,  1852, 
and,  four  years  later,  they  removed  to  Slab  creek,  where  they 
remained  until  death,  and  where  some  of  their  family  still 
live.  Airs.  Morris  died  on  March  20,  1884,  and  he,  in  1894.. 
Both  lie  at  Pullman. 

Their  children  were  ten  in  number:  Mrs.  Mary  (T.  N.) 
Kirkpatrick.  Fonsoville ;  the  late  Mrs.  Margaret  (A.  F.) 
Harris,  Pullman ;  Mrs.  Belle  Maulsby,  and  J.  W.  Morris. 
Pullman ;  Mrs.  Addie  Nichols,  and  Mrs.  Minnie  Rowe.  the 
late  Mrs.  Bertha  King,  and  the  late  Pinckney  Morris,  all  of 
Colorado;  and  Wilson  Morris,  of  Wyoming;  and  Mrs.  Nannie 
Riddel,  of  Nebraska. 

William  T.  Bane,  a  native  of  Marion  county,  married 
Miss  Louisa  Cox,  daughter  of  Col.  Daniel  V.  Cox,  and  set- 
tled the  ''Bane  homestead,"  where  his  widow  still  survives. 
He  served  as  a  soldier  of  the  Union,  and  in  the  Mt.  Pisgah 
churchyard  he  lies  at  rest. 

He  was  the  father  of  several  children,  all  of  whom  have 
passed  on,  save  three;  viz.,  Daniel  Bane,  and  Mrs.  Neva  Kirk- 
patrick, who  live  in  the  West ;  and  Jay  Bane,  of  Pullman ; 
Mary  Ann  Bane  was  the  late  Mrs.  John  Stull,  and  the  late 
Emerson  was  another  son. 

Daniel  Nay  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Hayhurst  Nay, 
were  other  pioneers  of  this  section.  Thc}^  came  from  Marion 
county,  in  1852,  and  found  a  home  on  the  farm  that  is  now 
owned  by  Claude  Allender,  and,  after  a  brief  residence  here, 
they  removed  to  the  J.  O.  Nay  homestead,  where  they  spent 
the  remainder  of  their  lives,  and  where  they  lie  sleeping. 
Mrs.  Nay  preceded  her  husband  to  the  other  shore  by  many 
years,  and  he  married  Miss  Abigail  Bee  for  his  second  wife. 
She,  too,  is  now  sleeping. by  his  side  on  the  old  homestead. 

Marshall  Nay,  a  son,  passed  on  in  his  youth,  and  J.  O. 
Na_y,  and  Mrs.  Jane  (W.  M.)  Wilson,  both  of  Pullman,  are 
his  surviving  children,  they  being  born  of  the  first  union. 

O.  Guy  Wilson,  who  is  now  one  of  the  promising  young 
educators  of  this  state,  is  a  grandson  of  Mr.  Nay. 


342  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COL  XT Y 

George  Foster  and  his  wife,  ]\Irs.  Michael  Hayhurst 
Foster,  sister  of  Mrs.  Xay,  also,  came  from  Marion  county  in 
the  early  fifties  and  took  up  their  residence  in  the  forest  where 
they  still  survive,  at  the  ages  of  eighty-nine,  and  eighty-seven 
years,  respectively. 

Their  children  are  as  follows :  S.  C.  Foster,  Missouri ;  J. 
N.,  F.  P.,  Clarke,  the  late  AA'.  F.,  and  the  late  [Mrs.  L.  A.  Xeal, 
all  of  Colorado;  Mrs.  ^lary  E.  Howard,  Pullman;  jNIrs.  A.  O. 
Wilson,  Mrs.  Ashford  Taylor,  and  Aliss  Louie  Foster,  all  of 
Pennsboro ;  and  the  late  W.  J.  and  Esther,  who  died  in  child- 
hood. 

Dr.  George  Curtis  Howard  who  is  widely  known  in  dental 
circles  is  the  grandson  of  Mr.  Foster,  he  being  the  son  of  the 
late  Ashford  and  Mrs.  Mary  Foster  Howard,  and  a  native  of 
Pullman. 

Dr.  Howard  became  interested  in  Dental  surgery  at  the 
age  of  eighteen  years — beginning  at  this  period  to  extract 
teeth — and  six  years  later  he  entered  the  office  of  Dr.  John 
Stoops,  and  continued  the  study  of  this  profession  until  June 
1906,  when  he  went  before  the  State  Dental  Board  of  Examin- 
ers at  Charleston  and  carried  olT  the  honors  of  a  class  of  forty, 
on  clinical  work,  all  of  wdiom,  with  an  exception  or  two,  held 
college  diplomas,  and  since  that  time  he  has  made  Pullman 
and  A\  est  Union  his  headquarters,  he  being  a  citizen  of  the 
latter  town  at  present. 

On  August  18,  1903,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Goldie  Mae 
Paugh,  daughter  of  \1t.  and  Airs.  A.  C.  Paugh  of  Preston 
county,  and  on  December  22,  1905,  her  gentle  spirit  took  its 
homeward  flight,  and  during  the  autumn  of  1907  he  was  again 
married  to  ]\Iiss  Sarah  Riggs,  of  Pullman,  and  the  one  son  of 
the  latter  union,  George  Jennings  Howard,  was  laid  in  the 
Pullman  churchyard  in  August,  1910. 

Jacob  Hayhurst  was,  also,  among  the  arrivals  of  the  early 
fifties.  He  was  the  son  of  David  and  Phebe  Devault  Hay- 
hurst, and  was  a  native  of  Prickett's  creek,  Marion  county, 
being  born  on  May  28,  18?0.  On  May  25,  1844,  he  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Elizabeth  Lake,  who  first  saw  the  light  in  Taylor 
county,  on  March  21,  1816  ;  and  in  1852,  they  came  to  Slab 
creek,  where  they  spent  the  remainder  of  their  lives,  on  the  old 


SLAB  CREEK  SETTLED  r>43 

homestead  that  is  now  owned  by  their  only  son,  G.  W.  Hay- 
hurst.  Here  Mrs.  Hayhurst  bade  adieu  to  earth  on  August 
1"3,  1885,  and  Air.  Hayhurst  joined  her  on  the  other  side,  on 
April  28,  1906. 

Besides  the  son  above  mentioned  they  were  the  parents  of 
tw'o  daughters,  Miss  Ellen  Hayhurst  of  Pullman  ;  and  ]\lar- 
garet  Jane  who  is  married  and  lives  in  Ohio. 

(David  Hayhurst  was  born  on  Sept.  23,  17.9J:,  and  died  on 
July  1,  1865  ;  and  his  wife  Phebe  Devault  lived  from  March  11, 
1797  to  July  20,  1877.) 

Leman  H.   Hayhurst,   Ritchie  county's  superintendent  of 
schools,  belongs  to  this  family,  he  being  the  only  son  of  G.  W.  ■ 
and  yirs.  Millie  Harris  Hayhurst,  and  one  of  a  family  of  six 
children;  viz.,  ]\letta,  Isa,  Juna,  Ida.  and  ]\Iae  Hayhurst. 

He  was  born  on  the  old  homestead  near  Pullman,  on 
February  18,  1876,  and  entered  the  profession  of  teaching  at 
the  age  of  eighteen  years.  He  served  as  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Teachers'  Examiners  for  four  years,  and  was  grad- 
uated from  the  State  Normal  at  Fairmont  in  the  class  of  1901. 
and  was  elected  to  the  ofhce  of  County  Superintendent  the 
following  year.  He  is  now  serving  his  second  term  in  this 
caijacity  and  is  proving  to  be  one  among  the  most  efficient 
and  popular  of  the  long  line  of  Ricchie's  superintendents. 

He  is  now  a  student  of  the  medical  department  of  the 
University  at  Louisville,  Kentucky,  and  will  soon  identify 
himself  with  the  medical  practioners  to  the  loss  of  the  Edu- 
cational field.  On  September  21,  1905,  he  was  married  to  Miss 
Cynthia  Pratt,  daughter  of  the  late  J.  E.  Pratt,  of  Pennsboro, 
and  two  little  daughters,  Ruth  and  Esther  are  the  result  of 
this  union.  Later,  Mr.  Hayhurst  was  graduated  from  the 
medical  college  in  June,  1910. 

John  Parker. — The  name  of  John  Parker  belongs  to  this 
corner  of  the  county's  history,  he  having  been  a  very  useful 
citizen  of  early  times. 

Mr.  Parker  was  born  in  Marion  county  in  October  1821 ; 
was  the  son  of  William  and  Sarah  Deacon  Parker.  His 
grandparents  came  from  England  and  settled  in  Marion 
county  before  his  father  was  born. 


344  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

He  was  one  of  six  cliildren  :  Thomas,  Phillip,  Washing- 
ton, Rachel,  and  Luvina. 

In  1830,  his  father  moved  to  Indiana,  where  he  died  two 
years  later,  and  soon  after  this  sad  occurrence,  the  family  re- 
turned to  their  old  home  in  Alarion  county. 

]\Ir.  Parker  is  said  to  have  come  to  this  county  in  1838, 
but  his  marriage  did  not  take  place  for  some  3'ears  after  this 
date,  as  he  was  but  a  lad  of  seventeen  years  at  this  time  and 
his  future  wife,  Miss  Nancy  Snodgrass,  daughter  of  Isaac 
Snodgrass,  who  was  born  in  1827,  was  but  eleven  years  of 
age,  so  it  was,  perhaps,  late  in  the  forties  when  he  took  up  his 
residence  on  the  waters  of  White  Oak,  where  Ellis  Prunty 
now  lives ;  and  shortly  after  his  settlement  here,  he  erected  a 
saw"  mill,  near  the  present  site  of  the  White  Oak  church, 
which  he  manipulated  for  a  few  years,  before  coming  to  Slab 
creek  to  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  by  Henry  Bruffey.  From 
here  he  moved  to  Pullman,  where  he  remained  until  he  was 
laid  in  the  churchyard,  in  December  1895. 

He  was  the  first  miller  of  this  section,  his  mill  having 
stood  in  what  is  now  the  garden  of  the  Pullman  hotel  property. 
It  was  in  operation  during  the  war,  and  the  women  and  the 
girls  were  the  "mill  boys." 

He  was  the  father  of  nine  children :  the  late  Sylvester,  and 
James,  Pullman;  Alvin  and  Airs.  Rose  Foster,  Colorado;  Eli, 
and  Mrs.  Luvina  Wilson,  Washington ;  Mrs.  Eliza  Howe, 
Upshur  county;  Usebius,  Parkersburg;  and  the  late  Frank, 
Clarksburg. 

Washington  Parker,  his  brother,  was  the  only  other  mem- 
ber of  the  famih'  that  came  to  this  county. 

In  1850,  he  married  Miss  Mary  Boone,  of  Marion  county, 
and,  four  years  later,  they  came  to  this  county  and  after  an 
eight  years'  residence  on  White  Oak,  removed  to  Chevauxde- 
frise  in  186?,  and  there  he  died  in  1885.  Mrs.  Parker  survived 
until  1909  when  she  was  laid  by  his  side  in  the  church}'ard 
at  Chevauxdefrise. 

Their  children:  Mrs.  Ella  Matheny,  Harrisville ;  Josiah, 
Washburn;  Leroy,  Pennsboro ;  Mrs.  Laura  Goodwin,  and 
]\Irs.  Lena  Cox,  Cairo ;  Festus  Parker,  W^ashington  state  ;  ]\Irs. 
Sarah  Foster,  Colorado ;  and  Mrs.  Iva  Lowther,  Yellow  creek. 


SLAB  CREEK  SETTLED  345 

Kirkpatrick  is  another  name  that  lias  long  been  associated 
with  this  part  of  the  county.  This  family,  as  their  name  sug- 
gests, originated  in  the  "Emerald  Isle."  Thomas  Kirkpatrick 
crossed  the  sea  at  a  date  unknown,  and  settled  in  Pennsyl- 
vania. He  later  removed  to  Ohio  and  finally  to  this  state 
where  he  finished  his  earthly  pilgrimage  in  Tyler  county. 

His  son,  Ichabod  Kirkpatrick,  was  born  in  Pennsylvania, 
on  October  11,  1815  ;  and  on  January  25,  1834,  he  was  married 
to  Miss  Agnes  Davis  who  was  born  on  August  19,  1815,  and 
settled  in  Ohio.  Here  Mrs.  Kirkpatrick  died  leaving  seven 
children  ;  and  in  1851,  the  family  removed  to  this  county  and 
settled  in  the  Pullman  vicinity,  where,  on  March  20,  1853,  Mr. 
Kirkpatrick  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  Ann  Bane,  sister  of 
the  late  William  Bane,  who  passed  on  in  March  1857,  leaving 
three  children.  The  family  at  this  time  resided  in  the  Corn- 
wallis  vicinity,  but  shortly  after  Mrs.  Kirkpatrick's  death,  he 
was  again  manned  to  Mrs.  Margaret  Lowther  Cunningham 
(daughter  of  Jesse  Lowther  of  Cornwallis)  and  this  same  year 
(1857)  purchased  a  farm  on  Isaac's  fork  of  Slab  creek,  where 
he  spent  his  last  hours  in  1874.  And  here,  on  his  old  home- 
stead, by  the  side  of  his  youngest  daughter,  he  lies  in  his 
last  sleep.  His  second  wife  rests  on  the  Flannagan  farm 
above  Berea ;  and  the  last  one,  in  Ohio,  where  she  spent  the 
remnant  of  her  days  with  a  daughter  of  her  former  marriage. 

The  children  of  his  first  marriage  were  as  follows : 
Drusilla,  died  in  infancy ;  J.  Jackson  resides  in  Maryland ; 
Ephraim,  on  Rock  Camp  ;  Levi,  on  Slab  creek  ;  Sanford  died 
in  childhood ;  Adonis,  in  youth  ;  Marie  married  James  Boner, 
of  Ellenboro ;  Eveline,  who  first  married  Nathaniel  Mitchell  is 
now  Mrs.  D.  S.  Bush,  of  Harrisville ;  Thomas  N.  Kirkpatrick, 
of  Grass  run;  the  late  Mrs.  Mattie  Owens,  of  Volcano;  and 
Sarah,  who  died  in  childhood,  were  the  children  of  the  second. 
And  of  the  third  marriage  there  was  no  issue. 

Daniel  Mason  and  his  wife  Rachel  Deacon,  came  from 
Marion  county  as  early  as  1852,  and  settled  near  Cornwallis, 
.and  from  there  removed  to  the  Mt.  Pisgah  vicinity  where 
their  grandson,  Thomas  Mason  now  lives.  Here  they  passed 
from  earth  and  in  the  White  Oak  churchyard  they  repose. 
Their  eldest  son  Thomas,  lost  his  life  in  the  LTnion  service'. 


34G  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Reilly  and  Sanford  are  of  Webster  county:  Eber  is  of  Penns- 
boro ;  Frank,  of  California;  Webster  met  a  traoic  death  from 
an  accidental  discharge  of  a  gun  in  his  young  manhood,  and 
the  only  daughter  died  in  infancy. 

Joseph  M.  Wilson. — Another  old  Slab  creek  family  which 
has  heretofore  been  overlooked,  and  which  now  comes  under 
our  notice  at  the  eleventh  hour,  is  that  of  Joseph  M.  Wilson, 
senior,  who,  with  his  wife,  Elizabeth  Gray  Wilson,  came  from 
Marion  county,  near  eighty  years  ago,  and  settled  on  the 
farm  that  is  now  the  estate  of  his  late  son,  Peter  T.  Wilson. 
"He  was  the  brother  of  Thomas  Wilson,  father  of  the  venerable 
Isaac  Wilson  of  Indian  creek ;  and  here  where  he  settled  he 
spent  his  last  moments  near  the  breaking  out  of  the  Civil 
war ;  and  in  the  Pullman  churchyard,  beside  his  wife,  he  rests. 

His  children  were  as  follows :  Thomas,  the  eldest  son 
v/ent  to  Zanesville,  Ohio ;  Eugenus  died  in  Preston  county  in 
1910  at  the  age  of  ninety-two  years  ;  the  late  Smallwood,  Jo- 
seph, Peter  T.,  and  Reason,  who  lost  his  life  in  the  Union 
cause,  were  all  of  this  county  ;  Lucy  Ann  married  Felix  Gray- 
son, and  after  her  death  the  family  went  to  Kansas  ;  Elizabeth 
was  the  late  Airs.  Levi  Wells  of  Grafton  ;  and  Sarah  was  the 
late  Airs.  Jackson  Shuttlesworth,  of  this  county. 

Joseph  Wilson,  junior,  married  Rebecca  Anne  Weaver, 
daughter  of  Joseph  Weaver,  and  spent  his  life  in  this  county. 
He  having  passed  on  in  1908  at  the  age  of  eighty-six  years. 
Louisa,  his  only  daughter  married  Charles  Pfeltz  of  Balti- 
more and  was  the  mother  of  Wm.  Pfeltz  of  Pennsboro :  and 
Winfield,  who  was  accidentally  killed  in  his  boyhood,  and  B. 
W.  Wilson,  of  Pennsboro,  were  the  other  members  of  the 
family. 

Note: — Doubtless  this  pioneer  was  the  first  citizen  of  ihi'^ 
creek  after  John  Cain. 


CHAPTER  XXIV 


White  Oak  Settled 


ins  stream  took  its  name  from  the  profusion 
of  valuable  White  Oak  timber  upon  its  banks. 
It  was  named  by  Adam  Weaver,  a  surveyor 
of  Baltimore,  Avho  laid  this  section  off  in 
blocks  before  it   was  permanently  settled. 

Barton  Hudkins  was  the  first  pioneer  to 
find  a  home  here.  He  came  from  what  is  now 
Barbour  county,  near  18'26,  and  erected  his  dwelling  where  L. 
S.  Clayton  now  lives,  and  after  a  brief  stay,  removed  to  the 
Bond's  creek  side,  and  settled  at  the  forks  of  the  Parkersburg 
and  St.  jMary's  turnpike,  where  his  life  came  to  a  close.  He 
was  of  English-Irish  origin,  his  father  having  come  from  Eng- 
land and  settled  in  the  Maryland  colony.  The  father  later  re- 
moved to  Randolph  county  (W.)  Virginia,  Avhere  Barton  was 
bom  in  1773, and  where  he  grew  to  manhood,  and  married  Altss 
NTaomi  Ingraham,  who  was  ten  years  his  junior.  She  was 
also  a  native  of  Randolph  county,  but  was  descended  from  a 
prominent  Scotch  family  by  the  name  of  Slavens  of  Highland 
county,  Virginia.  He  (Barton)  was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of 
1812,  and  had  been  a  resident  of  Harrison — now  Barbour— 
county  for  a  number  of  years  before  coming  to  Ritchie.  He 
died  at  his  old  homestead  on  Bond's  creek,  and  his  wife  spent 
her  last  hours  at  St.  Mary's,  but  both  rest  at  Highland. 
Their  children  were  as  follows : 

Mrs.  Rachel  (S.  G.)  Hall,  and  Bazil  Hudkins,  Highland; 
Mrs.  Margaret  (Arthur)  Hickman,  Tollgate ;  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
(Archibald)  Wilson,  Pennsboro ;  Mrs.  Edith  (Simon)  Davis, 
Tyler  county;  Mrs.  Sarah  (Thomas)  Dare,  Parkersburg;  and 
Allen  Hudkins,  Nebraska.  All  have  joined  the  throng  over 
there,  but  quite  a  number  of  the  grand-children  are  still  identi- 
fied among  the  older  citizens  of  the  county.     Among  them  are 


348  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY       . 

B.  H.  AA'ilson,  of  Goff's  ;  Airs.  Love  Prunty,  and  Airs.  Eveline 
Bee,  and  J.  AI.  \\'ilson,  Pennsboro ;  John  S.  Hall,  the  blinn 
poet  of  St.  Mary's,  is  also  a  grandson,  and  the  late  Airs.  Eliza- 
beth AIcGregor,  of  Highland  was  a  grand-daughter. 

Elijah  Clayton  in  ISll  purchased  the  Hudkins  improve- 
ment of  John  AT.  Wilson,  and  became  the  first  permanent  set- 
tler here,  remaining  until  his  dearh,  on  August  3.  1873.  He 
was  of  Irish  lineage,  his  father,  Xoah  Clayton  having  crossed 
the  sea,  and  settled  in  Virginia  earl}^  in  the  nineteenth  century, 
and  from  there,  removed  to  Alonongalia  county,  where  he  died. 
There,  on  September  27,  1811,  on  Little  Papau,  in  what  is 
now  Alarion  county,  Elijah  Clayton  was  born,  and  there 
he  grew  to  manhood.  He  was  one  of  a  family  of  twelve  chil- 
dren, some  of  whom  became  very  prominent.  John  Clayton 
represented  his  district  in  the  Richmond  Legislature  in  both 
the  House  of  Delegates  and  the  Senate;  David  L.  Clayton, 
another  brother,  being  a  musician  of  note,  v/rote  the  "old 
Virginia  Harmony."  Richard,  Ezekiel,  Little,  William,  and 
Elisha  were  the  other  brothers:  and  the  sisters  were,  Airs. 
Effie  Snodgrass,  Berea ;  Airs.  Xancy  Holden,  Airs.  John  D. 
Parker,  and  Airs.  Wilson,  all  of  Alarion  count}'. 

Elijah  Clayton  married  Aliss  Alillie  Amos,  daughter  of 
Stephen,  and  Elizabeth  Aliller  Amos,  of  Alarion  count}-,  and 
was  the  father  of  fourteen  children.  He  was  a  lay  minister 
of  the  Alethodist  Episcopal  church  and  his  influence  was  a 
power  for  good.  At  his  home  the  first  church  society  in  the 
community  was  organized.  He  gave  the  grounds  for  the 
White  Oak  church  and  cemeterv,  and  here,  beside  his  wife, 
who  died  on  August  20,  1891,  he  reposes.  He  was  one  of  the 
corner-stones  of  this  church,  and  was  a  pillar  as  long  as  he 
lived.  A  splendid  life-sized  portrait  of  this  venerable  man, 
which  was  placed  here  by  his  son  L.  S.  Clayton,  not  long 
since,  now  impressively  greets  the  visitor  to  this  church,  re- 
minding him  that  though  his  form  has  vanished,  his  memory 
is  revered,  his  influence  is  still  here. 

His  children: — L.  S.,  who  resides  at  the  old  home  and  the 
late  Stephen  and  Perry,  were  of  White  Oak;  Airs.  Rebecca 
(J.  AI.)   Wilson,  and  J.  Spencer,  are  of  Pennsboro:  Franklin 

C,  Des  Aloines,  Washington ;  A.  A.  Clayton,  Lawford ;  David 


WHITE  OAK  SETTLED  340 

L.,  Missouri;  the  late  Ishmael,  Illinois;  the  late  jNIrs.  Ingaby 
(Elmore)  Prunty,  White  Oak ;  the  late  Mrs.  Amanda  (Ezra) 
Chipps,  Doddridge  county;  Mrs.  Millie  F.  ( Reilly)  Mason, 
Webster  county;  Elizabeth  died  at  the  age  of  ten  years,  and 
Sophronia,  in  infancy. 

Peter  Pritchard  was  the  first  settler  at  the  mouth  of  this 
creek,  where  his  son,  John,  now  lives.  He  was  the  son  of 
Thomas  and  Nancy  Tichinel  Pritchard,  and  was  a  native  of 
Preston  county,  he  having  been  born  on  October  1,  1798.  On 
February  15,  1821,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth  W^illis, 
daughter  of  William  and  Anna  Douglass  Willis,  early  settlers 
of  the  Clarksburg  vicinity.  Her  father  came  from  the  "Emer- 
ald Isle,"  and  was  one  of  the  pioneer  pedagogues  of  Harrison 
county.  After  Mr.  Pritchard's  marriage,  he  resided  in  what 
is  now  Barbour  county  until  1837  when  he  came  to  White  Oak, 
where  he  spent  the  remnant  of  his  days.  He  was  one  of  the 
early  justices  of  the  peace,  and,  like  Mr.  Clayton,  was  a  cor- 
ner-stone of  the  White  Oak  M.  E.  cluirch.  He  died  on  Sep- 
tember 29,  1883,  and  Mrs.  Pritchard,  who  was  born  on  De- 
cember 30,  1798,  passed  to  her  "reward,  on  December  9,  1869. 
Both  rest  at  White  Oak. 

Their  children  :  the  late  George,  Thomas  and  Mrs.  Anna 
(B.  M.)  Lawson,  and  John,  of  White  Oak;  W^m.  T.,  of  Web- 
ster county;  Mrs.  Cassie  (Harrison)  Wass,  Harrisville ;  the 
late  Mrs.  Nancy  P.  (A.  E.)  Holt,  of  Fairmont;  and  Jane  P, 
who  first  married  Lewis  Maxwell,  of  Doddridge  county,  and 
after  his  death  became  the  wife  of  the  Rev.  W.  H.  Wiley,  is 
now  of  Fairmont. 

Thomas  married  Miss  Amanda  Lawson,  sister  of  B.  \\. 
Lawson,  and  was  the  father  of  the  Rev.  M.  F.  Pritchard,  of 
the  M.  E.  church,  and  J.  F.,  and  W.  I.  Pritchard,  of  the  U.  B. 
church. 

Mrs.  M.  R.  Lowther,  of  Parkersburg  is  also  a  grand- 
daughter of  this  pioneer,  she  being  the  daughter  of  Mrs.  Anna 
Pritchard  Lawson.  . 

William  I.  Lowther. — Contemporary  with  the  settlement 
of  Mr.  Clayton,  in  1841,  was  that  of  William  I.  Lowther,  who 
miade  his  improvement  on  the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of 
his   nephew,   John    F.    Lowther.     He   was    born    in    flarrison 


330  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUXTY 

couiil}',  on  August  "37,  1818;  and  was  the  son  of  Alexander  and 
Sarah  Ireland  Lowiher.  When  be  was  but  a  child  of  two 
years,  he  came  to  this  county  witl:  his  parents ;  and  in  1840, 
he  was  married  to  Miss  Virginia  Mitchell,  and  soon  after  be- 
gan to  carve  out  his  fortune  in  this  wilderness.  Here,  for 
more  than  sixty  years  he  resided,  and  to  his  dying  day  his  in- 
terests were  identified  with  this  community.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  tiie  I\I.  P.  church,  and  his  hand  played  an  im])ortant 
part  in  the  erection  of  the  first  church  at  Pullman,  known  as 
"Old  Slab,"  and  when  this  old  structure,  which  was  destroyed 
by  the  hand  of  an  incendiary  during  the  early  days  of  the 
Civil  war.  was  replaced  by  one  of  more  modern  architecture, 
he  again  lent  his  aid,  and  the  present  cluirch  stands  as  a 
monument  to  "his  memory.  He  was  a  delegate  to  the  General 
Conference  at  Pittsburg  in  1884.  His  wife  died  on  September 
15,  1885.  and  a  few  years  later,  he  married  his  brother,  Rob- 
ert's widow,  ]\lrs.  Jane  ]\IcKinley  Lowther,  and  the  last  three 
years  of  his  life  were  spent  at  Pennsboro,  where  he  laid  down 
the  cross,  on  November  (3,  1904,  and  where  she  still  survives. 

He  sleeps  by  his  first  wife  "at  Pullman. 

His  children:  Cordelia.  Alvin,  and  Mrs.  Sarah  Sommer- 
ville  Chapman,  rest  in  the  churchyard  at  Pullman;  the  late 
Rev.  Sylvester  Lowther.  D.  D.,  of  the  M.  E.  church,  at  Park- 
ersburg;  the  late  Rev.  Robert,  of  the  ^I.  E.  church,  in  Xew 
York;  and  the  Rev.  Oliver  Lowther  of  the  AL  P.  church,  the 
only  survivor  of  the  family,  resides  at  Pullman.  ]\Irs.  TnI.  A. 
Kendall,  of  Parkersburg,  is  his  grand-daughter,  she  being  the 
only  child  of  the  Rev.  Sylvester,  and  Mrs.  Cynthia  Prunty 
Lowther.  The  Rev.  Robert's  family  live  in  Xev\-  York,  and 
are  all  prominent  in  educational  circles. 

Job  Meredith. — Xear  the  year  1839,  Job  Meredith  came 
from  his  native  county — ^Marion — and  settled  at  the  mouth  of 
the  ]\Iiddle  fork,  near  the  site  that  is  now  marked  by  the  pump 
station;  and  a  little  later,  removed  to  the  mouth  of  White  Oak. 
just  across  the  creek  from  Peter  Pritchard  ;  and  from  there  in 
1852.  he  went  to  Rerea,  where  he  '-emained  until  a  few  weeks 
before  liis  death,  in  1881,  when  he  went  to  Salem,  where  he 
sleeps. 


][  HUE  OAK  SETTLED  351 

He  married  Miss  iSIary  Ann  Amos,^  daughter  of  Stephen 
and  Elizabeth  Miller  Amos,  of  Marion  county — cousin  of 
George  Amos — in  1837,  and  they  were  the  tirst  Marion  county 
people  to  come  to  Ritcliie,  though  quite  a  number  found 
honjes  here,  a  little  later. 

After  the  death  of  her  husband,  Airs.  Meredith  returned 
to  her  old  home  at  Berea,  where  she  bade  adieu  to  earth  in 
181)1) ;  and  there,  in  the  Pine  Grove  cemetery,  she  rests. 

Mr.  Meredith  was  a  member  of  the  Seventh-Day  Bap- 
tist church.  He  was  a  man  of  strong  character,  and  of  pro- 
nounced religious  views,  and  his  influence  for  good  had  a  tel- 
ling effect. 

His  children  were  twelve  in  number:  Mrs.  Elmina  Law- 
son,  Texas;  the  late   Mrs.   Hattie   Randolph,  and   Mrs.   Lillie 
Jett.  the  Rev.  D.  N.  Meredith,  and  Miss  Millie  Aleredith  (who 
is  a  deaf  mute)    Salem;  the  late  Alpheus,  and  the  late  ]\Irs 
Joel  Bee.     The  rest  died  in  childhood. 

William  Meredith  brother  of  Job,  though  not  a  pioneer 
was  long  identified  with  the  White  Oak  community.  In  18;?5, 
he  married  Miss  Tamar  Deacon,  daughter  of  John  and  Bar- 
bara Hardinger  Deacon,  and  from  Marion  comity,  they  went 
to  Monroe  county,  Ohio:  and  in  1857,  they  came  to  Ritchie 
county,  where  the  remainder  of  their  lives  were  spent.  ]\Irs. 
Meredith  came  to  her  death  by  a  fall  from  a  wagon,  in  1879. 
Pie  died  on  September  1,  1896,  at  the  home  of  his  youngest 
daughter,  Airs.  A\'.  G.  Lowther,  at  Fonsoville.  He  was  a  life- 
long Methodist — a  zealous  worker  in  the  Master's  vineyard. 

Side  by  side  he  and  his  wife  sleep  in  the  Wliite  Oak 
churchyard. 

Pie  was  the  father  of  live  children  :  A.  P.  Aleredith,  the 
onlv  son  resides  in  Washington  state ;  and  the  late  Mr.-,. 
Rachel  ( F.  C.)  Clayton  sleeps  there,  at  Des  Moines;  Mr&. 
Eliza  (Francis)  Day,  mother  of  J.  E.  Day,  of  Auburn,  sleeps 
in  Illinois;  Airs.  Jane  ( L.  S.)  Clayton,  is  of  A\diite  Oak;  and 
Mary  Eleanor,  the  youngest  daughter,  who  first  married  the 
late  James  Leggett,  is  now  Mrs.  \V.  G.  Lowther,  of  Fonso- 
x'ille. 


'For  Amos   family  ancestry,   see   Chevauxdefrise   chapter. 


352  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUXTY 

The  Merediths  are  of  AA'elsh  descent.  Davis  Aleredith 
was  born  in  AX^ales,  near  the  middle  of  the  eighteenth  century , 
and  being  a  Sabbatarian,  and  being  persecuted  for  his  re- 
Hgious  behef,  he  came  to  America  in  his  young  manhood, 
shortly  before  the  Revolution,  and  settled  in  Connecticut.  He 
took  up  arms  in  defense  of  his  adopted  country,  being  one  of 
the  patriots  that  helped  to  throw  ofif  the  British  yoke. 

He  was  married  three  times.  His  first  wife,  having  lived 
but  a  brief  time  after  the  marriage,  died  childless.  Xothing 
else  is  known  of  her  history,  but  she  probably  crossed  the  sea 
with  him.  Shortly  after  the  close  of  the  Revolution,  he  went 
to  Loudin  county,  Virginia,  where  he  was  again  married,  and 
where  two  children  were  born  of  this  union ;  viz.,  the  late 
Mrs.  Rebecca  Xipton,  of  Marion  county;  and  the  late  Xeu 
Meredith,  of  Ohio.  The  mother  died  when  these  children 
were  quite  small,,  and  Air.  Meredith  removed  from  the  "Old 
Dominion"  to  Marion  county,  where  he  married  ]\Iiss  Xancy 
Pritchard,  sister  of  Thomas  Pritchard,  senior,  and  seven  chil- 
dren were  the  result  of  this  union :  Rachel  married  Janif^s 
Arnett,  .Eleanor,  AA'illiam  Arnett,  and  Alartha,  James  Jones, 
all  of  Alarion  count}- ;  Thomas  sleeps  in  Kansas ;  Davis,  who 
was  a  la}'  minister  of  the  ]\I.  E.  church,  at  Centerville,  in 
Tyler  cotmty  ;  and  Job  and  \\'illiam  have  already  been  men- 
tioned. 

William  Baker  became  identified  with  the  White  Oak 
settlement  in  184T,  when  he  removed  from  ]Marion  county 
Avith  his  wife,  Mrs.  Ruth  Deacon  Baker,  and  their  seven  chil- 
dren, and  took  tip  his  residence  where  his  son  Tillman  H. 
Baker  now  lives.  Here  he  remained  until  March  1888,  when 
he  was  laid  in.  the  cemetery  at  the  mouth  of  White  Oak.  His 
wife  was  laid  by  his  side  in  1897. 

Their  children  were  twelve  in  number:  Thomas  D. 
Baker,  Hale,  Missouri;  X'athaniel,  of  Illinois;  Jonathan,  who 
died  in  the  hospital  at  Cumberland,  while  serving  as  a  Union 
soldier.  (The  first  two  mentioned  were  also  Union  soldiers.) 
]\Irs.  Amy  (Peter  T.)  A\"ilson,  and  Airs.  Alazan  S.  Snyder,  of 
Pullman;  Mrs.  Lurena  (A.  A.)  Clayton,  Lawford ;  Mrs. 
Kathrine  (E.  C.)  Snodgrass,  Smithville ;  A\'.  S.  Baker.  Au- 
burn; T.  H.,  White  Oak;  Airs.  Emma  J.    (Edmond)   Taylor, 


WHITE  OAK  SETTLED  353 

(lied  at  her  home  near  Pennsboro,  in  1907;  Newton  B.  sleeps 
in  Edgar  county,  Illinois  ;  and  Barbara  H.  died  in  infancy. 

?>Irs.  Clayton  has  also  passed  on. 

The  Bakers  came  from  Scotland  early  in  the  eighteenth 
century,  and  settled  among  the  mountains,  near  four  miles 
from  the  mouth  of  New  creek  in  what  is  now  Mineral  county, 
W-'est  Virginia.  There  Thomas  Baker,  the  father  of  William, 
the  Ritchie  county  pioneer  was  born,  and  there,  he  was  married 
to  Miss  Ruth  Jones,  who  was  a  native  of  Georgetown,  in  the 
District  of  Columbia.  From  there  they  went  to  Marion 
count}',  where  their  ashes  lie.  They  had  four  daughters,  Wil- 
liam being  the  only  son:  Mrs.  Mary  (George)  Saterfield,  Mrs. 
Hannah  (Nathaniel)  Mitchell,  Mrs.  Nancy  (George)  Daw- 
son, and  Airs.  Rachel  (Isaac)  Hawkins,  all  of  Marion  county. 

The  Deacons. — Since  the  Deacon  family  were  so  largely 
represented  among  the  wives  of  the  Ritchie  county  settlers, 
a  few  lines  is  here  due  them.  Mrs.  William  Baker,  nee  Ruth 
Deacon,  was  one  of  a  family  of  twelve  children — two  brothers 
and  ten  sisters.  Six  of  these  sisters  are  sleeping,  on  White 
Oak — five  of  them  in  the  White  Oak  churchyard ;  viz., 
Mrs.  Matilda  (Nathan))  Snodgrass,  Mrs.  Rachel  (Daniel) 
Mason,  Mrs.  Sarah  (Wm.)  Parker,  'Sirs.  Tamar  (Wm.)  Alere- 
ditli,  and  Mrs.  Julia  (Joseph)  Hawkins.  The  other  sisters 
were:  Mrs.  Mary  (Daniel)  Saterfield  Dog  Comfort,  chi^ 
county;  Airs.  Kathrine  Hawkins  (Aaron),  Alarion  county; 
Mrs.  Tasy  (Daniel)  Michael,  Alarion  county;  and  Rebecca, 
wht)  died  in  childhood;  Thomas  died  at  the  old  home  in 
Marion  county,  and  Phillip  went  West. 

The  Deacons  are  of  English  descent.  John  Deacoji  mar- 
ried Miss  Barbara  Hardinger,  a  German  maiden  of  Ciunber- 
land,  Maryland,  and  settled  on  Paupau  creek,  near  eight 
miles  from  Fairmont,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  the  twelve 
children   above  mentioned. 

Mr.  Deacon,  wdiile  on  a  trip  across  the  mountains  to  Rom- 
ney  with  a  drove  of  cattle,  contracted  the  yellow  fever,  and 
died  at  Kingwood,  before  he  reached  his  home,  leaving  his 
wife  with  eleven  children  entirely  to  her  care;  but  her  courage 
proved  equal  to  the  emergency  and  she  managed  to  clear  the 
debt  from  the  home  and  rear  her  familv. 


354  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

She  died  at  the  old  homestead  at  the  age  of  eighty,  ha\- 
ing  been  bhnd  for  many  years.  There,  she  and  her  husband 
rest. 

John  Lawson  was  the  pioneer  merchant  of  White  Oak. 
He  came  from  Rockingham  county,  Virginia,  between  the 
years  of  1845  and  "50,  and  erected  his  storehouse,  at  the 
mouth  of  tlie  creek,  on  land  now  (jwned  by  Mrs.  L.  AI.  Pvit- 
chard.  James  Taylor  succeeded  hun  ;  and  William  Pritchard, 
Charles  Satertield.  J.  AL  Gribble,  T.  D.  Baker,  Air.  Wilcox, 
and  James  Rymer,  later  held  this  business  intact.  Air.  Law- 
son  and  his  wife,  Airs.  Amanda  Long  Lawson,  Avere  natives 
of  Virginia,  and  to  the  place  of  their  nativit}^  they  returned., 
and  in  1904,  Air.  Lawson  passed  on.  He  was  the  father  of 
rive  children,  four  of  whom  survive. 

The  Lawsons  hail  from  Scotland.  Two  brothers  crossed 
the  sea,  one  settled  in  Virginia,  and  the  other,  at  P>altimorc. 
Alary  land. 

Theopolus  Lawson,  the  Virginian,  married  a  Aliss  Rus- 
saw,  and  from  his  son,  AA'illiam,  who  married  Aliss  Eliza  Alar- 
shall.  the  Lawsons  of  this  county  come.  AA^illiam  was  the 
father  of  ten  children:  John  F.  Lawson,  already  mentioned. 
Bushrod,  W.  of  Fairmont;  Salathial,  of  Texas;  the  late  A.Irs. 
Elizabeth  Thompson,  the  late  A'Irs.  Victoria  Amanda  Pritch- 
ard, who  resided  in  this  vicinity :  and  Airs.  Berthine  Alc- 
Dougal,  of  Pennsboro.  James  W.,  Rebecca,  Eliza  A.,  and 
Nancy  E.,  have  all  passed  on. 

Bushrod  W,  Lawson  was  long  a  resident  of  this  part  of 
the  county,  but  removed  to  Alarion,  late  in  the  eighties.  He 
first  married  Aliss  Anna  Pritchard,  and  they  were  the  parents 
of  Airs.  Lyda  (Al.  R.)  Lowther,  Parkersburg;  Airs.  Flora 
(Alarshall)  Prunty,  and  Airs.  Nancy  (David)  Clayton,  Oxford: 
and  several  other  children,  who  passed  on  in  childhood  and  in 
youth. 

Being  deprived  of  his  first  companion  by  death,  on  No- 
vember 21,  1872,  he  was  married  to  Aliss  Fannie  Prunty, 
daughter  of  Jacob  Prunty,  and  five  children,  four  of  whom 
survive,  are  the  fruits  of  this  imion. 

Salathial  married  Aliss  Elmina  Alercdith,  daughter  of  Job 
Meredith,    and    resided    here    for   a    numl)er    of   vears    before 


WHITE  OAK  SETTLED  355 

going  to  Texas  in  the  early  eighties,  where  he  still  survives. 
He  was  the  father  of  Mandeville,  the  late  Leni,  Mrs.  Enoch 
McGinnis,  Mrs.  Eva  Doak,  Morda,  and  Roxie. 

Josiah  L.  Hawkins,  a  well  known  lay  minister  of  the 
Methodist  Episcopal  church,  was  the  first  citizen  of  the  Scott 
Baker  homestead. 

He  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Julia  Anne  Deacon  Hawkins,  came 
from  their  native  county,  Marion,  near  1848,  and  only  a  few 
years  later,  Mrs.  Hawkins  was  borne  to  her  final  resting-place 
in  the  White  Oak  churchyard ;  and  not  long  afterwards  he 
married  Miss  Nancy  Haddox.  of  Barbour  county,  and  re- 
moved to  that  county. 

He  returned  to  this  county  late  in  life,  but  finally  went 
to  Mannington  where  he  met  his  death  by  a  train,  during  the 
latter  part  of  the  century. 

The  children  of  his  first  marriage  were  twelve  in  number; 
namely,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Perry)  Clayton,  White  Oak;  Mrs. 
Mary  Duckworth,  Barbour  county ;  Mrs.  Lucinda  Tichnell, 
Marion  county ;  Leroy  of  Upshur  county ;  and  two  infants 
who  are  all  numbered  with  the  dead.  Mrs.  Thamer  (Aaron) 
Mitchell,  Hazelgreen ;  Mrs.  Philena  (Nelson)  Williamson, 
Barbour  county;  Elmore  Hawkins,  W^ashburn  ;  Gideon.  Up- 
shur; Andrew  J.,  Monongalia;  and  John  W.,  Marion  county, 
are  the  surviving  ones. 

The  four  children  of  the  second  union  were  Belle,  and 
Galiard,  who  have  passed  on;  Ellsworth,  of  Marion  county; 
and  Allen,  who  lives  in  the  West. 

Henry  Hawkins,  thougli  hardly  a  pioneer  came  to  the 
White  Oak  vicinity  more  than  sixty  years  ago,  and  spent  the 
remainder  of  his  life  here.  He  was  a  son  of  Aaron  and  Kath- 
rine  Deacon  Hawkins,  of  Marion  county,  and  a  brother  of  the 
late  Mrs.  Syelus  Hall.  He  married  Miss  Martha  Yost,  and 
was  the  father  of  several  children,,  all  of  whom  have  joined 
him  on  the  other  side  except,  Woodson,  Permetus,  and  Aaron 
Hawkins. 

Three  died  in  childhood,  W^alter  and  Adolphus  in  youth, 
and  Elmus  married  Miss  Alice  Neal  and  left  two  children. 

After  the  death  of  his  wife,  Kathrine.  ]\Tv.  TT-^^^-kins  mar- 
ried   Miss   Melvina   Snyder,   of   Marion   county,   who.   by   his 


350  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

side,  is  sleeping-  in  the  '\\'hite  Oak  churchyard. 

John  Hawkins,  a  brother  of  Henry,  with  his  wife,  Mrs. 
Mary  Parker  Hawkins,  came  along  with  him  from  Marion 
county,  but  after  a  brief  stay  here,  removed  to  the  Harrisville 
vicinity,  where  some  of  his  family  still  live. 

He  passed  away  in  1863,  while  serving  as  a  Union  soldier 
in  the  Civil  war. 

John  Upton  and  his  wife,  Harriett  Hawkins  Upton,  and 
Jeremiah  Fluharty  and  his  wife,  Mary  Ann  Hawkins  Fluharty, 
were  also  members  of  the  little  colony  that  came  here  from 
Marion  county  at  the  time  the  Hawkinses  arrived.  They  be- 
ing all  the  sons  and  daughters,  and  the  sons-in-law  of  Aaron 
Hawkins,  who  gave  them  their  homes  here. 

Mr.  Fluharty  and  his  family  went  A\'est,  but  Mr.  Upton 
lenrained  until  he  passed  to  his  eternal  home. 

He  was  the  father  of  a  large  family: 

The  late  Mrs.  Carrie  Wagner,  ]\Irs.  Minnie  (E.  D.)  Clay- 
ton, Mrs.  Louie  (Sam)  McKinley,  the  late  Wesley,  Ulyses, 
Seigel  and  Grant  Upton. 

Samuel  Manear  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Olive  Zinn  Manear,  of 
I'reston  county,  were  other  early  settlers  in  this  section  on 
the  farm  that  for  long  years  w^as  known  as  the  "Manear 
farm."  Here  Mr.  Manear  passed  away,  and  afte^  his  death 
Mrs.  ]\Ianear  became  Mrs.  Silas  Sigler,  and  here  she  died,  and 
at  White  Oak  they  both  sleep. 

Mr.  Manear  was  twice  married,  the  wife  of  his  youth 
being  laid  to  rest  in  Preston  county  not  many  3'ears  after  the 
marriage. 

Asa — father  of  Jacob  Alanear — was  a  son  of  the  first  mar- 


riage. 


James,  of  California;  Marion,  David,  John,  who  lost  his 
life  in  defense  of  his  country,  on  July  20,  1864,  at  the  battle  of 
Winchester;  Mrs.  Hannah  Gallon,  Mrs.  Martha  Gallon,  Mrs. 
Mary  Martin,  and  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Ephal,  were  the  fruits  of 
the  second  marriage. 

John  Cook,  father  of  the  late  A\'illiam,  was  another  earl}^ 
settler  on  the  waters  of  White  Oak,  on  the  farm  that  is  now 
owned  by  the  Hawkins  heirs.  Here  he  died,  and  here  he  and 
his  Avife  sleep. 


CHAPTER  XXV 


Beeson  Settled 

ONAS  BEESON. — This  stream  took  its  name 
from  Jonas  Beeson,  who  is  said  to  have  erect- 
ed a  cabin  on  the  late  Smith  Bee  farm  very 
early  in  the  century.  But  investigation 
proves,  conclusively,  that  Beeson's  residence 
here  could  not  have  been  more  than  a  tem- 
porary and  fleeting"  one,  as  he  was  perma- 
nently located,  near  Parkersburg-  in  Wood  county,  on  a  tract 
of  land  given  him  by  his  father,  as  early  as  the  year  1799  ;  and 
he  held  his  residence  continuously  in  Wood  county  until  his 
death,  at  a  ripe  old  age.  He  was  a  great  hunter,  however, 
and  circumstances  point  to  the  fact  that  this  cabin  was  built 
for  the  sole  purpose  of  serving"  his  needs  while  on  these  hunt- 
ing expeditions  ;  for  beyond  a  doubt  this  stream  was  one  of 
his  favorite  haunts  in  those  early  days. 

He  was  born  at  Beesontown,  Pennsylvania,  near  the  year 
1767,  and  there  he  was  married  t<^  Miss  Rebecca  Tomlinson, 
daughter  of  Benjamin  Tomlinson ;  and  in  1799  they  removed 
to  Wood  county  where  they  rest.  Their  family  consisted  of 
four  sons  and  one  daughter,  the  late  Benjamin  Beeson,  who 
died  at  his  home  at  Williamstown  during  the  autumn  of  1909, 
at  the  age  of  more  than  ninety  years,  being  one  of  the  sons. 

Mr.  Beeson  was  the  grand-uncle  of  R.  S.  Blair,  junior  of 
Harrisville,  and  was  descended  from  a  prominent  and  highly 
respected  Virginia  family. 

Near  the  close  of  the  French  and  Indian  war  (1765),  his 
father,  Jacob  Beeson,  senior,  was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth 
Hedges,  daughter  of  Jonas  Hedges,  of  Berkeley  county  (W) 
Virginia,  and  grand-daughter,  of  Joseph  Hedges  who  emi- 
grated from  England  to  America  at  a  very  early  day,  and  set- 
tled in  Prince  county,  Maryland,  where  he  died  in  1732.  Her 
great-grandsire,    Charles    Hedges,   who   died    in    1714,    was   a 


358  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

prominent  English  statesmen,  and  held  various  high  offices 
under  the  Crown. 

Shortly  after  their  marriage,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Beeson  emi- 
grated to  Pennsylvania,  and  settled  at  Beesontown,  not  far 
from  L'niontown,  where  they  reared  a  family  of  ten  children, 
and  where  they  spent  the  remainder  of  their  lives. 

Their  children  were  as  follows  :  Jonas,  the  pioneer  of  the 
stream  that  bears  his  name,  was  the  eldest  son ;  Jane,  the  eld- 
est daughter,  married  John  Clarke  :  Alary  was  twice  married ; 
Lydia  died  single;  Jacob  Bee^ion,  Mrs.  Rebecca  (John)  Miller, 
U niontown ;  Agnes,  who  married  her  cousin,  James  Beeson,  of 
Berkley  county ;  Nancy,  wife  of  Jesse  Beeson,  and  Mrs.  Rachel 
(Robert)  Skililer. 

Jacob  Beeson,  junior,  was  born  at  Beesontown  in  17"r3: 
and  in  1796,  he  was  married  to  ]\Iiss  Elizabeth  Smalley,  who 
was  born  at  Newark,  New  Jersey,  on  April  3,  1773  ;  and  at 
L'niontown,  Pennsylvania,  they  spent  the  first  three  years  of 
their  married  life,  removing  from  there  to  Wood  county  in 
1799,  where  Mr.  Beeson  soon  rose  to  prominence  in  public  af- 
fairs. 

He  is  said  to  have  been  a  man  of  stout-build,  and  of 
medium  height  with  a  full,  open  countenance,  and  a  wonderful 
gift  of  oratory. 

He  was  one  of  the  justices  that  formed  the  County  court 
at  Parkersburg,  before  the  year  1810;  and  on  May  4,  1812,  he 
was  admitted  to  the  bar,  and  at  once  entered  upon  the  prac- 
tice of  law  in  the  courts  of  the  State.  He  represented  Wood 
county  in  the  Legislature  at  Richmond  for  a  number  of  years, 
and,  in  the  year  1819,  when  the  United  States  District  Court, 
which  embraced  the  territory  of  North-western  Virginia,  was 
formed,  and  Hon.  John  G.  Jackson  was  commissioned  as  its 
Judge,  Jacob  Beeson  was  appointed  as  (U.  S..)  Prosecuting 
Attorney  of  this  district  by  President  Monroe.  An  office 
which  he  filled  with  distinction  to  himself,  and  satisfaction  to 
the  Government  until  his  death  in  1823.  He  had  scarcely 
passed  his  forty-ninth  mile-stone  when  death  removed  him, 
and  thus  a  brilliant  career  came  to  a  sudden,  and  untimely  end. 

Mrs.  Beeson  survived  him  by  many  years,  dying  at  the 
home  of  her  daughter,  Mrs.  George  Neal,  junior,  at  Parkers- 


BEESOX  SETTLED       '  .-^5'.) 

burg,  on  August  i,  1S56,  and,  by  the  side  of  her  husband,  she 
lies  at  rest  in  the  "Riverview"  cemetery,  at  Parkersburg. 

They  were  the  parents  of  three  sons,  who  all  died  in  in- 
fancy and  childhood,  and  of  the  following  named  daughters : 
Elizabeth,  Jane,  Emma  G.,  Alary,  Agnes  R.,  and  Anne  S. 
Beeson. 

Elizabeth  married  David  Blair,  and  was  the  mother  of  the 
late  Jacob  Beeson  Blair,  and  the  late  R.  S.  Blair,  of  Harris- 
ville,  and  the  grand-mother  of  the  well-known  young  bar- 
rister, R.  S.  Blair,  junior,  who  doubtless  inherited  some  of  his 
oratorical  gift  from  his  distinguished  great-grandsire. 

Jane  Beeson  married  David  Stephenson,  of  Wood  county. 

Emma  G.  was  the  first  wife  of  the  late  Gen.  John  Jay  Jack- 
son, of  Parkersburg. 

Mary  was  the  late  Mrs.  John  Vail,  of  Ohio. 

Agnes  R.  married  George  Neal,  junior,  of  Parkersburg; 
and  Anne  S.,  was  the  late  Mrs.  A\  illiam  S.  Gardner  of  that  city. 

Part  of  this  sketch  is  taken  from  the  Parkersburg  Senti- 
nel. 

Jacob  Prunty  was  the  pioneer  at  the  mouth  of  Beeson.  He 
was  born  and  reared  at  Pruntytown  in  Ta3dor  county,  and 
there  he  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  McKinney :  and,  from 
there,  they  came  to  this  county  in  the  early  thirties,  and 
founded  a  permanent  home  at  the  mouth  of  this  stream. 

Mr.  Prunty  was  a  typical  pioneer  of  the  "Rough  and 
Ready''  order,  and  was  a  man  of  marked  ability.  He,  several 
times,  represented  the  people  of  this  section  in  the  Legislature, 
at  Richmond,  wdien  the  "Little  Mountain  State"  was  a  part  of 
the  "Old  Dominion,"  and  many  pleasing  anecdotes  are  told 
of  these  journeys  to  the  Capitol,  made  upon  the  back  of  a 
"superannuated"  gray  horse. 

He  survived  until  18G0,  when  he  was  laid  in  the  White 
Oak  churchyard.  Airs.  Prunty  died  at  the  home  of  her  son, 
Wilson  Prunty,  above  Gofif's  in  18G5,  and  owing  to  a  flood- 
tide  in  the  streams,  she  was  buried  on  the  homestead,  where 
she  died. 

These  pioneers  were  the  parents  of  eight  children,  all 
of  whom  have  passed  on  except  the  youngest  daughter,  Fan- 
nie, who  is   now   Mrs.   Bushrod   Lawson,  of   Fairmont.     The 


3G0  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

others  were  as  follows:  Felix,  Wilson,  Jacob,  and  Elmore 
Prunty,  Mrs.  Kathrine  (Stephen)  Clayton,  of  A\'hite  Oak; 
Mrs.  Emily  (Alexander)  Lowther,  of  Parkersburg;  and  ]\Irs. 
Rachel  Maley,  Rock  Camp. 

The  Pruntys  are  of  Irish  stock.  They  came  to  America 
in  Colonial  times  and  settled  in  \"irginia  where  John  Prunty, 
the  progenitor  of  the  Ritchie  county  family,  was  born. 

John  Prunty  was  the  founder  of  Pruntytown,  in  Taylor 
county,  he  having  broken  the  primitive  wilderness  there  at  a 
very  early  day,  and  left  this  little  "dot"  on  the  map  of  West 
Virginia,  which  serves  as  fitting  memorial  to  a  prominent 
career. 

Mr.  Prunty  served  the  people  of  his  section  in  the  Legis- 
lature at  Richmond  for  twenty  consecutive  years,  and  was  a 
candidate  for  re-election,  but  was  defeated  bv  the  small  m.a- 
jority  of  but  two  or  three  votes.  During  his  last  candidacy, 
he  told  his  opponent  that  he  purposed  to  hang  has  hat  on 
that  one  peg  (which  he  had  already  used  for  twenty)  for 
twenty-one  years  ;  and  when  he  was  defeated,  he  went  back 
to  Richmond,  and  served  as  Sergeant-at-Arms  in  the  Legis- 
lature, thus  occupying  the  same  "hat-peg"  for  the  twenty-one 
years  as  he  had  avowed. 

The  maiden  name  of  his  wife  has  been  lost  somewhere  in 
the  hazy  past,  but  he  was  the  father  of  six  sons  and  one 
daughter,  Roanna,  who  married  George  Arnold,  an  old  land 
surveyor  of  Lewis,  Braxton,  and  Gilmer  counties,  who  pat- 
ented the  large  tract  of  land  now  owned  by  Lewis  Bennett, 
and  also  the  tract  that  Mr.  Bennett  sold  to  the  "Standard  Oil 
Company." 

Jacob  Prunty,  the  Beeson  pioneer,  was  one  of  the  sons, 
JDavid  was  another,  and  Samuel,  who  married  Ellen  Taylor, 
sister  of  ^Nfrs.  Isaiah  AA'elis,  was  still  another.  The  last  one 
mentioned  Avas  the  father  of  Samuel  Prunty,  of  Sumner.  Mis- 
souri. 

Roanna  Arnold,  daughter  of  George  and  Roanna  Prunty 
Arnold,  married  Samuel  L.  Hays,  who  w^as  a  member  of  Con- 
gress (in  1841),  as  well  as  a  member  of  the  Richmond  Legis- 
lature,  and   they  were    the   parents   of  the   late  John    E.   and 


BEESOX  SETTLED  361 

Peregrine  Hays,  of  Glenville,  who  occupied  seats  in  the  Vir- 
ginia Legislature,  before  the  birth  of  AVest  Virginia. 

Peregrine  Plays,  also,  served  in  the  Legislature  of  this 
Slate,  and  his  sons,  A\'arren,  and  French  N.  Plays,  both  have 
a  record  there.  The  former,  in  the  Senate,  and  the  latter, 
though  still  cjuite  a  young  man,  is  the  oldest  member  of  the 
House  in  point  of  service,  he  having  repeatedly  succeeded 
himself,  from  Gilmer  county. 

It  will  be  noted  that  French  Plays  is  the  great-great- 
grandson  of  John  Prunty,  and  it  is  said  that  he  affirms  that 
he  is  hanging  his  "hat  upon  the  same  old  nail"  that  his  illus- 
trious grandsire  (so  many  generations  removed)  pressed  into 
service  for  the  twenty-one  years  that  he  was  a  member  of 
the  Richmond  Legislature.  But  since  this  "old-timer"  used 
a  "peg"  instead  of  a  nail,  doubtless,  the  voung  man  is  a  little 
deluded. 

Few  families  can  produce  such  a  record!  An  unbroken 
line  of  statesmen  for  five  generations! 

Felix  Prunty,  son  of  Jacob,  the  pioneer  of  this  county, 
was  also  a  member  of  the  House  of  Delegates  of  West  Vir- 
ginia, and  his  son,  the  late  Alex.  Prunty,  was  a  candidate  for 
this  office  at  one  time. 

Dr.  Frank  Prunty,  of  Belpre,  Ohio,  Dr.  Shirley  Prunty, 
M.  R.  Lowther,  of  Parkersburg,  who  has  helped  to  carry  out 
the  tradition  of  the  family  by  being  State  Senator,  and  not  a 
few  others  that  we  might  mention,  are  descended  from  this 
Ritchie  county  (Prunty)  family. 

Lynn  Camp  Settled. — This  stream,  which  is  a  small  tril)- 
utary  of  the  North  fork  of  Hughes  river,  took  its  name  from 
a  camp  of  lynn  wood  that  was  constructed  by  a  part\'  of 
hunters,  in  1776,  not  far  from  the  present  site  of  the  Wheeler 
Broadwater  residence. 

These  hunters  came  in  the  autumn-time,  leaving  orders 
for  their  pack-horses  to  follow  in  six  weeks;  but,  finding 
game  so  plentiful,  they  sent  the  fruits  of  their  first  six  wrecks' 
labor  home,  and  remained  another  six  weeks,  at  the  end  of 
which  time  they  had  slain  eighteen  bears.  During  this  entire 
time  they  had  had  no  change  of  clothing. 


■  It.-'  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

The  Richardses  were  the  pioneers  of  this  creek.  George 
Richards  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Kathrine  Bush  Richards,  with 
their  large  family,  having  come  from  Harrison  county  very 
early  ni  the  century,  and  settled  at  the  mouth  of  Lynn  Camp, 
on  the  land  that  afterwards  became  the  home  of  Edmund 
Taylor.  They  came  as  early  as  1800,  and  it  is  claimed  by 
some  that  they  were  here  in  1795,  but  this  cannot  be  verified, 
however ;  and  John  Bunnell  still  holds  the  distinction  that 
has  always  been  accorded  to  him,  as  being  the  first  settler, 
within  the  bounds  of  the  county. 

The  Richardses  are  said  to  have  come  and  to  have  gone 
back  to  their  home  in  Tlarrison  county  a  number  of  times, 
l^efore  settling  down  here  permanently.  George  Richards 
removed  from  the  mouth  of  this  stream  to  the  late  L.  P.  AX'il- 
son  farm,  where  his  life  came  to  a  close. 

Plis  sons,  who  were  as  follows,  were  nearly  all  pioneers 
here:  Isaac,  George,  Benjamin,  William,  John,  Michael, 
Jacob.  Elias,  James,  Nelson,  and  one  daughter,  Ivlrs.  George 
Six,  of  i\-thens,  Ohio. 

Isaac  Richards  died  (unmarried)  of  wounds  received  in 
the  war  of  1812, 

George  Richards,  junior,  settled  on  Rock  Camp,  where 
he  reared  a  family. 

Benjamin  Richards  married  Miss  Priscilla  Jones,  who 
was  of  Dutch  descent,  and  was  the  first  settler  on  Lynn  Camp, 
he  having  reared  his  dwelling  near  the  present  site  of  the 
school-house.  He  was  the  father  of  Dr.  Benjamin  Richards, 
of  Pullman. 

William  Richards  settled  on  the  Rev.  E.  J.  Taylor  farm, 
where  he  passed  from  earth. 

John  Richards  married  Miss  Nancy  Taylor,  sister  of 
James  Taylor,  and  went  to  Calhovm  county,  where  he  died  at 
the  age  of  one  hundred  four  years,  and  near  Big  Springs  he 
sleeps.  He  was  the  grandfather  of  Joseph  Richards,  of  Goflf's, 
Joseph  being  the  son  of  Edward  Richards. 

Other  Brothers. — Michael  married  Miss  Caroline  Wilson, 
daughter  of  John  Wilson,  of  Calhoun  county;  and  Benjamin, 
Miss  Ruth  Jones,  and  these  brothers  were  the  first  settlers 
on  the  Syelus  Hall  farm,  on  Lynn  Camp.     But  ^Michael  went 


BEESON  SETTLED  363 

to  Calhoun  county,  where  he  died,  and  where  his  descendants 
live  ;  and  Jacob  removed  to  Beeson,  where  he  died  in  1899,  at 
the  age  of  ninety-four  one-half  years,  and  in  the  Wilson  bury- 
ing ground,  near  the  mouth  of  the  stream,  he  lies  buried. 

He  (Jacob)  was  twice  married,  his  second  wife,  and 
widoAV,  being  Airs.  Drusilla  Jackson,  mother  of  C.  S.  Jackson, 
who  still  survives. 

Jacob  Richards  was  the  father  of  Mrs.  James  Elder,  of 
Hardman  chapel ;  of  Mrs.  Harrison  Lamb,  of  Beeson ;  the 
late  Mrs.  Priscilla  (John)  Elder,  of  Leatherbarke ;  the  late 
Airs.  Eli  R.  Cunningham,  of  Eva  (who  first  married  Asa 
Alanear.  and  was  the  mother  of  Jacob  Manear),  and  the  late 
A\'i]]iam  Richards,  of  Beeson.  Airs.  John  B.  Baker,  of 
Lamb's  run  ;  and  Airs.  Jennie  Baily,  of  Smithville,  are  among 
his  grandchildren. 

Elias  Richards  was  the  first  citizen  of  the  late  "Bail"  Wil- 
son homestead  (now  the  property  of  John  Jobes),  on  Lynn 
Camp. 

James  Richards  went  to  Ohio.,  and  Nelson,  to  Calhoun 
county. 

The  Richardses  were  of  German  descent,  and  were  noted 
Indian-fighters  and  hunters,  and  their  descendants  in  this  and 
sister  counties  are  a  multitude. 

Syelus  Hall  succeeded  the  Richardses  on  Lynn  Camp,  he 
having  purchased  the  improvement  of  both  Jacob  and  Alichael 
Richards,  near  the  year  1849,  and  founded  his  home  where 
his  son,  Elza  C.  Hall,  now  lives. 

Air.  Hall,  the  son  of  Reuben  and  Anna  .'^tuart  Hall,  was 
born  in  Alarion  county,  on  September  16,  1828,  and  was  one 
of  a  family  of  eight  children  ;  viz..  Airs.  Louisa  (John)  Cole, 
the  late  Strother  Hall,  Aliss  Julia,  Airs.  Lavina  (W.  T.)  Baker, 
and  the  late  Wm.  S.  Hall,  all  of  Marion  county  :  and  A.  H. 
Hall,  of  Pullman;  and  Airs.  Laura  Amos,  of  Harrisville.  Llis 
maternal  great-grandsire  (Stuart)  was  a  Revolutionary  sol- 
dier, and  when  he  returned  home  from  the  war,  he  brought 
with  him  a  souvenir  in  the  form  of  a  cream-pitcher  of  pretty 
design,  which  is  still  a  valued  heirloom  in  the  family,  it  being 
now  in  the  hands  of  A.  Hunter  Hail,  of  Pullman. 

On  April  12,  1849,  Air.  Hall  was  married  to  AUss  Lucinda 


;3G4  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Hawkins,  of  Marion  county,  and  soon  afterwards  came  to 
Ritchie,  where  he  has  ever  since  been  identified  among  the 
best  citizens.  Mrs.  Hall  laid  down  the  "cross"  at  their  home 
at  Pullman,  in  1907,  but  he  still  survives. 

They  were  the  parents  of  twelve  children,  all  of  whom 
reached  the  years  of  maturity  and  married.  One  son,  Leonard 
S.,  has  passed  on,  but  the  rest  survive.  What  is  said  of  this 
family  can  be  said  of  few  othere  of  its  size,  "All  are  Christians, 
and  none  have  ever  used  liquor  or  tobacco." 

The  surviving'  members  of  the  familv  are:  Elliott,  and 
Wilbert  Hall,  Mrs.  Florence  A.  (Morgan)  Pritchard ;  and 
Mrs.  Ardenia  McDougal.  Pullman;  Mrs.  Cordelia  A.  (C.  \V.) 
Nutter,  Holbrook ;  Mrs.  L.  Belle  Chipps,  Buckhannon ;  the 
Rev.  I.  S.  Hall,  Stuart  L.,  and  Elza  C,  of  Trilby. 

The  Halls  are  of  Scotch-Irish  lineage.  They  trace  their 
ancestry  back  to  Thomas  and  Rebecca  Story  Hall,  who  were 
citizens  of  the  Delaware  colony  at  the  time  of  the  Revolution. 

Thomas  was  born  on  September  34,  ITVl,  and  died  at 
Duck  creek  Cross  Roads,  in  Delaware,  on  May  39,  1773.  Here 
his  family  (a  widow,  two  daughters  and  five  sons)  remained 
until  1783,  when  they  emigrated  to  what  is  now  Monongalia 
county,  and  settled  near  the  forks  of  the  Cheat  river,  a  few 
miles  below  Morgantown ;  and  two  years  later,  removed 
farther  up  the  river. 

Mrs.  (Rebecca  Story)  Hall  was  of  English  descent.  She 
was  fifty-two  years  of  age  at  the  time  she  came  froin  Dela- 
ware, and  she  made  the  entire  trip  on  horse-back,  Mrs.  Alar- 
garet  White  being  the  companion  of  her  ride. 

Shie  died  in  Monongalia  county,  on  December  15,  1813, 
having  been  blind  for  twelve  or  fifteen  years.  Her  last  days 
were  spent  with  her  daughter,  Mrs.  Rebecca  (John)  Courtney. 

Her  other  daughter,  Parthena,  married  Isaac  Mason,  who 
had  served  as  a  soldier  of  the  Revolution  under  Washington, 
Greene,  and  Lafayette,  and  had  witnessed  the  surrender  of 
Lord  Cornwallis. 

They  remained  in  Sussex  courity,  Virginia,  from  1781 
until  1787,  when  they  removed  to  Monongalia  county.  There 
Mr.  Mason  constructed  a  boat,  and  with  a  number  of  other 
families    (there   being   sixteen   boats    in   all)    sailed   down   the 


BEESON  SETTLED  3G5 

( )iiio  river;  but  in  crossing  the  faHs,  his  boat,  the  most  valu- 
able one  of  all,  was  lost.  Undaunted  by  this  disaster,  how- 
ever, the  little  colony  pressed  on,  braving  the  danger  of  the 
hostile  Indians,  which  they  encountered,  until  they  reached 
the  present  site  of  Nashville,  Tennessee,  on  March  18,  1789, 
where  a  fort,  known  as  "French  Lick,"  then  stood;  and  there, 
they  "cast  their  anchor." 

Isaac  Mason  was  the  first  tailor  where  the  city  of  Nash- 
ville now  stands,  and  there  in  the  "land  of  Jackson  and  of  the 
Hermitage,"  he  and  his  beloved  Parthena,  sleep. 

The  sons  of  Mrs.  Rebecca  Story  Hall,  were,  Asa,  Jordon, 
Rynear,  Nathan,  and  Allen,  all  of  whom  remained  in  Marion 
and  Monongalia  county  except  Allen,  who  went  to  Ohio. 

The  late  Rev.  Ashford  Hall,  who  served  the  Harrisville 
Methodist  Episcopal  charge  in  the  early  seventies,  was  the 
grandson  of  Nathan  Hall,  he  being  the  son  of  Jesse  and  Sarah 
Bryan  Hall. 

Asa  married  Miss  Sophia  White,  and  from  his  son, 
Thomas,  who  married  Miss  Jane  Bennett,  the  Ritchie  county 
Halls  come.  Ira  Conditt  Hall,  of  Cokeley,  being  his  son,  and 
Syelus  and  A.  H.,  of  Pullman,  his  grandsons.  Reuben  Hall, 
as  before  mentioned,  was  the  father  of  Syelus  Plall. 

The  late  John  Hall,  of  Mt.  Zion  (father  of  D.  S.,  and  E. 
B.  Hall,  of  Washburn,  and  Fred,  of  Pullman)  ;  and  the  late 
Mrs.  Larkin  Peirpoint,  were  also  descended  from  this  family. 

And  we  have  strong  evidence,  though  no  positive  proof. 
that  the  family  of  the  late  John  Flail,  of  Harrisville;  and  the 
late  Mrs.  Ransom  Kendall,  of  Chevauxdefrise,  came  from  this 
family. 

Mrs.  Kendall's  mother,  Sarah  Hall  Rex,  was  a  native  of 
Delaware,  and  circumstances  all  point  to  the  fact  that  she  be- 
longed to  this  family,  but,  if  so,  her  name  was  omitted  from 
the  "Hall  Record,"  by  Richard  S.  Miller,  of  Newburg,  West 
Virginia,  from  which  this  information  is  gleaned.  (See  last 
chapter  for  origin  of  the  name  "Hall"  and  farther  history  of 
the  family.) 

Rock  Camp  is  a  small  tributary  of  the  North  fork  of 
Hughes  river — flowing  into  it  at  Hannahdale.     It  derived  its 


306  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUXTY 

name  from  a  huge  boulder,  at  its  head,  upon  which  a  team  of 
horses  and  a  wagon  can  be  turned. 

George  Richards,  junior,  son  of  George,  senior,  was  its 
first  denizen.  He  and  his  wife,  Airs.  Elizabeth  Coburn  Rich- 
ards, having  come  here  early  in  the  century,  and  settled  on 
the  farm  that  is  now  the  home  of  Parker  Grimes. 

Nimrod  Cross  was  the  next  settler.  He  was  of  English 
descent,  and  was  a  native  of  Taylor  count}'.  He  married  Aliss 
Eliza  Richards,  daughter  of  George  Richards,  junior,  and 
took  up  his  residence  where  Lincoln  Wilson  now  lives,  some 
time  in  the  thirties.  Here  he  passed  from  earth  in  1888,  and 
in  the  Pisgah  churchyard,  beside  his  wife,  he  rests. 

His  children  were,  G.  A\'.  Cross,  Pullman  ;  John  Cross. 
Indiana  (who  were  both  Union  soldiers)  :  the  late  Airs.  Alary 
(John)  Elder,  Leatherbarke ;  the  late  Airs.  Susan  ( R.  L.  B.) 
Elder,  of  Ritchie  and  Gilmer  counties;  Airs.  Kathrine  (Wm.) 
Cunningham,  Calhoun  county;  Airs.  Xancy  (George)  Jeffrej^s, 
Alole  Hill;  the  late  Airs.  Alartha  (Bent)  Prunty,  Doddridge 
county ;  and  Airs.  Thomas  Hamrick,  Wirt  county. 

John  Cross,  a  brother  of  Ximrod,  was  another  pioneer 
on  this  stream.  He  married  Aliss  Kathrine  Prunty,  daughter 
of  David,  of  Pruntytown,  for  his  first  wife,  and  his  second, 
was  Aliss  Sarah  Jones.    He  sleeps  on  Beeson. 

William  K.  Elder  was  another  old  settler  on  Beeson.  His 
parents,  John  and  Alargaret  AIcHenry  Elder,  crossed  from 
Ireland  and  settled  in  Harrison  county,  late  in  the  eighteenth 
century,  where  they  reared  their  family,  and  where  they  spent 
their  last  hours. 

William  K.  Elder  was  married  to  Aliss  Ruhama  \\"illis, 
of  Harrison  county,  and  came  to  this  county  perhaps  in  the 
earlv  forties  and  settled  on  this  stream.  Pie  later  removed  to 
Alurph}-  district  and  on  Grass  run  he  died  many  years  ago. 
He  and  his  wife  were  the  parents  of  thirteen  children,  seven 
of  whom  died  in  childhood,  and  the  rest  were  as  follows :  the 
late  Rev.  John  Elder,  the  late  Sanford,  Robert  L.  B.,  Airs. 
Loda  Simms,  and  Airs.  Anna  Ferrell  Campbell. 

Joseph,  a  brother  of  William  K.,  also  resided  in  this 
countv  for  a  brief  time.  And  some  of  his  descendants  are  still 
identified  among  the  citizens  of  the  county. 


CHAPTER  XXVI 


Macfarlan  and  Dutchman 


HE  names  of  Alacfarian  and  Dittclinian  are 
said  to  have  had  their  origin  in  a  most  in- 
teresting, but  tragic  incident  which  occurred 
here  in  1T69,  and  which  is  as  follows : 

Early  in  the  autumn  of  the  year  1769,  a 
party  of  ten  white  men,  which  included 
Jesse  and  James  Hughes,  an  Englishman 
by  the  name  of  Alacfarlan,  and  a  Dutchman  (whose  name  is 
missing  owing  to  the  fact  that  he  was  always  designated  b}^ 
liis  nationality,  "the  Dutchman"),  were  in  this  section  on 
some  unknown  mission,  perhaps  in  pursuit  of  the  red-skins, 
when,  on  coming  up  the  river  near  the  mouth  of  Bear  run, 
they  met  two  men  who  were  going  in  a  westerly  direction, 
and  Avho  confided  to  them  that  they  had  discovered  an  Indian 
trail,  which  seemed  to  lead  to  a  camp  near  the  mouth  of  the 
stream  that  is  now  known  as  Macfarlan,  and  warned  them 
to  be  on  the  alert.  The  warning  was  duly  heeded,  by  the  lit- 
tle party,  who  followed  the  trail  until  they  reached  the  Ox- 
bow ;  here  they  left  it,  taking  a  shorter  route  across  the  hill 
to  the  river  near  the  present  site  of  the  C.  8z  K.  V.  railroad 
depot,  where  they  came  upon  the  old  trail  again,  and  soon 
detected  unmistakable  signs  that  the  foe  was  near:  and  a 
council  was  then  held  as  to  what  should  be  done.  Jesse 
Hughes,  the  leader,  thought  it  best  to  cross  the  river,  and  to 
resume  the  journey  on  the  south  side,  but  James  Hughes, 
Macfarlan,  and  the  "Dutchman,"  and  two  others,  thinking 
there  was  no  imminent  danger,  after  resting  awhile,  continued 
on  the  "old  trail." 

But  scarcely  had  they  crossed  Macfarlan,  in  front  of  the 
present  site  of  the  "'Beechwood  hotel,"  when  they  were  fired 
upon  from  the  timber  at  the  right  hand  side  of  the  road,  and 
the  Dutchman  and  Macfarlan  were  wounded.     Jesse  Hughes 


3bS 


HISTORY  Oh  RITCHIE  COUNTY 


and  his  party,  hearing  the  firing  and  guessing  the  cause,  liast- 
ily  crossed  the  stream  near  the  present  pump-station  and 
ascended  the  hill,  and  opened  fire  on  the  fiank  and  rear  of  the 
savages  at  a  most  unexpected  moment,  putting  them  to  flight, 
and,  doubtlessly,  saving  the  five  from  the  tomahawk  and  the 
scalping-knife. 

Macfarlan  recovered  from  his  wounds,  but  the  "Dutcli- 
man"  died  that  night  at  their  camp  on  w^hat  is  now  Dutch- 
man's run,  and  was  buried  under  the  side  of  a  large  rock  in 
the  bed  of  the  stream,  near  one-half  mile  from  the  mouth. 

Though  one  hundred  forty  years  have  gone  by  since  this 
tragical  drama  was  enacted  here,  the  names  of  Macfarlan  and 
Dutchman  have  ever  since  clung  to  these  streams,  and  will 
doubtless  perpetuate  the  memory  of  these  unknown  indi\id- 
uals  who  were  thousands  of  miles  from  their  home-lands. 
Though  but  lowly  monuments,  they  will  endure  when  impos- 
ing ones  that  have  been  erected  to  the  great  earth  have  crum- 
bled to  decav.^ 


The  Village  of  Macfarlan. 
(The  scene   of   the  first   tragedy   enacted    on    Ritchie    county ,  poil.) 


^We  are  indebted  to  Mr.  John  B.  Lemon  for  this  interesting  tradi- 
tion, which  came  down  to  him  from  his  maternal  ancestors,  the  Deemses. 
James  Deem,  a  very  early  pioneer,  having  come  here  and  viewed  the 
scene  of  the  conflict  sixteen  years  after  it  took  place,  and  witnessed  the 
bullet  marks  upon  the  trees,  and  copied  the  date  (1769)  from  a  large  beei^h 
tree  that  stood  until  1S40,  when  it  was  cut  down  in  building  the  Pike. 
Mr.  Deem  also  pointed  out  the  sleeping  place  of  the  unfortunate  "Dutch- 
man." A  noticeable  feature  of  this  tradition  is  that  it  antedates  the  real 
time  of  the  discovery  of  Ritchie  county,  and  the  naming  of  its  principal 
streams. 


I 


MACFARLAN  AND  DUTCHMAN  3G9 

Dutchman  Settled  by  Robert  Lough. — Though  the  his- 
tory of  this  stream  began  at  such  an  early  day,  its  wilderness 
remained  unbroken  until  near  the  year  1840,  when  Robert 
Lough  came  here  from  Monongalia  county  v/ith  his  famil)^ 
and  reared  the  first  cabin — on  the  farm  that  is  now  owned  by 
the  Dawson  heirs. 

The  records  show  that  in  the  year  1812  the  Governor  of 
the  Commonwealth  of  Virginia  granted  to  the  said  Robert 
Lough  a  patent  for  one  hundred  acres  on  Dutchman's  run. 
From  here,  he  removed  to  the  Webb's  mill  vicinity,  a  few  years 
later,  he  having  purchased  five  hundred  sixty-nine  acres  of 
land  in  this  section  of  Waitman  Joseph,  of  Tyler  county,  on 
November  14,  1846,  a  tract  which  now  includes  the  farms  of 
John  P.  Kennedy,  John  V.  Warner,  John  Hallam,  and  per- 
haps, others. 

Here  he  resided  until  1863,  when  this  property  passed 
into  other  hands,  and  for  the  next  ten  years  he  made  his  home 
with  his  son,  John,  on  Indian  run ;  and  early  in  the  seventies,  • 
they  all  went  to  Vermillion  county,  Illinois,  where  he  died 
shortly  after  his  arrival ;  and  there,  in  a  rural  burying-ground, 
near  Ridge  Farm,  his  ashes  lie.  He  was  a  native  of  Monon- 
galia county  and  was  born  in  1800. 

A  year  or  two  after  his  death,  his  aged  widow,  Mrs.  Sarah 
Lynch  Lough,  returned  to  West  Virginia,  and  made  her  home 
with  her  daughter.  Airs.  Robert  Means,  .in  Calhoun  county, 
until  she  was  borne  to  the  Fluharty  cemetery,  on  Leading 
creek,  in  1880. 

They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  named  children: 

John,  Ninirod,  Edward  D.,  Pierce,  Eleanore,  Nancy, 
Sarah,  and  Rachel,  all  of  whom  were  born  in  Monongalia 
county,  except  Rachel. 

John  Lough,  the  eldest  son — born  in  the  early  twenties,  , 
married  Miss  Mary  Brand,  of  Monongalia  county,  nvho  only 
survived  the  nuptial  hour  a  short  time;  he  then  married  Mrs. 
Mary  Ann  Wilson  Drake,  sister  of  the  venerable  Isaac  Wil- 
son, and  settled  near  the  forks  of  Dutchman,  on  the  farm  thai: 
is  now  owned  by  the  DaAvson  heirs — doubtless  the  one  im- 
proved by  his  father — near  the  year  1845.  After  a  few  years 
sojourn  here,  he  traded  his  property  to  the  late  Cyrus  Daw- 


370  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUXTV 

son  for  what  is  now  the  P.  R.  Tharpe  farm,  on  Indian  run, 
and  tiiere  he  resided  nntil  he  went  to  Vermillion  county,  Illi- 
nois, late  in  the  sixties  or  early  in  the  seventies.  There  he 
saw  the  last  of  earth,  in  1879  ;  and  there,  beside  his  wdfe,  he 
rests,  with  his  father,  near  Ridge  Farm.  He  had  several 
children,  but  as  they  all  live  in  the  West,  their  names  are 
missing-. 

Nimrod  Lough — born  in  18?3.  was  first  married  to  Miss 
Elizabeth  Butcher,  sister  of  the  late  Washington  Bvitcher, 
and  Airs.  Jacob  Dougherty,  who  passed  to  her  final  home  m 
18G5 ;  and  his  second  wife  was  Mrs.  Rachel  Stansbury  GoiT. 
He  resided  in  the  Hardman  chapel  vicinity,  and  on  Alum  fork 
of  Bone  creek  for  many  years.  He  tendered  service  as  a  Union 
soldier  during  the  Civil  war.  and  finally  in  1905,  went  to  the 
Soldiers'  Home  at  Dayton,  Ohio,  where  he  answered  the  -"last 
roll  call"  in  1908,  and  where  he  slumbers. 

The  children  of  his  first  marriage  were.  Robert,  Thomas. 
and  Jerome,  of  Lewis  county ;  Caroline,  who  first  married 
John  Vv'illiam  Law,  of  this  county,  and  after  his  death,  went 
to  Harrison  county  and  married  Alilton  Davis,  of  Salem.  She 
is  the  mother  of  Steele  Law,  of  Clarksburg. 

Sarah  Ellen  became  Mrs.  Isaac  Smith,  of  Smitliville  ;  and 
Isa  married  a  Mr.  Clarke,  and  resides  in  Lewis  county. 

The  children  of  his  second  marriage  were  the  late  John 
Lough,  Moses,  and  Newton,  who  now  live  in  Ohio :  and 
Auriila,  who  was  the  late  Mrs.  Phineas  Folden,  of  Jackson 
county. 

Edward  D.  Lough  was  born  en  March  24,  1824,  and  on 
April  10,  1849,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Dorcas  Dawson,  of 
Marion  county ;  and  there  settled  down  until  1855.  when  he 
removed  his  family  to  land  owned  by  his  father  on  lower  In- 
dian creek.  From  there,  he  went  to  what  is  now  the  Amos 
Scott  farm,  farther  up  the  creek,  and  finally,  in  18T0,  to  the 
old  homestead,  near  Flarrisville,  which  is  still  in  the  hands 
of  his  heirs.  Here  on  August  25,  1903,  he  bade  adieu  to  earth. 
On  December  fifth  of  the  same  year,  his  aged  companion  fol- 
lowed him  to  the  grave.  Both  rest  in  the  Odd  Fellows  ceme- 
tery, at  Harrisville. 

They  were  the  parents  of  five  children:     John  A.,  died  in 


MACFARLAN  AND  DUTCHMAN  :-l7i 

infancy.  Napoleon  E.,  and  Misses  Mary  F.  and  Henrietta, 
who  has  been  an  invalid  for  many  long  years,  reside  at  the 
old  home;  and  Phillip  S.  is  engaged  in  the  mercantile  busi- 
ness in  Ohio.     All  are  unmarried. 

Pierce  Lough  was  born  in  18"i8,  and  near  the  year  1863, 
he  was  married  to  Aliss  Malinda  Campbell,  of  Wirt  county, 
and  for  a  few  years  after  this  event  he  called  the  "Buckeye 
slate"  his  home,  but  for  many  years  past  he  had  been  a  resi- 
dent of  Leading  creek,  in  Calhoun  county.  In  1877,  his  wife 
passed  on,  leaving  three  children  ;  viz.,  Hiram  Douglas  Lough, 
of  Williamstown  ;  Mrs.  Virginia  (I.  C.)  Fox.  of  Lough,  Cal- 
houn county ;  and  Mrs.  Ida  Black,  Gilmer  county ;  and  after 
her  death  he  married  Mrs.  Mar}'  Martin  Hayhurst,  and  the 
one  child  of  this  anion  died  in  infancy. 

Eleanor  Lough  (daughter  of  Robert)  married  Jacolj 
fiibbs,  of  Marion  county,  who  died  in  this  county,  in  1895, 
and  she  now  lives  with  her  daughter,  Mrs.  Sarah  Marshall, 
in  Ohio.  Her  other  children  are:  Mrs.  C.  D.  Furbee,  Graf- 
ton; Mrs.  Wilson  Rollins,  Parkersburg;  the  late  Mrs.  Nancy 
(Walter)  Dotson,  the  late  Ulysses,  Grant,  and  Walter,  of  this 
county;  John  C,  of  Wood,  and  Charles,  of  the  West. 

Nancy  Lough  (daughter  of  Robert)  married  Granville 
Sleeth,'  an  early  merchant  of  Smitnville,  and  she  died  in  lS5t), 
and  he,  the  following  year.  Their  children  are  Robert  Sleeth, 
of  Ohio;  and  A\'illiam,  of  Parkersburg. 

Sarah  Lough  married  Robert  Means,  who  came  to  this 
county  from  Lewis,  in  the  early  fifties,  and  figured  in  the 
affairs  of  the  Ritchie  Mines  vicinity  until  1875,  when  he  re- 
moved to  Leading  creek,  in  Calhoun  county,  where  his  wife 
died  in  1897,  and  where  he  still  survives.  Their  children 
were,  the  late  Scott  Means,  of  Calhoun  county  ;  Mrs.  Ella  L. 
(Wm.)  Otto,  of  Revere:  and  Edward  E.,  who  lives  with  his 
aged  father  at  the  old  homestead. 

Rachel  A.  Lough,  the  youngest  daughter  of  Robert,  mar- 
lied  James  Rogers,  son  of  John  B.  Rogers,  of  Smithville.  and 
at  Hutchinson,  Kansas,  they  reside.     They  have  no  children. 

Robert  Lough's  father,  whose  first  name  is  wanting, 
crossed  the  sea  from  Downs  county,  Ireland,  during  the  lat- 


'See  Sleeth  history  in   Smithville  chapter. 


372  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

ler  part  of  the  eighteenth  century,  and  prol?ably  settled  in 
the  Virginia  colony,  but  this  is  uncertain.  He  married  a 
Miss  Hart,  however,  and  was  identified  among  the  citizens 
oi'  what  is  now  Monongalia  count}-,  as  early  as  1800,  when 
his  sun,  the  progenitor  of  the  Ritchie  county  family,  made  his 
exit  upon  the  stage  of  life  ;  and  there,  perhaps,  he  spent  the 
remnant  of  his  days. 

Cyrus  Dawson. — The  family  of  the  late  Cyrus  Dawson 
have  been  identified  v\'ith  the  history  of  this  stream  since 
185"2,  when  he  traded  the  P.  R.  Tharpe  farm,  on  Indian  run, 
fur  the  possessions  of  John  Lough,  at  the  forks  of  this  creek. 

Mr.  Dawson  was  born  of  German-English  parentage,  in 
Beaver  county,  Pennsylvania,  on  October  31,  1S3T  ;  was  the 
son  of  John  and  Margaret  V'anati  Dawson.  He  was  first 
married  to  Miss  Jemima  Braden,  a  native  of  Greene  comity. 
Pennsylvania,  and  witli  her  came  to  this  county  in  1849,  and 
resided  on  Indian  run,  for  a  few  years,  before  coming"  co 
Dutchman,  as  above  mentioned. 

Here  on  August  1,  18G0,  ]virs.  Dawson  fell  asleep;  and 
some  time  afterAvards  he  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  E. 
Plaught,  daughter  of  Peter  rlaught,  of  Wirt  county;  and  dur- 
ing the  autumn  of  1861,  he,  with  his  little  family,  leaving  the 
old  home  on  Dutchman's  run,  set  out  for  Iowa,  where  he  re- 
mained for  two  years  and  farmed  with  his  brother,  \\'illianj 
Dawson. 

But  on  May  2,  1864,  both  families  started  across  the 
plains  in  their  emigrant  wagons,  drawn  by  mules  and  horses, 
with  California  as  their  destination. 

Their  route  lav  through  hundreds  of  miles  of  wild  and 
unbroken  forests,  and  their  experiences  with  the  Indians  were 
many  and  varied,  though  none  of  them  resulted  seriously.  Yet 
they  were  constantly  kept  on  their  guard  lest  they  should  be 
molested  by  these  dusky  denizens  of  the  forest,  who  often 
hung  about  their  tents  and  their  wagons  like  "hungry  hounds" 
begging,  as  best  they  could  in  their  unknown  tongue,  for 
something  to  eat. 

Xot  un frequently  did  this  little  party  come  across  signs 
of  encounters  that  other  emigrants  had  had  with  the  savages, 
and  noted   with   sadness   where  the  "dark  pathway  of  death 


MACFARLAN  AND  DUTCHMAN  :JT:i, 

had  been;"  for  time  and  again  did  they  find  lonely  graves  by 
the  wa3'-side  with  rude  inscriptions  telling  of  the  tragic  fate 
of  some  one  who  had  traversed  this  path  before. 

They  camped  out  all  the  way  and  feasted  upon  all  kinds 
of  wild  meat,  such-  as  was  everywhere  abundant,  except  tlie 
bufifalo,  which  seemed  to  be  shy  of  the  paths  that  were  fre- 
quented by  travelers. 

After  leaving  Omaha,  Nebraska,  they  were  unable  to 
purchase  food  until  they  reached  Salt  Lake  City.  Here  they 
remained  over  night  and  had  the  pleasure  of  seeing  the  late 
renowned  Mormon  Leader  Brigham  Younge,  who  was  out 
driving  in  his  carriage. 

In  October  they  landed  at  Stockton.  California,  and  early 
in  the  spring  removed  fifteen  miles  farther  north,  where  they 
found  employment  on  a  ranch  ;  and  in  1866,  they  removed  to 
Mercer  Falls,  near  the  foot  hills  of  the  Rocky  Mountains,  and 
there  remained  over  winter.  There  the  rain  fell  almost  in- 
cessantly throughout  the  season,  and  amid  such  surroundings 
the  thoughts  of  Mr.  Dawson  and  his  wife  turned  longingly  to 
the  humble  cottage  far  away  among  the  Virginia  hills  ;  and 
on  May  2,  1867,  they  turned  their  faces  homeward.  The  same 
Old  wagon,  and  the  same  team  of  horses  that  had  borne  them 
\Vestward  a  few^  years  before,  were  now  pressed  into  service 
for  the  honjeward-journey.  Everything  was  green  and  beau- 
tiful when  they  set  out,  but  a  few  days  travel  brought  them 
to  banks  of  snow  in  the  mountains.  Their  road  lay  over 
much  the  same  coiuitry,  and  the  incidents  of  camping-out  and 
guarding  their  stock  differed  but  little  from  the  Westward 
journey. 

They  came  across  many  other  families  coiinng  back  to 
"the  States,"  as  they  termed  it,  and  soon  their  wagon-train 
numbered  sixty-six  men,  besides  the  women  and  the  children  ; 
and  on  the  Fourth  of  July  they  camped  and  had  a  "general 
hunt,"  which  resulted  in  the  death  of  seventeen  antelopes, 
the  hams  of  which,  only,  they  could  save. 

As  they  passed  east  of  Denver  and  traveled  down  the 
Platte  river,  they  encountered  the  workmen  who  were  con- 
structing the  Union  Pacific  railroad,  and  felt  that  they  were 
again  nearing  civilization. 


374  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

By  the  time  they  had  reached  Ohio,  however,  their  travel- 
ing companions  had  all  gone  their  respective  ways,  to  their 
former  homes,  and  they  were  left  alone ;  and  late  in  October 
they  arrived  at  the  home  of  Peter  Haught,  in  Wirt  county, 
and  for  the  first  time  since  they  left  California,  in  May,  slept 
in  a  house. 

During  the  following  week  they  returned  to  their  old 
home  on  Dutchman's  run,  and  joyfully  entered  the  "lowly, 
thatched  cottage"  that  they  had  deserted  for  fairer  scenes. 

And  ''no  more  from  this  cottage  again  did  they  roam,"  for 
here,  on  July  27.  1897,  the  second  ^Nlrs.  Dawson  fell  asleep;  and 
on  ]\Iarch  the  twenty-fifth  of  the  following  year  (1898)  ^Ir. 
Dawson  joined  her  on  the  other  shore.  Both  rest  in  the 
Straight  creek  btirying-grotmd. 

The  old  homestead,  which  is  now  rich  in  oil,  has  been 
divided  and  Daniel  G.  Dawson  occupies  the  parental  dwell- 
ing, and  John  and  Calvin  reside  on  other  portions. 

The  children  of  the  first  union  were  five  in  number,  but 
two  alone  survive  ;  viz.,  Peter,  of  Wirt  county  :  and  William, 
^".  no  is  a  surveyor  and  Notary  public,  of  Williamstown ; 
Ezekiel  and  Kathrine  died  in  childhood  and  shortly  after  their 
departure,  Jtilia  Ann  met  a  tragic  death  by  pulling  a  pot  of 
boiling-hot  cofifee  from  the  table  upon  her. 

The  nine  children  of  the  second  union  were  as  follows: 
Rachel  D.,  who  is  Mrs.  E.  P.  Haught,  of  Calhotm  county; 
Mrs.  Margaret  (James  A.)  Hefner,  and  Newton  J.,  of  Hart- 
ley ;  the  late  Mrs.  Lucinda  (Wm.  H.)  Hayes,  Daniel  G.,  John, 
and  Calvin,  of  Dutchman;  Elmore  C,  Wirt  county;  and 
Richard  F.,  who  died  in  his  young  manhood. 

Newton  is  the  father  of  Gilbert,  the  young  pedagogue. 

William  Wilson  and  Archibald  Hess  were  other  early 
settlers  here.  ]\Ir.  Wilson  was  a  Clarion  county  product,  and 
his  wife,  ]\Irs.  Anna  Shuman  Wilson,  was  a  native  of  l\Ic- 
Curdysville,  Monongalia  county.  Pie  was  born  in  1821.  iind 
came  to  this  county  in  184.5,  and  settled  on  Dutchman's  run, 
where  he  finished  life's  pilgrimage  in  1894.  And  in  the  Hart- 
Icy  burying-ground.  beside  his  wife,  he  sleeps.  His  late 
children  were  Mrs.  Ruth  Snodgrass,  Mrs.  Rachel  Bush,  Mrs. 
Rosena  Lemon,  and  James  P.  Wilson  ;  and  the  surviving  ones 


MACFARLAN  AXD  DUTCHMAN  375 

aie:  ]\Irs.  Alary  Jane  Richards,  Doddridge  county;  Mrs. 
Manda  Mason,  Ohio;  Arthur  Wilson,  Freed;  and  Daniel  Vv'il- 
son,  who  resides  at  the  old  home. 

This  family  are  of  Irish  lineage,  and  there  is  but  little 
doubt  that  they  are  of  the  same  stock  as  the  other  Wilsons 
of  the  county. 

Benjamin  Wilson,  grandfather  of  William  ,of  Dutchman, 
was  a  second  corisin  of  the  late  father  of  the  venerable  Isaac 
Wilson,  of  Washburn,  and  b.is  (Benjomin'sj  son,  George,  was 
the  grandfather  of  E.  C.  \\  ilson,  of  Hazelgreen. 

William  Wilson,  senior  (son  of  Benjamin),  and  his  wife, 
Airs.  Rachel  L}-nch  W  ilson,  early  settlers  of  Marion  county, 
were  the  heads  of  the  branch  of  this  family  w^hich  is  of  most 
interest  to  us,  as  their  descendants  are  not  a  few  in  this  and 
sister  counties. 

Their  family  consisted  of  twelve  children;  viz.,  William, 
the  Dutchman  pioneer;  Edw'ard,  who  met  a  tragic  death  at 
his  home  in  Aiarion  county  in  a  runaway  accident  a  year  or 
two  ago;  John,  Beckett.  Alexander,  James,  Benjamin,  Eli, 
I-Merce,  Rachel  (who  married  Peter  Haught,  of  Wirt  county), 
Mary  (Mrs.  Archibald  Hess),  and  Sarah  Wilson,  who  re- 
mained unmarried  and  still  survives  at  her  home  in  Marior; 
county. 

Beckett  Wilson  was  married  to  Miss  Alary  Alason,  and 
lived  and  died  in  Alarion  county,  wdiere  his  large  family  all 
remained  except  one  daughter,  Jane,  who  was  the  late  Mrs. 
Henry  Alorris,  of  Pidlman.  His  other  children  were:  Mrs. 
Xancy  Hibbs,  Mrs.  Lucinda  Floyd,  Airs.  Isabel  Kuhn,  and 
Alls.  Alargaret  Wyer,  who  have  all  passed  on;  and  Wesley 
and  Pinckney  W^ilson,  who  survive. 

Eli  Wilson  was  married  to  Aliss  Jennie  AlcCru-d}',  in 
Alarion  county,  near  the  year  1840,  and  removed  to  Straight 
creek,  in  Wirt  cotmty,  where  he  still  survives,  thougii  blind 
and  almost  entirely  deaf.  His  wife  died  in  1907.  They  were 
the  parents  of:  Van  C,  the  late  Eher  AI.,  Smithville;  Airs.  U. 
S.  Fluharty,  Harrisville ;  Cyrus,  v^dio  died  in  childhood ;  the 
late  Airs.  AWlliam  Dawson.  AVilliam  Wilson,  Airs.  Oliver 
Smith,  of  Calhoun  countv  ;  W.  A.,  and  Allie  B.  \\'ilson. 


o7e  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Benjamin  L.  Wilson  was  married  to  Miss  Martha  Kelley, 
daughter  of  Joshua  and  Martha  Brand  Kelley.  and  principally 
spent  his  life  in  Doddridge  county,  where  a  number  of  liis 
descendants  still  li\'e.  He  was  iihe  father  of  the  following- 
named  sons  and  daughters:  The  late  Mrs.  Jane  Mason,  Toll- 
gate;  Mrs.  Rachel  Vanhorn,  Gilmer  county;  ^Irs.  Marg-aret 
Vanhorn.  Airs.  Nancy  (Joseph)  Summers,  the  late  Joshua 
Wilson,  and  James  K.  Wilson,  Doddridge  county;  Mrs. 
Louisa  Vanhorn,  and  Mrs.  Lydia  Watson,  Roane  county  ;  the 
late  Mrs.  Martha  Pless  Watson  (wife  of  Wilson  Watson). 
Auburn  :  and  Charity,  who  died  in  youth. 

The  Rev.  M.  A.  Summers,  of  the  Baptist  chinch,  and  M. 
Bruce  Summers,  cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank  at  W^st 
Union,  are  the  grandsons  of  Benjamin  A\'ilson.- 

Archibald  Hess  was  also  a  Marion  county  man.  He  three 
tunes  took  the  marriag-e  vow.  His  first  wife  was  Miss  Sarah 
Price  ;  the  name  of  the  second  is  missing,  but  the  third  was 
Miss  Mary  Wilson.  He  came  to  Dutchman  in  the  early 
forties,  and  after  a  brief  sojourn  here,  removed  to  near  Sum- 
mers, in  Doddridge  county.  Here  the  third  wife  'iied,  and  he 
spent  his  last  hours  at  Auburn  with  his  daugliter.  Mrs.  A!.  !'>. 
Watson,  in  1883,  and  in  the  Auburn  cemetery  he  lies  at  rest. 
Mrs.  W^atson  is  the  only  child  of  the  last  marriage.  .And 
Henry  and  George  Hess  were  other  members  of  the  family. 


CHAPTER  XXVII 


Devil  Hole  Creek  Settled 

HE  origin  of  the  name  of  this  stream,  "Devil 
Hole,"  which  has  such  a  forbidden  sound,  is 
variously  stated.  One  tradition  says  that  ii 
originated  from  a  remarkable  cave  in  the 
hill  not  far  from  its  mouth,  near  by  whicii 
is  a  huge  sand-stone  thirty  or  forty  feet  in 
height,  which  stands  out  prominently  alone, 
and  which  is  designated  as  the  "Devil's  Tea-table."  Anotn.er 
is  that  when  the  old  "Worth  line"  was  under  survey  tlirough 
this  section,  one  of  the  party  on  reaching  a  hole  which  reseo 
bled  the  far-famed  "bottomless  pit,"  exclaimed — -"What  devil 
of  a  hole  are  we  getting  into  here?"  But  the  venerable  Jona- 
than C.  Lowther,  of  Berea,  who  is  now  past  his  ninetieth  mile- 
stone, tells  us  that  his  father,  the  late  Elias  Lowtlier,  who 
was  a  member  of  the  surveying  party,  gave  it  its  name,  he 
being  the  individual  who  remarked  about  the  strong  resem- 
blance that  this  opening  in  the  earth  bore  to  the  general  idea 
entertained  concerning  the  abode  of  Satan  and  his  hosts. 
Hence  the  authentic  origin  of  the  name. 

Doubtless,  owing  to  the  dreadful  title  bestowed  upon  this 
region,  it  was  not  settled  until  the  middle  of  the  nineteenth 
century,  when  Michael  Hoover  ventured  into  its  unbroken 
wilderness  and  erected  his  dwelling  on  the  land  that  is  now 
owned  by  the  Simmons"  heirs,  and  the  Layfields.  His  father, 
Thomas  Hoover,  having  patented  a  tract  of  six  hundred 
ninety-six  acres  on  the  head  waters  of  this  stream  some  time 
before.  Mr.  Hoover  married  a  Miss  Mullenax  and  they  finally 
went  West  anrl  died,  and  of  their  family  we  have  no  record. 

Absalom  Cunningham  \vas  the  second  pioneer  to  pene- 
trate this  wilderness.  He  was  born  near  XA'ebb's  mill,  in 
1820;  was  the  son  of  Adam  and  Sarah  Sinnett  Cunningham, 
and    the   grandson   of   Adam,   senior — the   brother  of  Thomas 


37S  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Cvmningham.  He  married  ]\Iiss  Huldah  Simmons,  daughter 
o/  Abraham  and  Alary  Alnllenax  Simmons,  and  came  here  in 
the  year  1852.  He  later  resided  on  Indian  run  and  Indian 
creek,  and  finally  went  to  live  with  his  son,  John  S.  Cunning- 
ham, the  Washburn  artist,  where  he  died  in  1898.  He  sleeps 
ni  the  Indian  creek  Baptist  churchyard,  beside  his  first  wife. 
His  second  wife,  ]vlrs.  Jane  Simmons  Nottingham  Cunning- 
ham Divine,  was  a  sister  of  his  first  wife.  She  resides  with 
her  son,  Jacob  Cunningham,  near  Washburn. 

Mr.  Cunningham  was  the  father  of  eight  children,  all  of 
whom  were  born  of  the  first  union;  viz.,  ]\Iartin,  of  Auburn- 
John  S.,  and  George,  and  the  late  Airs.  Alary  A.  (J.  A.)  \"alen- 
tine,  of  Washburn :  Charles,  of  Lawford ;  Airs.  Alalinda 
(James)  Valentine,  Ohio;  and  Airs.  Elizabeth  (Ellsworth; 
Alatson,  AA'irt  county. 

Jacob  Layfield  was  the  next  settler,  he  having  taken  the 
place  of  Alichael  Hoover,  in  1854.  He  w^as  the  son  of  John 
and  Elizabeth  Aloats  Layfield,  and  his  second  wife  was  AIis^ 
Agnes  Drake,  daughter  of  James  Drake.  He  passed  from 
earth  in  1865,  and  his  venerable  widow  survived  until  the 
autumn  of  1908,  when  she  was  laid  by  his  side,  in  the  Layfield 
l:)urying-ground.  The  youngest  son  now  occupies  the  old 
home. 

The  children  of  this  union  were  four  sons:  viz.,  AA'illiam 
J.,  John  A.,  George  O.,  and  Newton. 

Uriah  Shrader  was  another  early  settler  on  the  head- 
waters of  this  creek.  He  came  from  Pendleton  countv,  where 
he  was  born  and  reared,  and  married  Aliss  Alary  Layfield, 
daughter  of  John  Layfield,  senior,  and  remained  here  until  he 
was  borne  to  the  Alt.  Aloriah  churchyard.  He  was  a  soldier 
of  the  Lnion  army,  and  his  little  family  consisted  of  four 
children..  Two  died  in  infancy,  Phebe,  in  young  womanhood, 
and  Jacob  Shrader  is  a  citizen  of  Cokeley. 

Air.  Shrader's  grandparents  came  direct  from  Germany 
lo  Pendleton  county,  and  there  his  father,  Jacob  Shrader, 
spent  his  entire  life;  but  in  1868,  after  the  death  of  his  father, 
his  mother.  Airs.  Phebe  Shrader,  came  to  this  county,  and 
remained  as  a  member  of  his  household  until  lier  death  in 
1892,  at  the  age  of  eighty-eight  years.     She,  too,  rests  in  the 


DEVIL  HOLE  CREEK  SETTLED  37'.i 

Alt.  Aloriah  ciuirch}'ard.  Uriah  Shrader  was  a  member  of  a 
family  of  five  children ;  viz.,  Ami,  and  Benjamin,  who  re- 
mained in  Pendleton  county ;  Mrs.  Eliza  Groggs,  of  Calhoun 
countv;  and  David  Shrader,  who  came  to  this  county. 

David  Shrader  was  long  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Edu- 
cation in  Grant  district,  but  he  is  now  a  resident  of  Virginia. 

He  married  Miss  Hannah  Moats  and  settled  on  Addis' 
run,  where  Mrs.  Shrader  died  a  few  years  since,  and  where 
their  daughter,  Mrs.  Jane  Hubbard,  now  lives.  The  other 
children  born  of  this  union  were :  the  late  Mrs.  Anna  Ross, 
and  the  late  Henry,  who  were  both  formerly  identified  aniong 
the  teachers  of  this  county;  Edward,  of  Ohio;  Mrs.  Lucretia 

.  of  Kansas;  Mrs.  Grace   (B.  M.)    Cowell,  of  Goose 

creek;  and  Miss  Lydia  Shrader,  of  this  county. 

John  W.  Simmons  was,  perhaps,  the  next  settler.  He, 
too,  was  a  native  of  Pendleton  county,  and  of  German  descent. 
But  in  his  boyhood,  with  his  parents,  he  came  to  Indian  creek, 
this  county,  where  he  grew  to  manhood.  He  married  Miss 
Elizabeth  Hourhood,  of  Doddridge  county,  and  their  children 
were  as  follows  ; 

Mrs.  Mary  (Cameron)  Swadley,  Indian  creek;  Mrs. 
Huldah  (George  G.)  Layfield ;  the  late  Mrs.  Robert  Smith, 
Cokeley's  ;  and  Aaron,  and  William  Simmons,  Cantwell.  He 
died  at  his  old  home  several  years  ago,  and  sleeps  in  the  Pleas- 
ant Hill  churchyard,  not  far  distanc. 

Mr.  Simmons  was  the  eldest  son  of  Abraham  and  Mary 
Mullenax  Simmons,  who  came  from  Pendleton  county  to  In- 
dian creek,  perhaps  more  than  sixty  years  ago,  and  remained 
until  they  were  laid  in  the  Indian  creek  Baptist  churchyard. 
He  was  one  of  a  family  of  eight  children  ;  viz.,  Hanson,  Abra- 
ham, Salathiel,  George,  James,  Jane  and  Pluldah,  all  of  whom 
have  passed  on,  except  Jane  and  Salathiel. 

Abraham,  junior,  married  Airs.  Melissa  Wilson  Stanley, 
and  was  the  father  of  George,  and  Tames  Simmons,  of  Au- 
burn. 

Huldah  married  Absalom  Cunningham,  and,  after  her 
death,  her  sister  Jane  (who  first  married  Jackson  Nottingham, 
and   later  Jasper  Cunningham,  and   A\'illiam    Di\'ine)    became 


3S0  I-IISTORV  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

the  wife  of  Absalom  Cunningham.  She  now  resides  witli  her 
sen  at  Washburn. 

Hanson  passed  on  several  years  ago.  George  and  James 
died  in  youth,  and  Salathiel  lives  on  Island  run. 

Abraham  Simmons,  senior,  was  a  brother  of  Peter,  whose 
history  appears  with  the  Indian  creek  settlers. 

Later  Settlers  on  this  creek  were  M.  D.  Cowan.  Stacy 
Stephens,  John  W.  Marshall,  Jacob  Campbell.  Daniel  Coke- 
ley,  Samuel  Parks,  James  Eddy,  C.  H.  Ptarrison  and  others, 
but  these  settlements  hardly  belong  to  pioneer  days,  as  the}' 
were  of  such  recent  date. 

The  Miller  Flat,  which  was  improved  by  the  noted  jurist. 
Charles  T.  Harrison,  in  1880,  is  the  scene  of  the  oldest  settle - 
ment  on  the  creek,  it  having  been  settled  as  early  as  1830  or 
'40,  by  the  Miller  Brothers. 

M,  Duke  Cowan  is  now  the  oldest  citizen  of  this  creek. 
He  came  here  in  1878,  and  made  the  first  improvement  on 
the  head  of  the  small  tributary  known  as  "Rock  Fork,"  and 
his  possessions  are  now  valued  at  forty  or  fifty  thousand  dol- 
lars, and  he  is  staled  the  "Oil  King"  of  this  region. 

His  wife  was  Miss  Mary  Ann  Vanort,  of  Doddridge 
county,  and  their  wedding  day  was  November  17,  1854.  They 
came  to  this  count}'  in  the  ante-bellum  days,  and  found  a 
home  on  Back  run,  near  Harrisville ;  and  from  there,  they  re- 
moved to  Oil  Ridge.  He  was  a  soldier  of  the  Union  army, 
and  his  family  consisted  of  nine  children.  Two  have  crossed 
to  the  other  side,  and  the  rest  are  as  follows : 

Mary  (Mrs.  W.  H.  Scott),  John  W.,  Laura  (Mrs.  Judd 
Blam),  Martha  Jane  (Mrs.  W.  H.  Moore),  Samuel  E.,  Frank, 
and  Fannie  (Mrs.  Wade  Broadwater). 

The  Cowans  are  old  citizens  of  the  county.  Isaac  Cowan 
was  born  in  A\'estmoreland  county,  Pennsylvania,  on  July  IP 
1808,  and  his  wife.  Miss  Nancy  Idoult,  was  born  in  Marion 
county,  this  state,  on  June  6,  1811:  and  their  marriage  took 
place  on  November  15,  1831.  They  called  Ohio  their  home 
for  a  time  before  removing  to  this  county,  in  1849,  where  they 
found  a  permanent  home,  and  a  final  resting-place.  Here, 
near  one  one-half  miles  from  Harrisville,  he  died  on  Septem- 
ber 19,  18(14,  and  Mrs.  Cowan  survived  until  November  15, 
1888.  when  she  joined  him  on  the  other  side. 

4  hey   were   the   parents   of   eleven   children  :   viz..   ]\I.    D. 


DEriL  HOLE  CREEK  SETTLED  381 

Cowan,  already  mentioned;  J.  W.,  of  Indian  creek;  Mrs.  Neal 
(Melvina)  Moats,  Harrisville  ;  Mary  E.  Cowan,  of  Oil  Ridge; 
the  late  Joseph,  of  the  West;  the  late  Mrs.  Rachel  (David) 
Mclntyre,  of  Harrisville;  and  the  rest  died  in  youth. 


The  Harrison  family,  who  is  a  very  prominent  one  in  the 
county,  merits  recognition  here,  bat  owing  to  the  innate  mod- 
esty of  the  head  of  this  family,  and  to  his  thorough  dislike  for 
publicity,  our  request  for  this  data  was  met  with  a  polite  dec- 
lination, as  he  felt  confident  that  the  "little  he  had  done  was 
not  worthy  of  a  place." 

Rutherford. — The  foundation  of  this  village  was  laid  in 
1881,  vvhen  H.  S.  Wilson,  the  projector  of  the  Cairo  and 
Kanawha  Valley  railroad,  erected  a  lumber  camp  here,  which 
was  abandoned  a  livtle  later.  But  he  built  a  station-house 
and  dwelling  here  in  1892,  and  in  April  of  that  same  year,  the 
late  John  O.  Lynch  became  the  occupant  of  that  dwelling, 
which  is  still  the  home  of  his  family.  Mr.  Wilson  opened  a 
store  the  same  year,  and  then  came  the  post-office  (1892) 
with  R.  W.  Rutherford  post-master.  The  school-house  was 
erected  in  1889,  on  land  given  by  the  Ritchie  Lumber  Com- 
pany. 

The  nearest  church  is  the  "Fairview"  M.  E.  church,  the 
grounds  of  which  were  donated  by  Mrs.  Rachel  Six. 

W.  H.  Reynolds  was  the  first  blacksmith.  The  dwellings 
now  number  near  a  score,  and  the  population  is  close  to  eighty- 
five. 

It  was  named  in  honor  of  the  Rutherfords,  who  were  the 
charter  members  of  the  "Ritchie  Lumber  Company." 

John  O.  Lynch,  the  first  citizen  uf  the  town,  was  a  Tyler 
county  product,  he  having  been  born  on  Pursley  creek,  seven 
miles  from  Sistersville,  on  July  2,  1858,  but  he  came  to  this 
county  in  his  youth  or  early  manhood,  and  taught  school  for 
a  time,  and  served  as  assessor  later  on.  He  married  Miss 
Miranda  Smith,  daughter  of  Aaron  Smith,  of  Smith's  chapel, 
and  was  the  father  of  six  sons :  Okey,  Charley,  who  has 
passed  on.  Gainer,  Theodore,  Emmett  and  Hallie. 

He  was  merchant,  post-master,  and  one  of  the  most  use- 
ful citizen  of  the  place  until  his  death  early  in  the  year  1908. 


CHAPTER  XXVIII 


Ritchie  Mines 

HE  famous  Ritchie  coal  mine,  which  is 
located  two  miles  from  the  month  of  Mac- 
farlan  creek,  was  discovered  during  the 
autmn  of  1852,  by  the  late  Frederick  Lemon. 
The  countr}-  had  been  visited  by  one  of 
the  greatest  floods  in  its  history,  during 
April  of  that  year,  and  the  general  wash-out 
revealed  this  noted  mine. 

Air.  Lemon,  being  impressed  by  its  every  appearance  (the 
coal  standing  on  edge  instead  of  lying  down,  etc.)  that  he 
had  made  a  valuable  discovery,  covered  it  up,  hoping  to  make 
a  deal  for  the  land,  but,  before  his  plans  were  carried  into 
effect,  anotlier  flood  came,  in  1858,  which  again  revealed  the 
hidden  treasure,  and  the  coal  w^as  then  put  to  the  test  for 
black-smithing  purposes.  Thus  it  was  found  to  be  different 
from  other  coal  and  of  far  greater  value,  and  it  has  since 
proved  to  be  asphalt — the  pnly^  asphalt  mine  in  the  L^nited 
States. 

This  same  vear,  Mr.  Lemon  purchased  the  tract  of  land 
covering  two  hundred  sixteen  acres,  of  John  Webb  and 
Robert  Marshall ;  and  the  following  y^ear,  he  sold  to  Nelson 
Beall,  of  Frostburg,  Maryland,  who  soon  after  began  to  oper- 
ate the  mine:  but  the  Civil  war  came  on.  and  operations 
ceased  until  its  close  in  18G5,  when  Mr.  Beall  sold  to  a  S3'ndi- 
cate  from  Xew  York  and  Baltimore,  who  constructed  a  nar- 
row-gauge railroad,  from  Cairo  to  the  mine,  which  was  known 
as  the  "Calico  railroad."  This  launched  a  boom  for  business, 
and  marked  an  important  epoch  in  the  history  of  this  part  oi 
the  county.  The  population  rapidly  increased.  ]\Iany  good 
families  having  found  permanent  homes  here  near  that  time. 
Among  them  were  a  large  number  of  Irish  people,  who  are 
still  prominently   identified  with   the  citizenship  of  this  com- 


RITCHIE  MINES 


383 


nmnity:  The  Dolans,  the  Goldens,  the  Burkes,  the  Coyles, 
the  Overtoils,  etc. 

But  in  1S74,  the  coal  vein  was  lost,  and  work  suddeniy 
ceased ;  and  everything  sank  into  a  state  of  apathy — into 
dilapidation  and  ruin,  and  thus  continued  until  1885,  when 
the  land,  mine,  and  railroad,  were  purchased  bv  H.  S.  Wilson, 
of  Parkersburg,  who  (in  189-0)  sub-railed  the  road  and  ex- 
tended it  as  far  as  Mellin  (in  1892),  and,  on  to  the  river  at 
Macfarlan  (in  1894),  under  the  chang-ed  name  of  the  "Cairo 
and  Kanawha  Valley  railroad."  In  1906,  Mr.  Wilson  and  his 
sons  sold  this  railroad  to  a  syndicate,  which  has  since  that  time 
been  talking  of  transforming  it  into  a  broad-gauge  road  and 
extending  it  to  the  coal-fields  in  some  of  the  south-eastern 
counties  of  the  state. 

The  Hon.  Charles  F.  Teter,  and  S.  A.  Moore,  of  Philippi ; 
T.  R.  Cowell  and  C.  B.  Kefauver,  of  Parkersburg,  are  the 
trustees,  and  several  other  strong  financial  interests  of  Park- 
ersburg, and  elsewhere,  are  members. 


The  ruins  of  the  Ritchie  Mine3  and  Frederic  Lemon,  tiie  discoverer. 


384  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

The  mine,  too,  passed  from  the  hands  of  Mr.  Wilson 
several  years  ago,  and  has  since  that  time  been  operated  by 
a  Alichigan  syndicate;  but  it  is  now  taking  on  new  life  with 
a  Mining  Company  at  the  helm,  which  is  composed  of  local 
people,  and  New  York  and  Wheeling  men  of  means. 
Machinery  is  now  on  the  ground  and  a  shaft  is  being- sunk  as 
rapidly  as  possible,  and  important  developments  are  looked 
forward  to  with  interest. 

The  opening  of  the  C.  &  K.  V.  railroad  gave  rise  to  the 
towns  of  Mellin  and  iSlacfarlan.  Thomas  L.  Lemon,  son  of 
John  B.  Lemon,  erected  the  first  store  at  Mellin,  in  1891 :  and 
l-J.  S.  Wilson  and  John  S.  W^arnick  opened  the  first  store  at 
Macfarlan.  in  189-1.  The  post-office  was  established  a  little 
later  v/ith  Mr.  Warnick,  post-master. 

The  "Beechwood"  hotel  was  i)uilt  near  the  same  time  b}^ 
H.  S.  Wilson.  This  large,  commodious  building,  which  is 
surrounded  by  an  ideal  forest,  was  for  a  time  quite  a  retreat 
for  the  lovers  of  quietude  and  sylvan  beauty.  After  ]\Ir.  Wil- 
son had  rented  and  leased  this  hotel  property  for  several 
years,  he  sold  to  James  D.  Hill  and  Burleigh  Fowler,  and  not 
long  after  this  transaction  (in  1904),  it  was  destroyed  by  fire, 
but  was  rebuilt  by  Hill  and  Fovv^ler,  who  sold  to  J.  E.  Snyder. 
William  H.  McCray  is  now  the  owner  and  proprietor.  The 
village,  which  numbers  near  a  dozen  scattered  dwellings,  has 
another  hotel,  known  as  the  "Dogwood,"  with  B.'P.  Goff  pro- 
prietor. 

It  has  two  stores,  with  W.  R.  Hayes  Trading  Company 
at  the  W^arnick  stand,  and  F.  J.  Lemon  in  charge  of  the  other, 
a  good  school-house,  a  blacksmith  shop,  a  pump-station,  a 
depot-building,  and  a  physician  in  the  person  of  Dr.  Lester 
Miller. 

Frederick  Lemon,  the  discoverer  of  this  famous  mine, 
claims  a  place  in  this  chapter: 

Mr.  Lemon  was  born  in  Botetourt  county,  Virginia,  in 
1818,  and  came  to  this  county  in  1835,  with  his  father.  George 
S.  Lemon,  who  settled  at  the  forks  of  Hughes  river,  (^n 
January  15,  18;38,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Roena  Deem, 
daughter  of  Phillip  Deem,  and  shortly  after  his  marriage 
took  up  his  residence  at  Macfarlan,  on  the  old  estate,  w-here 


RITCHIE  MINES  3S5 

his  life  came  to  a  close  in  1902.  Nine  children  were  the  fruits 
of  this  union:  Phillip  J.,  C.  N.,  F.  J.,  John  B.,  A.  W.,  Z.  T., 
and  L.  L.,  Mrs.  Roena  Pribble,  and  the  late  Mrs.  Cinderilla 
(John  K.)  Bradley,  all  of  Macfarlan,  except  Z.  T.,  and  L.  L., 
who  are  numbered  with  the  dead.  The  first  three  mentioned 
were  Confederate  soldiers  during  the  Civil  war. 

The  Lemons  are  of  German  extraction,  their  ancestors 
having"  come  from  Prussia  during  the  last  quarter  of  the 
seventeenth  century,  and  settled  in  the  fertile  valley  of  the 
James  river,  in  Virginia.  Here  Frederick  Lemon,  senior,  was 
born  in  1739,  an.d  at  the  breaking  out  of  the  Revolution,  he 
took  up  arms  in  defense  of  the  colonies,  and  was  in  ihe  en- 
gagement at  Yorktown.  His  son,  George  S.  Lemon,  who 
came  to  Ritchie  county  in  1835  and  settled  at  the  forks  of 
Hughes  river,  was  also  a  native  of  the  "Old  Dominion." 

George  S.  Lemon  was  married  to  Miss  Nancy  Tilden,  of 
Virginia,  and  was  the  father  of  twelve  children,  all  of  whom 
reached  the  years  of  maturity.  He  was  a  soldier  of  the  war 
of  1813,  and  enjoys  the  distinction  of  having  been  the  first 
man  to  bore  an  oil  well  in  the  Commonwealth  of  Virginia. 

In  1844,  while  putting  down  a  well  for  salt  water,  near 
the  mouth  of  Flint  run,  in  Wirt  county,  he  struck  oil  at  a 
depth  of  one  hundred  twenty-five  teet.  His  object  in  sinking 
the  well  being  to  engage  in  the  manufacture  of  salt,  which 
purpose  was  defeated  by  the  in-flowing  of  oil.  But  his  labor, 
however,  Avas  not  lost,  for  he  pumoed  the  well  an'1  introduced 
the  oil  into  the  Marietta  market,  where  it  sold  for  medicinal 
purposes.  But  scarcely  had  he  begun  to  reap  the  benefits  of 
his  labor,  when  one  Bushrod  W.  Creel  appeared  upon  the 
scene,  and  laid  claim  to  the  land  and  took  this  enterprise  out 
of  Mr.  Lemon's  hands.  This  distinguished  pioneer  died  at 
FTockingport,  Wood  county,  in  December,  1865,  and  sleeps 
at  Cisko,  this  county.  His  venerable  companion  was  laid  hy 
his  side  in  1872. 

Tlieir  children  were  as  follows :  James  sleeps  at  St. 
Joseph,  Missouri;  Frederick,  at  Macfarlan;  John,  in  Illinois; 
George,  Jacob,  and  E.  T.,  who  lost  his  life  in  the  Confederate 
cause,  in  the  family  burying-ground  at  Cisko;  and  Albert,  the 
only  survivor  of  the  family,  lives  in  Wirt  county.     Charlwtte. 


38G  HISTORy  OF  RITCHIE  COUXTY 

the  eldest  daughter,  married  Henry  Valentine ;  Harriet,  Adam 
Valentine;  Nancy,  Alex.  Alackey,  and  all  spent  their  lives  in 
this  county;  Sallie  became  Mrs.  Nelson  Hickle  and  went  to 
Kentuck}^ ;  and  Almi  married  Abe  ]\Ialoney  and  spent  her  last 
hours  at  Hockingport,  in  Wood  county. 

The  Irish  families  who  have  largely  made  up  the  citizen- 
ship of  this  part  of  the  county  for  the  past  lialf-centur_v  or 
longer,  merit  a  corner  in  this  chapter,  but  as  our  appeals  have 
gone  by  unheeded,  we  are  unable  to  do  them  justice.  How- 
ever, the  facts  concerning  the  family  of  ^Michael  Goldin  are  at 
hand : 

Michael  Goldin  was  born  in  Ireland  in  1819,  and  came 
to  New  York  in  ISiS,  where  he  met  and  married  ]\Iiss  ]\lar- 
garet  Mullin,  and  from  that  commonwealth,  they  came  to 
this  county,  in  1858,  and  settled  at  Oxbow,  where  he  followed 
farming  and  teaching  school,  in  w^inter,  for  several  years ;  and 
where  he  served  as  post-master  for  twenty-three  years.  He 
passed  from  earth  on  April  11,  1898,  and  in  the  Catholic  ceme- 
tery, at  Oxbow,  he  rests. 

His  family  consisted  of  four  sons  and  one  daughter: 
James  A.  Goldin.  of  Minnesota;  Thomas,  Patrick,  and 
i\Iichael.  of  Oxbow ;  and  Airs.  Marv  Dolan.  Parkersburg. 

H.  S.  Wilson. — No  other  one  individual  is  more  entitled 
to  recognition  in  the  history  of  this  part  of  the  county  than 
PI.  S.  Wilson,  of  Parkersburg,  who  was  the  chief  factor  in  the 
opening  up  of  much  of  the  wilderness  in  the  Southern  section 
of  the  county. 

Mr.  AMlson  comes  of  Irish  stock.  His  father,  Robert 
Wilson,  was  born  in  County  Downs,  Ireland,  on  May  1,  179"?, 
and  crossed  the  water  to  Philadelphia  in  1816,  and  spent  the 
remaining  years  of  his  life  in  the  "Keystone"'  state — (at 
Coxestown,  Highspire,  and  Paxtong).  He  died  in  1878,  at  the 
age  of  eighty-six  years,  and  lies  buried  in  the  Paxtongchurch- 
yard. 

Robert  \\'ilson  was  married  in  the  year  1825  to  Miss 
jMar}^  Stewart,  daughter  of  Henr\^  Stewart  (born  1708-1804), 
who  embarked  to  America  from  County  Downs.  Ireland,  in 
1811,  and  settled  at  Harrisburg,  Pennsvlvania,  and  H.  S.  W'il- 


RITCHIE  MIXES  387 

son,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  the  second  child  of  this 
union. 

Henry  Stewart  AMlson  stepped  upon  the  battle-field  of 
li^'e  at  Highspire,  on  July  5,  1S?9,  and  there  spent  his  youth 
and  the  early  days  of  his  manhood.  From  1856  until  1871.  he 
was  ensras-ed  in  the  lumber  business  in  his  native  town,  and 
from  there  during  the  latter  year,  he  came  to  \\>st  V'irginia 
and  started  a  saw-mill,  on  Lick  nui  in  Doddridge  county, 
which  he  continued  to  operate  until  1874  when  he  removed  it 
to  Grafton. 

In  February,  1877,  he  first  made  the  acquaintance  of  the 
forests  of  this  county  when  he  moved  his  saw-mill  to  Buz- 
zard's run.  and  shipped  his  lumber  from  Tollgate.  He  also 
shipped  lumber  from  Beeson,  and  Pennsboro  a  little  later, 
(1878-9)  ;  and  removed  his  mill  to  Devil  Hole  where  he  ex- 
ported his  products  from  Cairo  over  the  "Calico  railroad." 

In  1890,  he  and  his  son,  Robert,  organized  the  Cairo  and 
Kanawha  Valley  Railroad  Company,  and  built  the  narrow- 
guage  road  from  Cairo  to  Macfarlan,  a  distance  of  sixteen 
miles,  and  thus  opened  up  the  forest  and  founded  the  towns 
along  this  road  as  stations. 

In  addition  to  his  labors  in  this  county,  he  and  his  son, 
Robert  managed  a  saw-mill  at  Davisville  from  1885-87,  and 
during  the  latter  year  established  one  at  Parkersburg,  which 
has  been  in  operation  almost  continuously  ever  since  that 
time. 

In  accord  wuth  the  faith  of  his  fore-fathers,  Mr.  Wilson  is 
a  Presbyterian  in  religion.  He  was  baptized  at  the  Paxtong 
church  two  one-half  miles  from  Flarrisburg,  in  1831.  and 
has  been  a  deacon  in  the  church  at  Parkersburg  for  a  number 
of  years.  He  was  JMayor  of  Parkersburg  from  1891-93,  and 
has  had  official  connection  with  the  Second  National  Bank, 
and  varioiis  other  business  concerns  of  that  city ;  was  a  dele- 
gate to  the  National  Democratic  convention  in  1896  and  in 
1904: ;  was  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Directors  for  the  Insane 
Hospital  at  Spencer  from  1888-90,  and  served  as  a  director  for 
the  Girl's  Industrial  School  at  Salem,  from  the  time  of  its  in- 
stitution until  this  board  was  abolished  by  the  Legislature  of 
1909.     Though  so  closely  allied  with  the  affairs  of  this  count}- 


388 


HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE.  COUNTY 


he  has  never  claimed  his  residence  here,  as  his  home  was  at 
Grafton  from  18T4  until  1887,  when  he  removed  to  Parkers- 
burg,  where  he  is  spending  the  evening  hours  of  his  long  and 
useful  life,  surrounded  by  the  comforts  that  his  industry  has 
so  w^ell  merited. 

On  July  7,  1856,  Mr.  Wilson  claimed  Miss  Anna  M.  Ennis, 
of  Huntingdon,  Pennsylvania,  as  his  bride,  and  seven  children 
were  the  result  of  this  union  ;  viz.,  Sophia  and  A\'allace  died  in 
childhood,  and  the  rest  are  as  follows :  Robert  married  ^liss 
Lilian  McGregor,  and  lives  at  Parkersburg,  where  he  is  promi- 
nently identified  in  business.  Carrie  Porter  is  the  wife  of  the 
Rev.  R.  C.  Hughes  of  the  Presbyterian  church  of  Madison, 
Wisconsin.  Ellen  Blair  married  ^he  Rev.  E.  AW  Work,  of 
Logan,  Ohio,  who  is  now  pastor  of  the  AA'est   End  Avenue 


H.    S.    Wilson. 


RITCHIE  MIXES  3S9 

Presbyterian  church  in  New  York  city.  H.  S.  junior,  married 
Miss  Maude  Jarrett,  daughter  of  Dr.  A.  M.  Jarrett,  of  Grafton, 
and  resides  at  Parkersburg.  And  Edwin  Ennis  and  his  wife 
(Miss  Alae  Lyle)  are  also  of  Parkersburg. 


CHAPTER  XXIX 


Pioneer  Life  and  Character 

What  sought  they  thus  afar? 

Bright  jewels  of  the  mine? 
The  wealtii  of  seas,  the  spoils  of  war? 

They  sought  a  faith's  pure  shrine. 

Ay,  call  it  holy  ground, 

The  soil  where  first  they  trod! 
They  have  left  unstained  what  here  ihey  found! 

Freedom  to  worship  God! 

— Mrs.  Hemans. 

These  early  pioneers  resided  upon  the  outer-borders  of 
three  counties — Wood,  Lewis,  and  Harrison,  and  near  forty 
or  fifty  miles  from  their  respective  county-seats. 

The  "'State  road,"  was  the  only  thoroughfare,  the  settle- 
ments being"  accessible  to  this  road  and  to  one  another  by 
bridle-paths. 

Their  cabins  were  built  of  logs  cut  from  sm.all  trees,  and 
were  covered  with  clap-boards,  made  with  a  tool  called  a 
"frow."  The  boards,  wdiich  were  laid  upon  rib-poles,  were 
held  in-tact  by  weight-poles,  and  the  floor  was  made  of 
puncheons,  which  were  split  and  partly  smoothed  by  an  adz. 
The  open  spaces  between  the  logs  were  filled  by  chunks  and 
by  mortar  made  of  clay.  A  large  fire-place  with  a  "cat  and 
clay"  chimney  (of  clay  and  sticks)  occupied  one  end  of  the 
house,  which  was  usually  one  story  in  height. 

Their  furniture,  which  was  home-made,  consisted  of 
tables,  chairs,  bedsteads,  etc.,  just  such  things  as  necessity  de- 
manded, and  the  fire-place  was  their  cook-stove.  A  wooden 
paddle  called  a  "battler,"  was  their  washing-machine ;  tallow 
candles,  their  lights ;  their  lanterns  were  made  of  tin  punched 
fttll  of  holes,  in  which  a  candle  burned  ;  and  a  wooden-clock 
ticked  ofif  the  hotirs.  Their  plows  were  made  of  wood  (ironed 
by  a  blacksmith),  and  a  paddle  was  pressed  into  service  while 


PIONEER  LIFE  AND  CHARACTER  391 

plowing  in  order  to  keep  the  mold-board  free  from  dirt.  Their 
wool,  which  was  shorn  from  the  backs  of  the  sheep  within 
their  fold,  was  carded  on  hand-cards;  and  their  corn  was 
ground  by  hand,  and  on  horse-mills,  which  were  constructed 
with  very  large  tread-wheels,  the  main  shaft  of  which  occu- 
pied an  inclined  position,  so  as  to  elevate  one  side  of  the  wheel, 
which  turned  under  the  horses'  feet.  Their  clothing  was 
made  of  dressed  deer-skins,  linen  and  linsey.  And  the  "good 
house-wife"  toiled  early  and  late  at  her  loom  and  spinning- 
wheel.  Their  sugar  and  syrup  were  principally  manufactured 
at  home  from  the  sap  of  the  sugar-tree. 

The  forests  abounded  in  deer,  bears,  wolves,  panthers, 
wild  turkeys,  and  many  other  varieties  of  game,  and  hunting 
was  a  regular  pursuit  during  the  autumn  and  the  winter  sea- 
sons, and  thus  their  meat  was  obtained.  And  corn-bread, 
milk  and  butter  with  a  few  other  products  of  the  soil,  made 
up  their  bill  of  fare. 

The  nearest  store  (for  a  number  of  years)  was  at  Marietta, 
and  there  they  went  once  a  year  for  their  salt  and  iron,  which  , 
vv^ere  procured  in  exchange  for  the  skins  of  wild  animals,  veni- 
son,   ham,    and,    occasionally,    snake-root    and    ginseng    were 
added  to  these  exchange  products. 

They  would  assemble  from  a  radius  of  fifteen  or  twenty 
miles,  in  order  to  assist  one  another  in  loar-roll""---  house-rais- 
ings, corn-liuskings,  etc.  Quilting  bees  usually  accompanied 
these  gatherings,  and  the  night  was  turned  into  one  of  social 
merriment. 

And  though  their  mode  of  living  was  rude  and  simple,  it 
was  characterized  by  a  generosity  of  spirit,  and  a  hospitality 
of  manner  that  belonged  only  to  their  day.  No  stranger  was 
turned  from  their  gates  until  his  wants  had  been  supplied. 
No  cot  was  too  humble,  no  meal,  too  frugal,  to  be  shared  with 
the  weary,  Avay-worn  traveler,  and  many  a  blessing  did  their 
kindnesses  call  down  upon  their  heads. 

No  bells  called  them  to  the  house  of  God,  for  there  were 
no  churches,  but  some  suitable  home  in  the  settlement  was  the 
shrine  for  their  devotion. 

They  placed  little  stress  upon  education,  for  they  were 
prone  to  believe  that  it  made  men  dishonest,  vain,  effeminate. 


392  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

and  unfitted  them  for  the  sterner  duties  of  Hfc.  But  Hie}' 
loved  to  excel  in  feats  of  physical  strength,  and  this  was 
looked  upon  as  an  enviable  distinction. 

As  a  rule  tJiey  were  honest,  industrious,  courageous,  and 
strong-.  With  great  fortitude,  they  braved  the  dangers,  en- 
dured the  toils  and  the  privations  of  this  forest-life,  and  thus 
paved  the  way  for  the  many  privileges  and  blessings  that  we 
to-day  so  much  enjoy.  And  yet  how  \Gvy  few  of  us  realize 
what  we  owe  to  them  !  How  our  smiling  vallevs  and  vine- 
clad  hills,  our  fruitful  fields  and  gardens,  our  comfortable 
homes,  school-houses,  churches,  our  convenient  post-offices 
and  telephone  lines,  and  a  thousand  other  comforts  and  ad- 
vantages, whisper  of  the  benediction  of  their  lives,  and  of  the 
gratitude  that  we  owe  to  the  memorv  of  these  grand  and 
noble  sires ! 

"Who  shook  the  depth  of  the  desert's  gloom, 
With  their  hymns  of  lofty  cheer." 


3lti  ^ratrful  iR^mrmhranr^ 


of 


txnli 


®1)?  3FtrBt  (!l0«ttlij  ^upprtnt^nJi^nt 


James  Woods. 


Education   is   a  better   safaguard     of     liberty     than     a     standing 
army. — Everett. 


CHAPTER  XXX 


Schools  and  Teachers 

OHN  AYRES. — The  first  school  in  the  coun- 
ty was  taught  by  John  Ayres,  in  1810,  in  an 
old  log  cabin,  a  vacated  dwelling,  that  stood 
near  the  mouth  of  Cedar  lun,  in  the  Webb's 
mill  vicinity. 

Air.  Ayres,  as  before  stated,  came  from 
Rockbridge  county,  Virginia,  and  settled  on 
the  S.  C.  Phillips"  farm.  He  was  then  thirty  years  of  age.  hav- 
ing been  born  near  Lexington,  in  17S0.  He  belonged  to  the 
Ayres  family  whose  history  appears  with  the  South  fork  set- 
tlers, being  the  son  of  Daniel  and  Ellen  McGee  Ayres ;  and  the 
brother  of  Daniel,  who  settled  on  the  McNeill  homestead. 

He  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Watkins  of  Virginia,  and 
they  were  the  parents  of :  Daniel,  Barcas,  Thomas,  Jeremiah, 
Eli,  Mrs.  Ellen  (John)  Stanley,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Williams,  Mrs. 
Mary  (George)  Stebbs,  and  Nancy,  who,  perhaps,  died  in 
youth. 

Mr.  Ayres,  having  spent  fifty  years  of  his  life  in  teaching, 
died  in  1873  at  the  advanced  age  of  ninety-three  vears  ;  and  in 
the  Haught  graveyard,  on  Indian  creek,  but  a  short  distance 
from  the  scene  of  his  settlement,  he  lies  in  his  last  sleep. 

His  children  have  all  passed  on,  but  quite  a  number  of 
his  grand-children  yet  remain.  Among  them  are  "Dick" 
Ayres,  of  Island  run  ;  and  Mrs.  Mary  Rinehart  Wiant,  Ken- 
nedy, of  Smithville.  John  and  Flavins  Stanley  are  his  great- 
grandsons,  and  Misses  June  and  Cocoa  Stanley,  who  are  iden- 
tified among  the  young  pedagogues  of  the  county,  are  his 
great-great-granddaughters,    they    having    perhaps,    inherited 


SCHOOLS  AXD    TEACHERS  395 

their  love  for  the  profession  from  their  distinguished  grand-* 
sire. 

Samuel  Rittenhouse,  who  came  from  Harrison  county  in 
1821,  was  the  second  teacher  in  this  section.  He  married 
Miss  Grissey  Murphy,  daughter  of  Samuel  Murphy,  and  went 
from  here  to  Illinois. 

Barcas  Ayres. — In  the  meantime,  John  Ayres  had  sent  his 
son,  Barcas,  to  his  old  home  in  Virginia  to  be  educated,  and 
he  returned  in  1826,  and  became  the  third  teacher  in  what  is 
now  Murphy  district.  He  married  Miss  Anne  Riprogal,  sis- 
ter of  ]\Irs.  Daniel  Ayres,  of  the  McNeil]  homestead,  and  of 
Mrs.  John  Hostetter.  She  sleeps  beneath  a  myrtle  mound, 
onl}^  a  fcAv  paces  from  the  Philipps'  school-house,  and  he,  in 
Indiana,  where  he  spent  his  last  hours  with  his  daughters, 
Mrs.  Ophelia  (\A'm.)  Drake,  and  Mrs.  Elizabeth  A.  (Wm.) 
Stuart. 

The  First  School  House  was  erected  in  1814,  near  the 
mouth  of  Cedar  run,  on  land  owned  by  William  Murphy,  now 
the  property  of  Sheridan  Hardman.  The  date  of  the  erection 
of  this  pioneer  building  is  marked  by  the  closing  of  our  second 
war  with  Great  Britain. 

John  McCauley  was  the  first  teacher  within  the  present 
bounds  of  Clay  district,  he  having  given  his  instructions  in  an 
old  log  cabin  on  Lynn  Camp.  He  was  the  son  of  Dr.  James 
McCauley  of  Clarksburg,  and  was  the  uncle  of  the  late  Mrs. 
John  S.  Peirpoint,  of  liarrisville.  He  afterv.-ards  became  a 
physician,  and  practiced  his  profession  at  Glen\'ille,  Weston, 
(etc.)  and  in  Wood  county  where  he  died. 

Mrs.  Hermione  Helmick,  and  Mrs.  Helen  Saterfield,  of 
Fairmont;  and  Earle  Peirpoint,  of  Harrisville,  are  his  grand- 
nieces  and  grand-nephew,  he  being  a  brother  of  Dr.  William 
McCauley,  their  grand-father. 

The  First  School  in  what  is  now  Union  district  is  said  ti3 
have  been  taught  by  one  P.  F.  Randolph  in  a  cabin  on  the 
Fawrence  Maley  farm  near  Harrisville,  during  the  winter  of 
1818  ;  but  all  our  efiforts  to  learn  something  farther  concerning 
the  history  of  this  pedagogue  have  been  fruitless. 

John  Piatt  was  the  first  to  "wield  the  scepter"  over  the 
youth    within    the   present   boundary   of   Grant   district.     The 


396  HISTORY  OP  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

•scene  of  this  school  was  on  Rush  run.  near  one  mile  from 
Cairo,  on  the  Marshall  farm. 

A\'hat  a  curiosity  this  "pioneer  temple  of  learning"  with 
its  massive  stone  chimney  and  huge  fireplace;  its  window 
made  by  chopping  out  a  log,  and  ])asting  greased  paper  over 
the  opening;  its  seats  of  split  logs,  with  wooden  pins  for  legs; 
and  its  roof  held  in-tact  i)y  weight  poles,  would  be  to  the  boys 
and  girls  of  to-day,  who  enjoy  the  many  comforts  and  con- 
veniences of  modern  school  life ! 

^Ir.  Piatt  was  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  a  cousin  of  Airs. 
William  McKinney,  senior,  and  during  the  winter  of  18'?G, 
while  on  a  visit  with  the  McKinney s,  lie  taught  this  school. 

He  went  from  here  to  Kentucky,  and  later  to  Indiana. 
He  was  the  father  of  the  distinguished  John  James  Piatt,  the 
poet  and  journalist,  Avho  was  born  at  Milton.  Indiana,  on 
March  1,  1835  (eleven  years  after  this  school  was  taught), 
and  who  entered  the  journalistic  field  early  in  life,  and  later 
served  as  clerk  of  the  House  of  Representatives,  and  of  the 
United  States  Treasury  Department,  and  who,  also,  filled  the 
position  of  consul  at  Cork,  Ireland  from  1882  to  1894. 

John  James  Piatt's  best  known  poems  are  "Poems  by 
Two  Friends''  with  W.  D.  Howells ;  "Poems  in  Sunshine  and 
Firelight,"  and  "Idylls  and  Lyrics  of  the  Ohio  Valley,"  etc. 

He  (John  James  Piatt)  married  Miss  Sarah  Morgan 
Bryan,  who  was  born  at  Lexington,  Kentucky,  on  August  11, 
1836,  and  who  was,  also,  a  poet  of  note.  "A  Woman's 
Poems,"  "A  Voyage  to  the  Unfortunate  Isles,"  "Dramatic 
Persons  and  Moods,"  and  "An  Enchanted  Castle,''  being 
among  her  best  known  works.  She  was,  also,  the  author  of 
the  beautiful  little  poems,  "The  Gift  of  Empty  Hands,"  which 
will  be  found  in,  "Famous  Poems  Explained"  by  W^aitman  T. 
Barbe,  in  the  "Teachers'  Reading  Circle  Library"  of  this 
county. 

That  the  son  inherited  poetic  talent  from  his  father,  can 
hardly  be  doubted,  when  we  here  reproduce  a  little  poem 
that  the  elder  Piatt  wrote  during  his  term  of  school  at  Cairo 
(in  182G)  in  the  form  of  an  acrostic  on  the  name  of  Alary 
Skelton,  who  afterwards  became  Mrs.  Jacob  McKinney: 


SCHOOLS   AND    TEACHERS  397 

"May  health  and  peace,  inestimable  gifts,  adorn — 

And  aye,  attend  you  thi'ough  life's   fickle  dream; 

Religion,  likewise,  though  too  oft  held  in  scorn. 
Your  path  direct  across  the  sluggish  stream. 

"Say,  dost  thou  wish  true  happiness  to  find? 
Know  happiness  is  rare  in  human  kind, 
Envy  or  pride,  if  either  find  a  place. 
Leaves  little  room  for  virtue  to  embrace; 
'Tis  virtue,  then,  which  happiness  bestows. 
Oh!  claim  the  prize,  and  safe  you  are  from  foes; 
Nor  pride  nor  envy,  shall  ever  dare  oppose." 

The  Piatts  have  a  most  distinguished  and  interesting"  an- 
cestral history — one  that  dates  back  to  the  time  of  the  Revo- 
cation of  the  Edict  of  Nantes  in  France   (in  1685). 

Among  the  Huguenot  fugitives  of  the  Province  of  Dan- 
plume  that  sought  refuge  in  Holland  from  the  religiotts  per- 
secution, that  immediately  followed  the  Revocation,  was  a 
family  by  the  name  of  Piatt. 

John  Piatt,  the  first  of  whom  we  have  any  definite  ac- 
count, was  doubtless,  a  very  young  child  at  the  time  of  the 
flight  from  France.  His  parents,  however,  established  their 
home  at  Amsterdam,  and  there  John  grew  to  manhood's  es- 
tate, and  married  Mrs.  Frances  Van  Flirt  Wycoff,  a  widow^  of 
English-Dutch  ancestry.  And  soon  after  his  marriage,  with 
his  bride,  and  his  brother,  he  set  sail  for  the  Danish  West 
Indies,  where  he  engaged  in  busuiess  on  the  Island  of  St. 
Thomas,  and  where  he  continued  to  sojourn  until  after  the 
birth  of  his  elder  children,  when  he  migrated  to  North  Amer- 
ica, and  settled  in  the  New  Jersey  colony,  at  Six  Mill  rtm,  near 
the  town  of  New  Brunswick,  in  Middlesex  county. 

Some  years  after  his  settlement  in  New  Jersey,  he  de- 
cided to  return  to  France,  for  the  purpose  of  making  an  effort 
to  recover  his  inheritance  which  had  been  confiscated  by  the 
Crown,  but  he  was  deterred  from  carrying  his  plans  into  ef- 
fect by  the  seven  years  war  (1756-'63),  and  went  to  St. 
Thomas,  instead,  with  his  son  Abraham,  to  take  charge  of  the 
sugar  plantation  of  his  brother,  and  there  his  life  ebbed  away 
in  1760  ;  and  Lhere  the  Southern  breezes  play  about  his  ancient 
tomb.  Flis  wife  died  at  her  home  in  New  Jersey,  on  Decem- 
ber 26,  1776,  and  not  far  from  New  Brunswick,  she  rests. 


■69S  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

Their  sons  were.  John.  i\braham,  AA'illiam,  Daniel,  and 
Jacob  Piatt. 

These  sons  were  all  officers  and  soldiers  of  the  Conti 
nental  army  during  the  American  Revolution  ;  and  William, 
Daniel,  and  Jacob  were  among  the  original  members  of  the 
"Society  of  the  Cincinnati"— an  organization  which  was 
founded  by  the  officers  of  the  Revolution  for  the  purpose  of 
perpetuating  friendships,  and  for  the  raising  of  a  fund  for  the 
benefit  of  the  widows  and  the  orphans  of  the  soldiers  of  this 
war. 

John  Piatt,  the  eldest  son,  whom  we  shall  designate  as 
John  the  II,  was  evidently  born  on  the  Island  of  St.  Thomas, 
the  date  of  his  birth  being  1739.  In  1763,  three  years  after 
the  death  of  his  father,  lie  was  married  to  Miss  Jane  William- 
son, daughter  of  William  and  Jane  Van  Nest  Williamson,  who 
was  born  in  1745  ;  and  at  Trenton,  New  Jersey  he  founded  his 
home.  He  served  as  High  Sheriiif  of  Aliddlesex  county, 
which,  in  1838,  was  sub-divided  into  four  counties;  and  at  the 
close  of  the  Revolution,  in  which  he  played  his  part  as  "min- 
ute man"  in  the  New  Jersey  militia,  he  removed  with  his 
family  to  Milton,  on  the  Susquehannah  river,  in  Northumber- 
land county,  Pennsylvania  :  and  later,  to  AA'hite  Deer  Valley, 
where  he  died  in  1820.  at  the  age  of  eighty-one  years. 

He  fell  heir  to  the  old  Dutch  Bible  which  the  famil}^ 
brought  from  Holland  to  America,  and  which  bears  the  date 
1710 ;  and  when  his  daughter,  Frances,  the  wife  of  William 
McKinney,  senior,  was  leaving  Pennsylvania  for  her  new  home 
in  Ritchie  county,  he  came  out  with  this  old  Bible,  and  said, 
"tiere,  Frances,  take  this  with  you,  as  you  are  the  only  one 
that  can  read  it."  Mrs.  McKinney  accepted  the  proftered 
treasure,  and  it  is  now  in  the  possession  of  the  family  of  her 
late  grand-daughter,  j\frs.  Drusilla  Wanless. 

Besides  Frances  McKinney.  the  other  children  of  John 
Piatt,  the  II,  were,  Mrs.  Jane  Allen,  yirs.  Cathrine  Fenbrook, 
A\'illiam  and  John  Piatt. 

Abraham  Piatt,  the  second  son  of  John  Piatt,  of  France, 
was  a  Colonel  in  the  Revolution.  He  was  born  in  1741,  and 
married  Annabella  Andrew  and  settled  in  Penn's  Valle\'  wliere 
he  died  in  1791. 


SCHOOLS   AXD    TEACHERS  39'.) 

His  children  were,  Jacob,  John,  Cathrine,  Eleanor,  Anna, 
Aijraham,  James,  Frances,  Jane  and  Margaret. 

William  Piatt,  the  third  son  of  John  of  France,  was  a 
Lieutenant  at  the  beginning  of  the  Revolution,  but  rose  to  the 
rank  of  Captain,  and  in  this  capacity  served  throughout  the 
war.  He  was  born  in  1743,  and  died  in  1791,  perhaps,  in 
Pennsylvania.  He  was  first  married  to  Miss  Quick,  and  one 
son.  John  Piatt,  the  HI,  was  born  of  this  union.  And  after 
her  death,  he  married  Miss  Sarah  Smith,  and  they  were  the 
parents  of  James.  Frances,  who  died  in  3'outh.  Jemima  G.,  who 
was  adopted  by  a  family  by  the  name  of  Cummings,  and  Dr. 
William  F.,  of  New  York  city. 

James  Piatt,  the  eldest  son  of  William  and  Sarah  Smitli 
Piatt,  married  Miss  Rachel  Bear,  and  they  were  the  parents 
of  John  Piatt, ^  the  pioneer  school-teacher  of  Grant  district. 

Daniel  Piatt,  the  fourth  son  of  John  of  France,  was  Cap- 
tain of  the  first  Regiment  of  the  Xew  Jersey  Brigade,  and  rose 
to  the  rank  of  Major.  He  was  born  in  1745,  and  married 
Cathrine  Herrad  ;  and  their  children  were,  John,  Mary,  Rob- 
ert, Frances,  William,  Daniel,  and  Margaret. 

Jacob  Piatt,  the  fifth  and  last  son  of  John  of  France,  was 
bom  in  1747,  and  died  in  1834.  He  was,  also,  a  captain  in  the 
Continental  army,  and  served  in  many  of  the  more  important 
engagements  during  the  Revolution.  He  married  Miss  Han- 
nah McCullough,  and  was  the  father  of  Benjamin,  John  H.. 
P'rances,  Hannah  C,  AVilliam,  and  Abram  S.  Piatt 

NOTE:  To  Miss  Fannie  McKinney  of  Williamstown,  we 
owe  our  gratitude  for  this  invaluable  little  poem,  and  tlie  other 
information  concerning  the  identity  of  this  pioneer  educator, 
with  the  exception  of  the  career  of  his  son  and  his  (the  son's) 
wife  which  we  gleaned  from  the  pages  of  an  encyclopedia. 

And  to  Mrs.  Lulu  Hallam  Parker  of  Kansas  City,  Mis- 
souri, we  owe  our  thanks  for  the  Piatt  ancestral  history. — 
Author. 


'Some  of  the  Piatt  ciescendants  seems  to  think  that  John  Piatt,  the 
Ritchie  county  pedagojrue,  was  tlie  son  of  WiHiam,  but  dates  and  other 
circumstances  point  to  the  fact  that  lie  must  ha\e  belonged  to  a  younger 
greneration.  However,  he  was  descended  from  William,  and  was  the  father 
of  John  James  Piatt,   the  poet-consul. 


400  HISTORY  OF  RITCHIE  COUNTY 

The  School  System  at  this  early  day  was  in  a  crude  state. 
As  a  rule,  the  teacher  possessed  but  little  education.  Some- 
times the  one  person  in  the  community  having  the  most 
knowledge  was  employed  as  instructor.  He  was  regarded 
fully  competent  if  he  had  reached  the  Rule  of  Three  (Propor- 
tion) in  Arithmetic,  and  could  read  and  write,  little  stress 
being'  placed  upon  the  necessity  of  farther  education. 

These  schools  were  made  up  by  subscription,  and  the 
teacher  "boarded  round  the  district"  if  he  were  not  established 
in  the  community.  Provisions  were  made  by  the  over-seer 
of  the  poor  for  the  children  whose  parents  were  unable  to  pay 
tuition,  and  the  term  only  covered  a  period  of  three  months. 

The  schools  w^ere  very  few  in  number  down  to  the  year 
1830.  It  will  be  remembered  that  our  stale  ^vas  still  a  part 
of  the  "Old  Dominion,"  at  this  time,  and  that  some  of  her  Gov- 
ernors had  strongly  opposed  the  advancement  of  education. 

Sir  William  Berkeley,  in  one  of  his  Colonial  reports  to  the 
King,  while  he  occupied  the  Gubernatorial  chair  (in  1611)  had 
said :  "Thank  God !  there  are  no  free  schools  or  printing" 
presses,  and  I  hope  there  will  be  none  for  a  hundred  years  to 
come,  for  learning  has  brought  disobedience  and  heresy  into 
the  world,  and  printing  has  divulged  these  and  other  libels." 

The  wish  herein  expressed  was  fully  realized :  for  one 
hundred  twenty-five  years  had  passed,  after  this  utterance  be- 
fore Virginia  enacted  a  law  "having  the  semblance  of  a  pub- 
lic school  system ;"  and  then  its  provisions  rendered  it  in- 
operative for  half  a  century  longer.  "It  was  not  until  IS-tH, 
that  another  statute  was  enacted,  which  with  the  amendment 
of  1848,  was  practically  a  free  school  law  for  the  counties  that 
chose  to  adopt  it." 

Jefferson,  Ohio,  Kanawha,  and  Brooke  were  the  only 
counties  in  (West)  Virginia  that  established  schools  under 
the  law  of  1846.  Jefferson  county  being  the  first  to  inaugu- 
rate the  Free  School  System  in  A\^est  Virginia. 

When  the  Constitution  of  our  State  was  formulated,  it 
contained  provisions  for  free  schools,  and  Arthur  I.  Boreman, 
the  first  governor,  in  delivering  his  message  to  the  Legisla- 
ture, which  convened  on  June  20,  1863,  called  special  attention 
to  this  (educational)  provision,  and  said,  "I  trust  that  you  will 


SCHOOLS   AND    TEACHERS  40L 

take  such  action  as  will  result  in  the  org-anization  of  a  thor- 
ough and  efficient  system." 

At  this  session  committees  on  education  were  appointed, 
and  from  their  reports,  this  Legislature  formulated  "the  first 
Free  School  Law  of  the  State."  Under  the  provision  of  the 
Constitution,  the  educational  work  of  the  State  was  placed  in 
the  hands  of  a  General  Superintendent,  who  was  chosen  by 
the  Legislature;  and  in  1864,  the  Reverend  Ryland  White  was 
named  as  the  first  Superintendent,  and  entered  upon  his  of- 
ficial duties  at  once. 

This  was  the  beginning  of  our  school  system,  and  in  1873, 
under  the  new  Constitution  of  our  State,  the  present  system 
was  inaugurated.     The  grading  system  came  in  1891. 

Since  the  birth  of  the  Free  School  System  in  our  State, 
the  following  named  gentlemen  have  served  this  county  in 
the  capacity  of  County  Superintendent : 

James  Woods,  J.  M.  McKinney,  F.  H.  Martin,  T.  W.  Ire- 
land, P.  W.  Morris,  J.  N.  Kendall,  George  W.  Lowther,  H.  C. 
Showalter,  M.  K.  Duty,  C.  E.  Haddox,  J.  H.  Nichol,  H.  B. 
Woods,  D.  B.  Strickling,  S.  M.  Hoff,  and  L.  H.  Hayhursi , 
(and  Ross  L.  Cokeley  will  soon  claim  the  place  of  Mr.  Hay- 
hurst,  he  having  been  chosen  at  the  November  election,  1910.) 

James  Woods  (who  was  the  grand-father  of  Id.  B. 
Woods)  f